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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA); Toly, Norman F. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

Haney, S.J.; Stulen, R.H.; Toly, N.F.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

3

Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

Liu, K.C.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

6

Development of pressurized tube specimen for creep testing of beryllium  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that creep tests could be performed on beryllium in the same pressurized tube geometry as is commonly used in the FFTF/MOTA.

Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Opperman, E.K. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Hamilton, M.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.  

SciTech Connect

As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermal Regenerator Testing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Regenerator Testing Thermal Regenerator Testing Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007,...

9

Methods for identifying cancellous bone specimen location and size for the Reduced Platen Compression Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method for defining the specimen thickness is to average the largest and smallest overall bone lengths in the test group and use a reference thickness of 2 millimeters as a percentage of this average length. This percentage of the overall average length...

Cowen, Kyle Ray

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Alkali-silica reaction products: Comparison between samples from concrete structures and laboratory test specimens  

SciTech Connect

Alkali-silica gels (ASG) were investigated in concrete from bridge structures (constructed from the 1920s to 2000), as well as in experimental specimens; employing optical microscopy, petrographic image analysis, and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The main differences were found in the chemical composition and morphology of the ASGs. ASGs which had formed in older concrete samples (50-80 years old) show a partly crystalline structure and higher Ca{sup 2+} content, indicating their aging and maturation. Younger concrete samples and experimental test specimens exhibit the presence of amorphous ASG. The chemistry of ASG from experimental specimens reflects the chemical composition of accelerating solutions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of alkali-silica gels {yields} Comparison of ASR in experimental conditions with ASR in bridge structures {yields} Investigation of factors affecting alkali-silica reaction {yields} Investigation of ASR of different types of aggregates.

Sachlova, Sarka, E-mail: lukschova@seznam.cz; Prikryl, Richard; Pertold, Zdenek

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm{sup 2} that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW{sub t}. The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m {times} 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm{sup 2} over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW{sub t}. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW{sub t}. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm{sup 2} over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW{sub t}. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

Ralph, M.E.; Cameron, C.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ghanbari, C.M. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm[sup 2] that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW[sub t]. The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m [times] 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm[sup 2] over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW[sub t]. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm[sup 2] over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW[sub t]. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm[sup 2] over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW[sub t]. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

Ralph, M.E.; Cameron, C.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Ghanbari, C.M. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The first solar receivers ever tested in the world were tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). The receivers were each rated up to 5 megawatts thermal (MWt). Receivers with various working fluids have been tested here over the years, including air, water-steam, molten salt, liquid sodium, and solid particles. The NSTTF has also been used for a large variety of other tests, including materials tests, simulation of thermal nuclear pulses and aerodynamic heating, and ablator testing for NASA.

15

Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: (a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; (b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; (c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and (d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen. 6 figs.

Buescher, B.J. Jr.; Lloyd, W.R.; Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen.

Buescher, Jr., Brent J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lloyd, W. Randolph (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NO. REV. NO. LSPE THERMAL BATTERY TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NO. REV. NO. ATM 1086 LSPE THERMAL BATTERY TEST PAGE 1 OF DATE 2/25/72 Prepared by @c!_.e,~.~ ~P. Weir Approved by ~~---:J L. Lewis 5 #12;KC::Y, NO. LSPE THERMAL BATTERY TEST ATM 1086 2 PAGE OF DATE 2-52-72 Introduction The purpose of this ATM is to document the results of a Thermal Battery test for the Lunar Seismic

Rathbun, Julie A.

19

Apparatus for pre-stress-straining rod-type specimens in tension for in-situ passive fracture testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stress-strain testing apparatus imposes a stress-strain on a specimen while disposed in a controlled environment. Each end of the specimen is fastened to an end cap and a strain gage is attached to the specimen. An adjusting mechanism and a compression element are disposed between the end caps forming a frame for applying forces to the end caps and thereby stress-straining the specimen. The adjusting mechanism may be extended or retracted to increase or decrease the imposed stress-strain on the specimen, and the stress-strain is measured by the strain gage on the specimen while the apparatus is exposed to an environment such as high pressure hydrogen. Strain gages may be placed on the frame to measure stress-strains in the frame that may be caused by the environment.

Wang, John Jy-an (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Ken C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN)

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Influence of Penetration Rate and Indenter Diameter in Strength Measurement by Indentation Testing on Small Rock Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Indentation testing has been developed as an unconventional method to determine intact rock strength using small rock specimens within the size of drill cuttings. In previous investigations involving indentati...

Mohammad Haftani; Bahman Bohloli; Alireza Nouri…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Comparison of test specificity in commercial antigen and in-house PCR methods for rotavirus detection in stool specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Copyright 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. 2014 research-article Comparison of test specificity in commercial antigen and in-house PCR methods for rotavirus detection in stool specimens S Ye a b S. B. Lambert...

S Ye; S. B. Lambert; K Grimwood; S Roczo-Farkas; G. R. Nimmo; T. P. Sloots; C. D. Kirkwood; D. M. Whiley

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

22

AFCI Fuel Irradiation Test Plan, Test Specimens AFC-1Ć and AFC-1F  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository (DOE, 2003). One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. There are little irradiation performance data available on non-fertile fuel forms, which would maximize the destruction rate of plutonium, and low-fertile (i.e., uranium-bearing) fuel forms, which would support a sustainable nuclear energy option. Initial scoping level irradiation tests on a variety of candidate fuel forms are needed to establish a transmutation fuel form design and evaluate deployment of transmutation fuels.

D. C. Crawford; S. L. Hayes; B. A. Hilton; M. K. Meyer; R. G. Ambrosek; G. S. Chang; D. J. Utterbeck

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Vehicle Test Cell Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Powertrain Research Facility Vehicle Test Cell Thermal Upgrade Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Vehicle Test Cell Thermal Upgrade 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

24

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

25

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/15/05 13:40 18.08 17.75 17.91 16.84 17.43 right 8 triple/quad, 2 sputtered low-e layers, 2 layer teflon center insert clinging in center, Kr 18.26 17.58 18.05 17.23 17.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

26

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/11/05 11:40 18.10 17.80 18.13 17.44 17.82 right 7 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer top angled toward cold side, Kr 17.80 13.74 16.90 14.44 15.77 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

27

In-situ thermal testing program strategy  

SciTech Connect

In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes NREL's Battery Thermal Test Facility and identifies test requirements and equipment and planned upgrades to the facility.

Keyser, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

THERMAL TESTING OF PROTOTYPE GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGES USING A FURNACE  

SciTech Connect

The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed by SRNL to replace the DOT 6M Specification Package and ship Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. Urethane foam was used for the overpack to ensure the package would withstand the 10CFR71.73(c)(2) crush test, which is a severe test for drum-type packages. In addition, it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam configuration provided adequate thermal protection for the containment vessel during the subsequent 10CFR71.73(c)(4) thermal test. Development tests were performed on early prototype test specimens of different diameter overpacks and a range of urethane foam densities. The thermal test was performed using an industrial furnace. Test results were used to optimize the selection of package diameter and foam density, and provided the basis for design enhancements incorporated into the final package design.

Smith, A; Lawrence Gelder, L; Paul Blanton, P

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility Air Force Research Laboratory Testing On August 17, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, Renewable...

31

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/14/05 17:22 18.51 17.42 17.76 17.67 16.61 17.18 right 15 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, dense sun screen center layer, Kr 19.33 17.07 13.77 18.00 14.20 16.26 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

32

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 1/31/06 16:22 17.15 15.06 16.46 15.32 13.91 14.68 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.53 17.87 16.90 17.71 16.41 17.11 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

33

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/24/05 12:40 17.51 17.52 17.63 16.30 17.03 right 9 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 72% open insect screen center layer, Kr 17.12 13.05 17.65 13.84 15.91 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 1.12 0.00 0.39 4.47 21.36 20.68 21.02 20.8

34

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/25/05 16:15 18.47 17.37 17.87 17.40 16.11 16.82 right 20 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, folded Lexan center layer, Kr 18.63 17.24 16.06 17.51 15.64 16.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

35

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at bottom only, Kr 9/22/06 9:42 18.28 18.07 17.38 17.66 16.79 17.27 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.34 17.70 16.83 17.57 16.28 16.98 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

36

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/20/05 18:05 18.33 16.96 17.89 17.27 16.04 16.71 right 19 double, 1 sputtered low-e glass layer, 3/8" gap, Kr 15.73 15.53 14.97 14.51 13.65 14.13 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 2.59 2.60 1.43 2.92 21.54 20.61 21.08 20.85

37

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/4/05 21:29 18.57 17.93 17.92 17.66 16.52 17.13 right 18 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated glass center layer in traditional broken spacer, Kr 18.54 18.38 17.67 17.81 16.85 17.37 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

38

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at top only, Kr 6/28/06 23:48 18.39 17.74 17.53 17.48 16.45 17.00 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.40 17.74 16.71 17.56 16.09 16.88 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

39

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/29/05 16:09 18.54 17.98 17.98 17.85 16.77 17.34 right 17 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer with 1/16" perimeter gap, Kr 18.88 16.14 16.08 17.71 14.41 16.15 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

40

Advances in the Hopkinson bar testing of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and large specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the twentieth century, research activity in the nuclear field of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) was concentrated on problems of nuclear reactor safety, especially...dynamic material testing programme for the high ductility...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar Keymark Testing of Solar Thermal Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Keymark is the official CEN certification scheme for thermal solar collectors and factory made thermal solar systems. The Solar Keymark requires that the products fulfil the...

Harald Drück; Stephan Fischer…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

Hebert, Peter H. (Glendale, CA); Brandt, Randolph J. (Palmdale, CA)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility...

44

Evaluation of the Alere i Influenza A&B Nucleic Acid Amplification Test by Use of Respiratory Specimens Collected in Viral Transport Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Influenza AB Nucleic Acid Amplification Test by Use of Respiratory Specimens Collected...to 19 years. Alere i Influenza AB assay test results were compared with viral culture...assays as their first-line diagnostic test for influenza virus infections. Though...

J. Jeremiah Bell; Rangaraj Selvarangan

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation of the Cobas TaqMan MTB Test for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex According to Acid-Fast Bacilli Smear Grades in Respiratory Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Evaluation of the Cobas TaqMan MTB Test for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis...the performance of the Cobas TaqMan MTB Test (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland...smear grades. The sensitivity of this test in smear-positive specimens was 95...

Hee Jae Huh; Won-Jung Koh; Dong Joon Song; Chang-Seok Ki; Nam Yong Lee

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Field Evaluation of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus Rapid Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in Bolivia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus Rapid Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in...hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for field surveys, requires...

Vishal Shah; Lisbeth Ferrufino; Robert H. Gilman; Margot Ramirez; Eliana Saenza; Edith Malaga; Gerardo Sanchez; Emi E. Okamoto; Jacqueline E. Sherbuck; Eva H. Clark; Gerson Galdos-Cardenas; Ricardo Bozo; Jorge Luis Flores-Franco; Rony Colanzi; Manuela Verastegui; Caryn Bern

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

48

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visit to NSTTF On September 10, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, Renewable Energy Dr. David Danielson visited Sandia National...

49

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Wins Three R&D100 Awards On July 24, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic,...

50

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Technical Management Position On July 12, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, Job Listing, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News,...

51

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

52

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Sandia Capabilities to Support Power Industry On January 8, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

53

Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es110smith2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility...

54

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Interactive Tour National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility of this type in the United States. The NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants planned for large-scale power generation. In addition, the site was built and instrumented to provide test facilities for a variety of solar and nonsolar applications. The facility can provide

55

A Gas Chromatography–Thermal Conductivity Detection Method for Helium Detection in Postmortem Blood and Tissue Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......victim's head, although some internet sources recommend use of...for volatiles and drugs of abuse. The cause of death was...Discussion of the Influence of the Internet. Am. J. Forensic Med...Suicide Thermal Conductivity Young Adult...

Jason E. Schaff; Roman P. Karas; Laureen Marinetti

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Utility of transient testing to characterize thermal interface materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes a transient method for the characterization of low-resistance thermal interfaces of microelectronic packages. The transient method can yield additional information about the package not available with traditional static methods at the cost of greater numerical complexity, hardware requirements, and sensitivity to noise. While the method is established for package-level thermal analysis of mounted and assembled parts, its ability to measure the relatively minor thermal impedance of thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers has not yet been fully studied. We combine the transient thermal test with displacement measurements of the bond line thickness to fully characterize the interface.

Smith, B; Michel, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Utility of transient testing to characterize thermal interface materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes a transient method for the characterization of low-resistance thermal interfaces of microelectronic packages. The transient method can yield additional information about the package not available with traditional static methods at the cost of greater numerical complexity, hardware requirements, and sensitivity to noise. While the method is established for package-level thermal analysis of mounted and assembled parts, its ability to measure the relatively minor thermal impedance of thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers has not yet been fully studied. We combine the transient thermal test with displacement measurements of the bond line thickness to fully characterize the interface.

B. Smith; T. Brunschwiler; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drawings Drawings specimen number made by description layer 1 layer 2 layer 3 gas gap (in) spacer height (in) overall thickness (in) glass (mm) center layer (mm) gap (mm) calc. thick (mm) 1 Alpen 9/16" double with two pyrolytic low-e coatings, Ar 0.125" pyro none 0.125" pyro Ar 0.563 0.563 0.81 3.18 none 14.29 20.6 4 Alpen low-e suspended film with two pyrolytic low-e coatings 0.125" pyro TC88 0.125" pyro Kr 0.344 2 X 0.344 0.94 3.18 0.10 8.73 23.8 6 LBL parallel acrylic center layer in grooved spacer 0.118" card170 0.06" acrylic 0.118" card170 Kr 0.375 0.813 1.05 3 1.60 9.53 26.6 7 LBL angled acrylic center layer in groved spacer 0.118" card170 0.06" acrylic 0.118" card170 Kr variable 0.813 1.05 3 1.60 variable 26.6

59

Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Testing Climate Models Using Thermal Infrared Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach to test climate models with observations is presented. In this approach, it is possible to directly observe the longwave feedbacks of the climate system in time series of annual average outgoing longwave spectra. Tropospheric ...

Stephen Leroy; James Anderson; John Dykema; Richard Goody

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fire tests on defective tank-car thermal protection systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many railway tank-cars carrying hazardous materials are thermally protected from fire impingement by thermal insulation and a steel jacket applied to the outside of the tank-car shell. Over time, it is possible that the thermal insulation will sag, rip, degrade, or be crushed under the steel jacket. A thermographic technique to determine whether or not a tank has insulation deficiencies has been developed, but it is necessary to determine which thermal deficiencies do not affect a tank’s survivability in a fire and which thermal deficiencies must be repaired. In order to develop a guideline in assessing thermal defects, a thermal model and experimental data would be beneficial. A series of fire tests were performed on a quarter-section tank-car mock-up to assist in developing a guideline and to provide validation data for a thermal model. Twelve fire tests, with constant, credible, simulated pool fire conditions, were performed on the tank-car mock-up with various insulation deficiencies. An infrared thermal imaging camera was used to measure the tank wall temperature. The thermal images were useful in determining the temperature profiles across the defects at different times and the transient temperature behaviour at different locations. It was seen that the properly installed thermal protection system significantly reduced the heat transfer from the fire to the tank wall. It was also seen that the steel jacket alone (i.e. 100% defect) acted as a radiation shield and provided a significant level of protection. With small defects, it was observed that the surrounding protected material provided a cooling effect by thermal conduction. A square defect greater than about 40 cm on each side should be considered significant, because unlike smaller defects, there is little benefit from the surrounding material as far as the peak defect temperature is concerned.

J.D.J VanderSteen; A.M Birk

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Study on Effective Thermal-Shock Test Improvement of Battery Packs for PHEVs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While there are many test items to secure a vehicle’s reliability, this study reviews the test method for Thermal-shock Test, one of climatic tests to evaluate the damage caused by thermal expansion coefficient d...

Byoung-Hoon Kim; Hong-Jong Lee…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

MoWiTT:Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 MoWiTT: Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems requires accurate measurement of the flow of energy through windows in realistic conditions, a capability provided by the Mobile Window Thermal Test facility. Consisting of a pair of outdoor, room-sized calorimeters, MoWiTT measures the net energy flow through two window samples in side-by-side tests using ambient weather conditions. MoWiTT characterizes the net energy flow as a function of time and measures the temperatures, solar fluxes, and

64

Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

JL Bump; RF Luther

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Thermal Test and Analysis of Envelope in Existing Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The thickness of polystyrene slab is in Tab .3. ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-5-2 The temperature and the heat flux distributing of wall are shown in Fig.2 and Fig.3. Tab. 2... The temperature distributing of wall ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-5-2 Fig3. The heat flux distributing of wall 5 CONCLUSIONS Through the thermal testing, calculation...

Liu, X.; Li, X.; Sun, J.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)  

SciTech Connect

This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

Bradley K. Heath

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Outdoor and Indoor Testing to Increase the Efficiency and Durability of Flat Plate Solar Thermal Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the test performed on the solar thermal flat plate collector and the effect of saline aerosol on the solar thermal conversion; an assembly of testing rigs developed ... presented; the rigs all...

Daniela Ciobanu; Ion Visa; Anca Duta…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Envelope Thermal Test Unit (ETTU): Full Measurement of Wall Perform ance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation in the Built Environment, Dublin, Ireland, March 30-April THE ENVELOPE THERMAL TEST UNIT (ETTU): FIELD MEASUREMENT

Sonderegger, R.C.; Sherman, M.H.; Adams, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Envelope Thermal Test Unit (ETTU): Full Measurement of Wall Perform ance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation in the Built Environment, Dublin, Ireland, March 30-April THE ENVELOPE THERMAL TEST UNIT (ETTU): FIELD MEASUREMENT

Adams, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Apparatuses for prestressing rod-type specimens in torsion for in-situ passive fracture toughness testing in an extremely high-pressure environment of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ specimen fixture particularly adapted for prestressing rod-type SNTT-type specimens comprising a tube and end cap wherein the specimen is secured at one end to the tube, and at the opposite end to the end cap. The end cap is rotatable relative to the tube, and may be fixedly secured for creating a torsional force prestressing the specimen enclosed within the tube.

Wang, Jy-an (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Ken C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermal Analysis and Test Results for the Overpack of a Typical Radioactive Materials Package  

SciTech Connect

In the course of the development and certification of the 9975 Package, extensive thermal analyses were performed and the package subjected to the regulatory HAC thermal test. The results of the thermal analysis and materials tests of the cane fiberboard overpack material were evaluated in comparison with the package HAC thermal test results. The evaluation confirmed that the thermal analysis correctly predicted the performance of the 9975 in the HAC fire test. The post test examination revealed that the heat affected region of the Celotex(R) overpack correlated well with the calculated temperature distribution

Smith, A.C.

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain  

SciTech Connect

TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Lifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Toughness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thermally grown oxide (TGO), and a porous ceramic topcoat which serves as the thermal insulation. DetailsLifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Mechanisms leading to degradation of the adherence of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) used in aircraft

Hutchinson, John W.

75

Thermal analyses of LiCoO2 lithium-ion battery during oven tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three dimensional thermal abuse model for graphite/LiPF6/LiCoO2 batteries is established particularly for oven tests. To ... of heat release condition and oven temperature on battery thermal behaviors, we perfo...

Peng Peng; Yiqiong Sun; Fangming Jiang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information  

SciTech Connect

Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Laboratory test results on the thermal resistance of polyisocyanurate foamboard insulation blown with CFC-11 substitutes: A cooperative industry/government project  

SciTech Connect

The fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbon gases (CFC-11 and CFC-12) are used as blowing agents for foam insulations for building and appliance applications. The thermal resistance per unit thickness of these insulations is greater than that of other commercially available insulations. Mandated reductions in the production of these chemicals may lead to less efficient substitutes and increase US energy consumption by one quad or more. This report describes laboratory thermal and aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminate boardstock to evaluate the viability of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFSs) as alternative blowing agents to chlorofluorcarbon-11 (CFC-11). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC- 123, HCFC-141b, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b. These HCFC gases have a lower ozone depletion potential than CFC-11 or CFC-12. Apparent thermal conductivity (k) was determined from 0 to 50{degrees}C. Results on the laminate boards provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The measured laboratory increase in k was between 8 and 11% after a 240-d field exposure in the RTRA. Results are reported on a thin-specimen, aging procedure to establish the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. These thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 75 and 150{degrees}F for up to 300 d. The resulting k-values were correlated with an exponential dependency on (diffusion coefficient {times} time){sup {1/2}}/thickness and provided diffusion coefficients for air components into, and blowing agent out of, the foam. This aging procedure was used to predict the five-year thermal resistivity of the foams. The thin-specimen aging procedure is supported with calculations by a computer model for aging of foams. 43 refs., 33 figs., 25 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Weaver, F.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

LSPE Qualification and Flight Acceptance T /V Test Su.m..mary and Thermal Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. 2 5. 3 5.4 5.5 5. 6 5.7 Nodal Description Thermal Resistances Solar Heating Lunar SurfaceLSPE Qualification and Flight Acceptance T /V Test Su.m..mary and Thermal Design Final Report NO Thermal Control Systems. The report is divided into three sections. The first section introduces

Rathbun, Julie A.

79

Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

today, according to Lockheed Martin. The technology in play: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Lockheed Martin is developing a design for an OTEC system that would produce...

80

Optimal Positive Cutoff Points for careHPV Testing of Clinician- and Self-Collected Specimens in Primary Cervical Cancer Screening: an Analysis from Rural China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specimens (careHPV-S), and Hybrid Capture 2 on clinician-collected...issues: lack of the necessary infrastructure and quality control systems...is the same as the one for Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen...capture of HPV DNA and RNA probe hybrids and chemiluminescent signal...

Le-Ni Kang; Jose Jeronimo; You-Lin Qiao; Fang-Hui Zhao; Wen Chen; Melissa Valdez; Xun Zhang; Pooja Bansil; Proma Paul; Ping Bai; Roger Peck; Jing Li; Feng Chen; Mark H. Stoler; Philip E. Castle

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Initial Flow Testing is a Tremendous Success On November 2, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, News, Renewable Energy, Solar The Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL ) system at...

82

Thermal tests of MC3811 rigid/flex printed wiring boards  

SciTech Connect

Rigid/flex multilayer printed wiring boards are more sensitive to thermal environmental changes than conventional printed wiring boards. This is manifested because of a composition of dissimilar materials used within the construction of this type of product. During fabrication and assembly, stresses can develop within the plated-through holes from differences in thermal properties of the rigid and flexible materials, primarily thermal coefficient of expansion. Thermal shock and thermal stress tests and rework simulation as defined in MIL-P-50884 have been performed in this study as indicators of processing quality to detect faults and to verify improvements in board reliability. 3 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Gentry, F.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Design of thermal control systems for testing of electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electronic component manufacturing industry, most components are subjected to a full functional test before they are sold. Depending on the type of components, these functional tests may be performed at room ...

Sweetland, Matthew, 1970-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Adulteration of Drugs-of-Abuse Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Persons abusing drugs attempt to adulterate urine specimens in ... fluid and various detoxifying agents available through the Internet is a common practice. Household chemicals such ... mask drug testing if the c...

Amitava Dasgupta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effects of Thermal Exposure and Test Temperature on Structure Evolution and Hardness/Viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Thermal Exposure and Test Temperature on Structure Evolution and Hardness/Viscosity the physical and mechanical properties (i.e., viscosity, flow, and fracture). In some cases, the thermal coating techniques (e.g., high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), plasma spray, cold spray, etc.) have been used

Rollins, Andrew M.

86

Sandia National Laboratories: Thermal Pulses for Boeing Test...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating- Point...

87

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet), Thermal Test Facility (TTF), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management Scientists at this living laboratory develop optimal solutions for managing energy flows within buildings and transportation systems. The built environment is stressing the utility grid to a greater degree than ever before. Growing demand for electric vehicles, space conditioning, and plug loads presents a critical opportunity for more effective energy management and development of efficiency technologies. Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing this opportunity. Through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems,

88

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of TFE verification test UFAC-1  

SciTech Connect

The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) irradiation test Uninstrumented Fueled Accelerated (UFAC)-1 of seven encapsulated thermionic test pins was analyzed with the code COBRA-SFS. The model predicted coolant and material temperatures for three conditions of interest: steady state full power, response to the unlikely loss of flow transient, and decay heat cooling by forced down flow of argon. Modeling assumptions and a summary of results are included. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

McWethy, L.M.; Pearce, K.L.; Rector, D.R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC; ,

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

W-1 SLSF post-test data analysis. Part 1. Thermal hydraulic analysis. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

Four types of tests were performed: (1) a decay heat transient test, (2) Loss-of-Piping-Integrity (LOPI) tests, (3) Boiling Window Tests (BWT), and (4) a fuel pin dryout and failure test. In addition, preliminary tests were run to check systems performance, instrumentation performance and test section heat balance. The objective of the decay heat test was to determine the decay heat transfer characteristics of fresh fuel pins with subcooled sodium. The objective of the LOPI experiments was to test the thermal behavior of fuel pins with four different fuel conditions subjected to the same transient. The transient was designed to simulate a rapid flow decrease as a result of pipe rupture followed by a reactor scram. The objective of the Boiling Window Tests was to study boiling initiation and progression of boiling within the fuel pin bundle.

Knight, D.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Standard Test Method for Thermal Oxidative Resistance of Carbon Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the apparatus and procedure for the determination of the weight loss of carbon fibers, exposed to ambient hot air, as a means of characterizing their oxidative resistance. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to inch-pound units which are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific hazard information, see Section 8.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces  

SciTech Connect

The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain in effect, although deeper powder beds (up to 2 inches) also yielded temperatures of greater than 950 C for longer than 2 hours.

COMPTON, J.A.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hypothetical accident condition thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package  

SciTech Connect

A thermophysical property model developed to analytically determine the thermal response of cane fiberboard when exposed to temperatures and heat fluxes associated with the 10 CFR 71 hypothetical accident condition (HAC) has been benchmarked against two Type B drum package fire test results. The model 9973 package was fire tested after a 30 ft. top down drop and puncture, and an undamaged model 9975 package containing a heater (21W) was fire tested to determine content heat source effects. Analysis results using a refined version of a previously developed HAC fiberboard model compared well against the test data from both the 9973 and 9975 packages.

Hensel, S.J.; Alstine, M.N. van; Gromada, R.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hypothetical accident condition thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package  

SciTech Connect

A thermophysical property model developed to analytically determine the thermal response of cane fiberboard when exposed to temperatures and heat fluxes associated with the 10 CFR 71 hypothetical accident condition (HAC) has been benchmarked against two Type B drum package fire test results. The model 9973 package was fire tested after a 30 ft. top down drop and puncture, and an undamaged model 9975 package containing a heater (21W) was fire tested to determine content heat source effects. Analysis results using a refined version of a previously developed HAC fiberboard model compared well against the test data from both the 9973 and 9975 packages.

Hensel, S.J.; Alstine, M.N. Van; Gromada, R.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A dynamic thermal performance model for flat-plate solar collectors based on the thermal inertia correction of the steady-state test method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In determining the dynamic thermal performance of a flat-plate solar collector, when the instantaneous solar irradiance changes sharply at one moment, most of the existing models cannot accurately predict the momentary thermal characteristics of outlet temperature and useful heat gain. In the present study, an analytical model in the form of series expansion is put forward to depict the momentary thermal characteristics of flat-plate solar collectors. The analytical model reveals that, instantaneous useful heat gain of a solar collector at one moment consists of the steady-state useful heat gain and corresponding thermal inertia correction. The model is then validated by the experimental data. It indicates that the analytical model can properly predict the dynamic thermal performance of the solar air collector. Besides, the model pertains to other types of solar thermal collectors, if they can be tested by the steady-state test method.

Jie Deng; Yupeng Xu; Xudong Yang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar thermal upper stage technology demonstrator liquid hydrogen storage and feed system test program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Demonstrator (STUSTD) Liquid Hydrogen Storage and Feed System (LHSFS) Test Program is described. The test program consists of two principal phases. First an engineering characterization phase includes tests performed to demonstrate and understand the expected tank performance. This includes fill and drain; baseline heat leak; active Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS); and flow tests. After the LHSFS performance is understood and performance characteristics are determined a 30 day mission simulation test will be conducted. This test will simulate a 30 day transfer mission from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO). Mission performance predictions based on the results of the engineering characterization tests will be used to correlate the results of the 30 day mission simulation.

E. C. Cady

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

THERMAL TESTING OF 9977 GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGE USING A POOL FIRE  

SciTech Connect

The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP), has been designed as a cost-effective, user-friendly replacement for the DOT 6M Specification Package for transporting Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. To ensure the capability of the 9977 GPFP to withstand the regulatory crush test, urethane foam was chosen for the impact absorbing overpack. As part of the package development it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam overpack would provide the required protection for the containment vessel during the thermal test portion of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions Sequential Tests. Development tests of early prototypes were performed, using a furnace. Based on the results of the development tests, detailed design enhancements were incorporated into the final design. Examples of the definitive 9977 design configuration were subjected to an all-engulfing pool fire test, as part of the HAC Sequential Tests, to support the application for certification. Testing has confirmed the package's ability to withstand the HAC thermal tests.

Smith, A; Cecil May, C; Lawrence Gelder, L; Glenn Abramczyk, G

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Testing the scaling of thermal transport models: predicted and measured temperatures in the Tokamak Fusion Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor dimensionless scaling experiments D. R. Mikkelsen, S. D. Scott Princeton the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] nondimensional to International Tokamak Experimental Reactor [2] (ITER) class tokamaks. This paper compares the predictions

99

Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

CACI: The Cesium-137 Agricultural Commodities Irradiator. Final design report: Volume 7, Safety analysis, thermal analysis, and thermal testing  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a complete description of the final detailed design of the Cesium-137 Agricultural Commodities Irradiator (CACI). The design was developed and successfully completed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The CACI project was initiated in April 1985 under DOE`s Byproducts Utilization Program, with the objectives of transferring food irradiation technology to the industry and thereby demonstrating a beneficial use for the 137 Cs nuclear by-product isotope. As designed, CACI will meet the intended requirements for research, development, and demonstration of irradiation processing of food. Further, as shown in the safety analyses performed during the project, the design conforms to all the safety and licensing requirements set forth for the project. The original scope of the CACI project included completion of its construction. However, the project was terminated for the convenience of the government during the final design phase in February 1986 for lack of a specific site. The CACI final design is described in eight volumes. This volume, Volume VII, describes Safety Analysis, Thermal Analysis, and Thermal Testing.

Not Available

1986-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Results of testing a development module of the second-generation E-Systems concentrating photovoltaic-thermal module  

SciTech Connect

An actively-cooled linear Fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic and thermal module, designed and built by E-Systems, was tested in the Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility. Physical, electrical, and thermal characteristics of the module are presented. Module performance is characterized through the use of multiple linear regression techniques.

Harrison, T D

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Analysis of thermal properties of basalt from heater Test No. 2 experiment  

SciTech Connect

Rockwell Hanford Operations is conducting a series of full-scale in situ tests at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) near Richland, Washington as an integral part of the Basalt Waste isolation project. An objective of the Phase I tests, which include Main Heater Test No. 2, is to provide data for determination the material properties necessary for predicting the response of a repository system at depth. During the first 90 days Heater Test No. 2 represents the near-field response of a high-level waste canister which generates 1 kW of heat energy. The analysis of the thermal response of basalt from data collected during this initial heating period is described in this report. Values of thermal conductivity and heat capacity for basalt are determined using three methods referred to as type curve matching, Jacob's straight line method, and the Gauss-Newton parameter optimization method. Results indicate that the type curve and the Gauss-Newton methods give values which correspond relatively closely to those measured in the laboratory.

Huyakorn, P.; Williams, J.R.; Thomas, S. (GeoTrans, Inc., Reston, VA (USA); Applied Mechanics, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (USA); GeoTrans, Inc., Reston, VA (USA))

1981-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF THERMAL SHOCK IN CERAMICS BASED ON A NOVEL TEST TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF THERMAL SHOCK IN CERAMICS BASED ON AQUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF THERMAL SHOCK IN CERAMICS BASED ON AAl 203). The thermal failure of another ceramic material (

Faber, K.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Outdoor testing of advanced optical materials for solar thermal electric applications  

SciTech Connect

The development of low-cost, durable advanced optical materials is an important element in making solar energy viable for electricity production. It is important to determine the expected lifetime of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions. The demonstration of the optical durability of such materials in outdoor environments is critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal electric technologies. For many years optical performance data have been collected and analyzed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for candidate reflector materials subjected to simulated outdoor exposure conditions. Much of this testing is accelerated in order to predict service durability. Some outdoor testing has occurred but not in a systematic manner. To date, simulated/accelerated testing has been limited correlation with actual outdoor exposure testing. Such a correlation is desirable to provide confidence in lifetime predictions based upon accelerated weathering methods. To obtain outdoor exposure data for realistic environments and to establish a data base for correlating simulated/accelerated outdoor exposure data with actual outdoor exposure data, the development of an expanded outdoor testing program has recently been initiated by NREL. Several outdoor test sites will be selected based on the solar climate, potential for solar energy utilization by industry, and cost of installation. Test results are site dependent because exposure conditions vary with geographical location. The importance of this program to optical materials development is outlined, and the process used to determine and establish the outdoor test sites is described. Candidate material identification and selection is also discussed. 10 refs.

Wendelin, T.J.; Jorgensen, G.; Goggin, R.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Thermal drawdown analysis of the Hijiori HDR 90-day circulation test  

SciTech Connect

The Hijiori 90-day circulation test is unique in the development of HDR technology in that it was the first (and thus far the only) multiproduction well test run for a sufficient production period to obtain observed cooldown curves at multiple production horizons in the stimulated reservoir volume. The experimental data have been analyzed by the SGP 1-D linear heat sweep model to examine the extent of thermal cooldown in this relatively small, multi-well, multi-zone reservoir. Although changes in production flow were carried out in specific wells at specific times during the 90 days of circulation, matching of the observed cooldown curves in conjunction with the structural and temperature logging data allows estimation of the reservoir volume and the mean fracture spacing between rock blocks for heat extraction during the 90-day test.

Kruger, Paul; Yamaguchi, Tsutomu

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

A NEW MEASUREMENT STRATEGY FOR in situ TESTING OF WALL THERMAL PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power consumed in electric resistance heaters. The twopower input to electric resistance heaters, is easily doneelectric heaters must then flow into the specimen. resistance

Condon, P.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results  

SciTech Connect

The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m{sup 2}-s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ``hot channel``. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m{sup 2}, a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m{sup 2}-s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ``soft`` a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author`s knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure.

Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank by application to a well-controlled, large-scale tank experiment with 9 m length, 6 m width, and 4.5 m depth, and by data interpretation from a field-scale test. The tank experiment imitates an advection-influenced TRT

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

113

Erosion resistance of cooled thermal sprayed coatings under simulated erosion conditions at waterwall in FBCs  

SciTech Connect

The erosion-corrosion (E-C) behavior of cooled 1018 steel and several thermal sprayed coatings by bed ash, retrieved from an operating circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) boiler firing biomass, was determined in laboratory tests using a nozzle type elevated temperature erosion tester. Test conditions attempted but not exactly to simulate the erosion conditions found at the refractory/bare-tube interface at the combustor waterwall of FBC boilers. The specimens were water-cooled on the backside. Material wastage rates were determined from the thickness loss measurements of specimens. Test results were compared with erosion-corrosion test results for isothermal specimens. The morphology of specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the cooled specimens demonstrated higher erosion-corrosion wastage than those of the isothermal specimens. At a shallow impact angle of 30{degree} the effect of cooling specimens on the erosion wastage for thermal sprayed coatings was less than that for 1018 steel, while at a steep impact angle of 90{degree} this effect for thermal sprayed coatings was greater than that for 1018 steel. The hypersonic velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} ceramic coating exhibited the highest E-C resistance due to its favorable composition and fine structure. The poor E-C resistance of arc-sprayed FeCrSiB coating was attributed to larger splat size, higher porosity and the presence of radial and tangential microcracks within the coating.

Wang, B.Q. [Metalspray USA, Inc., Richmond, VA (United States). Metallurgical Lab.; Lee, S.W. [Morgan State Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). School of Engineering

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fracture toughness measurements with subsize disk compact specimens  

SciTech Connect

Special fixtures and test methods have been developed for testing small disk compact specimens (1.25 mm diam by 4.6 mm thick). Specimens of European type 316L austenitic stainless steel were irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 or 250 C and tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250 C. Results show that irradiation to this dose level at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the test temperature increases. Irradiation at 250 C is more damaging than at 90 C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The testing shows that it is possible to generate useful fracture toughness data with a small disk compact specimens.

Alexander, D.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

PWR blowdown heat transfer separate-effects program - Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test 177. [Contains microfiche data  

SciTech Connect

Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test 177, which is part of the ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. Objective of the program is to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomenon governing the energy transfer and transport processes that occur during a loss-of-coolant accident in a PWR system. Test 177 was conducted at the request of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory ''for use in the independent assessment of RELAP4/MOD6.'' Primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses during test 177 available. The responses are presented in graphical form in engineering units and have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure reasonableness and consistency. The data are presented in microfiche form.

Clemons, V.D.; Flanders, R.M.; Craddick, W.G.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Simple test for dissimilar-metal welds  

SciTech Connect

A simplified accelerated test procedure has been developed for testing dissimilar-metal welds between austenitic stainless steels and low-alloy ferritic steels. The failure of these welded joints in operating steam generators of fossil-fired power plants has become an increasing problem for the utility industry. The proposed test is a three-point loading, bent-beam test that uses sheet specimens taken from a dissimilar-metal weldment. Tests were conducted in a simple test fixture where the specimens are loaded with a set-screw. To determine whether the test produces the same type of failure as those produced in a power plant, tests were conducted on specimens taken from a weld between Type 316 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel plates using Type 309 stainless steel filler metal. The specimens were loaded in the test fixture at room temperature and then thermally cycled between room temperature and 593/sup 0/C (1099/sup 0/F) by placing the test apparatus in a box furnace (thermal cycling during power plant operation plays a major role in the weld failure during service). The specimens were kept in the furnace for 20 to 70 hours (h), cooled to room temperature, and then the cycle was repeated. Metallographic examination of specimens cycled as few as 64 times with a total of 2300 h at 593/sup 0/C revealed that the specimens contained cracks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after long-time elevated-temperature service racks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after longtime elevated-temperature service in a fossil-fired steam generator. All indications are that this simple accelerated test could be used as a screening procedure to compare the relative behavior of ''improved'' welds in future research and development programs.

Klueh, R.L.; King, J.F.; Griffith, J.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal hydraulic performance testing of printed circuit heat exchangers in a high-temperature helium test facility  

SciTech Connect

In high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, such as a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to a secondary fluid for electricity generation with an indirect power cycle and/or process heat applications. Currently, there is no proven high-temperature (750–800 °C or higher) compact heat exchanger technology for high-temperature reactor design concepts. In this study, printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE), a potential IHX concept for high-temperature applications, has been investigated for their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics under high operating temperatures and pressures. Two PCHEs, each having 10 hot and 10 cold plates with 12 channels (semicircular cross-section) in each plate are fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and tested for their performance in a high-temperature helium test facility (HTHF). The PCHE inlet temperature and pressure were varied from 85 to 390 °C/1.0–2.7 MPa for the cold side and 208–790 °C/1.0–2.7 MPa for the hot side, respectively, while the mass flow rate of helium was varied from 15 to 49 kg/h. This range of mass flow rates corresponds to PCHE channel Reynolds numbers of 950 to 4100 for the cold side and 900 to 3900 for the hot side (corresponding to the laminar and laminar-to-turbulent transition flow regimes). The obtained experimental data have been analyzed for the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of the heat transfer surface of the PCHEs and compared with the available models and correlations in the literature. In addition, a numerical treatment of hydrodynamically developing and hydrodynamically fully-developed laminar flow through a semicircular duct is presented. Relations developed for determining the hydrodynamic entrance length in a semicircular duct and the friction factor (or pressure drop) in the hydrodynamic entry length region for laminar flow through a semicircular duct are given. Various hydrodynamic entrance region parameters, such as incremental pressure drop number, apparent Fanning friction factor, and hydrodynamic entrance length in a semicircular duct have been numerically estimated.

Sai K. Mylavarapu; Xiaodong Sun; Richard E. Glosup; Richard N. Christensen; Michael W. Patterson

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

J-integral values for cracks in conventional fatigue specimens  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive S-N fatigue data has been developed worldwide using conventional low-cycle fatigue tests. Such tests use smooth unnotched specimens subjected to controlled axial deflection or strain ranges. The tests must be run in the plastic regime in order to achieve the required cycles-to-failure. Recent developments have highlighted the need to understand and interpret the significance of the resulting strain range vs. cycles to failure data in terms of crack initiation and propagation. Since conventional fatigue tests are conducted in the plastic regime, linear elastic fracture mechanics cannot be used to accurately quantify crack growth in such tests. Elastic-plastic J-integral theory, however, has been shown to provide excellent correlations of crack growth in the elastic, elastic-plastic and grossly-plastic regimes for a wide range of geometric and loading conditions. The authors are applying this theory to the low-cycle fatigue specimen crack behavior. As cracks progress in conventional fatigue specimens, bending becomes significant. Since fatigue testing machines are quite stiff relative to the small fatigue specimens, the ends of the specimen are constrained to remain parallel, and this reduces bending in the cracked cross-section. Three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic analyses are required to include these constraints in the J-integral solutions.

O`Donnell, T.P.; O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in a large-scale underground heater test in partially saturated fractured tuff  

SciTech Connect

The Drift Scale Test (DST) is being conducted in an underground facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to probe the coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes likely to occur in the fractured rock mass around a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Thermal-hydrological processes in the DST have been simulated using a three-dimensional numerical model. The model incorporates the realistic test configuration and all available site-specific measurements pertaining to the thermal and hydrological properties of the unsaturated fractured tuff of the test block. The modeled predictions were compared to the extensive set of measured data collected in the first year of this 8-year-long test. The mean error between the predictions and measurement at 12 months of heating for over 1600 temperature sensors is about 2 degrees C. Heat-pipe signature in the temperature data, indicating two-phase regions of liquid-vapor counterflow, is seen in both the measurements and simulated results. The redistribution of moisture content in the rock mass (resulting from vaporization and condensation) was probed by periodic air-injection testing and geophysical measurements. Good agreement also occurred between the model predictions and these measurements. The general agreement between predictions from the numerical simulations and the measurements of the thermal test indicates that our fundamental understanding of the coupled thermal-hydrologic processes at Yucca Mountain is sound. However, effects of spatial heterogeneity from discrete fractures that are observed in the temperature data are not matched by simulations from the numerical model, which treat the densely spaced fractures as a continuum.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Tsang, Y.W.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 6. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 05. 5B - double-ended cold-leg break simulation  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.05.5B was conducted by members of the ORNL PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program on July 3, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.05.5B was designed to provide transient thermal-hydraulics data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. Reduced instrument responses are presented. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.; Schwinkendorf, K.N.

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Simulation of the PBF-Candu test with coupled thermal-hydraulic and fuel thermo-mechanical responses  

SciTech Connect

During a large loss-of-coolant accident (LLOCA), the fuel sheath temperature is influenced by thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical phenomena. The thermal-hydraulic phenomena include the heat transfer from the sheath to the coolant and surroundings. Thermo-mechanical phenomena, such as creep and thermal expansion, influence the size of the fuel-to-sheath gap, and thus the heat transfer from the fuel to the sheath. Therefore, coupling the thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analysis of an LLOCA would result in more accurate predictions of sheath temperature. This is illustrated by comparing the sheath temperature predictions from coupled and decoupled simulations of the PBF-Candu Test with experimental measurements. The codes CATHENA and ELOCA were used for the thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analysis, respectively. The predicted sheath temperatures from both the coupled and decoupled simulations were higher than the measured values. However, after the initial power pulse, when the fuel-to-sheath gap was calculated as being opened, the sheath temperatures predicted by the coupled simulation were closer to the experimental measurements. Thus, under conditions of an open fuel-to-sheath gap, a coupled thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analysis can improve predictions of sheath temperatures. (authors)

Baschuk, J. J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Testing the ae \\Lambda scaling of thermal transport models: predicted and measured temperatures in the Tokamak Fusion Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor dimensionless scaling experiments D. R. Mikkelsen, S. D. Scott Princeton the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] nondimensional to extrapoďż˝ late [1] from current experiments to International Tokamak Experimental Reactor [2] (ITER) class

125

A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis  

SciTech Connect

The performance assessment of a geological repository for radioactive waste requires quantifying the geochemical evolution of the bentonite engineered barrier. This barrier will be exposed to coupled thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. This paper presents a coupled THC model of the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test which accounts for bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis. Model results attest the relevance of thermal osmosis and bentonite swelling for the geochemical evolution of the bentonite barrier while chemical osmosis is found to be almost irrelevant. The model has been tested with data collected after the dismantling of heater 1 of the in situ test. The model reproduces reasonably well the measured temperature, relative humidity, water content and inferred geochemical data. However, it fails to mimic the solute concentrations at the heater-bentonite and bentonite-granite interfaces because the model does not account for the volume change of bentonite, the CO{sub 2}(g) degassing and the transport of vapor from the bentonite into the granite. The inferred HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and pH data cannot be explained solely by solute transport, calcite dissolution and protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation, suggesting that such data may be affected also by other reactions.

Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluating the ignition sensitivity of thermal battery heat pellets  

SciTech Connect

Thermal batteries are activated by the ignition of heat pellets. If the heat pellets are not sensitive enough to the ignition stimulus, the thermal battery will not activate, resulting in a dud. Thus, to assure reliable thermal batteries, it is important to demonstrate that the pellets have satisfactory ignition sensitivity by testing a number of specimens. There are a number of statistical methods for evaluating the sensitivity of a device to some stimulus. Generally, these methods are applicable to the situation in which a single test is destructive to the specimen being tested, independent of the outcome of the test. In the case of thermal battery heat pellets, however, tests that result in a nonresponse do not totally degrade the specimen. This peculiarity provides opportunities to efficiently evaluate the ignition sensitivity of heat pellets. In this paper, a simple strategy for evaluating heat pellet ignition sensitivity (including experimental design and data analysis) is described. The relatively good asymptotic and small-sample efficiencies of this strategy are demonstrated.

Thomas, E.V.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental Thermal energy storage in confined aquifers. ©lAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-3 test data report : thermal Hydraulic results, Rev. 0 February 19, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the third water ingression test, designated SSWICS-3. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete at a system pressure of 4 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Numerical analysis of thermal-hydrological conditions in the single heater test at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain, LBNL-39789, E.O. Law­Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain Jens T. Birkholzer andwaste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heating phase of the

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Yvonne W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

10 MWe solar thermal central receiver pilot plant. Collector subsystem functional test plan  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II Collector Subsystem Functional Test Plan presents the functional testing to be performed to demonstrate the readiness of the Collector Subsystem for the Integrated Acceptance Tests. The functional testing will be performed with the collector subsystem as a stand-alone subsystem. In this context, all heliostat operational commands will be issued from the Heliostat Array Controller (HAC) and heliostat responses will be verified by visual means and from the HAC status displays.

Not Available

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Thermal Expansion, Elastic and Fracture Properties of Porous Cordierite at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The properties that determine the thermal shock resistance in materials are reported for porous cordierite, a leading candidate material for the fabrication of diesel particulate filters. Fracture toughness and slow crack growth tests were performed on test specimens obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter monolithic substrates using the double-torsion test method at temperatures between 20 C and 900 C. The thermal expansion and elastic properties were characterized between 20 C and 1000 C. The role of the microstructure of porous cordierite in determining its unusual thermal expansion and elevated temperature Young's modulus and fracture toughness are discussed.

Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Pandey, Amit [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; More, Karren [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Normal Condition on Transport Thermal Analysis and Testing of a Type B Drum Package  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the content limits of radioactive material packagings can save money and increase transportation safety by decreasing the total number of shipments required to transport large quantities of material. The contents of drum packages can be limited by unacceptable containment vessel pressures and temperatures due to the thermal properties of the insulation. The purpose of this work is to understand and predict the effects of insulation properties on containment system performance.

Jerrell, J.W.; van Alstine, M.N.; Gromada, R.J.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Thermal performance testing of two Thales 9310 pulse-tube cryocoolers for PHyTIR  

SciTech Connect

PHyTIR is a NASA-funded technology demonstration for a near-term earth-observing instrument in the thermal infrared spectrum, intended for use in the HyspIRI mission. PHyTIR will use two Thales 9310 single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers, one to directly cool the FPA, the other to simulate a passive radiator. We report performance measurements for the two Thales 9310 cryocoolers intended for inclusion in the PHyTIR demonstrator.

Paine, Christopher G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

Development and testing of improved heat transfer media for regenerative thermal oxidizers in the wood products industry  

SciTech Connect

Recently regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) have been used to control gaseous hydrocarbon air pollutant emissions from wood products plants. Two major problems related to the ceramic saddle heat transfer matrix in conventional RTOs have been encountered, cold face fouling and breakdown of the ceramic matrix. A structured packing heat transfer media having straight airflow passages of constant cross section was developed to remedy these problems. Results of pilot scale testing has shown that the structured packing is resistant to cold face fouling and breakdown of the ceramic matrix. In addition, in a full scale retrofit application, improvements in pollutant reduction effectiveness and operating efficiency were measured. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Klobucar, J.M. [Duerr Industries, Inc., Plymouth, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Influence of specimen design on the ductility of zircaloy cladding: Experiment and analysis  

SciTech Connect

In a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA), a control rod ejection or drop causes a sudden increase in reactor power, which in turn deposits a large amount of energy into the fuel. The resulting thermal expansion and fission gas release loads the cladding into the plastic regime and may cause it to fail. In order to predict cladding survivability, there has been considerable interest and effort in supplementing integral WA tests with separate-effects ring tests of cladding tubes. Such tests can give one insight into failure mechanisms and measure relevant mechanical properties (such as yield strength, uniform elongation, uniaxial stress-strain curve, etc.), for use in computer codes that attempt to predict cladding response during an RIA. The accuracy of such model predictions obviously depends on appropriate and accurate failure data. This study concerns itself with the proper development of ring tensile tests that (i) are similar to the loading conditions present in an RIA, (ii) measure the relevant mechanical properties and (iii) provide insight regarding the influence of the strain paths on the failure mechanisms present if Zircaloy cladding. Based on both experiments and computational modeling, the authors investigate the failure of Zircaloy tubing as a function of specimen geometry, and discuss the limitations of certain ring-test geometries in yielding failure ductility data that are applicable to RIA situations.

Bates, D. W.; Majumdar, S.; Koss, D. A.; Motta, A. T.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 3. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 06. 6B - transient film boiling in upflow. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hyraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.06.6B. This test was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water-Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on August 29, 1980. The objective of the program was to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWR's during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.06.6B was conducted to obtain transient film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses for THTF Test 3.06.6B available. Included in the report are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Testing Platform for Validation of Overhead Conductor Aging Models and Understanding Thermal Limits  

SciTech Connect

Power system equipment manufacturers and researchers continue to experiment with novel overhead electric conductor designs that support better conductor performance and address congestion issues. To address the technology gap in testing these novel designs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory constructed the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) facility to evaluate the performance of novel overhead conductors in an accelerated fashion in a field environment. Additionally, PCAT has the capability to test advanced sensors and measurement methods for accessing overhead conductor performance and condition. Equipped with extensive measurement and monitoring devices, PCAT provides a platform to improve/validate conductor computer models and assess the performance of novel conductors. The PCAT facility and its testing capabilities are described in this paper.

Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Young II, Marcus Aaron [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Stovall, John P [ORNL; Overholt, Philip N [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Test results of heat-exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion  

SciTech Connect

These tests evaluated flow-driven brushes, recirculating sponge rubber balls, chlorination, and mechanical system/chlorination combinations for in-situ cleaning of two potential heat exchanger materials: titanium and aluminum alloy 5052. Tests were successful when fouling resistance was <3.0 x 10/sup -4/ ft/sup 2/ hr-/sup 0/F/Btu. Results indicated systems and cleaning techniques using brushes, soft sponge balls, and various concentrations of chlorine had some potential for maintaining heat transfer efficiency.

Lott, D F

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

JV Task 46 - Development and Testing of a Thermally Integrated SOFC-Gasification System for Biomass Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has designed a biomass power system using a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermally integrated with a downdraft gasifier. In this system, the high-temperature effluent from the SOFC enables the operation of a substoichiometric air downdraft gasifier at an elevated temperature (1000 C). At this temperature, moisture in the biomass acts as an essential carbon-gasifying medium, reducing the equivalence ratio at which the gasifier can operate with complete carbon conversion. Calculations show gross conversion efficiencies up to 45% (higher heating value) for biomass moisture levels up to 40% (wt basis). Experimental work on a bench-scale gasifier demonstrated increased tar cracking within the gasifier and increased energy density of the resultant syngas. A series of experiments on wood chips demonstrated tar output in the range of 9.9 and 234 mg/m{sup 3}. Both button cells and a 100-watt stack was tested on syngas from the gasifier. Both achieved steady-state operation with a 22% and 15% drop in performance, respectively, relative to pure hydrogen. In addition, tar tolerance testing on button cells demonstrated an upper limit of tar tolerance of approximately 1%, well above the tar output of the gasifier. The predicted system efficiency was revised down to 33% gross and 27% net system efficiency because of the results of the gasifier and fuel cell experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of thermally integrating a gasifier and a high-temperature fuel cell in small distributed power systems.

Phillip Hutton; Nikhil Patel; Kyle Martin; Devinder Singh

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Brain Tissue: A Viable Postmortem Toxicological Specimen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Short Communication Brain Tissue: A Viable Postmortem Toxicological...Minneapolis, Wichita, KS 67214, USA Brain tissue may be a valuable specimen in interpretation...protected and isolated position of the brain eliminates or at least attenuates many......

Timothy P. Rohrig; Charity A. Hicks

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thermal Blanket for In-Situ Remediation of Surficial Contamination:? A Pilot Test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surficial PCB contamination has been successfully and safely removed from soils in a field test at the site of a former dragstrip where oil-containing PCBs had been sprayed to minimize airborne dust. Decontamination was achieved by electrically heating a ...

I. E. T. Iben; W. A. Edelstein; R. B. Sheldon; A. P. Shapiro; E. E. Uzgiris; C. R. Scatena; S. R. Blaha; W. B. Silverstein; G. R. Brown; G. L. Stegemeier; H. J. Vinegar

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3. 07. 9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Measuring the Optical Performance of Evacuated Receivers via an Outdoor Thermal Transient Test: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Modern parabolic trough solar collectors operated at high temperatures to provide the heat input to Rankine steam power cycles employ evacuated receiver tubes along the collector focal line. High performance is achieved via the use of a selective surface with a high absorptance for incoming short-wave solar radiation and a low emittance for outgoing long-wave infrared radiation, as well as the use of a hard vacuum to essentially eliminate convective and conductive heat losses. This paper describes a new method that determines receiver overall optical efficiency by exposing a fluid-filled, pre-cooled receiver to one sun outdoors and measuring the slope of the temperature curve at the point where the receiver temperature passes the glass envelope temperature (that is, the point at which there is no heat gain or loss from the absorber). This transient test method offers the potential advantages of simplicity, high accuracy, and the use of the actual solar spectrum.

Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Netter, J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Use of coconut fiber as a low-cost thermal insulator  

SciTech Connect

Cost is one of the major factors to be considered when choosing a thermal insulator. Design engineers continuously strive to provide the best at the lowest possible cost. In the tropics climate conditions are essentially hot and humid and a cause for daily discomfort. To some extent, air-conditioning of buildings has solved this problem. The major deterrent to air-conditioning is the exorbitant cost of imported thermal insulation materials. This has prompted a search for local, low-cost but effective thermal insulation for buildings. Coconut fiber is available at minimal cost from the copra industry in Trinidad, as it is a waste product from the coconut. The viability of using coconut fiber as building thermal insulation was explored by conducting thermal conductivity tests on 200 mm X 400 mm X 60 mm thick slab-like specimens. The test equipment used was a locally designed constant temperature hot box apparatus. This apparatus was designed to test slab-like specimens under steady-state conditions. The reliability if this experimental set up was checked using Gypsum Plaster. The thermal conductivity test results for coconut fiber over the density range 30 kg/m{sup 3} to 115 kg/m{sup 3} showed the characteristic hooked shape graph for fibrous material. For the 60 mm thick specimens at a mean temperature of 39 C, a minimum thermal conductivity of 0.058 W/mK occurred at an optimum density of 85 kg/m{sup 3}. The thermal conductivity of commonly used industrial insulators, namely loose-fill expanded vermiculite, cellular glass and blanket fiber glass, at a mean temperature of 38 C are 0.066 W/mK, 0.061 W/mK and 0.052 W/mK respectively. When compared, these results show that air dried coconut fiber has far reaching potential for use as an effective building thermal insulation.

Kochhar, G.S.; Manohar, K. [Univ. of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Enhanced performance of high temperature aluminate cementitious materials incorporated with Cu powders for thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cementitious materials have been extensively developed in thermal energy storage system of solar thermal power. This paper deals with the volume heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, and compressive strength of aluminate cementitious thermal energy storage materials with the addition of metal Cu powders. The specimens were subjected to heat-treatment at 105, 350, and 900 °C, respectively. In the heating process, Cu powders gradually oxidized to Cu2O and CuO, providing a so-called mass compensation mechanism for the composite paste. Meanwhile, it indicates that volume heat capacity and thermal conductivity both increase with increasing Cu powders content and decrease with the rising temperature. The optimum thermal properties were obtained at 15 wt% Cu powders loading. In addition, Calorimetric Test, XRD, TG–DSC, and MIP are performed for characterizing the hydration rates, the phases, the mass/heat evolution, and the pore distribution, respectively.

Huiwen Yuan; Yu Shi; Chunhua Lu; Zhongzi Xu; Yaru Ni; Xianghui Lan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE. Geo-Quebec 2004 2 Presentation outlinePresentation outline The need of laboratory testing behaviour Conclusions #12;11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 3 Triaxial test on solid

Prashant, Amit

153

MEMS test structure for measuring thermal conductivity of thin films L. La Spina, N. Nenadovi*, A. W. van Herwaarden**,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from handbook values for the corresponding bulk materials. This is because the thermal transport the one is patterned with the film-to- analyze (FTA). In this case, the thermal resistance can be regarded as a parallel between the thermal resistances of the supporting membrane and of the FTA. Thus, the measured

Technische Universiteit Delft

154

In this paper, the composition calculation in plasma out of thermal equilibrium is discussed and we test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACTS In this paper, the composition calculation in plasma out of thermal equilibrium plasma out of thermal equilibrium. Finally we applied the formulations to Fire II reentry. 1. INTRODUCTION In a first step from the H theorem we discuss the composition obtaining in plasma out of thermal

Boyer, Edmond

155

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 174205 (2011) Testing the minimum thermal conductivity model for amorphous polymers using high pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and propagons" to classify the vibrational modes of disordered materials and their contributions to thermal predict the thermal conductivity of most amorphous materials--and many strongly disordered crystals) simulations of polystyrene (PS)7 and proteins.8,9 Pressure tuning of the thermal conductivity enables

Braun, Paul

156

COLORED PHOTOGRAPHS OF PLANT DISEASE SPECIMENS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DISEASE SPECIMENS IN the preparation of a handbook of the diseases of vegetables by the...World in 1893. In 1896 the American Electrician was established, and this magazine...a high order. In 1906 the American Electrician was absorbed by the Electrical World...

Max W. Gardner; Geo. K. K. Link

1920-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

One Nanometer Thickness Specimen Supporting Film  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......carbon ultra thin film coated on the micro-grid is developed for the electron microscopy...carbon ultra thin film coated on the micro-grid is developed for the electron microscopy...specimen supporting film, which is a micro-grid coated with carbon thin film of......

Shigeo Sakata; Shinsuke Hotsumi; Hiroyuki Watanabe

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

Schmid, Andreas Karl (Berkeley, CA); Andresen, Nord (Berkeley, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings were determined using composite specimens of ceramic coated onto stainless steel substrates, tested with the coating in compression and the steel in tension. The strength of the coating was determined from an elastic bi-material analysis of the resulting failure of the coating in compression.(3) Altough initial comparisons of the materials would appear to be straight forward from these results, the results of the aging tests of the materials are necessary to insure that trends in properties remain after long term exposure to a diesel environment. Some comparisons can be made, such as the comparison between for lot-to-lot variation. An axial fatigue test to determine the high cycle fatigue behavior of TTBCs was developed at the University of Illinois under funding from this program.(4) A fatigue test apparatus has been designed and initial work performed which demonstrates the ability to provide a routine method of axial testing of coating. The test fixture replaces the normal load frame and fixtures used to transmit the hydraulic oil loading to the sample with the TTBC specimen itself. The TTBC specimen is a composite metal/coating with stainless steel ends. The coating is sprayed onto a mild steel center tube section onto which the stainless steel ends are press fit. The specimen is then machined. After machining, the specimen is placed in an acid bath which etches the mild steel away leaving the TTBC attached to the the stainless steel ends. Plugs are then installed in the ends and the composite specimen loaded in the test fixture where the hydraulic oil pressurizes each end to apply the load. Since oil transmits the load, bending loads are minimized. This test fixture has been modified to allow piston ends to be attached to the specimen which allows tensile loading as well as compressive loading of the specimen. In addition to the room temperature data, specimens have been tested at 800 Degrees C with the surprising result that at high temperature, the TTBC exhibits much higher fatigue strength. Testing of the TTBC using tension/compression cycling has been con

M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of thermal comfort using combined CFD and experimentation study in a test room equipped with a cooling ceiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature gradient is less than 1°C/m, which corresponds to the standards recommendations. A comparison a good indoor thermal comfort. Heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, which consume

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

162

The Solar Power Tower Jülich — A Solar Thermal Power Plant for Test and Demonstration of Air Receiver Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The open volumetric receiver technology allows the use of air as heat transfer medium at high temperatures in solar thermal power tower plants. It combines porous ceramic ... a strictly modular receiver design. H...

K. Hennecke; P. Schwarzbözl; G. Koll…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Sudar, Damir (Walnut Creek, CA); Albertson, Donna (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A review of test results on parabolic dish solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted rankine engines and for production of process steam  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results of development testing of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies. Most of the tests were at modules and assemblies that used a dish-mounted, organic Rankine cycle turbine for production of electric power. Some tests were also run on equipment for production of process steam or for production of electricity using dish-mounted reciprocating steam engines. These tests indicate that early modules achieve efficiencies of about 18 percent in converting sunlight to electricity (excluding the inverter but including parasitics). A number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other operating experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

Jaffe, L.D.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada S. Mukhopadhyay * , Y.waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scalerock; Radioactive waste; Yucca Mountain, Nevada Introduction

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Conceptual and Numerical Model for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, NV from three-Scale Heater Test. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 MilestoneReport, Chapter 6. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 Milestone

Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Conrad, Mark; Apps, John

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Failure analysis of pinch-torsion tests as a thermal runaway risk evaluation method of Li-Ion Cells  

SciTech Connect

Recently a pinch-torsion test is developed for safety testing of Li-ion batteries (Ren et al., J. Power Source, 2013). It has been demonstrated that this test can generate small internal short-circuit spots in the separator in a controllable and repeatable manner. In the current research, the failure mechanism is examined by numerical simulations and comparisons to experimental observations. Finite element models are developed to evaluate the deformation of the separators under both pure pinch and pinch-torsion loading conditions. It is discovered that the addition of the torsion component significantly increased the maximum principal strain, which is believed to induce the internal short circuit. In addition, the applied load in the pinch-torsion test is significantly less than in the pure pinch test, thus dramatically improving the applicability of this method to ultra-thick batteries which otherwise require heavy load in excess of machine capability. It is further found that the separator failure is achieved in the early stage of torsion (within a few degree of rotation). Effect of coefficient of friction on the maximum principal strain is also examined.

Xia, Yuzhi [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Dr. Tianlei [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Ren, Prof. Fei [Temple University; Gao, Yanfei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

New Devise for Penetration of Embedding Media into Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......MICROSCOPY New Devise for Penetration of Embedding Media into Specimens...been devised to enhance the penetration of embedding media into specimens...the size of the hole and the rate of gas flow. E - H Fig...Apparatus for enhancing penetration of embedding media (A) and......

Hiroshi KUSHIDA; Kunio FUJITA

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Review of the Development and Testing of a New Family of Boron and Gadolinium-Bearing Dual Thermal Neutron Absorbing Alloys - 13026  

SciTech Connect

The development of a new class of Fe-based thermal neutron absorbing alloys (patent pending) containing both natural boron (B) and gadolinium (Gd) is reviewed. Testing has shown that Ar and N inert gas atomized powder metallurgy (PM) variants offer superior processability coupled with improved mechanical properties that exhibit reduced anisotropy and reduced corrosion rates compared to conventional cast/wrought processed material. PM processing results in a microstructure containing a uniform distribution of second phase borides and gadolinides, and the morphology of the gadolinides prevents the formation low melting point Gd-bearing phases at solidifying austenite boundaries. The new T316-based materials containing both B and Gd exhibit superior corrosion resistance compared to straight B-bearing T304 materials. By keeping the B content < 1 weight percent (%) and using Gd to attain an equivalent B (B{sub Eq}) content higher than that achievable through the use of B only, the new materials exhibit superior ductility, toughness and bendability as a result of significantly reduced area fraction of Cr-rich M{sub 2}B borides. Limiting the total area fraction of second phase particles to < 22% insures a product with superior bendability. By restricting B to < 1% and using Gd up to 2.5%, B{sub Eq} levels approaching 12% can be attained that provide a cost effective improvement in thermal neutron absorption capability compared to using B-10 enriched boron. The new materials can be easily bent during fabrication compared to existing metal matrix composite materials while offering similar thermal neutron absorption capability. Production lots containing B{sub Eq} levels of 4.0 and 7.5% (Micro-Melt{sup R} DuoSorb{sup TM} 316NU-40 and 75, respectively) are in the process of being fabricated for customer trial material. (authors)

Schmidt, M.L.; Del Corso, G.J.; Klankowski, K.A. [Carpenter Tech., Corp., P.O. Box 14662, Reading PA 19612-4662 (United States)] [Carpenter Tech., Corp., P.O. Box 14662, Reading PA 19612-4662 (United States); Lherbier, L.W.; Novotnak, D.J. [Carpenter Powder Products, 600 Mayer St., Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)] [Carpenter Powder Products, 600 Mayer St., Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Resonance test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

Musial, Walter (Boulder, CO); White, Darris (Superior, CO)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Applicability of RELAP5-3D for Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of a Sodium-Cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Actinide Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is envisioned as a sodium-cooled, fast reactor that will burn the actinides generated in light water reactors to reduce nuclear waste and ease proliferation concerns. The RELAP5-3D computer code is being considered as the thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the ABTR. An evaluation was performed to determine the applicability of RELAP5-3D for the analysis of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The applicability evaluation consisted of several steps, including identifying the important transients and phenomena expected in the ABTR, identifying the models and correlations that affect the code’s calculation of the important phenomena, and evaluating the applicability of the important models and correlations for calculating the important phenomena expected in the ABTR. The applicability evaluation identified code improvements and additional models needed to simulate the ABTR. The accuracy of the calculated thermodynamic and transport properties for sodium was also evaluated.

C. B. Davis

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1.times.10.sup.-9 torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating.

Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1{times}10{sup {minus}9} torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating. 5 figs.

Coombs, A.W. III

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

Bordenstein, Seth

178

Experimental deformation of multilithologic specimens simulating sedimentary facies changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in controlling the location of deformation. To investigate this problem, three-layered specimens of Coconino Sandstone (11 by 3 by 3 cm. , 1 cm. layer thickness), each containing a block inclusion of Indiana Limestone, polycrystalline halite, modeling clay... the stages 17 (1, 2, 3) of shortening referred to in the text. Curves are labeled according to confining pressure. Representative force-displacement curves for specimens. 18 a. Limestone inclusion, 1. 0 kb confining pressure; b. halite inclusion, 1. 0 kb...

Dyke, Lawrence Dana

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

DEVELOPMENT OF BURN TEST SPECIFICATIONS FOR FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS IN RAM PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

The regulations in 10 CFR 71 require that the radioactive material (RAM) packages must be able to withstand specific fire conditions given in 10 CFR 71.73 during Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). This requirement is normally satisfied by extensive testing of full scale test specimens under required test conditions. Since fire test planning and execution is expensive and only provides a single snapshot into a package performance, every effort is made to minimize testing and supplement tests with results from computational thermal models. However, the accuracy of such thermal models depends heavily on the thermal properties of the fire insulating materials that are rarely available at the regulatory fire temperatures. To the best of authors knowledge no test standards exist that could be used to test the insulating materials and derive their thermal properties for the RAM package design. This paper presents a review of the existing industry fire testing standards and proposes testing methods that could serve as a standardized specification for testing fire insulating materials for use in RAM packages.

Gupta, N.

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Impact of Ageing on Thermal Efficiency of Solar Thermal Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today it is common practice to calculate the performance of solar thermal systems or solar collectors based on the results of a thermal performance test carried out with a new solar collector. However, for an int...

Elke Streicher; Stephan Fischer…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Single groove double cantilever beam fracture specimens versus Dugdale specimens for estimating shear lip propagation energies: BPA polycarbonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cracks in double cantilever beam specimens with single side grooves (S-G DCB) exhibit crack tip plastic zones that mimic closely the plastic zones that produce shear lips in mixed mode crack propagation in thi...

R. P. Kambour; S. Miller

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Abstract --The beneficial effect of AlN heat spreaders in terms of reduction of thermal resistance is tested on silicon-on-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract -- The beneficial effect of AlN heat spreaders in terms of reduction of thermal resistance such as SiO2 and SiNx can also lead to a very high thermal resistance. This has been demonstrated it is shown that PVD AlN layers result in a significant reduction of thermal resistance in a single device

Technische Universiteit Delft

184

Multicenter Clinical Evaluation of the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay for Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Strains in Clinical Stool Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conducted a multicenter evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay (Great Basin, West Valley City, UT) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in clinical stool specimens. This test utilizes the...

Blake W. Buchan; Tami-Lea A. Mackey; Judy A. Daly; Garrison Alger; Gerald A. Denys; Lance R. Peterson; Sue C. Kehl; Nathan A. Ledeboer

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thickness dependence of Gc for shear lip propagation from a single crack propagation specimen: aluminium 6061-T6 alloy, cold-rolled copper and BPA polycarbonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

G c...and plastic zone data from specimens of both kinds are reported for aluminium 6061-T6 alloy, cold-rolled copper and BPA polycarbonate. Results of uniaxial tensile tests and....

R. P. Kambour; S. Miller

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Method for non-destructive testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reverse?field reciprocity for conducting specimens in magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new static?electromagnetic reciprocity principle is presented extending ordinary resistive reciprocity to the case of nonzero magnetic fields by requiring the magnetic field to be reversed when the reciprocal measurement is made. The principle is supported by measurements on various types of specimens including those which exhibit the quantum?Hall effect. A derivation using elementary electromagnetic theory shows that the principle will hold provided only that the specimen is electrically linear (Ohmic) and that the Onsager form for the conductivity tensor applies throughout. The principle has important implications for electrical measurements on semiconductors in applied?magnetic fields.

H. H. Sample; W. J. Bruno; S. B. Sample; E. K. Sichel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Measuring the thermal diffusivity in a student laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes a method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of materials having a high thermal conductivity. The apparatus is rather simple and low-cost, being therefore suitable in a laboratory for undergraduate students of engineering schools, where several set-ups are often required. A recurrence numerical approach solves the thermal field in the specimen, which is depending on the thermal diffusivity of its material. The numerical method requires the temperature data from two different positions in the specimen, measured by two thermocouples connected to a temperature logger.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway Fall Semester ELEC Sci, Engineering, Math Elective 6* 16 Senior Year Fall VU Spring VU BME 271 Biomedical Seminar 1 BME 273 Design of Medical Engineering Systems II 3 BME 255w Biomedical Engineering Lab 3 18 SEM

Simaan, Nabil

191

Influence of EB-PVD TBC Microstructure on Thermal Barrier Coating System Performance Under Cyclic Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The lifetimes of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) with three different microstructures of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO, YSZ) ceramic top layer were investigated in lh thermal cycles at 1100 and 1150°C in flowing oxygen. Single crystal alloys CMSX-4 and Rene N5 that had been coated with an EB-PVD NiCoCrAlY bond coat were chosen as substrate materials. At 1150°C all samples failed after 80-100, lh cycles, predominantly at the bond coat/alumina interface after cooling down from test temperature. The alumina scale remained adherent to the YSZ after spallation. Despite the different YSZ microstructures no clear tendency regarding differences in spallation behavior were observed at 1150°C. At 1100°C the minimum lifetime was 750 , lh cycles for CMSX-4, whereas the first Rene N5 specimen failed after 1750, lh cycles. The longest TBC lifetime on CMSX-4 substrates was 1250, lh cycles, whereas the respective Rene N5 specimens have not yet failed after 2300, lh cycles. The failure mode at 1100°C was identical to that at 115O?C, i.e. the TBC spalled off the surface exposing bare metal after cooling. Even though not all specimens have failed to date, the available results at 1100°C suggested that both, the substrate alloy chemistry and the YSZ microstructure significantly affect the spallation resistance of the TBC.

Leyens, C.; Pint, B.A.; Schulz, U.; Wright, I.G.

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Theoretical and Experimental Thermal Performance Analysis of Complex Thermal Storage Membrane Containing Bio-Based Phase Change Material (PCM)  

SciTech Connect

Since 2000, an ORNL research team has been testing different configurations of PCM-enhanced building envelop components to be used in residential and commercial buildings. During 2009, a novel type of thermal storage membrane was evaluated for building envelope applications. Bio-based PCM was encapsulated between two layers of heavy-duty plastic film forming a complex array of small PCM cells. Today, a large group of PCM products are packaged in such complex PCM containers or foils containing arrays of PCM pouches of different shapes and sizes. The transient characteristics of PCM-enhanced building envelope materials depend on the quality and amount of PCM, which is very often difficult to estimate because of the complex geometry of many PCM heat sinks. The only widely used small-scale analysis method used to evaluate the dynamic characteristics of PCM-enhanced building products is the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, this method requires relatively uniform, and very small, specimens of the material. However, in numerous building thermal storage applications, PCM products are not uniformly distributed across the surface area, making the results of traditional DSC measurements unrealistic for these products. In addition, most of the PCM-enhanced building products contain blends of PCM with fire retardants and chemical stabilizers. This combination of non-uniform distribution and non-homogenous composition make it nearly impossible to select a representative small specimen suitable for DSC tests. Recognizing these DSC limitations, ORNL developed a new methodology for performing dynamic heat flow analysis of complex PCM-enhanced building materials. An experimental analytical protocol to analyze the dynamic characteristics of PCM thermal storage makes use of larger specimens in a conventional heat-flow meter apparatus, and combines these experimental measurements with three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference modeling and whole building energy simulations. Based on these dynamic tests and modeling, ORNL researchers then developed a simplified one-dimensional (1-D) model of the PCM-enhanced building component that can be easily used in whole-building simulations. This paper describes this experimental-analytical methodology as used in the analysis of an insulation assembly containing a complex array of PCM pouches. Based on the presented short example of whole building energy analysis, this paper describes step-by-step how energy simulation results can be used for optimization of PCM-enhanced building envelopes. Limited results of whole building energy simulations using the EnergyPlus program are presented as well.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Microstructures and properties of laser-glazed plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2}-YO{sub 1.5}/Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y thermal barrier coatings  

SciTech Connect

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consisting of two layers with various yttria contents (ZrO{sub 2}-YO{sub 1.5}/Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y) were plasma sprayed, and parts of the various specimens were glazed by using a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser. All the specimens were then subjected to furnace thermal cycling tests at 1,100 C; the effect of laser glazing on the durability and failure mechanism of the TBCs was then evaluated. From these results, two models were developed to show the failure mechanism of as-sprayed and laser-glazed TBCs: model A, which is thermal-stress dominant, and model V, which is oxidation-stress dominant. For top coats containing cubic phase, cubic and monoclinic phases, or tetragonal and a relatively larger amount of monoclinic phases, whose degradation is thermal-stress dominant, laser glazing improved the durability of TBCs by a factor of about 2 to 6. Segmented cracks that occurred during glazing proved beneficial for accommodating thermal stress and raising the tolerance to oxidation, which resulted in a higher durability. Thermal barrier coatings with top coats containing tetragonal phase had the highest durability. Degradation of such TBCs resulted mainly from oxidation of the bond coats. For top coats with a greater amount of monoclinic phase, thermal mismatch stress occurred during cooling and detrimentally affected durability.

Tsai, H.L.; Tsai, P.C. [National Taiwan Inst. of Tech., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Technology

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test - Comparison of field measurements to predictions of four different numerical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –Chemical Responses in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test.Heating Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. In:

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test J.mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –scale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Int J Rock

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.5 V Thermal Mgmt.: Passive, Vacuum-Sealed Unit Pack Weight: 294 kg BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 6,696 mi Date of...

197

The Application and Verification of ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) to DOE-2-1e Simulation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL-TR-08-06-01 THE APPLICATION AND VERIFICATION OF ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) TO DOE-2.1e SIMULATION PROGRAM Jeff S... Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report describes the application and verification of duct model on DOE 2.1e version 119 using ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal...

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

198

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Model Studies of Pore Stability and Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Katz, “Advanced Ceramics: Thermal Barrier Coatings BeatConductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier CoatingsFatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings,” NASA/

Glaeser, A M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mixed Stream Test Rig Winter FY-2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the data and analysis of the initial testing campaign of the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the test specimen selection, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, and data and analysis of specimens exposed in two environments designed to represent those expected for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE).

Chalres Park; Tedd Lister; Kevin DeWall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Thermal alteration of collagenous tissue subjected to biaxial isometric constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?????????????????????????.. VITA?????????????????????????????. 144 152 154 ix LIST OF TABLES TABLE 3.1 4.1 6.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 8.1 8.2 Comparison of orientation index and intensity threshold for the seven tissue specimens??????????.. Characteristic times for biaxial thermal... isometric tests heated in glycerol and saline??... Page 38 58 87 104 106 109 127 129 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Myocardium was carefully peeled from the epicardium, yielding a clean, undamaged...

Wells, Paul B.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous- fiber ceramic composite materials and components  

SciTech Connect

Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC {sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sub (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other ``defects`` would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistant coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

Steckenrider, J.S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rothermel, S.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Type Specimens of Athyridid Brachiopods from the James Hall Collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); Hall, 1857a, p. 94, fig. 3-4 and unnumbered; Hall, 1859b, p. 247; Hall, 1861, pl. 39. Meristella princeps (Hall, 1857a); Hall, 1860, p. 93, fig. 7; Hall, 1862, p. 180, fig. 7. Meristella laevis (Vanuxem, 1842); Miller, 1889, p. 354; Hall and Clarke... figured by Vanuxem. The well-preserved adult specimen figured by Hall (1861, pl. 39,3.1-n; see also, Hall, 1857a, p. 94, fig. 3-4 and unnumbered; 1857b, p. 54, p. 94, fig. 3-4 and unnumbered; 1860, p. 93, fig. 7; 1862, p. 180, fig. 7; Hall and Clarke, 1893...

Alvarez, Fernando; Brime, Covadonga

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

ThermalPhysicsLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Thermal Measurement of harsh environments using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PhysicsLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Problem/Tests Cook-off Live test on MK45 Mod 4 (NSWC) ) 3/11 #12;Thermal

Walker, D. Greg

205

Thermal Management Studies and Modeling | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Energy Storage R&D - Thermal Management Studies and Modeling Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

206

APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR GENERAL PURPOSE RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS  

SciTech Connect

Polyurethane foam has been employed in impact limiters for large radioactive materials packagings since the early 1980's. Its consistent crush response, controllable structural properties and excellent thermal insulating characteristics have made it attractive as replacement for the widely used cane fiberboard for smaller, drum size packagings. Accordingly, polyurethane foam was chosen for the overpack material for the 9977 and 9978 packagings. The study reported here was undertaken to provide data to support the analyses performed as part of the development of the 9977 and 9978, and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Performance of Thermal Insulation Containing Microencapsulated Phase Change Material  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is dynamic thermal performance microencapsulated phase change material (PCM) blended with loose-fill cellulose insulation. Dynamic hot-box testing and heat-flux measurements have been made for loose-fill cellulose insulation with and without uniformly distributed microencapsulated PCM. The heat flux measurements were made with a heat-flow-meter (HFM) apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 518. Data were obtained for 1.6 lb{sub m}/ft{sup 3} cellulose insulation containing 0 to 40 wt% PCM. Heat-flux data resulting from a rapid increase in the temperature on one side of a test specimen initially at uniform temperature were analyzed to access the effect of PCM on total heat flow. The heat flux was affected by the PCM for about 100 minutes after the temperature increase. The total heat flow during this initial period decreased linearly with PCM content from 6.5 Btu/ft{sup 2} at 0% PCM to 0.89 Btu/ft{sup 2} for 40 wt% PCM. The cellulose insulation with PCM discharged heat faster than the untreated cellulose when the hot-side temperature of the test specimen was reduced. In addition, hot-box apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 1363 was utilized for dynamic hot-box testing of a wood stud wall assembly containing PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. Experimental data obtained for wood-frame wall cavities containing cellulose insulation with PCM was compared with results obtained from cavities containing only cellulose insulation.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Yarbrough, David [R & D Services] [R & D Services; Syed, Azam M [ORNL] [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

Cunnington, G.R.; Clark, R.K.; Robinson, J.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Focused ion beam specimen preparation for electron holography of electrically biased thin film solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biased TEM specimen, thin film solar cell, FIB Thin films of hydrogenated Si (Si:H) can be used as active for electron holography of a thin film solar cell using conventional lift-out specimen preparation and a homeFocused ion beam specimen preparation for electron holography of electrically biased thin film

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

210

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

Linderman, R; Smith, B; Michel, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Specimen coordinate automated measuring machine/fiducial automated measuring machine  

SciTech Connect

The Specimen coordinate Automated Measuring Machine (SCAMM) and the Fiducial Automated Measuring Machine (FAMM) is a computer controlled metrology system capable of measuring length, width, and thickness, and of locating fiducial marks. SCAMM and FAMM have many similarities in their designs, and they can be converted from one to the other without taking them out of the hot cell. Both have means for: supporting a plurality of samples and a standard; controlling the movement of the samples in the +/- X and Y directions; determining the coordinates of the sample; compensating for temperature effects; and verifying the accuracy of the measurements and repeating as necessary. SCAMM and FAMM are designed to be used in hot cells.

Hedglen, Robert E. (Bethel Park, PA); Jacket, Howard S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Schwartz, Allan I. (Turtle Creek, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electrostatically actuated failure of microfabricated polysilicon fracture mechanics specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CHF3/C2F6 plasma, followed...polysilicon in a Cl2 plasma. The remaining...Both the Cl2 plasma etching and...beneath these areas during release...the proper frequency (ca. 20...respectively, and a large strain formulation...be small or non-existent...the doping, thermal grooving occurs...3.1 (at atmospheric pressure...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

On-line ultrasonic velocity measurements for characterisation of microstructural evaluation during thermal aging of ?-quenched zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique has been used for characterisation of evolution of microstructure in ?-quenched and thermally aged zircaloy-2 specimens. On-line ultrasonic velocity measurements have been made in ?-quenched state of zircaloy-2 (A specimen) during heating at different heating rates up to 573 K (B specimen), 603 K (C specimen) and 623 K (D specimen) with holding time periods of 5 h for specimens B and C, and 2 h for specimen D, at the corresponding maximum temperature, by employing a specially designed experimental set-up. The observed change in velocity at room temperature (298 K) before and after ageing for specimens B and D is 0.52% and 0.48%, respectively, and this reveals that intermetallic precipitates are formed during the aging treatment. Ultrasonic measurements are correlated with the hardness, density and microstructural changes.

A. Nishara Begum; V. Rajendran; T. Jayakumar; P. Palanichamy; N. Priyadharsini; S. Aravindan; Baldev Raj

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development of a nanostructure thermal property measurement platform compatible with a transmission electron microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the electrical and thermal transport properties of one-dimensional nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes and nanowires) typically are obtained without detailed knowledge of the specimen's atomicscale structure ...

Harris, C. Thomas (Charles Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Discovering Discriminative Cell Attributes for HEp-2 Specimen Image Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test results. This paper describes a novel CAD system for the Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA) test via the proposed approach to various state-of-the- art approaches on a novel HEp-2 cell dataset which the existence of con- nective tissue diseases is via the Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA) test using Indirect

Sanderson, Conrad

217

A comparison of the toughness of ductile iron to cast steel using modified charpy test specimens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters from Charpy V-notch results are desirable (. '12]. Rolfe and Barsom [1] suggest that one may correlate Klc with total Charpy fracture energy on the upper shelf using the relationship (Klc/YS) = A(CVN-YS/20)/YS (2) where K1c is the static...

McKinney, Keith Elison

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Sensitivity analysis for joint inversion of ground-penetrating radar and thermal-hydrological data from a large-scale underground heater test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potentialin the Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada,” U.S. Geol.with the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada,” J. of

Kowalsky, M.B.; Birkholzer, J.; Peterson, J.; Finsterle, S.; Mukhopadhya y, S.; Tsang, Y.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Novel scheme for the preparation of transmission electron microscopy specimens with a focused ion beam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel scheme is presented for the preparation of cross?section transmission electron microscopy(TEM) specimens with a focused ion beam(FIB). This scheme is particularly suitable for highly structured substrates such as integrated circuits. The specimen is made by cutting a thin slice of material from the substrate by sputtering with the FIB. The position of the specimen can be selected with submicron resolution. The specimen is subsequently removed from the substrate and transported to a standard TEM?specimen holder. A specimen ready for TEM inspection can be prepared within 2 hs. The samples are of excellent quality as is illustrated with cross?section TEM images of FIB?made specimens of an electrically programmable read?only memory.

M. H. F. Overwijk; F. C. van den Heuvel; C. W. T. Bulle?Lieuwma

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Workers Received Entrepreneurial Spirit Awards On April 3, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

222

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities,...

223

A technique for calculating the effective thermal resistance of steel stud walls for code compliance  

SciTech Connect

Canada`s Model National Energy Codes for Houses and for Buildings contain prescriptive requirements in the form of minimum thermal characteristics of envelope assemblies, including steel stud walls. To assist in the uniform enforcement of these requirements, it was necessary for the codes to prescribe acceptable methods of calculating the thermal resistance of steel and assemblies. The ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals proposes a simple method for predicting the thermal performance of stud walls, which is based on a weighted average of the values predicted by isothermal planes and parallel path calculation methods. The thermal resistance of 2440 mm x 2440 mm (8 ft x 8 ft) wall specimens, with 92 mm (3-5/8 in.) steel studs, was measured in a series of guarded hot box tests. Two stud gauges were evaluated, as well as two stud spacings, with one wood-based and three insulating sheathings. The measurements demonstrated that a weighting of 2:1 (isothermal planes:parallel path) provided an/ accurate prediction of the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 406 mm (16 in.) o.c., but that a 1:1 weighting best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 610 mm (24 in.) o.c. These results applied to walls with wood-based sheathing directly applied to the studs, whether or not the walls had insulating sheathing. Finally, the measurements demonstrated that an intermediate weighting of 3:2 best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with insulating sheathing installed directly onto the studs, i.e., without intermediate structural sheathing.

Brown, W.C.; Swinton, M.C.; Haysom, J.C. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Thermal Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

226

Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ANALYSIS OF TRACER AND THERMAL TRANSIENTS DURING REINJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and developed a new technique which combines the results from in- terwell tracer tests and thermal injection variables of the injection and backflow periods. Finally we suggested thermal injection-backflow tests for interpreting thermal injection-backflow tests. In fact, the MD model was first developed by Lauwerier to study

Stanford University

228

Miniature Specimen Testing The Small Punch Test (SPT) has successfully been used in the US and in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in Japan to assess the material behavior of steels in nuclear reactor and pressure vessels as well

Berlin,Technische Universität

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial specimens intravaskulaere Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

across Arterial and Venous Endothelium in Rats Studies with Evans Blue... of fluorescent spots for EBA leakage. The HRP specimens were subjected to histochemicai treatment,...

230

LoCuSS: A COMPARISON OF CLUSTER MASS MEASUREMENTS FROM XMM-NEWTON AND SUBARU-TESTING DEVIATION FROM HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-THERMAL PRESSURE SUPPORT  

SciTech Connect

We compare X-ray hydrostatic and weak-lensing mass estimates for a sample of 12 clusters that have been observed with both XMM-Newton and Subaru. At an over-density of DELTA = 500, we obtain 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.01 +- 0.07 for the whole sample. We also divided the sample into undisturbed and disturbed sub-samples based on quantitative X-ray morphologies using asymmetry and fluctuation parameters, obtaining 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.09 +- 0.06 and -0.06 +- 0.12 for the undisturbed and disturbed clusters, respectively. In addition to non-thermal pressure support, there may be a competing effect associated with adiabatic compression and/or shock heating which leads to overestimate of X-ray hydrostatic masses for disturbed clusters, for example, in the famous merging cluster A1914. Despite the modest statistical significance of the mass discrepancy, on average, in the undisturbed clusters, we detect a clear trend of improving agreement between M {sup X} and M {sup WL} as a function of increasing over-density, M{sup X}/M{sup WL}=(0.908+-0.004)+(0.187+-0.010){center_dot} log{sub 10}(DELTA/500). We also examine the gas mass fractions, f{sub gas} = M {sup gas}/M {sup WL}, finding that they are an increasing function of cluster radius, with no dependence on dynamical state, in agreement with predictions from numerical simulations. Overall, our results demonstrate that XMM-Newton and Subaru are a powerful combination for calibrating systematic uncertainties in cluster mass measurements.

Zhang, Yu-Ying [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Okabe, Nobuhiro [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Smith, Graham P.; Sanderson, Alastair J. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B152TT (United Kingdom); Piffaretti, Rocco [CEA, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Valdarnini, Riccardo [SISSA/ISAS, via Beirut 4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada); Evrard, August E. [Department of Physics and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mazzotta, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Marrone, Daniel P., E-mail: yyzhang@astro.uni-bonn.d [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases  

SciTech Connect

The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest status and plans are presented.

Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Measuring the Impact of Experimental Parameters upon the Estimated Thermal Conductivity of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation Subjected to an Accelerated Aging Protocol  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Recent efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM standard test method have led to the initiation of a broad ruggedness test. This test includes the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods up to five years for later comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. This paper will cover the structure of the ruggedness test and provide a glimpse of some early trends

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL] [ORNL; Bogdan, mary [Honeywell, Inc.] [Honeywell, Inc.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermal conductivity of the insulation system of the stator winding of a high-power turbogenerator with air cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Values of the thermal-conductivity coefficient of specimens of the frame insulation manufactured from pre- and unimpregnated, mica-containing tapes are determined. It is established that the tape structure, te...

A. Sh. Azizov; A. M. Andreev; A. M. Kostel’ov…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Mahr-Federal, Inc. respectively facilitated and provided the necessary surface metrology data of the test pieces. Mr. Claude Davis of Corning, Inc. obtained the thermophysical properties of the Ultra Low Expansion Titanium Silicate glass used... as thermal expansion standard. The engineers at National Instruments provided some much-needed advice and software for programming the data acquisition system. The TAMU Physics Machine Shop provided design advice and a couple of last...

Ayers, George Harold

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

237

APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS.  

SciTech Connect

Polyurethane foam has been widely used as an impact absorbing and thermal insulating material for large radioactive materials packages, since the 1980's. With the adoption of the regulatory crush test requirement, for smaller packages, polyurethane foam has been adopted as a replacement for cane fiberboard, because of its ability to withstand the crush test. Polyurethane foam is an engineered material whose composition is much more closely controlled than that of cane fiberboard. In addition, the properties of the foam can be controlled by controlling the density of the foam. The conditions under which the foam is formed, whether confined or unconfined have an affect on foam properties. The study reported here reviewed the application of polyurethane foam in RAM packagings and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

New calibration method for high and low triaxiality and validation on SENT specimens of API X70  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The determination of the exact mechanical properties of material is essential for an optimal and safe design of linepipes. It is especially important for the prevention of over-engineering and the reliable assessment of complex accidental loading, such as extreme bending due to loss of buoyancy of support, or abrupt ground movement. Currently, the focus of research in offshore deepwater installations and linepipes is towards pre-cracked structures with high triaxiality stress states and complex loading histories. At the same time, low triaxiality stress states must be correctly studied in order to represent shear dominated failure in pipes. A comprehensive experimental and numerical program was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of the traditional API X70 grade of steel. The material was characterized for anisotropic plasticity, fracture initiation and uncracked ductility for various states of stress. The same material was also used for pre-cracked fracture toughness assessment. The experimental program included flat and round specimens. The first type of tests on flat butterfly-shaped, central hole, notched and circular disk specimens; were selected to address the low stress triaxiality range. Tests on round notched bar specimens and SENT fracture mechanics tests extended the characterization and verification process to higher stress triaxiality values. This program covered a wide range of stress conditions and demonstrated their effect on the material resistance to crack extension. Each test conducted was numerically simulated using solid finite element models, matching the exact geometric and loading history features. The numerical simulation provided information on the local stress and strain fields around the location of the potential or existing cracks. Based on the above hybrid experimental/numerical technique tailored for pipe applications, the MMC fracture model was calibrated. The model relates the material ductility not only to stress triaxiality but also to the Lode parameter. The predictive capabilities of the MMC were then evaluated in the case of SENT testing, used extensively in the pipeline industry. It was shown that the present fracture model calibration can describe fracture behavior of SENT experiments.

Kirki Kofiani; Aida Nonn; Tomasz Wierzbicki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermalization of isolated quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the evolution towards thermal equilibrium of an isolated quantum system is at the foundation of statistical mechanics and a subject of interest in such diverse areas as cold atom physics or the quantum mechanics of black holes. Since a pure state can never evolve into a thermal density matrix, the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) has been put forward by Deutsch and Srednicki as a way to explain this apparent thermalization, similarly to what the ergodic theorem does in classical mechanics. In this paper this hypothesis is tested numerically. First, it is observed that thermalization happens in a subspace of states (the Krylov subspace) with dimension much smaller than that of the total Hilbert space. We check numerically the validity of ETH in such a subspace, for a system of hard core bosons on a two-dimensional lattice. We then discuss how well the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian projected on the Krylov subspace represent the true eigenstates. This discussion is aided by bringing the projected Hamiltonian to the tridiagonal form and interpreting it as an Anderson localization problem for a finite one-dimensional chain. We also consider thermalization of a subsystem and argue that generation of a large entanglement entropy can lead to a thermal density matrix for the subsystem well before the whole system thermalizes. Finally, we comment on possible implications of ETH in quantum gravity.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The design and construction of a cryostat for thermal battery investigations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A test cryostat was constructed to investigate the potential of a locally made thermal battery. A thermal battery is proposed to be a useful component… (more)

Swann, Brett Matthew.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Non-destructive testing method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydrogen Crack Growth Resistance of Thermal Power Plant Material Collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of electrolytical hydrogenation on fracture toughness, corrosion crack-growth resistance and fracture micromechanisms of operated 12Cr1MoV steel of thermal power plant superheater collector has been studied. Compact tension specimens were cut from perforated surface of thermal power plant superheater collector dismounted after 178,500 hours of operation. Corrosion crack-growth resistance under tension of previously hydrogenated compact specimens with fatigue cracks was studied. Due to the increased concentration of hydrogen in solution an additional buffer was being created that prevents hydrogen leakage from the specimen through the fracture surface during the experiment. The hydrogenation causes the significant decrease of critical stress intensity factor Kc, during the experiment in 0.1 N NaOH solution as compared with critical stress intensity factor K of non-hydrogenation 12Cr1MoV steel obtained by the 5% secant line method and in comparison with critical stress intensity factor Kc, determined through the J-integral. The areas of ductile crack growth in hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated specimens were found to have similar material fracture micromechanisms with dimples creation of different shape and size. But on the ductile crack growth area in hydrogenated specimens material intergranular fracture mechanisms were found caused by the hydrogen embrittlement which are similar to areas without ridges with the products corrosion traces.

V. Iasnii; P. Maruschak; O. Yasniy; Y. Lapusta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Measuring the Impact of Experimental Parameters upon the Estimated Thermal Conductivity of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation Subjected to an Accelerated Aging Protocol ? Two Year Results  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C 1303 standard test method have led to a broad ruggedness test. This test includes the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods up to five years for later comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. This paper will compare the results after two years of full-thickness aging.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL] [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Insights Gained from Ultrasonic Testing of Piping Welds Subjected to the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in leak-before-break piping systems. Part of this involves determining whether inspections alone, or inspections plus mitigation, are needed. This work addresses the reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) of cracks that have been mitigated by the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). The MSIP has been approved by the NRC (NUREG-0313) since 1986 and modifies residual stresses remaining after welding with compressive, or neutral, stresses near the inner diameter surface of the pipe. This compressive stress is thought to arrest existing cracks and inhibit new crack formation. To evaluate the effectiveness of the MSIP and the reliability of ultrasonic inspections, flaws were evaluated both before and after MSIP application. An initial investigation was based on data acquired from cracked areas in 325-mm-diameter piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. In a follow-on exercise, PNNL acquired and evaluated similar UT data from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) specimen containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks. The DMW specimen is a carbon steel nozzle-to-safe end-to-stainless steel pipe section that simulates a pressurizer surge nozzle. The flaws were implanted in the nozzle-to-safe end Alloy 82/182 butter region. Results are presented on the effects of MSIP on specimen surfaces, and on UT flaw responses.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

SciTech Connect: Charpy impact test results on five materials...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charpy...

247

Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (?2 mm thick, ?10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; M. Sky Driver; Anthony N. Caruso; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

DNA Synthetic Activity of Right and Left Ventricular Biopsy Specimens in Patients with Cardiomyopathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation was designed to evaluate the difference in DNA activity between biopsy specimens obtained from right and left ventricles. Nucleic DNA in the myocardial cells of hypertrophied and congestive ...

Y. Yabe; H. Abe; Y. Kashiwakura

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RISĂ?-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

250

Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Nano-Continuum Modeling of aNano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen AlteredSignature on File) iv Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of Mechanical Systems for Automated Medical Slide Specimen Storage and Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intriguing considering that improving medical systems can save the lives of patients. The Intelligent System and Automation Laboratory at the University of Kansas has created a prototype machine with the goal of making the process of medical slide specimen...

Wurtz, Joshua James

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Applications of Non Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is now being developed for use in ... a lot of clinical applications of non-thermal plasma have been tested and the results show promising potential for Plasma Medicine. In...

S. Kalghatgi; D. Dobrynin; G. Fridman…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/?-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/?-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/?-TCP scaffolds.

Yu-Ri Choi; Jae-Sung Kwon; Doo-Hoon Song; Eun Ha Choi; Yong-Keun Lee; Kyoung-Nam Kim; Kwang-Mahn Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

ALSEP CASK ASSEMBLY GEARBOX THERMAL VACUUM TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems Division DATE 1. 0 Introduction As a result of Chit #S-3 which was generated at the ALSEP Cask to the gearbox assembly by means of the gearbox ball chain. This chain was placed over a sprocket which was of the same diameter of the gearbox sprocket wheel and was coupled to the magnetic feedthrough by means

Rathbun, Julie A.

255

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Profiling On November 2, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, News, Renewable Energy, Solar On Thursday, June 7, we began beam profiling the NSTTF field heliostat beam....

256

Simulation and testing of pyramid and barrel vault skylights  

SciTech Connect

The thermal performance of fenestration in commercial buildings can have a significant effect on building loads--yet there is little information on the performance of these products. With this in mind, ASHRAE TC 4.5, Fenestration, commissioned a research project involving test and simulation of commercial fenestration systems. The objectives of ASHRAE Research Project 877 were: to evaluate the thermal performance (U-factors) of commonly used commercial glazed roof and wall assemblies; to obtain a better fundamental understanding of the heat transfer processes that occur in these specialty fenestration products; to develop correlations for natural-convection heat transfer in complex glazing cavities; to develop a methodology for evaluating complex fenestration products, suitable for inclusion in ASHRAE Standard 142P (ASHRAE 1996); and to generate U-factors for common commercial fenestration products, suitable for inclusion in the ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. This paper describes testing and simulation of pyramid and barrel vault skylight specimens and provides guidelines for modeling these systems based on the validated results.

McGowan, A.G. [Enermodal Engineering, Ltd., Kitchener, Ontario (Canada); Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States); Wright, J.L. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough System and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System and Component Testing System and Component Testing Here you'll find information about parabolic trough system and components testing, as well facilities and laboratories used for testing. Tests include those for: Concentrator thermal efficiency Receiver thermal performance Mirror contour and collector alignment Mirror reflectivity and durability Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Concentrator Thermal Efficiency Testing Researchers and industry use the following facilities for testing parabolic trough collectors. AZTRAK Rotating Platform At Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF), the AZTRAK rotating platform has been used to test several parabolic trough modules and receivers. Initially, researchers tested a

258

Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Use of Laser Engineered Net Shaping for Rapid Manufacturing of Dies with Protective Coatings and Improved Thermal Management  

SciTech Connect

In the high pressure die casting process, molten metal is introduced into a die cavity at high pressure and velocity, enabling castings of thin wall section and complex geometry to be obtained. Traditional die materials have been hot work die steels, commonly H13. Manufacture of the dies involves machining the desired geometry from monolithic blocks of annealed tool steel, heat treating to desired hardness and toughness, and final machining, grinding and polishing. The die is fabricated with internal water cooling passages created by drilling. These materials and fabrication methods have been used for many years, however, there are limitations. Tool steels have relatively low thermal conductivity, and as a result, it takes time to remove the heat from the tool steel via the drilled internal water cooling passages. Furthermore, the low thermal conductivity generates large thermal gradients at the die cavity surfaces, which ultimately leads to thermal fatigue cracking on the surfaces of the die steel. The high die surface temperatures also promote the metallurgical bonding of the aluminum casting alloy to the surface of the die steel (soldering). In terms of process efficiency, these tooling limitations reduce the number of die castings that can be made per unit time by increasing cycle time required for cooling, and increasing downtime and cost to replace tooling which has failed either by soldering or by thermal fatigue cracking (heat checking). The objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of designing, fabricating, and testing high pressure die casting tooling having properties equivalent to H13 on the surface in contact with molten casting alloy - for high temperature and high velocity molten metal erosion resistance – but with the ability to conduct heat rapidly to interior water cooling passages. A layered bimetallic tool design was selected, and the design evaluated for thermal and mechanical performance via finite element analysis. H13 was retained as the exterior layer of the tooling, while commercially pure copper was chosen for the interior structure of the tooling. The tooling was fabricated by traditional machining of the copper substrate, and H13 powder was deposited on the copper via the Laser Engineered Net Shape (LENSTM) process. The H13 deposition layer was then final machined by traditional methods. Two tooling components were designed and fabricated; a thermal fatigue test specimen, and a core for a commercial aluminum high pressure die casting tool. The bimetallic thermal fatigue specimen demonstrated promising performance during testing, and the test results were used to improve the design and LENS TM deposition methods for subsequent manufacture of the commercial core. Results of the thermal finite element analysis for the thermal fatigue test specimen indicate that it has the ability to lose heat to the internal water cooling passages, and to external spray cooling, significantly faster than a monolithic H13 thermal fatigue sample. The commercial core is currently in the final stages of fabrication, and will be evaluated in an actual production environment at Shiloh Die casting. In this research, the feasibility of designing and fabricating copper/H13 bimetallic die casting tooling via LENS TM processing, for the purpose of improving die casting process efficiency, is demonstrated.

Brevick, Jerald R. [Ohio State University

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Crystallization Behavior of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber Measured Using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Two dynamic temperature sweep tests, 25 to -100 C and 25 to -70 to 0 C (ramp rate = 1 C/min), were conducted at a frequency of 6.28 rad/s (1 Hz) using a torsion rectangular test geometry. A strain of 0.1% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on an initial dynamic strain sweep test. Storage (G{prime}) and loss (G{double_prime}) moduli, the ratio G{double_prime}/G{prime} (tan {delta}), and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion ({alpha}) were determined as a function of temperature. Crystallization occurred between -40 and -60 C, with G{prime} increasing from {approx}6 x 10{sup 6} to {approx}4 x 10{sup 8} Pa. The value of {alpha} was fairly constant before ({approx}4 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) and after ({approx}3 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) the transition, and peaked during the transition ({approx}3 x 10{sup -3} mm/mm- C). Melting occurred around -30 C upon heating.

Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced Duct Sealing Testing  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected weekly. The baking test specimens were visually inspected weekly, and the durability was judged by the observed deterioration in terms of brittleness, cracking, flaking and blistering (the terminology used in the UL 181B-FX test procedure).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

264

Thermal Performance of a Double-Tube Type Lng Vaporizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report concerns the confirmed test results and method of analysis of the thermal performance of a double-tube type LNG vaporizer (DTV). The DTV is a...

Y. Miyata; T. Miura; S. Kasahara; H. Shohtani…

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Project Profile: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, will design, develop, and test a prototype high-temperature and high-efficiency thermal energy storage (TES) system...

266

SciTech Connect: Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a...

267

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Light-Duty Vehicle Thermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and passenger thermal comfort. Analogous to crash-test dummies, these manikins measure heat loss and skin temperature through numerous sensors, making it possible to efficiently...

268

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Flow Test Details Activities (38) Areas (33) Regions (1) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Flow tests provide information on permeability, recharge rates, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling. Thermal: Flow tests can measure temperature variations with time to estimate characteristics about the heat source. Dictionary.png Flow Test: Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened and fluids are released, the

269

Thermal storage for solar cooling using paired ammoniated salt reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the program were to investigate the feasibility of using various solid and liquid ammoniates in heat pump/thermal storage systems for space heating and cooling. The study included corrosion testing of selected metallic and non-metallic specimens in the ammoniates, subscale testing of the candidate ammoniates singly and in pairs, trade studies and conceptual design of a residential system, prototype testing, and ammoniation/deammoniation cyclic testing of manganese chloride. Results of the corrosion testing showed that problems exist with manganese and magnesium chloride ammoniates, except with the teflon which displayed excellent resistance in all environments. Also, all liquid ammoniates are unsuitable for use with uncoated carbon steel. Cycling of the manganese chloride between the high and low ammoniates does not affect its properties. However, the density change between the high and low ammoniates could cause packing problems in a reactor which constrains the salt volume. Subscale tests with solid ammoniates indicated that the heat transfer coefficient in a fixed bed reactor is low (approx. 1 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F). Therefore solid ammoniates are not practical because of the high heat exchanger cost requirement. Forced ammonia recirculation was tested as a means of increasing heat transfer rate in the fixed bed reactor with solid salts, but was not successful. Conversely, the subscale testing with liquid ammoniates produced heat transfer coefficients of 40 to 45 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. Thus, the residential design was based on a liquid ammoniate/ammonia system using ammonium nitrate as the salt.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of nickel-base superalloys. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The main achievements of a 36-month research program are presented. The main objective was to gain more insight into the problem of crack growth under thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. This program was conducted at M.I.T. for the period of September 1982 to September 1985. The program was arranged into five technical tasks. Under Task I, the literature of TMF data was reviewed. The goal was to identify the crack propagation conditions in aircraft engines (hot section) and to assess the validity of conventional fracture mechanics parameters to address TMF crack growth. The second task defined the test facilities, test specimen and the testing conditions needed to establish the effectiveness of data correlation parameters identified in Task I. Three materials (Inconel X-750, Hastelloy-X, and B-1900) were chosen for the program. Task II was accomplished in collaboration with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft engineers. Under Task III, a computerized testing system to measure the TMF behavior (LCF and CG behaviors) of various alloys systems was built. The software used to run isothermal and TMF tests was also developed. Built around a conventional servohydraulic machine, the system is capable of push-pull tests under stress or strain and temperature controlled conditions in the temperature range of 25C to 1050C. A crack propagation test program was defined and conducted under Task IV. The test variables included strain range, strain rate (frequency) and temperature. Task V correlated and generalized the Task IV data for isothermal and variable temperature conditions so that several crack propagation parameters could be compared and evaluated. The structural damage (mode of cracking and dislocation substructure) under TMF cycling was identified and contrasted with the isothermal damage to achieve a sound fundamental mechanistic understanding of TMF.

Pelloux, R.M.; Marchand, N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

272

Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

Peterson, David P. (Orland Park, IL); Huff, Edmund A. (Lemont, IL); Bhattacharyya, Maryka H. (Naperville, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An investigation of the efficiency of the receiver of a solar thermal cooker with thermal energy storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A small scale solar concentrator cooker with a thermal energy storage system was designed, constructed and tested on the roof of the Physics building at… (more)

Heilgendorff, Heiko Martin.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A proposed benchmark for simulation in radiographic testing  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this benchmark study is to compare simulation results predicted by various models of radiographic testing, in particular those that are capable of separately predicting primary and scatter radiation for specimens of arbitrary geometry.

Jaenisch, G.-R.; Deresch, A.; Bellon, C. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Schumm, A.; Guerin, P. [EDF R and D, 1 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Observations of unstained biological specimens using a low-energy, high-resolution STEM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......film, such as a thin slice on a micro-grid. In the present study, we observed...about 30-40 nm was skimmed on a micro-grid. We observed the specimen with...of this sample was dropped on a micro-grid on ice and the glycerol was decomposed......

Akio Takaoka; Toshiaki Hasegawa

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

James C. Parks Herbarium specimen collection of Solanaceae, deadly nightshade family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important plants, the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and for that reason is sometimes known as the Potato family. Both potatoes and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) are found in the nightshade genus and have is unknown, but it is common in fields, roadsides and waste areas (Rhoades & Block). The two specimens found

Hardy, Christopher R.

277

Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems [Heat Transfer and Fluid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Hydraulic Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Accelerator Driven Test Facility Target Accelerator Driven Test Facility Target. Click on image to view larger

278

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Regional Test Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

279

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Design of a non-contact vibration measurement and analysis system for electronic board testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional vibration measurement methods involve placing accelerometers at discrete locations on a test object. In cases where the test specimen is small in mass, the addition of these measurement transducers can alter ...

Arn, Krissa Elizabeth, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transient thermal behavior of stratospheric balloons at float conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prediction of the thermal behavior of stratospheric balloons under varying environmental conditions is one of the key issues in the design and flight test of balloons. In this paper, a three-dimensional transient thermal model is developed to predict the thermal behavior of spherical stratospheric balloons. The diurnal variations of the skin and lifting gas temperatures at float conditions are discussed in detail. The further studies on the thermal behavior of stratospheric balloons are presented also.

Xin-Lin Xia; De-Fu Li; Chuang Sun; Li-Ming Ruan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade September 10, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis This “power tower” is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories This "power tower" is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories is unique - and in demand. The Facility has been instrumental in NASA tests, national defense programs and concentrated solar technology development.

283

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Methods for reduced platen compression (RPC) test specimen cutting locations using micro-CT and planar radiographs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to complete an RPC analysis and improving the quality of the obtained results. High-resolution micro-CT scans are used to gain a better understanding of rat long bone anatomy by quantifying the location, shape, and orientation of the growth plate, primary...

Lemmon, Heber

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Thermal and mechanical properties of polyurethane foams and a survey of insulating concretes at cryogenic temperatures. Final report, January 1979-February 1984  

SciTech Connect

Thermal and mechanical properties of expanded plastics, foams, are reported. The system studied was rigid, closed cell, CCl/sub 3/F blown, polyether based polyurethane. The primary temperature range of study was 100 to 300 K; however, several properties were determined to 4 K. The nominal densities of the foams tested were 32, 64, and 96 kg/cu m. Properties reported are thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, strength and moduli in tension and in compression, proportional limit, yield strength, ultimate strength, and shear strength. Physical properties were determined both parallel and perpendicular to the orthogonal axes of the bulk supplies. The gas content of the specimens was determined using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and with a gas displacement pycnometer. Empirical procedures for estimating the temperature dependent thermophysical properties were developed. These procedures are based on the experimental data and utilize the characterization parameters for molar gas concentration, gas pressure, and cell morphology. Regulations affecting vapor dispersion in the area around liquefied natural gas facilities make it attractive to construct dikes and impounding areas out of materials having low thermal conductivities. Several insulating concretes have the general properties required for such applications. Screening tests were done to determine the thermal conductivity, modulus of rupture, and the compressive strength of several polyester based materials with glass bead or perlite aggregate and of portland cement based materials with vermiculite or polystyrene aggregate. A bibliography resulting from an extensive literature survey of lightweight concretes is presented. Seven of the references which were particularly applicable are presented in annotated form.

Sparks, L.L.; Arvidson, J.M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stricker, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Advanced thermal barrier coating system development: Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Objectives are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability, for the Advanced Turbine Systems program (gas turbine). The base program consists of three phases: Phase I, program planning (complete); Phase II, development; and Phase III (selected specimen-bench test). Work is currently being performed in Phase II.

NONE

1996-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this contribution is to report on preliminary nano-continuum scale modeling of nuclear waste glass corrosion. The focus of the modeling is an experiment involving a French glass SON68 specimen leached for 25 years in a granitic environment. In this report, we focus on capturing the nano-scale concentration profiles. We use a high resolution continuum model with a constant grid spacing of 1 nanometer to investigate the glass corrosion mechanisms.

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automotive industry optics biomedical technology environmental technology Plasma Technology Quote from: Pla-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

292

Specimen Chamber Geometry?A Possible Source of Error in Quantitative X-Ray Microanalysis in STEM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......used both the normal specimen holder and the specimen holder for EDX. X-ray microanalysis was carried out using a PGT 1000 XCEL microanalysis system (Princeton Gamma Tech, Princeton, U.S.A.). Sections through organic element standards which were......

Monika GROTE; Hans Georg FROMME

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solar Thermal Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of solar energy for desalination purposes was one of ... The process is based on the use of solar thermal energy to evaporate water, thus separating pure ... brine. In this chapter an overview of solar thermal

M.T. Chaibi; Ali M. El-Nashar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of its title. It is not for the nuclear physicist, nor even for the neutron physicist, but for the student of solids and liquids. "Thermal ... physicist, but for the student of solids and liquids. "Thermal neutron ...

G. E. BACON

1968-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

Miller, D. C.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials  

SciTech Connect

New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 şC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 şC.

Paul Wosko; Sundram, S. K.

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

Moreno, G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

302

Standard Test Method for Measurement of Hydrogen Embrittlement Threshold in Steel by the Incremental Step Loading Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method establishes a procedure to measure the susceptibility of steel to a time-delayed failure such as that caused by hydrogen. It does so by measuring the threshold for the onset of subcritical crack growth using standard fracture mechanics specimens, irregular-shaped specimens such as notched round bars, or actual product such as fasteners (2) (threaded or unthreaded) springs or components as identified in SAE J78, J81, and J1237. 1.2 This test method is used to evaluate quantitatively: 1.2.1 The relative susceptibility of steels of different composition or a steel with different heat treatments; 1.2.2 The effect of residual hydrogen in the steel as a result of processing, such as melting, thermal mechanical working, surface treatments, coatings, and electroplating; 1.2.3 The effect of hydrogen introduced into the steel caused by external environmental sources of hydrogen, such as fluids and cleaners maintenance chemicals, petrochemical products, and galvanic coupling in an aqueous enviro...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Stress Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress Test Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Stress Test Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: Fluid flow direction Thermal: Dictionary.png Stress Test: A geologic stress analysis based on images of a borehole wall and hydraulic fracturing tests to characterize fracture orientations and stress magnitudes in order to identify stress planes and zones of potential permeability. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

304

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

305

Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

Cockeram, B. V.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thermal Insulation in Solar Thermal Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Insulation is a device or a practice which is used in a system for minimising heat losses caused due to transfer of heat from hotter to colder regions. It is one of the cheapest methods of energy conse...

B. C. Raychaudhuri

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials indicated there are variations in the changes of appearance and wear in these materials. Solid sheet vinyls and rubber tiles showed significantly less wear than asphalt tiles, vinyl- asbestos tiles, linoleums and cork. Asphalt tiles showed... in home installations. Six common floor covering materials-solid .sheet vinyls, rubber tiles, vinyl-asbestos tiles, J linoleums, corks and asphalt tiles-were used to construct 63 test specimens 2 x 2 feet in size. 1 T'ariations in specimens were...

Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens  

SciTech Connect

Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drift-scale thermal test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencemechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test–waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The modeling

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal Modeling and Device Noise Properties of Three-Dimensional-SOI Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal test structures and ring oscillators (ROs) are fabricated in 0.18-mum three-dimensional (3-D)-SOI technology. Measurements and electrothermal simulations show that thermal and parasitic effects due to 3-D packaging ...

Chen, Tze Wee

311

Toward zero-emission data centers through direct reuse of thermal energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have tested hot water data center cooling by directly reusing the generated thermal energy in neighborhood heating systems. First, we introduce high-performance liquid cooling devices with minimal thermal resistance in order to cool a computer system ...

T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; E. Ruetsche; B. Michel

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A system for combined three-dimensional morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue specimens  

SciTech Connect

We present a new system for simultaneous morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue samples. The system is composed of a computer assisted microscope and a JAVA-based image display, analysis and visualization program that allows acquisition, annotation, meaningful storage, three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structures of interest in thick sectioned tissue specimens. We describe the system in detail and illustrate its use by imaging, reconstructing and analyzing two complete tissue blocks which were differently processed and stained. One block was obtained from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lumpectomy specimen and stained alternatively with Hematoxilyn and Eosin (H&E), and with a counterstain and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ERB-B2 gene. The second block contained a fully sectioned mammary gland of a mouse, stained for Histology with H&E. We show how the system greatly reduces the amount of interaction required for the acquisition and analysis and is therefore suitable for studies that require morphologically driven, wide scale (e.g., whole gland) analysis of complex tissue samples or cultures.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Jones, Arthur; Garcia-Rodriguez, Enrique; Yuan Chen, Ping; Idica, Adam; Lockett, Stephen J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

313

cDNA Microarray Analysis of Serially Sampled Cervical Cancer Specimens From Patients Treated With Thermochemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To elucidate changes in gene expression after treatment with regional thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tru-Cut biopsy specimens were serially collected from 16 patients. Microarray gene expression levels before and 24 h after the first and second trimodality treatment sessions were compared. Pathway and network analyses were conducted by use of Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA; Ingenuity Systems, Redwood City, CA). Single gene expressions were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: We detected 53 annotated genes that were differentially expressed after trimodality treatment. Central in the three top networks detected by IPA were interferon alfa, interferon beta, and interferon gamma receptor; nuclear factor kappaB; and tumor necrosis factor, respectively. These genes encode proteins that are important in regulation cell signaling, proliferation, gene expression, and immune stimulation. Biological processes over-represented among the 53 genes were fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. Conclusions: Microarrays showed minor changes in gene expression after thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. We detected 53 differentially expressed genes, mainly involved in fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. A limitation with the use of serial biopsy specimens was low quality of ribonucleic acid from tumors that respond to highly effective therapy. Another 'key limitation' is timing of the post-treatment biopsy, because 24 h may be too late to adequately assess the impact of hyperthermia on gene expression.

Borkamo, Erling Dahl, E-mail: borkamo@gmail.co [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schem, Baard-Christian [Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Fluge, Oystein; Bruland, Ove [Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing Tracer Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Tracer Testing Details Activities (9) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture zones and formation permeability Hydrological: Flow rates, flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity Thermal: Dictionary.png Tracer Testing: A method based on injecting chemical tracers into the reservoir and monitoring how long it takes and where those tracers travel. The purpose is to model subsurface hydrothermal flow characteristics.

315

Assessing Diet and Seasonality in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands: An Evaluation of Coprolite Specimens as Records of Individual Dietary Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents an evaluation of coprolite specimens from the Lower Pecos canyonlands as records of individual dietary decisions. Prior studies of coprolites from this region have greatly expanded our knowledge of Archaic subsistence...

Riley, Timothy

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Thermal comfort during surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Industrial... Engineering THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Approved as to style and content by: airman of C it ee Head of Department Member Me er December 1978 ABSTRACT Thermal Comfort During Surgery (December 1978) David Harold...

Manning, David Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Material test machine for tension-compression tests at high temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus providing a device for testing the properties of material specimens at high temperatures and pressures in controlled water chemistries includes, inter alia, an autoclave housing the specimen which is being tested. The specimen is connected to a pull rod which couples out of the autoclave to an external assembly which includes one or more transducers, a force balance chamber and a piston type actuator. The pull rod feeds through the force balance chamber and is compensated thereby for the pressure conditions existing within the autoclave and tending to eject the pull rod therefrom. The upper end of the push rod is connected to the actuator through elements containing a transducer comprising a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT). The housing and coil assembly of the LVDT is coupled to a tube which runs through a central bore of the pull rod into the autoclave where it is connected to one side of the specimen. The movable core of the LVDT is coupled to a stem which runs through the tube where it is then connected to the other side of the specimen through a coupling member. A transducer in the form of a load cell including one or more strain gages is located on a necked-down portion of the upper part of the pull rod intermediate the LVDT and force balance chamber.

Cioletti, Olisse C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Operating temperatures of recessed fluorescent fixtures with thermal insulation  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed to determine steady state surface temperatures for recessed fluorescent fixtures operated with and without thermal insulation on the top side of the fixture and to identify potential problems associated with the installation of thermal insulation. In addition to measuring temperatures, means were sought by which the fixtures can be thermally insulated and operated without fire hazards or damage to the fixture. (MCW)

Yarbrough, D.W.; Toor, I.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures and the thermal transport prop- erties is a key point to design materials with preferred thermal properties with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity

Boyer, Edmond

322

TWO NEW DUCT LEAKAGE TESTS  

SciTech Connect

Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

ANDREWS,J.W.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

STANDARD DATA FILES FOR COMPUTER THERMAL SIMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STANDARD DATA FILES FOR COMPUTER THERMAL SIMULATION OF SOLAR LOW ENERGY NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS has been collated into descriptions of standard buildings to provide starting points for designers); Weather File Analyses (6) Standard Model Building Descriptions 6 Testing of Model Buildings 7 Summary 7

Amor, Robert

324

Thermal Insulation of Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Thermal Insulation (Dwellings) Bill which Mr. G. Nabarro introduced into the House of Commons on ... , sponsored by members of both major political parties, extends the principle of the Thermal Insulation (Industrial Buildings) Act of July 1957 to all new dwelling houses built in the ...

1958-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

326

Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermal behaviour of new crystalline semitransparent solar cell structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the structure of a novel semitransparent solar cell and its thermal behaviour, which cell can be used for building integrated applications. The crystalline self-made test cells can be manufactured using basic semiconductor technological ... Keywords: Building integrated photovoltaics, Semitransparent solar cell and thermal characteristics

Enik Bándy; Márta Rencz,

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Field Notes and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 56-877 (1933-1934)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A l l specimens l i s t e d h e r e i n , unless otherwise s t a t e d , are i n the c o l l e c t i o n 9 LIBRARY BINDING COMPANY P.O. BOX 7217 WACO. 1,K.\\AS 76710, ? ? - -Name of ]) e p-t. PWSf 'P AMU Library Ooile^e Station, 77843... ? Bind a| j$ h missing issues or missing pages ? BINDERY COPY LOT NO: CRM Write 6*i type tfffe, volume, months, page nos., year call nos., imprint in the exact order to be stamped on the spine. Fi e l d Notod and Catalog Davis Numbers 56...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Thermal Recovery Methods  

SciTech Connect

Thermal Recovery Methods describes the basic concepts of thermal recovery and explains the injection patterns used to exploit reservoir conditions. Basic reservoir engineering is reviewed with an emphasis on changes in flow characteristics caused by temperature. The authors discuss an energy balance for steam and combustion drive, and they explain in situ reactions. Heat loss, combustion drive, and steam displacement also are examined in detail, as well as cyclic steam injection, downhole ignition, well heating, and low-temperature oxidation. Contents: Thermal processes; Formation and reservoir evaluations; Well patterns and spacing; Flow and process equations; Laboratory simulation of thermal recovery; Heat loss and transmission; Displacement and production; Equipment; Basic data for field selection; Laboratory evaluation of combustion characteristics; Thermal properties of reservoirs and fluids.

White, P.D.; Moss, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Tunable thermal link  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Agreement between Self- and Clinician-Collected Specimen Results for Detection and Typing of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Specimens from Women in Gugulethu, South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...still fair, with the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 test (HC2), with...significant clinical and laboratory infrastructure, trained cytologists or pathologists...of Cape Town with the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) High-Risk...Shah, et al. 1999. Use of a hybrid capture assay of self-collected...

Heidi E. Jones; Bruce R. Allan; Janneke H. H. M. van de Wijgert; Lydia Altini; Sylvia M. Taylor; Alana de Kock; Nicol Coetzee; Anna-Lise Williamson

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fatigue crack growth testing of sub-clad defects  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on four-point bend specimens with cracklike defects intentionally placed in A302B low-alloy pressure vessel steel clad with 308/309L weld-deposited stainless steel. The defects were placed in the base metal under the cladding by machining a cavity from the side opposite the cladding, electric-discharge machining a very sharp flaw, fatigue precracking the flaw, and then filling up the cavity by a weld repair process. The specimens were stress relieved before fatigue testing. The specimens were fatigue cycled at positive load ratios until the defects broke through to the surface. The specimens were then fractured at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reveal the fracture surfaces. Seven different sub-clad flaw specimens were tested in room temperature air and each test provides a record of cycles to defect breakthrough. Changes in defect size and shape as a function of applied load cycles were obtained by beach-marking the crack at various stages of the load history. The results provide a set of embedded defect data which can be used for qualifying fatigue crack growth analysis procedures such as those in Section XI of the ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the ASME B and PV Section XI fatigue crack growth procedures conservatively predict cycles to defect breakthrough for small sub-clad defects.

Jones, D.P.; Leax, T.R. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Thermal Comfort Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comfort Model Comfort Model Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Working with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, our team at NREL developed an empirical model of people's temperature sensation (hot/cold) as well as perceptions (comfortable/uncomfortable) in a transient non-homogeneous environment. The model predicts sensation and comfort locally (at specific points on the body) as well as globally (overall). The university performed more than 100 tests on human test subjects in a controlled environmental chamber under a range of steady state and transient thermal conditions. Participants subjectively recorded their thermal comfort on a simple form. Core and local skin temperature data was

336

Determining the environmental and thermal characteristics of coke oven batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is proposed for assessing the environmental and thermal characteristics of coke oven batteries and is tested for coke oven batteries 1 and 5 at OAO Zaporozhkoks. On ... the basis of data for the environm...

E. I. Toryanik; A. L. Borisenko; A. S. Malysh; A. A. Lobov…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and Model Field Data from a Test of Steam Injection in an Hydraulically Created Fracture, EPA (co-PI) 1994-1998 Field Demonstration of In Situ Thermally Enhanced Extraction...

338

Making Steel Framing as Thermally Efficient as Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the steel web with a less conductive material, and 4) placing foam insulation in locations where the thermal shorts are most critical. Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have utilized both hot box testing and computer simulations in aim...

Kosny, J.; Childs, P.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Thermal and Oxidative Degradation of Castor Oil Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal and Oxidative Degradation of Castor Oil Biodiesel ... The neat biodiesels, 20% blends, and the base fuel (No. 2 diesel) were tested at 2 different loads (100 and 20%) and 3 injection timings (3° advanced, std., 3° retarded). ...

Marta M. Conceiçăo; Valter J. Fernandes, Jr.; Antonio S. Araújo; Mirna F. Farias; Ieda M. G. Santos; Antonio G. Souza

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock  

SciTech Connect

This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Celotex Structural Properties Tests  

SciTech Connect

In the course of regulatory review of the 9975 packaging, the question of the effects environmental conditions on performance of the packaging was raised. The results of previous tests of the Celotex material, used for impact absorption and thermal insulation, indicated that the effect of temperature variation was small. Accordingly, performance under ambient conditions was judged to be representative of performance under temperature extremes. To extend the database to include other effects, and in response to the questions, a series of materials tests were performed on the Celotex brand cellulose fiberboard material.

Smith, A.C.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Three-point bending test at extremely high temperature enhanced by real-time observation and measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We developed a three-point bending test equipment with a heating chamber to provide a high temperature environment. An observation window was intentionally opened in the chamber wall for image capture. A high speed camera is integrated to record the surface evolution of the specimen through the observation window. The fixture stage for the specimens was made of Al2O3 ceramic (>99% pure) and could resist extremely high temperature. This testing platform provides the specimens with an environment that is up to 1600 °C in atmosphere for three-point bending test. Experiments were conducted for refractory alloy and C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and the surface evolution of these specimens at high temperature was recorded. The crack propagation of the specimens was captured real-time and provided more detailed information for study of fracture behavior of the materials at high temperature.

Xufei Fang; Jingmin Jia; Xue Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

344

Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space?based applications of interest to NASA DoD and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE?CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end?pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid?Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); (b) a quad?redundant DTE?CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam NIRSpec and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM); (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO); and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL?sponsored CRYOTOOL program which include a dual DTE?CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini?CLHP) and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition design fabrication and testing. For the latter three this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

D. Bugby; C. Stouffer; J. Garzon; M. Beres; A. Gilchrist

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experimental Study of Thermal Performance and the Contribution of Plant-Covered Walls to the Thermal Behavior of Building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presented on experimental investigation of the influence of plant-covered wall on the thermal behavior of buildings in the semi-arid regions during the summer period. Thermal performance of a green walls system on facade walls has been experimentally investigated in a test room. The test cell dimensions are 1x1.2x0.8 m. In this study the thermal analysis concerns two test cells that incorporate non-covered and covered with two types of plants (Jasmine and Aristolochia). A Light source is used to simulate solar radiation. The results showed that plant cover improved indoor thermal comfort in both summer, and reduced heat gains and losses through the wall structure. It is verified that a microclimate between the wall of the test cell and the green wall is created, and it is characterized by slightly lower temperatures and higher relative humidity.

Saifi Nadia; Settou Noureddine; Necib Hichem; Damene Djamila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Regional Test Center in Vermont...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

347

Sandia National Laboratories: NASA's Solar Tower Test of the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* National Solar Thermal Test Facility * NSTTF * Partnership * Renewable Energy * Solar Energy Comments are closed. Last Updated: September 29, 2014 Go To Top Exceptional...

348

SciTech Connect: ABRASION TEST OF THORIA PELLETS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

BREEDING; PELLETS; REACTORS; TESTING; THERMAL NEUTRONS; THORIUM; THORIUM OXIDES Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI:...

349

Effects of oxidation on the impact energy of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 Charpy V-notch specimens heated in air at 600 to 800  

SciTech Connect

The /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source being developed at PNL utilizes a Hastelloy S or Hastelloy C-4 outer capsule having a 0.5-in.-thick wall to contain the Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule. The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate that the air oxidation of the outer capsule that could occur during heat-source service would not degrade the ductility and Charpy impact strength of the capsule below the licensing requirements given in Section 1.1. The /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source under development is intended for general-purpose use. Compatibility considerations limit the interface temperature between the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ and Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule to a maximum of 800/sup 0/C. The outer capsule surface temperature will be somewhat less than 800/sup 0/C, and depending on the service, may be substantially lower. The oxidation tests were therefore carried out at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C for exposures up to 10,000h to cover the range of temperature the outer capsule might expect to encounter in service. The results showed that the oxidation of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 in air at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C is very slow, and both alloys form adherent oxide layers that serve to protect the underlying metal. Subsurface attack of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 due to oxidation was greater than expected, considering the slow oxidation rates of the two alloys at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C. Estimates of subsurface attack, determined from micrographs of the oxidized specimens, showed erratic results and it was impossible to assign any type of rate equation to the subsurface attack. A conservative estimate of long-term effects can be made using a linear extrapolation of the test results. There were no significant differences between the room-temperature Charpy impact energy of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 specimens oxidized in air at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C and control specimens heated in vacuum.

Fullam, H.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A miniature shock-activated thermal battery for munitions applications  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a small, fast-rise thermal battery for non-spinning munitions applications was examined by studying the response of conventional thermal cells to impact (mechanical) energy to simulate a setback environment. This is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated that shock activation could be used to produce power from a conventional thermal-battery cell. The results of tests with both single and multiple cells are presented, along with data for a 5-cell miniature (5-mm diameter) thermal battery. The issues needing to be resolved before such a device can become a commercial reality are also discussed.

Guidotti, R.A.; Kirby, D.L.; Reinhardt, F.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Lab Trials of an Electricity Transmission Line Voltage Sensor Based on Thermally Poled Silica Fibre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Voltage sensing using helically coiled lengths of thermally poled twin-hole silica optical fibre is presented. Lab accuracy test results showing good linearity and signal to noise...

Michie, Andrew M; Hambley, Philip; Bassett, Ian M; Haywood, John H; Henry, Peter; Ingram, John

352

Theory of delayed thermal fluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory of nonradiative thermal activation involved in delayed thermal fluorescence has been developed from the viewpoint of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation.

S. H. Lin

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR THERMAL DISTRIBUTION STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

This report details development paths for advanced versions of ASHRAE Standard 152, Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Efficiency. During the course of conversations within the ASHRAE committee responsible for developing the standard (SPC152P), three areas of development for Standard 152 were proposed: (1) extend the scope of the standard to include thermal comfort variables; (2) extend the scope of the standard to include small commercial buildings; and (3) improve the existing standard with respect to accuracy and economy of effort. Research needs associated with each of the three options are identified.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermally driven circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several problems connected by the theme of thermal forcing are addressed herein. The main topic is the stratification and flow field resulting from imposing a specified heat flux on a fluid that is otherwise confined to a ...

Nelken, Haim

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials — phononic crystals — might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many...

Hsu, Chung-Hao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Solar Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal energy storage systems are introduced and their importance and desired characteristics are outlined. Sensible heat storage, which is one of the most commonly used storage systems in pract...

E. Paykoç; S. Kakaç

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Neutron stars - thermal emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Confronting theoretical models with observations of thermal radiation emitted by neutron stars is one of the most important ways to understand the properties of both, superdense matter in the interiors of the neutron stars and dense magnetized plasmas in their outer layers. Here we review the theory of thermal emission from the surface layers of strongly magnetized neutron stars, and the main properties of the observational data. In particular, we focus on the nearby sources for which a clear thermal component has been detected, without being contaminated by other emission processes (magnetosphere, accretion, nebulae). We also discuss the applications of the modern theoretical models of the formation of spectra of strongly magnetized neutron stars to the observed thermally emitting objects.

Potekhin, A Y; Pons, J A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

362

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Storage System Basics Thermal Storage System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics August 21, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to this challenge. In a concentrating solar power (CSP) system, the sun's rays are reflected onto a receiver, which creates heat that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables CSP systems to be cost-competitive options for providing clean, renewable energy. Several thermal energy storage technologies have been tested and

364

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Beatriz L´opez-Wallea,1 and analytical calculations. Key words: Micro-actuators, Thermal modelling, Electrical analogy, Thermal network 1 and MicroMechatronic Systems Department (AS2M), 24 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besan¸con, France Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

NREL Test-to-Failure Protocol (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The presentation describes the test-to-failure protocol that was developed and piloted at NREL, stressing PV modules with multiple applications of damp heat (with bias) and thermal cycling until they fail.

Hacke, P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine — with nanoscale resolution — the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

367

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine — with nanoscale resolution — the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

368

Rotational remanent magnetization (RRM) and its high temporal and thermal stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and its high temporal and thermal stability S. W. Mahon* and...per cent per decade of time. Thermal demagnetization of thermoremanent...To test the temporal and thermal stability of RRM, a source...Neolithic pot 05 162 Soba (Sudan) Post-Roman pot 07 73 Soba......

S. W. Mahon; A. Stephenson

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries Peyman Taheri in batteries with orthotropic thermal conductivities, where the heat generation is due to irreversible of the battery thermal behavior with modest numerical effort. The accuracy of the proposed model is tested

Bahrami, Majid

370

Thermal Profile of a Bacillus Species (ATCC 27380) Extremely Resistant to Dry Heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of interest to determine the thermal response of the isolate to...TEMPERATURE (C.) FIG. 2. Thermal resistance curve of Bacillus...of reaction (1). From a battery of standard biochemical tests...and C. F. Schmidt. 1968. Thermal destruction of microorganisms...

Walter W. Bond; Martin S. Favero

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermal neutron imaging support with other laboratories BL06-IM-TNI  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this project are: (1) detect and locate a source of thermal neutrons; (2) distinguish a localized source from uniform background; (3) show shape and size of thermalizing material; (4) test thermal neutron imager in active interrogation environment; and (5) distinguish delayed neutrons from prompt neutrons.

Vanier,P.E.

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

STUDY OF THERMAL SENSITIVITY AND THERMAL EXPLOSION VIOLENCE OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN THE LLNL ODTX SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Some energetic materials may explode at fairly low temperatures and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults for safe handling and storage of energetic materials. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can measure times to explosion, lowest explosion temperatures, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also generate useful data for determining thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. We also performed detonation experiments of LX-10 in aluminum anvils to determine the detonation violence and validated the Zerilli Armstrong aluminum model. Results of the detonation experiments agreed well with the model prediction.

HSU, P C; Hust, G; May, C; Howard, M; Chidester, S K; Springer, H K; Maienschein, J L

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

Determination of Thermal Contact Conductance of Metal Tabs for Battery Ultrasonic Welding Process  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental apparatus and data analysis algorithm were used to determine the thermal contact conductance between 0.2-mm-thick pure aluminum battery tabs as a function of contact pressure from 3.6 to 14.4 MPa. Specimens were sandwiched between one optically transparent and one infrared (IR) transparent glass windows, and heated up from one side by an intense short pulse of flash light. The temperature transient on the other side was measured by an IR camera. In order to determine the thermal contact conductance, two experiment configurations having different number of Al specimen layers were used. Numerical heat conduction simulations showed that the thermal contact conductance strongly depended on the ratio of the maximum temperature rise between the two configurations. Moreover, this ratio was not sensitive to the uncertainties of other thermal properties. Through the simulation results, a simple correlation between the gap conductance and the ratio was established. Therefore, once the ratio of the temperature rise between two configurations was experimentally measured, the thermal contact conductance could be readily determined from the correlation. The new method was fast and robust. Most importantly, the data analysis algorithm improved the measurement accuracy by considerably reducing the uncertainties associated with the thermophysical properties of materials and measurement system.

Chen, Jian [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Random Testing versus Partition Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The difference between Partition Testing and Random Testing has been thoroughlyinvestigated theoretically. In this thesis we present a practical study ofthe differences between random… (more)

Oftedal, Kristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

High–rate material modelling and validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test P. J. Maudlin G. T. Gray III C. M...topography) with measured shapes from post-test Taylor specimens and quasi-static compression...extracted from the experimental post-test geometries using classical r-value definitions...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE PROBE SPECIMENS REMOVED FROM TANK 241-AN-107 JUNE 2010  

SciTech Connect

An Integrated Multi-function Corrosion Probe (IMCP) was installed in Tank 241-AN-107 on September 20, 2006. A portion of the probe was retrieved on June 8, 2010 and the sections holding the detectors were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for analysis. The examination and disassembly of the probe sections encountered a number of challenges. However, disassembly and relevant analyses were successfully completed. The following summarizes our observations. Brittle failure of the fiberglass probe in the middle of detector 2 resulted in the recovery of only three vapor space C-rings and six supernatant bullet specimens. The design of the bullets and how they were attached to the probe made the recovery of the components more difficult. The use of glue/epoxy on the bullets and the attachment of the flat bottom of the bullets to the curved surface of the fiberglass probe body meant that weight loss on cleaning and surface area of the specimens could not be determined with acceptable accuracy. Macrophotography of all specimens reveals that corrosion was slight in the vapor space and extremely slight in the supernatant. The one pre-cracked C-ring recovered from the vapor space still had the stress bulge visible on the polished surface, indicating that crack propagation had not occurred in the tank. No photographs were taken of the C-ring before deployment. No further analysis was conducted on this specimen. A detailed discussion and photographic documentation are provided in this report.

COOKE GA; WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

377

Particularities of high-voltage electron microscopy: instrument design, defect imaging and in situ investigation in 'thick' specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......microscopy: instrument design, defect imaging and in situ investigation in 'thick' specimens Roger Valle1 and Alain Marraud2 'DMSC, ONERA, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, F-92322 Chatillon Cedex and 2 LMSSM, ECP, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92295 Chatenay-Malabry......

Roger Valle; Alain Marraud

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium  

SciTech Connect

The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

Schneibel, Joachim H [ORNL; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ON THE EXISTENCE OF 'RADIO THERMALLY ACTIVE' GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we investigate the possibility of significant production of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation at radio continuum frequencies that could be linked to some Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). The main targets for this investigation are SNRs expanding in high-density environments. There are several indicators of radio thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from SNRs, such as a flattening at higher frequencies and thermal absorption at lower frequencies intrinsic to an SNR. In this work, we discuss the radio continuum properties of three SNRs that are the best candidates for testing our hypothesis of significant thermal emission. In the case of SNRs IC 443 and 3C 391, thermal absorption has been previously detected. For IC 443, the contribution of thermal emission at 1 GHz, from our model fit is 3%-57%. It is similar to the estimate obtained from the thermal absorption properties (10%-40% at 1 GHz). In the case of the 3C 391 the conclusions are not so clear. The results from our model fit (thermal emission contribution of 10%-25% at 1 GHz) and results obtained from the low-frequency absorption (thermal contribution of 0.15%-7% at 1 GHz) do not overlap. For the SNR 3C 396 we suggest that if previously detected thermal absorption could be intrinsic to the SNR then the thermal emission (<47% at 1 GHz from our model fit) could be significant enough to shape the radio continuum spectrum at high frequencies. Polarization observations for these SNRs can constrain the strength of a thermal component. Reliable observations at low frequencies (<100 MHz) are needed as well as more data at high radio frequencies (>1 GHz), in order to make stronger conclusions about the existence of 'radio thermally active' SNRs.

Onic, D.; Urosevic, D.; Arbutina, B. [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade (Serbia); Leahy, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary (Canada)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

2013 Chevrolet Volt - VIN 3929 - Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Voltage 3 : 3.00 V Thermal Management: Active - Liquid cooled BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 4,007 mi Date of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermally Sprayed SiC Coatings for Offshore Wind Turbine Bearing Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tribological tests were conducted on thermally sprayed silicon carbide (SiC) coatings to investigate its potential on reducing wear in offshore wind turbine bearings. The tests were carried out under...3Al5O12) o...

F. Mubarok; S. Armada; I. Fagoaga; N. Espallargas

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

SciTech Connect

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

385

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect

A thermal ignition combustion system adapted for use with an internal combustion engine is described comprising: (a) means for providing ignition chamber walls defining an ignition chamber, the chamber walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m/sup 0/C. and a specific heat greater than 480J/kg/sup 0/C., the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber; (b) means for maintaining the temperature of the chamber walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel; and (c) means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

On the Influence of Laser Cladding and Post-processing Strategies on Residual Stresses in Steel Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal cycles during laser cladding can alter mechanical properties of the original part significantly. In case of cyclically loaded parts residual stresses are suspected to be a property strongly determining fatigue life. Therefore, in this paper the influence of processing and post-processing strategies on resulting residual stresses are determined by neutron-diffraction. A low-alloy as well as a high-alloy steel have been considered within this study, both cladded with the Co-based superalloy Stellite 21. Processing speed and post-treatment by laser annealing and by deep rolling strategies have been tested. Residual stresses in low-alloyed steel show high sensitivity on applied treatment strategies. In the present study only deep rolling induced compressive residual stress close to the part surface. In high-alloy steel compressive stress in this area resulted directly after laser cladding, where its magnitude depends on processing speed. A compressive residual stress statewhich is suspected to be beneficial for fatigue strength could be achieved at the two representative steels.

H. Köhler; R. Rajput; P. Khazan; J. Rebelo Kornmeier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Small solar (thermal) water-pumping system  

SciTech Connect

A small solar (thermal) water pump phototype was tested. The pump works on an organic Rankine cycle using refrigerant R113. The design of the pump is described. Detailed temperature and pressure measurements of the working fluid for different operating conditions are performed. The behaviour of the cycle is analysed to get a clear picture of the thermodynamic process. Power-characteristic curves are obtained by a systematic variation of water temperature, pumping head and heat input. 10 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Spindler, K.; Hahne, E. [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)] [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Chandwalker, K. [Stiletto Engineers, Hyderabad (India)] [Stiletto Engineers, Hyderabad (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermalfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods  

SciTech Connect

Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal barrier coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermal management of nanoelectronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state thermoelectric on- spot cooling, requiring efficient thermoelectric materials that can be integrated with the IC are further complicated by the fact that the material's ability to conduct heat deteriorates when at the packaging level but also at the nanoscale materials and device levels. THERMAL CHALLENGES AT NANOSCALE One

395

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Mobile Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile apps are everywhere. Some apps entertain and others enable business transactions. Apps increasingly interact with complex IT landscapes. For example, a banking app on a mobile device acts as a front end that invokes services on a back-end server ... Keywords: mobile apps, mobile devices, software quality management, software testing, test automation, test strategy

Klaus Haller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTBEAM TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENT­BEAM TESTS by Khaled Z. Kahhaleh, Enrique Vaca which simulate a highly corrosive environment and under loading conditions producing concrete cracking was intended to produce a very aggressive environment and to accelerate corrosion of the specimens. The state

Texas at Austin, University of

398

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Q1 High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this Los Alamos National Laboratory...

399

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

SciTech Connect

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70`s by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his `Adiabatic Diesel Engine` in the late 70`s. Kamo`s concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo`s work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as `convection vive.` Woschni`s work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components.

Fairbanks, J.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Performance Evaluation of Three On-Site Adulterant Detection Devices for Urine Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......prepared with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration...Sensitivity and Specificity Substance Abuse Detection methods Substance-Related...specimenscollected for drug-of-abuse testing was evaluated: the...and readily available via the internet and drug para- phernalia magazines......

Michelle R. Peace; Lisa D. Tarnai

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Locality, entanglement, and thermalization of isolated quantum systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A way to understand thermalization in an isolated system is to interpret it as an increase in entanglement between subsystems. Here we test this idea through a combination of analytical and Krylov-subspace-based numerical methods applied to a quantum gas of bosons. We find that the entanglement entropy of a subsystem is rapidly generated at the initial state of the evolution, to quickly approach the thermal value. Our results also provide an accurate numerical test of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), according to which a single energy eigenstate of an isolated system behaves in certain respects as a thermal state. In the context of quantum black holes, we propose that the ETH is a quantum version of the classical no-hair theorem.

S. Khlebnikov and M. Kruczenski

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

404

Thermal Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal storage is needed to improve the efficiency and usefulness of solar thermal systems. The paper indicates the main storage ... which would greatly increase the practical use of solar energy — is more diffi...

H. Tabor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental wear testing of nonmetallic materials for compressor applications  

SciTech Connect

A full-size prototypical test facility was designed and built to test nonmetallic materials in support of reciprocating compressor applications. Conventional test rigs utilize a pin- or ring-on-disk configuration to produce wear data in rotary motion under relatively low applied loads. In contrast, the subject test facility is constructed around a 9-inch (23-cm) stroke compressor frame. The test specimen and counterface configurations are similar to compressor packing rings and piston rods, respectively, and specimens are spring-loaded to variable levels encompassing actual compressor conditions. Testing to date has been performed at 500 rpm, 200 F (93 C), and three different load levels [65, 130 and 195 psi (450, 900 and 1,350 kPa)]. Material wear rate in air versus specimen pressure reveals a linear relationship with a slope of approximately 0.12 mils/day/psi (0.44 {micro}m/day/kPa). The wear performance of six different materials has been ranked in air. Future testing will focus on creating a database for material wear rates in air and nitrogen.

Parrington, R.J.; Hinchliff, E.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method provides a measure of the chemical durability of a simulated or radioactive monolithic waste form, such as a glass, ceramic, cement (grout), or cermet, in a test solution at temperatures radioactive waste forms in various leachants under the specific conditions of the test based on analysis of the test solution. Data from this test are used to calculate normalized elemental mass loss values from specimens exposed to aqueous solutions at temperatures <100°C. 1.3 The test is conducted under static conditions in a constant solution volume and at a constant temperature. The reactivity of the test specimen is determined from the amounts of components released and accumulated in the solution over the test duration. A wide range of test conditions can be used to study material behavior, includin...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Electric Motor Thermal Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape030bennion2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Electric Motor Thermal Management Electric Motor Thermal Management...

409

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management...

410

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

412

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' Information

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

Boyer, Edmond

415

Acoustical performance testing of duct silencers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The test method used in North America to evaluate the acoustical performance of duct silencers is ASTM E477. The ASTM standard provides an approved method for measuring the aerodynamic pressure drop dynamic insertion loss and self?generated noise of duct silencers. Unfortunately restrictions on the construction of the test duct in the current standard cause erroneous results in the measurement of insertion loss at low frequencies. These errors are due to acoustic resonances that occur naturally in the empty test duct. It is recommended that the standard be modified to require anechoic terminations at both ends of the test duct. It is also recommended that more specific design criteria for the source chamber be established and that a new section be added to provide for the measurement of the radiated noise from the casing of the test specimen. Specific recommendations relating to all of these issues will be provided.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

417

LSPE Interim Stowage Thermal Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-arm and thermal battery timers require operating temperatures at or above +40°F for reliable starting when·, ' LSPE Interim Stowage Thermal Constraints· Nl,;. ATM1080 PAGE 1 OF 13 DATE 15 December l97l constraints required for thermal integrity are defined. Prepared by:.:Z4·:..=..-~31!::..--.::..·~-:·::....-c

Rathbun, Julie A.

418

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

419

Thermalization through parton transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A radiative transport model is used to study kinetic equilibration during the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. The parton system is found to be able to overcome expansion and move toward thermalization via parton collisions. Scaling behaviors show up in both the pressure anisotropy and the energy density evolutions. In particular, the pressure anisotropy evolution shows an approximate alpha_s scaling when radiative processes are included. It approaches an asymptotic time evolution on a time scale of 1 to 2 fm/c. The energy density evolution shows an asymptotic time evolution that decreases slower than the ideal hydro evolution. These observations indicate that partial thermalization can be achieved and viscosity is important for the evolution during the early longitudinal expansion stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision.

Bin Zhang

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal stares for solar systems are surveyed which include: long-term water stores for solar systems; ground storage using soil as an interseasonal energy store; ground-water aquifers; pebble or rock bed storage; phase change storage; solar ponds; high temperature storage; and cold stores for solar air conditioning system. The use of mathematical models for analysis of the storage systems is considered

W.E.J. Neal

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development of the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in alkaline solutions.

Zapp, P.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

425

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Images & Videos On September 26, 2012, in Image Gallery Videos Concentrating Solar Power Image Gallery A picture says a thousand words, especially on the World Wide Web. Both...

426

Improved mechanical design and thermal testing of MIT Solarclave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solarclave is a solar-powered autoclave designed for use in rural health clinics in developing countries. The autoclave must sufficiently sterilize medical instruments to ensure that they can safely be used in providing ...

Van den Heuvel, Louise E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Concentrating Solar Power, Customers & Partners, Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar Areva Solar is collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories on a new...

428

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Reliability Workshop Sandia Wind Energy in the News Wind & Water Power Newsletter Solar Energy Solar Newsletter Photovoltaics Advanced Research & Development Microsystems...

429

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Webinar Wednesday, Jan. 14 Sandian Presents on PV Failure Analysis at European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Design and Analysis...

430

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Vehicle Test Cell Thermal Upgrade  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

431

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and systems ... Solar Furnace On November 10, 2010, in A solar furnace uses a heliostat that tracks the sun to direct sunlight onto a mirrored parabolic dish. Because the...

432

Design and testing of a thermal liquid level sensor  

SciTech Connect

Liquid level detection is of extreme importance in nuclear reactor systems. In the event of a loss of coolant, plant operators should be able to ascertain quickly whether there is danger of the core becoming uncovered. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Levin, A.E.; Schneider, A.; Harris, J.D.; Pfeifer, H.; Croft, W.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Clip gage attachment for frictionless measurement of displacement during high-temperature mechanical testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment for placement between a test specimen and a remote clip gage extensometer providing improved fracture toughness tests of materials at elevated temperature. Using a cylindrical tube and axial rod in new relationship, the device transfers the displacement signal of the fracture toughness test specimen directly to a clip gage extensometer located outside the high temperature furnace. Virtually frictionless operation is assured by having the test specimen center one end of the rod in one end of the tube, while the clip gage extensometer arms center the other end of the rod in the other end of the tube. By providing positive control over both ends of both rod and tube, the attachment may be operated in orientations other than vertical.

Alexander, David J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Clip gage attachment for frictionless measurement of displacement during high-temperature mechanical testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment for placement between a test specimen and a remote clip gage extensometer providing improved fracture toughness tests of materials at elevated temperature is described. Using a cylindrical tube and axial rod in new relationship, the device transfers the displacement signal of the fracture toughness test specimen directly to a clip gage extensometer located outside the high temperature furnace. Virtually frictionless operation is assured by having the test specimen center one end of the rod in one end of the tube, while the clip gage extensometer arms center the other end of the rod in the other end of the tube. By providing positive control over both ends of both rod and tube, the attachment may be operated in orientations other than vertical. 1 figure.

Alexander, D.J.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

435

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Testing and evaluation of damaged tubular jacket braces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In addition, crack growth at welded connections may also occur due to corrosion. Due to the high costs and dire consequences of catastrophic failure of an offshore platform, there exists the need to assess the structural integrity of platforms... will be presented. Experimental results of pure compression tests on undamaged, steel, tubular columns were reported by Bouwkamp (1975). Three fabricated electric-weld pipes and four seamless pipe were used for this study. The specimens were tested in pure...

Moehlman, Scott Alan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The thermal conductivity of silicon nitride with molybdenum disilicide additions  

SciTech Connect

Room-temperature thermal conductivity has been measured for a series of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix composites with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) additions of 2, 5 10, 25 and 50 wt. %. Included in these measurements were a pure MoSi{sub 2} sample and a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample containing only sintering aids. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added as the sintering aids, at approximately 6 and 2 respectively. When the amount of MoSi{sub 2} was increased to greater than 10 wt. %, the amount of the sintering aids necessary to densify the composite was decreased. No sintering aids were added to the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample. Thermal conductivities of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample without MoSi{sub 2} and the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample wee 36 W/m.K and 52 W/m.K respectively, which agree very well with the literature values for similar materials. No statistically significant changes were observed in the thermal conductivity for those samples containing up to 10 wt. % MoSi{sub 2}. However, between 10 and 25 wt. % MoSi{sub 2} there was a dramatic decrease in the thermal conductivity from 37 to 20.9 W/m.K. The thermal conductivity then increased steadily with further additions of MoSi{sub 2} up to 52 W/m.K for the pure MoSi{sub 2} specimen.

Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Abeel, A.M.; Lowden, R.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials  

SciTech Connect

Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Bionics in textiles: flexible and translucent thermal insulations for solar thermal applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...translucent thermal insulations for solar thermal applications Thomas Stegmaier...Denkendorf73770 Denkendorf, Germany Solar thermal collectors used at present consist...transparent thermal insulation|solar thermal collector| 1. Introduction...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program ..........................................................................3 2.1 Participants in the CSI-Thermal Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermomechanical measurements on thermal microactuators.  

SciTech Connect

Due to the coupling of thermal and mechanical behaviors at small scales, a Campaign 6 project was created to investigate thermomechanical phenomena in microsystems. This report documents experimental measurements conducted under the auspices of this project. Since thermal and mechanical measurements for thermal microactuators were not available for a single microactuator design, a comprehensive suite of thermal and mechanical experimental data was taken and compiled for model validation purposes. Three thermal microactuator designs were selected and fabricated using the SUMMiT V{sup TM} process at Sandia National Laboratories. Thermal and mechanical measurements for the bent-beam polycrystalline silicon thermal microactuators are reported, including displacement, overall actuator electrical resistance, force, temperature profiles along microactuator legs in standard laboratory air pressures and reduced pressures down to 50 mTorr, resonant frequency, out-of-plane displacement, and dynamic displacement response to applied voltages.

Baker, Michael Sean; Epp, David S.; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Thermal Conductivity of Hexagonal Close-Packed Solid Helium Four at High Densities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity measurements between 1.1° K and 7° K have been made on solid helium samples grown under constant pressures from 185 atm to 1050 atm. At high temperatures the phonon mean free path lŻ for the highest conductivity samples at six different densities is in good agreement with the expression, lŻ=Aexp(?DbT), where ?D is the Debye temperature at T=0° K, A=2.5×10-8 cm, b=2.13. Several samples grown from gas repurified by an adsorption trap exhibited mean free paths in agreement with this expression over almost four orders of magnitude. Slightly impure samples showed a considerable attenuation in the peak thermal conductivity at pressures above 320 atm. There was some evidence for anisotropy of the thermal conductivity in the umklapp region and for Poiseuille flow in the low-temperature region, but both these effects were considerably smaller than reported by other investigators for specimens grown at lower pressures.

W. D. Seward, D. Lazarus, and S. C. Fain, Jr.

1969-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

Thermal stability of high temperature structural alloys  

SciTech Connect

High temperature structural alloys were evaluated for suitability for long term operation at elevated temperatures. The effect of elevated temperature exposure on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a number of alloys was characterized. Fe-based alloys (330 stainless steel, 800H, and mechanically alloyed MA 956), and Ni-based alloys (Hastelloy X, Haynes 230, Alloy 718, and mechanically alloyed MA 758) were evaluated for room temperature tensile and impact toughness properties after exposure at 750 C for 10,000 hours. Of the Fe-based alloys evaluated, 330 stainless steel and 800H showed secondary carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) precipitation and a corresponding reduction in ductility and toughness as compared to the as-received condition. Within the group of Ni-based alloys tested, Alloy 718 showed the most dramatic structure change as it formed delta phase during 10,000 hours of exposure at 750 C with significant reductions in strength, ductility, and toughness. Haynes 230 and Hastelloy X showed significant M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitation and a resulting reduction in ductility and toughness. Haynes 230 was also evaluated after 10,000 hours of exposure at 850, 950, and 1050 C. For the 750--950 C exposures the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in Haynes 230 coarsened. This resulted in large reductions in impact strength and ductility for the 750, 850 and 950 C specimens. The 1050 C exposure specimens showed the resolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} secondary carbides, and mechanical properties similar to the as-received solution annealed condition.

Jordan, C.E.; Rasefske, R.K.; Castagna, A. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

445

Low Temperature Thermal Expansion of G-10 Plastic and Mylar  

SciTech Connect

This engineering note is a summary of test information and conclusions from the thermal expansion tests conducted at D-O during the fall of 1992. Each test was conducted separately but using the same basic procedure and equipment. While information on material properties at room temperature and above for these products is quite well doccumented, the companies producing these products had no available data about the thermal properties of these materials at cryogenic temperatures. This lack of readily available information prompted these tests to determine the accuracy of using the elevated temperature data for lower temperatures also. The results of each test were written up separately as stand alone short reports for immediate use in the design stages of the V.L.P.C. cryostat cassette. Both short reports are gathered here for convenient reference.

Bell, D.; /Fermilab

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies...

447

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

448

Report on workshop on thermal property measurements  

SciTech Connect

Results of thermogravimetric analysis of basalt is discussed. Heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion are specifically addressed. (CBS)

Robertson, E.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Methodology for Mechanical Property Testing of Fuel Cladding Using a Expanded Plug Wedge Test  

SciTech Connect

An expanded plug method was developed earlier for determining the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding. This method tests fuel rod cladding ductility by utilizing an expandable plug to radially stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The circumferential or hoop strain is determined from the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. A developed procedure is used to convert the load circumferential strain data from the ring tests into material pseudo-stress-strain curves, from which material properties of the cladding can be extracted. However, several deficiencies existed in this expanded-plug test that can impact the accuracy of test results, such as that the large axial compressive stress resulted from the expansion plug test can potentially induce the shear failure mode of the tested specimen. Moreover, highly nonuniform stress and strain distribution in the deformed clad gage section and significant compressive stresses, induced by bending deformation due to clad bulging effect, will further result in highly nonconservative estimates of the mechanical properties for both strength and ductility of the tested clad. To overcome the aforementioned deficiencies associated with the current expansion plug test, systematic studies have been conducted. By optimizing the specific geometry designs, selecting the appropriate material for the expansion plug, and adding new components into the testing system, a modified expansion plug testing protocol has been developed. A general procedure was also developed to determine the hoop stress in the tested ring specimen. A scaling factor, -factor, was used to convert the ring load Fring into hoop stress , and is written as _ = F_ring/tl , where t is the clad thickness and l is the clad length. The generated stress-strain curve agrees well with the associated tensile test data in both elastic and plastic deformation regions.

Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer Reprinted: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer A unique specimen of gopher snake of pulmocutaneous water loss and heat transfer, no difference was observed between the scale- less animal

Bennett, Albert F.

451

NREL's Advanced Thermal Conversion Laboratory at the Center for Buildings and Thermal Systems: On the Cutting-Edge of HVAC and CHP Technology (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure describes how the unique testing capabilities of NREL's Advanced Thermal Conversion Laboratory at the Center For Buildings and Thermal Systems can help industry meet the challenge of developing the next generation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and combined heat and power (CHP) equipment and concepts.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermally switchable dielectrics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Measurement of the in-plane shear modulus of medium-density fibreboard by torsional and flexural vibration tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The in-plane shear modulus (IPSM) of medium-density fibreboard (MDF) was obtained via a torsional vibration (TV) test using the specimen with various configurations and a subsequent numerical analysis. Because the out-of-plane shear modulus (OPSM) of MDF was much lower than the IPSM, the difference between the IPSM and OPSM had to be considered in the TV test. Therefore, the OPSM value was measured from the flexural vibration (FV) tests, and it was applied for the calculation of the IPSM value. The experimental and numerical results indicated that the TV test is effective to obtain the IPSM of MDF accurately under various configurations of the specimen.

Hiroshi Yoshihara; Masahiro Yoshinobu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same m...

Saint-Hilaire, P; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Benz, Arnold O.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A 10% increase in shaft work is directly attributable to modified thermal heat capacity Engineering HTF Specific heat yields modified power output. 27 127 227 327 427 527...

456

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Thermal plasmonic interconnects in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one emerging plasmonic material, graphene can support surface plasmons at infrared and terahertz frequencies with unprecedented properties due to the strong interactions between graphene and low-frequency photons. Since graphene surface plasmons exist in the infrared and terahertz regime, they can be thermally pumped (excited) by the infrared evanescent waves emitted from an object. Here we show that thermal graphene plasmons can be efficiently excited and have monochromatic and tunable spectra, thus paving a way to harness thermal energy for graphene plasmonic devices. We further demonstrate that “thermal information communication” via graphene surface plasmons can be potentially realized by effectively harnessing thermal energy from various heat sources, e.g., the waste heat dissipated from nanoelectronic devices. These findings open up an avenue of thermal plasmonics based on graphene for different applications ranging from infrared emission control, to information processing and communication, to energy harvesting.

Baoan Liu; Yongmin Liu; Sheng Shen

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Disilane ... Thermal decomposition of disilane was investigated using time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry coupled with vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization (VUV-SPI) at a temperature range of 675?740 K and total pressure of 20?40 Torr. ... Concentrations of disilane and trisilane during thermal decomposition of disilane were quantitatively measured using the VUV-SPI method. ...

Kazumasa Yoshida; Keiji Matsumoto; Tatsuo Oguchi; Kenichi Tonokura; Mitsuo Koshi

2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

Thermal desorption for passive dosimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ Flare Tubes for Thermal Desorber . . . . . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 27 4. 5 ~ Thermal Desorber Manufactured by Century System Sample Flow from Thermal Desorber to Gas Chromatograph 29 6. Direct Injection Port for Therma1 Desorber . . . . . $2... the gas badges and. providing additional guidance in conducting the study. DEDICATZOil This thesis is cedicated to my parents and my wife, Unice, for their support during the last t', o years AHSTHACT ACKI;ODL DG~~. 'ITS D' DICATICI'. LIST OF TABL...

Liu, Wen-Chen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

462

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

463

Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt  

SciTech Connect

Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25{degrees}C.

Brodsky, N.S. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Low temperature thermal transport in partially perforated silicon nitride membranes.  

SciTech Connect

The thermal transport in partially trenched silicon nitride membranes has been studied in the temperature range from 0.3 to 0.6 K, with the transition edge sensor (TES), the sole source of membrane heating. The test configuration consisted of Mo/Au TESs lithographically defined on silicon nitride membranes 1 {micro}m thick and 6 mm{sup 2} in size. Trenches with variable depth were incorporated between the TES and the silicon frame in order to manage the thermal transport. It was shown that sharp features in the membrane surface, such as trenches, significantly impede the modes of phonon transport. A nonlinear dependence of thermal resistance on trench depth was observed. Partial perforation of silicon nitride membranes to control thermal transport could be useful in fabricating mechanically robust detector devices.

Yefremenko, V.; Wang, G.; Novosad, V.; Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Divan, R.; Chang, C. L.; Downes, T. P.; Mcmahon, J. J.; Bleem, L. E.; Crites, A. T.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Univ. of Chicago

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

466

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Flowmeter Test Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Define permeable zones within a well Thermal: Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test: A well testing technique done upon completion of a well to identify locations of permeable zones within the well and to quantify the relative permeability of each zone. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A vertical flowmeter test is also known as a spinner test and is preformed

469

Abradability testing of Bn-Nextel{trademark} 312/Blackglas{trademark} 3-D woven composites and the effect on retained strength  

SciTech Connect

The low pressure (LP) turbine interstage seal for the Allison Engine Company AE 3007 turbofan engine is the component selected for the Low Cost Ceramic Composite (LC{sup 3}) program. The AE 3007 engine is a 7200 lb thrust turbofan engine with both military and commercial applications. The goals of the LP turbine interstage seal design are to provide a directly interchangeable design that will meet the 12,000 hours service life requirement with an approximate 74% weight reduction as well as initial acquisition cost and life cycle cost savings. The current LP turbine interstage seal design is comprised of a Hastelloy X honeycomb compliant seal member brazed to an INCO 718 structural member. Two approaches were used for the ceramic matrix composite (CMC) version of the interstage seal. The first approach entailed developing a process for brazing the Hastelloy X honeycomb material to the CMC with provisions for accommodating the differential thermal expansion ratio of 4:1. The second approach was to evaluate the abradability/conformability of the CMC material by conducting high speed, high temperature, rub rig testing as well as mechanical testing of the rub specimens to evaluate the retained mechanical strength. In the event the direct rub testing proved to be successful, the need for the Hastelloy X honeycomb and braze joint would be eliminated, resulting in a significant component fabrication cost reduction.

Wildman, D. [Allison Advanced Development Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Khandelwal, P. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Emergently Thermalized Islands in the Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, we point out that in the eternal inflation driven by the metastable vacua of the landscape, it might be possible that some large and local quantum fluctuations with the null energy condition violation can stride over the barriers between different vacua and straightly create some islands with radiation and matter in new vacua. Then these thermalized islands will evolve with the standard cosmology. We show that such islands may be consistent with our observable universe, while has some distinctly observable signals, which may be tested in coming observations.

Yun-Song Piao

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

471

Solid-Phase Extraction of 11-Nor-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-Carboxylic Acid from Urine Drug-Testing Specimens with the Cerex PolyCrom-THC™ Column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Confirmation of drugs of abuse by gas chromatography-mass...Sensitivity and Specificity Substance Abuse Detection methods Tetrahydrocannabinol...Abstract Confirmation of drugs of abuse by gaschromatography-mass...store and or- dered from an Internet website. Apparatus ACerex SPE......

David K. Crockett; Gordon Nelson; Philip Dimson; Francis M. Urry

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Rapid electrochemical screening of engine coolants. Correlation of electrochemical potentiometric measurements with ASTM D 1384 glassware corrosion test  

SciTech Connect

Engine coolants are typically subjected to comprehensive performance evaluations that involve multiple laboratory and field tests. These tests can take several weeks to conduct and can be expensive. The tests can involve everything from preliminary chemical screening to long term fleet tests. An important test conducted at the beginning of coolant formula development to screen the corrosion performance of engine coolants is described in ASTM D 1384. If the coolant formula passes the test, it is then subjected to more rigorous testing. Conducting the test described in ASTM D 1384 takes two weeks, and determining the coolant corrosion performance under several test parameters can takes resources and time that users seldom have. Therefore, it is very desirable to have tests that can be used for rapid screening and quality assurance of coolants. The purpose of this study was to conduct electrochemical tests that can ultimately be used for quick initial screening of engine coolants. The specific intent of the electrochemical tests is to use ASTM D 1384 as a model and to attempt to duplicate its results. Implementation of the electrochemical tests could accelerate the process of selecting promising coolant formulas and reduce coolant evaluation time and cost. Various electrochemical tests were conducted to determine the corrosion performance of several engine coolant formulas. The test results were compared to those obtained from the ASTM D 1384 test. These tests were conducted on the same metal specimens and under similar conditions as those used in the ASTM D 1384 test. The electrochemical tests included the determination of open circuit potential (OCP) for the various metal specimens, anodic and cathodic polarization curves for the various metal specimens, corrosion rate for metal specimens involved in a galvanic triad, and critical pitting potential (CPP) for aluminum (pitting of aluminum engine components and cooling systems is a cause for concern). The details for the methods and the correlation of the results to ASTM D 1384 tests results will be presented.

Doucet, G.P. [Shell Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States); Jackson, J.M.; Kriegel, O.A.; Passwater, D.K. [Shell Oil Products Co., Houston, TX (United States); Prieto, N.E. [Petroferm Inc., Fernandina Beach, FL (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?˘ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?˘ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?˘ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?˘ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Thermally induced photon splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate thermal corrections to the non-linear QED effective action for low-energy photon interactions in a background electromagnetic field. The high-temperature expansion shows that at $T \\gg m$ the vacuum contribution is exactly cancelled to all orders in the external field except for a non-trivial two-point function contribution. The high-temperature expansion derived reveals a remarkable cancellation of infrared sensitive contributions. As a result photon-splitting in the presence of a magnetic field is suppressed in the presence of an electron-positron QED-plasma at very high temperatures. In a cold and dense plasma a similar suppression takes place. At the same time Compton scattering dominates for weak fields and the suppression is rarely important in physical situations.

Per Elmfors; Bo-Sture Skagerstam

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

476

Study on thermal performance of high power LED employing aluminum filled epoxy composite as thermal interface material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper elucidates the thermal behavior of an LED employing metal filled polymer matrix as thermal interface material (TIM) for an enhanced heat dissipation characteristic. Highly thermal conductive aluminum (Al) particles were incorporated in bisphenol A diglycidylether (DGEBA) epoxy matrix to study the effect of filler to polymer ratio on the thermal performance of high power LEDs. The curing behavior of DGEBA was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The dispersion nature of the Al fillers in polymer matrix was verified with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The thermal performance of synthesized Al filled polymer composite as TIM was tested with an LED employing thermal transient measurement technique. Comparing the filler to polymer ratio, the rise in junction temperature for 60 wt% Al filled composite was higher by 11.1 °C than 50 wt% Al filled composite at cured state. Observed also from the structure function analysis that the total thermal resistance was 10.96 K/W higher for 60 wt% Al filled composite compared to 50 wt% Al filled composite. On the other hand, a significant rise of 9.5 °C in the junction temperature between cured and uncured samples of 50 wt% Al filled polymer TIM was observed and hence the importance of curing process of metal filled polymer composite for effective heat dissipation is discussed extensively in this work.

P. Anithambigai; S. Shanmugan; D. Mutharasu; T. Zahner; D. Lacey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Thermal Performance and Reliability Characterization of Bonded Interface Materials (BIMs): Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Thermal interface materials are an important enabler for low thermal resistance and reliable electronics packaging for a wide array of applications. There is a trend towards bonded interface materials (BIMs) because of their potential for low thermal resistivity (< 1 mm2K/W). However, BIMs induce thermomechanical stresses in the package and can be prone to failures and integrity risks. Deteriorated interfaces can result in high thermal resistance in the package and degradation and/or failure of the electronics. DARPA's Thermal Management Technologies program has addressed this challenge, supporting the development of mechanically-compliant, low resistivity nano-thermal interface (NTI) materials. In this work, we describe the testing procedure and report the results of NREL's thermal performance and reliability characterization of an initial sample of four different NTI-BIMs.

DeVoto, D.; Paret, P.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.; Bar-Cohen, A.; Matin, K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

test test test test More Documents & Publications 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution...

479

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for ThermalOF THE THESIS Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energyto utilize phase change materials (PCM’s) to enhance thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal test specimen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation  

SciTech Connect

As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement