Sample records for thermal systems external

  1. Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  2. Thermalization in External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali-Akbari, Mohammad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the AdS/CFT framework meson thermalization in the presence of a constant external magnetic field in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been studied. In the gravitational description the thermalization of mesons corresponds to the horizon formation on the flavour D7-brane which is embedded in the AdS_5 x S^5 background in the probe limit. The apparent horizon forms due to the time-dependent change in the baryon number chemical potential, the injection of baryons in the gauge theory. We will numerically show that the thermalization happens even faster in the presence of the magnetic field on the probe brane. We observe that this reduction in the thermalization time sustains up to a specific value of the magnetic field.

  3. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  4. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  5. Thermal Insulation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, T. F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy...

  6. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  7. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  8. 57EXTERNAL CONTROLS ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS: THREE CASE STUDIES EXTERNAL CONTROLS ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    57EXTERNAL CONTROLS ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS: THREE CASE STUDIES EXTERNAL CONTROLS of controlling factors that combine to influence the development of modern turbidite systems, and how these vary ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS: THREE CASE STUDIES C. HANS NELSON AND CARLOTA ESCUTIA Instituto Andaluz

  9. Solar thermal power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

  10. Experimental study of the effect of external pressure on particle bed effective thermal properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehranian, F.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate prediction of the thermomechanical responses of particle beds in fusion blankets depends strongly on the availability of experimental data on their thermal properties as a function of the blanket operating conditions. Experiments are conducted to measure the effective thermal conductivity and interface conductance of single-size aluminum, beryllium, and lithium zirconate particle beds as a function of applied external load in the 0- to 1.6-MPa range, with both helium and air as cover gas over a pressure range of 30 to 760 Torr. In both the aluminum and beryllium beds, as the applied load is increased to 1.5 MPa, the effective thermal conductivity increases by a factor of nearly 3 to 7 in an air cover gas and by a factor of nearly 2 to 3 in helium. With 1.2-mm lithium zirconate particles and air or helium as the cover gas, changes in the bed thermal conductivity when the applied load is varied in the 0 to 1.6-MPa range are small and within the experimental error. The increase in the interface conductance values with applied external load shows variations similar to those of the thermal conductivity. Based on the Hertz elastic equation and finite element models, the particle-to-particle contact areas as a function of the applied external load are evaluated and used in a predictive model by Bauer, Schlunder, and Zehner to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of a beryllium particle bed as a function of external pressure. Results are in agreement with predictions. 19 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Thermal management systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  12. Impact of External Heat-shielding Techniques on Shell Surface...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    External Heat-shielding Techniques on Shell Surface Temperatures and Dynamic Shell Thermal Deformation of Diesel Engine Emission Control Systems Impact of External Heat-shielding...

  13. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  14. Thermalization in Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of equilibrated states. iv. Definition for "quantum integrability". v. Many-body localization... vi. Open systems () 0 = ||2 . ETH: is approximately constant in the "energy window" of the state . ETH: For all 10 #12;Integrability 101 Quantum Integrability Classical systems: Definition: A system is integrable

  15. Integrating externally developed systems for SNS Linac cooling and vacuum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marroquin, P. S. (Pilar S.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    External contractors are developing the local cooling and vacuum control systems for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac. Soon these systems will be integrated into the facility-wide controls system. Allen-Bradley Logix5000 series programmable controllers, populated with appropriate input/output modules, were selected as the local controllers. These controllers will be interfaced to the facility-wide control system via VME systems with PowerPC processors running the Wind River VxWorks operating system and Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) front-end controller software. This paper describes the interface and integration issues driven by project, cooling system and vacuum system requirements and hardware selections.

  16. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  17. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems (VTMS) AnalysisModeling Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) AnalysisModeling 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

  18. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

  19. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  20. Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. ape13bennion.pdf More Documents & Publications Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Integrated Power Module Cooling Vehicle...

  1. Hydraulic External Pre-Isolator System for LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, S; Mason, K; Giaime, J; Abbott, R; Kern, J; O'Reilly, B; Bork, R; Hammond, M; Hardham, C; Lantz, B; Hua, W; Coyne, D; Traylor, G; Overmier, H; Evans, T; Hanson, J; Spjeld, O; Macinnis, M; Mailand, K; Sellers, D; Carter, K; Sarin, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydraulic External Pre-Isolator (HEPI) is the first 6 degrees of freedom active seismic isolation system implemented at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). Implementation was first completed at the LIGO Livingston Observatory (LLO) prior to LIGO's 5th science run, successfully cutting down the disturbance seen by LLO's suspended optics in the two most prominent seismic disturbance bands, the microseism (0.1-0.3Hz) and the anthropogenic (1-3Hz) bands, by a factor of a few to tens. The improvement in seismic isolation contributed directly to LLO's much improved duty cycle of 66.7% and LIGO's triple coincident duty cycle of 53%. We report the design, control scheme, and isolation performance of HEPI at LLO in this paper. Aided with this success, funding for incorporating HEPI into the LIGO Hanford Observatory was approved and installation is currently underway.

  2. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

  3. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  4. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, E. E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand which results in lower electrical costs. The effectiveness of this 'Thermal Retention System" is determined by its design characteristics, its operational efficiency and comparative system analysis. Today's computer technology has provided...

  5. Thermal performance measurements of insulated roof systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, G.E.; Childs, K.W.; Walukas, D.J.; Childs, P.W.; Griggs, E.I.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Roof Thermal Researcch Apparatus for carrying out thermal and hygric experiments on sections of low-sloped roofs. Test panels are exposed to a controlled temperature interior space and to the prevailing East Tennessee exterior environment. They are well instrumented and all data are stored and aided in the analysis by computer systems. Current experiments include studies of the effect of wet insulation on membrane temperature, thermal storage phenomena in built-up roof insulation, and the effects of varying surface reflectance on roof thermal performance.

  6. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, Joseph R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  7. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols....

  8. Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Fesmire, J. E. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida] [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida; Augustynowicz, S. D. [Sierra Lobo Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Florida] [Sierra Lobo Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

  9. Design optimization of thermal paths in spacecraft systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Kevin Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis introduces a thermal design approach to increase thermal control system performance and decrease reliance on system resources, e.g., mass. Thermal design optimization has lagged other subsystems because the ...

  10. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

    1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  11. External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

  12. External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732 DOEDepartment of EnergyEric J.ExploringExternalSimulation

  13. Mutual information-energy inequality for thermal states of a bipartite quantum system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey Fedorov; Evgeny Kiktenko

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we consider an upper bound for the quantum mutual information in thermal states of a bipartite quantum system. This bound is related with the interaction energy and logarithm of the partition function of the system. We demonstrate the connection between this upper bound and the value of the mutual information for the bipartite system realized by two spin-1/2 particles in the external magnetic field with the XY-Heisenberg interaction.

  14. ME 343 Thermal-Fluid Systems ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    ) 8. Unsteady thermal system modeling, energy storage 9. Software design and development ClassME 343 ­ Thermal-Fluid Systems Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 343 ­ Thermal-Fluid Systems Spring thermal and fluid processes are central to function and performance: thermodynamics of nonreacting

  15. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall temperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser. 8 figs.

  16. Thermal Storage Systems at IBM Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, IBM commissioned its first large scale thermal storage system with a capacity of 2.7 million gallons of chilled water and 1.2 million gallons of reclaimed, low temperature hot water. The stored cooling energy represents approximately 27...

  17. EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because-scale thermal energy storage via hot compressed liquid water. Such a cycle is potentially interesting becauseEXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM Paul T. O'Brien 1 , and John Pye 2 1

  18. External optimal control of self-organisation dynamics in a chemotaxis reaction diffusion system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Helmut

    External optimal control of self-organisation dynamics in a chemotaxis reaction diffusion system D of self-organising biological systems, we describe numerical optimal control of E. coli bacterial by applying a boundary influx control of chemoattractant without interfering with the system itself. Optimal

  19. Thermalization and decoherence in open Majorana systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earl T. Campbell

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling to a thermal bath leads to thermalisation and decoherence of stored quantum information. For a system of Gaussian fermions, the fermionic analog of linear or Gaussian optics, these dynamics can be elegantly and efficiently described by evolution of the system's covariance matrix. Taking both system and bath to be Gaussian fermionic, we observe that thermalization and decoherence occurs at a rate that is independent of the bath temperature. Furthermore, we also consider a weak coupling regime where the dynamics are Markovian. We present a microscopic derivation of Markovian master equations entirely in the language of covariance matrices, where temperature independence remains manifest. This is radically different from behaviour seen in other scenarios, such as when fermions interact with a bosonic bath. Our analysis applies to many Majorana fermion systems that have been heralded as very robust, topologically protected, qubits. In these systems, it has been claimed that thermal decoherence can be exponentially suppressed by reducing temperature, but we find Gaussian decoherence cannot be cooled away.

  20. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MANAGED WINDOW SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S. E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes ofof thermal loads resulting from the building envelope areThermal Test Facility, LhL-9653, prepared for the ASHRAE/DOE Conference-on"t:heThermal Performance the Exterior Envelope

  1. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  2. Low-temperature thermally regenerative electrochemical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loutfy, R.O.; Brown, A.P.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally regenerative electrochemical system is described including an electrochemical cell with two water-based electrolytes separated by an ion exchange membrane, at least one of the electrolytes containing a complexing agent and a salt of a multivalent metal whose respective order of potentials for a pair of its redox couples is reversible by a change in the amount of the ocmplexing agent in the electrolyte, the complexing agent being removable by distillation to cause the reversal.

  3. Low temperature thermally regenerative electrochemical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Tucson, AZ); Brown, Alan P. (Bolingbrook, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally regenerative electrochemical system including an electrochemical cell with two water-based electrolytes separated by an ion exchange membrane, at least one of the electrolytes containing a complexing agent and a salt of a multivalent metal whose respective order of potentials for a pair of its redox couples is reversible by a change in the amount of the complexing agent in the electrolyte, the complexing agent being removable by distillation to cause the reversal.

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-15A NA7.5.14 Thermal Energy Storage (TES) System THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  5. Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

  6. Evaluation of alternate-fuels performance in an external combustion system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, R.A.; Connelly, M.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the economic attractiveness of many alternate fuels increases relative to gasoline, the viability of any future automotive power plant may soon depend on the ease with which these alternate fuels can be utilized. It is generally assumed that external-combustion engines are more tolerant of alternate fuels than internal-combustion engines. This study attempted to verify that assumption. The purpose of the Alternate-Fuels Performance Evaluation Program was to evaluate and compare the impact of burning six different liquids fuels in an external-combustion system. Testing was conducted in the automotive Stirling engine (ASE) combustion performance rig, which duplicates the external heat system (EHS) of a Stirling engine. The program expanded the range of fuels evaluated over previous studies conducted at Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI). The specific objective was to determine the optimal combustion stoichiometry considering the performance parameters of combustion efficiency, temperature profile, exhaust emissions, and burner wall temperature. 14 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. ape016bennion2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric...

  8. Trinity Thermal Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin HydropowerTrinity Thermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search

  9. NGATS ATM-Airportal Project Reference Material (External Release) Next Generation Air Transportation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NGATS ATM-Airportal Project Reference Material (External Release) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) Air Traffic Management (ATM) - Airportal Project Reference Material May 23, 2007 Manager NASA Mike Madson Project Scientist NASA #12;NGATS ATM-Airportal Project Reference Material

  10. FREE ENERGY AND SOLUTIONS OF THE VLASOV-POISSON-FOKKER-PLANCK SYSTEM : EXTERNAL POTENTIAL AND CONFINEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolbeault, Jean

    FREE ENERGY AND SOLUTIONS OF THE VLASOV-POISSON-FOKKER-PLANCK SYSTEM : EXTERNAL POTENTIAL-mail: dolbeault@ceremade.dauphine.fr June 20, 1997 Introduction I. The free energy 1. Jensen's inequality and related topics 2. Applications to the free energy 2.1. The linear case 2.2. The self-consistent case 3

  11. Adapting Task Utility in Externally Triggered Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Adapting Task Utility in Externally Triggered Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensing Systems Jamie tajana@ucsd.edu Abstract--Energy harvesting sensor nodes eliminate the need for post-deployment physical the utility of their tasks to accommodate the energy availability. For example, on sunny days, a solar

  12. Tuning energy transport in solar thermal systems using nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar thermal energy conversion can harness the entire solar spectrum and theoretically achieve very high efficiencies while interfacing with thermal storage or back-up systems for dispatchable power generation. Nanostructured ...

  13. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  14. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

  15. Calibration of Muon Reconstruction Algorithms Using an External Muon Tracking System at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SNO Collaboration

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To help constrain the algorithms used in reconstructing high-energy muon events incident on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), a muon tracking system was installed. The system consisted of four planes of wire chambers, which were triggered by scintillator panels. The system was integrated with SNO's main data acquisition system and took data for a total of 95 live days. Using cosmic-ray events reconstructed in both the wire chambers and in SNO's water Cherenkov detector, the external muon tracking system was able to constrain the uncertainty on the muon direction to better than 0.6 degrees.

  16. Gibbs attractor: a chaotic nearly Hamiltonian system, driven by external harmonic force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Elyutin

    2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A chaotic autonomous Hamiltonian systems, perturbed by small damping and small external force, harmonically dependent on time, can acquire a strange attractor with properties similar to that of the canonical distribution - the Gibbs attractor. The evolution of the energy in such systems can be described as the energy diffusion. For the nonlinear Pullen - Edmonds oscillator with two degrees of freedom the properties of the Gibbs attractor and their dependence on parameters of the perturbation are studied both analytically and numerically.

  17. A digital control system for external magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, J. M.; Klein, A. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. Sunn [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback system for controlling external, long-wavelength magnetohydrodynamic activity is described. The system is comprised of a network of localized magnetic pickup and control coils driven by four independent, low-latency field-programable gate array controllers. The control algorithm incorporates digital spatial filtering to resolve low mode number activity, temporal filtering to correct for frequency-dependent amplitude and phase transfer effects in the control hardware, and a Kalman filter to distinguish the unstable plasma mode from noise.

  18. Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic Systems: Evaluating the Rationale for the Utility-Accessible External Disconnect Switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coddington, M.; Margolis, R.M.; Aabakken, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utility-accessible alternating current (AC) external disconnect switch (EDS) for distributed generators, including photovoltaic (PV) systems, is a hardware feature that allows a utility?s employees to manually disconnect a customer-owned generator from the electricity grid. This paper examines the utility-accessible EDS debate in the context of utility-interactive PV systems for residential and small commercial installations. It also evaluates the rationale for EDS requirements.

  19. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

  20. Thermal Systems Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Thermal Systems Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

  1. Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Looks at the impact of cooling strategies with air and both direct and indirect liquid cooling for battery thermal management.

  2. Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dynamics & Propulsion Innovation Center Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions 8 th Diesel Engine Emission...

  3. Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) External Stakeholders Workshop: Workshop Proceedings, 9 October 2008, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komomua, C.; Kroposki, B.; Mooney, D.; Stoffel, T.; Parsons, B.; Hammond, S.; Kutscher, C.; Remick, R.; Sverdrup, G.; Hawsey, R.; Pacheco, M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 9, 2008, NREL hosted a workshop to provide an opportunity for external stakeholders to offer insights and recommendations on the design and functionality of DOE's planned Energy Systems Infrastructure Facility (ESIF). The goal was to ensure that the planning for the ESIF effectively addresses the most critical barriers to large-scale energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) deployment. This technical report documents the ESIF workshop proceedings.

  4. Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

  5. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage,” Angewandtescale molecular solar thermal energy storage system, in

  6. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Labs, "Solar Thermal Energy Research," in Sandiareclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

  7. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  8. Automated rapid thermal imaging systems technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phan, Long N., 1976-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major source of energy savings occurs on the thermal envelop of buildings, which amounts to approximately 10% of annual energy usage in the United States. To pursue these savings, energy auditors use closed loop energy ...

  9. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  10. Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez Buño, Mariana

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

  11. Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, David J. (David James)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

  12. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 Forschungsgemeinschaft. leads to a tremendous increase in the complex- ity of the traditional power optimization mod- els-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  13. Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

  14. Thermal modeling of the Tevatron magnet system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker; Arkadiy L. Klebaner

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of the Tevatron at lower temperatures, for the purpose of allowing higher energies, has resulted in a renewed interest in thermal modeling of the magnet strings. Static heat load and AC loses in the superconducting coils are initially transported through subcooled liquid helium. Heat exchange between the subcooled liquid and a counter flowing two-phase stream transfers the load to the latent heat. Stratification of the two-phase helium stream has resulted in considerably less heat exchange compared to the original design. Spool pieces have virtually no heat transfer to the two-phase resulting in a ''warm'' dipole just downstream. A model of the magnet string thermal behavior has been developed. The model has been used to identify temperature profiles within magnet strings. The temperature profiles are being used in conjunction with initial magnet quench performance data to predict the location of quench limiting magnets within the Tevatron. During thermal cycles of magnet strings, the model is being used to ''shuffle'' magnets within the magnet string in order to better match the magnets quench performance with its actual predicted temperature. The motivation for this analysis is to raise the operating energy of the Tevatron using a minimal number of magnets from the spares pool.

  15. Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combined with heat pump improve the thermal performance of the heat pump and the global system. The performances of the heating system combining heat pump and solar collectors are higher than that of solar heating system with solar collectors and storage...

  16. Technology assessment of external heat systems for Stirling heat pumps. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilakis, A.D. [Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Newton, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technology assessment and design improvement effort was undertaken for the Stirling engine heat pump external heat system (EHS) in order to reduce costs. It was found that only two applicable EHS design approaches have been developed to any extent: a relatively undeveloped design featuring a premixed fuel and air transpiration burner, and a turbulent diffusion type burner system developed by Mechanical Technology, Inc. To evaluate and optimize the design concepts, an analytical model was developed that examined design and performance variables. The model calculated key temperatures, allowing the specification of materials requirements. Adherence to American National Standards Institute appliance furnace code material specifications was assumed. Concepts for EHS control systems were evaluated, and a cost-effective control system design was developed for the turbulent diffusion burner EHS. The study reveals that optimizing the diffusion burner EHS design can result in significant cost savings. No clear choice between the diffusion burner and transpiration burner systems could be determined from this study, but the designs of both were further developed and improved. Estimates show the EHS based on a transpiration burner to have a manufactured cost that is roughly 70% of the turbulent diffusion burner EHS cost, but fuel efficiency is lower by about 18%.

  17. Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

  18. Analysis of the Thermal Loads on the KSTAR Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.S.; Oh, Y.K.; Kim, W.C.; Park, Y.M.; Lee, Y.J.; Jin, S.B.; Sa, J.W.; Choi, C.H.; Cho, K.W.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S. [Korea Basic Science Institute, Yusung-Ku, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale helium refrigeration system is one of the key components for the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device. In the design of the refrigeration system, an estimation of the thermal loads on the cold mass is an important issue according to the operation scenario. The cold mass of the KSTAR device is about 250 tons including 30 superconducting (SC) coils and the magnet structure. In addition to the static thermal loads, pulsed thermal loads to the refrigeration system have been considered in the operation stage. The main pulsed thermal loads on magnet system are AC losses in the SC coils and eddy current losses in the magnet structure that depend on the magnetic field variation rate. The nuclear radiation loss due to plasma pulse operation is also considered. The designed cooling capacity of the refrigeration system is estimated to be about 9 kW at 4.5 K isothermal. In this paper, calculation of the various kinds of thermal loads on KSTAR cryogenic system and design of the large-scale helium refrigeration system are presented.

  19. Anomalous decoherence and absence of thermalization in a photonic many-body system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Jonas [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The intention of this work is twofold: first, to present a most simple system capable of simulating the intrinsic bosonic Josephson effect with photons and, second, to study various outcomes deriving from inherent or external decoherence. A qubit induces an effective coupling between two externally pumped cavity modes. Without cavity losses and in the dispersive regime, intrinsic Josephson oscillations of photons between the two modes occurs. In this case, contrary to regular Markovian decoherence, the qubit purity shows a Gaussian decay and recurrence of its coherence. Due to intrinsic nonlinearities, both the Josephson oscillations as well as the qubit properties display a rich collapse-revival structure, where, however, the complexity of the qubit evolution is in some sense stronger. The qubit as a meter of the photon dynamics is considered, and it is shown that qubit dephasing, originating, for example, from nondemolition measurements, results in an exponential destruction of the oscillations which manifests the collectiveness of the Josephson effect. Nonselective qubit measurements, on the other hand, render a Zeno effect seen in a slowing down of the Josephson oscillations. Contrary to dephasing, cavity dissipation results in a Gaussian decay of the scaled Josephson oscillations. Finally, following Ponomarev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 010405 (2011)], we analyze aspects of thermalization. In particular, despite similarities with the generic model studied by Ponomarev et al., our system does not seem to thermalize.

  20. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [K Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems inK Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in

  1. Selecting Thermal Storage Systems for Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, C. L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement at six equally spaced elevations. Charged by chiller or hydronic vent cycle. B. Hot Water Storage Tank - Concrete lined steel 17,000 gallon with four headers arranged for dual temperature storage. C. Chiller - Variable frequency drive, 196... for Thermal Storage Projects since 1985: KW SCHOOL REDUCTION Kimball E.S. 7 1 Poteet H.S. 210 Phases I & I1 AC New M.S. 18 4 Pirrung E.S. 7 6 Poteet H.S. 14 0 Phase I11 Kimball E.S. 2 0 Phase I1 Black E.S. 3 7 Cannaday E.S. 9 0 Austin E.S. 94 N...

  2. Statement of work for solar thermal power systems and photovoltaic solar-energy systems technical support services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is broken down in the following areas: solar thermal central receiver systems analysis; advanced solar thermal systems analysis and engineering; thermal power systems support; total energy systems mission analysis; irrigation and small community mission analysis; photovoltaics mission analysis; Solar Thermal Test Facility and Central Receiver Pilot Plant systems engineering. (LEW)

  3. Demo Abstract: TOSS: Thermal Occupancy Sensing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    materials harnessing passive solar technologies along with increasingly efficient HVAC systems have,jlusby,acerpa}@andes.ucmerced.edu ABSTRACT We propose a system that can accurately determine the oc- cupancy of zones within a building to a building's energy management system in order to control the Heating, Ventilation, Air Condition- ing, (HVAC

  4. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in MicrogridsEnvironmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgridsa) ABSTRACT The addition of solar thermal and heat storage

  5. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  6. Handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Allen, G.C.

    1992-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  7. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  8. Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice thermal storage is promising technology to reduce energy costs by shifting the cooling cost from on-peak to off-peak periods. The paper discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, demand, and total...

  9. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  10. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF INSULATING WINDOW SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient Use of Energy, New York (1975). Glaser, V.H.J. , "Energy Transport Control in Window Systems", Report ETR-1277-2, Stony Brook, New York, (

  11. FY 93 Thermal Loading Systems Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.F. Saterlie

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Thermal Loading Systems Study being conducted by the is to identify a thermal strategy that will meet the performance requirements for waste isolation and will be safe and licensable. Specifically, both postclosure and preclosure performance standards must be met by the thermal loading strategy ultimately selected. In addition cost and schedule constraints must be considered. The Systems Engineering approach requires structured, detailed analyses that will ultimately provide the technical basis for the development, integration, and evaluation of the overall system, not just a subelement of that system. It is also necessary that the systems study construct options from within the range that are allowed within the current legislative and programmatic framework. For example the total amount of fuel that can legally be emplaced is no more than 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) which is composed of 63,000 MTU spent fuel and 7,000 MTU of defense high level waste. It is the intent of this study to begin the structured development of the basis for a thermal loading decision. However, it is recognized that to be able to make a final decision on thermal loading will require underground data on the effects of heating as well as a suite of ''validated'' models. It will be some time before these data and models are available to the program. Developing a final, thermal loading decision will, therefore, be an iterative process. In the interim, the objective of the thermal loading systems study has been to utilize the information available to assess the impact of thermal loading. Where technical justification exists, recommendations to narrow the range of thermal loading options can be made. Additionally, recommendations as to the type of testing and accuracy of the testing needed to establish the requisite information will be made. A constraint on the ability of the study to select an option stems from the lack of primary hard data, uncertainties in derived data, unsubstantiated models, and the inability to fully consider simultaneously coupled processes. As such, the study must rely on idealized models and available data to compare the thermal loading options. This report presents the findings of the FY 1993 MGDS Thermal Loading Systems Study. The objectives of the study were to: (1) if justified, place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading that is ''too hot''; (2) ''grade'' or evaluate the performance as a function of thermal loading of the potential repository to contain high level spent nuclear fuel against performance criteria; (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability; and (4) recommend the additional types of tests and/or analyses to be conducted to provide the necessary information for a thermal loading selection.

  12. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications.

  13. Thermal Protection Systems Materials and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and liquid hydrogen, the main engine could attain a maximum thrust level (in vacuum) of 232,375 kg (512 Engineering for Life Cycle of Complex Systems Engineering Innovations 157Engineering Innovations #12;The of the Main Propulsion System-- the Space Shuttle Main Engine and the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs)-- powering

  14. Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Gerald W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is the key element in the national effort to establish solar thermal conversion technologies within the major sectors of the national energy market. It provides for the development of concentrating mirror/lens heat collection and conversion technologies for both central and dispersed receiver applications to produce electricity, provide heat at its point of use in industrial processes, provide heat and electricity in combination for industrial, commercial, and residential needs, and ultimately, drive processes for production of liquid and gaseous fuels. This report is the second Annual Technical Progress Report for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program and is structured according to the organization of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program on September 30, 1979. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program, a brief history, the significant achievements and real progress during FY 1979, also future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements are forecast. (WHK)

  15. Development of a Kingdon ion trap system for trapping externally injected highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Numadate, Naoki; Okada, Kunihiro, E-mail: okada-k@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182-0021 (Japan); Tanuma, Hajime [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a Kingdon ion trap system for the purpose of the laboratory observation of the x-ray forbidden transitions of highly charged ions (HCIs). Externally injected Ar{sup q+} (q = 5?7) with kinetic energies of 6q keV were successfully trapped in the ion trap. The energy distribution of trapped ions is discussed in detail on the basis of numerical simulations. The combination of the Kingdon ion trap and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer enabled us to measure precise trapping lifetimes of HCIs. As a performance test of the instrument, we measured trapping lifetimes of Ar{sup q+} (q = 5?7) under a constant number density of H{sub 2} and determined the charge-transfer cross sections of Ar{sup q+}(q = 5, 6)-H{sub 2} collision systems at binary collision energies of a few eV. It was confirmed that the present cross section data are consistent with previous data and the values estimated by some scaling formula.

  16. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  17. Thermal Plasma Systems for Industrial Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fey, M. G.; Meyer, T. N.; Reed, W. H.; Philbrook, W. O.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    furnaces, extending from below 2000 F to almost any conceivably useful processing temperature, with efficiencies much higher than can be achieved with combustion heating equipment. Numerous applications for plasma systems exist in the chemical...

  18. Tehachapi solar thermal system first annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A. [Southwest Technology Development Inst., Las Cruces, NM (US)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), in conjunction with the staff of Industrial Solar Technology (IST), have analyzed the performance, operation, and maintenance of a large solar process heat system in use at the 5,000 inmate California Correctional Institution (CCI) in Tehachapi, CA. This report summarizes the key design features of the solar plant, its construction and maintenance histories through the end of 1991, and the performance data collected at the plant by a dedicated on-site data acquisition system (DAS).

  19. Lighting system with thermal management system having point contact synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Sharma, Rajdeep

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting system having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system includes a plurality of synthetic jets. The synthetic jets are arranged within the lighting system such that they are secured at contact points.

  20. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allan, Marita (Old Field, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  1. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  2. In the paper, we describe an optical system which is capable of providing external access to both the sensor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Hong

    an intermediate image plane which is optically conjugated to the camera sensor. As indicated by its name, a relayAbstract In the paper, we describe an optical system which is capable of providing external access to both the sensor and the lens aperture (i.e., projection center) of a conventional camera. The proposed

  3. NIH eRA System xTrain External Termination of Fellowships Quick Reference 1 January 27, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    NIH eRA System xTrain External Termination of Fellowships Quick Reference 1 January 27, 2011 Powering the Advancement of Science xTrain Termination of Fellowships Quick Reference Guide for Institution finds the Fellowship award to be terminated and selects the View Trainee Roster link. NOTE: Although

  4. Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Magnus Hindsberger Kgs. Lyngby 2003 IMM-PHD-2003-112 Interconnected hydro-thermalsystems #12;Technical University of Denmark 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-PHD-2003-112 ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Interconnected hydro

  5. Continuous Commissioning(SM) of a Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be costly, which can result in turning on chillers during on-peak hours in order to provide cooling to the buildings. In this paper the optimization of a thermal storage system operation through Continuous CommissioningSM is presented. Detailed building...

  6. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Bridge Stay Cable and External Post-Tensioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Katlyn Mae

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    such as corrosion, steel strand and wire breakage, tendon section loss, voids in the grout, water infiltration, and other undesired grout conditions can go undetected in nontransparent stay cable and external PT ducts without proper inspection. In this research...

  7. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Bridge Stay Cable and External Post-Tensioning Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Katlyn Mae

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    such as corrosion, steel strand and wire breakage, tendon section loss, voids in the grout, water infiltration, and other undesired grout conditions can go undetected in nontransparent stay cable and external PT ducts without proper inspection. In this research...

  8. Rehabilitating A Thermal Storage System Through Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Veteto, B.; Claridge, D. E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems. The design air flow rate is 40,300 cfm (1.67 cfin/ft2) with 8,800 cfin (0.37 cfin/ft2) outside air. The installed coil capacity is 130 tons for the 13 AHUs excluding the FCUs. The summary of design air-handler information is listed in Table... handlers has direct return. The FCUs in the patient rooms have three-way valves while the roof top units have two-way valves. Table 1: Summary of Design Characteristics of the AHtJs * Outside air unit for the patient rooms. Figure 2a presents a...

  9. Shutdown heat removal system reliability in thermal reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Y.H.; Bari, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the failure probability per year of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS) at hot standby conditions for two thermal reactor designs is presented. The selected reactor designs are the Pressurized Water Reactor and the Nonproliferation Alternative System Assessment Program Heavy Water Reactor. Failures of the SHRS following the initiating transients of loss of offsite power and loss of main feedwater system are evaluated. Common mode failures between components are incorporated in this anlaysis via the ..beta..-factor method and the sensitivity of the system reliability to common mode failures is investigated parametrically.

  10. Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal envelope..Branch Duct -Hot-Air Duct Outside Thermal Envelope. - - -Cold-Air Duct Outside Thermal Envelope =="-"Hot-Air Duct

  11. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

  12. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DEFOA- 0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed Durability Test Rig.

  13. VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

  14. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.A.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 microliters of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded. 13 figs.

  15. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, Anthony D. A. (Berkely, CA); Jaklevic, Joseph M. (Lafayette, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the-circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate microtiter plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 .mu.l of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded.

  16. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  17. Analysis, testing, and operation of the MAGI thermal control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Sonny; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Kasper, Brian P. [The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA 90245 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerospace Corporation has completed the development of the Mineral and Gas Identifier (MAGI) sensor - an airborne multi-spectral infrared instrument that is designed to discriminate surface composition and to detect gas emissions from the environment. Sensor performance was demonstrated in a series of flights aboard a Twin Otter aircraft in December 2011 as a stepping stone to a future satellite sensor design. To meet sensor performance requirements the thermal control system was designed to operate the HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA) at 50 K with a 1.79 W heat rejection load to a 44.7 K sink and the optical assembly at 100 K with a 7.5 W heat load to a 82.3 K sink. Two commercial off-theshelf (COTS) Sunpower Stirling cryocoolers were used to meet the instrument’s cooling requirements. A thermal model constructed in Thermal Desktop was used to run parametric studies that guided the mechanical design and sized the two cryocoolers. This paper discusses the development, validation, and operation of the MAGI thermal control system. Detailed energy balances and temperature predictions are presented for various test cases to demonstrate the utility and accuracy of the thermal model. Model inputs included measured values of heat lift as a function of input power and cold tip temperature for the two cryocoolers. These measurements were also used to make predictions of the cool-down behavior from ambient conditions. Advanced heater software was developed to meet unique requirements for both sensor cool-down rate and stability at the set point temperatures.

  18. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

  19. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  20. Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated systems engineering approach is used for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for management of contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. Ten different systems encompassing several incineration design options are studied. All subsystems, including facilities, equipment, and methods needed for integration of each of the ten systems are identified. Typical subsystems needed for complete treatment of MLLW are incoming waste receiving and preparation (characterization, sorting, sizing, and separation), thermal treatment, air pollution control, primary and secondary stabilization, metal decontamination, metal melting, mercury recovery, lead recovery, and special waste and aqueous waste treatment. The evaluation is performed by developing a preconceptual design package and planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for each system. As part of the preconceptual design process, functional and operational requirements, flow sheets and mass balances, and conceptual equipment layouts are developed for each system. The PLCC components estimated are technology development, production facility construction, pre-operation, operation and maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning. Preconceptual design data and other technology information gathered during the study are examined and areas requiring further development, testing, and evaluation are identified and recommended. Using a qualitative method, each of the ten systems are ranked.

  1. An experimental and numerical investigation on the influence of external gas recirculation on the HCCI autoignition process in an engine: Thermal, diluting, and chemical effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, FRT, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr l'Ecole (France); Guibert, Philippe [UPMC Universite Paris 06, FRT, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr l'Ecole (France)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to contribute to the solution of controlling the autoignition in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, parameters linked to external gas recirculation (EGR) seem to be of particular interest. Experiments performed with EGR present some difficulties in interpreting results using only the diluting and thermal aspect of EGR. Lately, the chemical aspect of EGR is taken more into consideration, because this aspect causes a complex interaction with the dilution and thermal aspects of EGR. This paper studies the influence of EGR on the autoignition process and particularly the chemical aspect of EGR. The diluents present in EGR are simulated by N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, with dilution factors going from 0 to 46 vol%. For the chemically active species that could be present in EGR, the species CO, NO, and CH{sub 2}O are used. The initial concentration in the inlet mixture of CO and NO is varied between 0 and 170 ppm, while that of CH{sub 2}O alters between 0 and 1400 ppm. For the investigation of the effect of the chemical species on the autoignition, a fixed dilution factor of 23 vol% and a fixed EGR temperature of 70 C are maintained. The inlet temperature is held at 70 C, the equivalence ratios between 0.29 and 0.41, and the compression ratio at 10.2. The fuels used for the autoignition are n-heptane and PRF40. It appeared that CO, in the investigated domain, did not influence the ignition delays, while NO had two different effects. At concentrations up until 45 ppm, NO advanced the ignition delays for the PRF40 and at higher concentrations, the ignition delayed. The influence of NO on the autoignition of n-heptane seemed to be insignificant, probably due to the higher burn rate of n-heptane. CH{sub 2}O seemed to delay the ignition. The results suggested that especially the formation of OH radicals or their consumption by the chemical additives determines how the reactivity of the autoignition changed. (author)

  2. A prototype photovoltaic/thermal system integrated with transpired collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athienitis, Andreas K.; Bambara, James; O'Neill, Brendan; Faille, Jonathan [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 Maisonneuve W., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Building-integrated photovoltaic/thermal (BIPV/T) systems may be utilized to produce useful heat while simultaneously generating electricity from the same building envelope surface. A well known highly efficient collector is the open-loop unglazed transpired collector (UTC) which consists of dark porous cladding through which outdoor air is drawn and heated by absorbed solar radiation. Commercially available photovoltaic systems typically produce electricity with efficiencies up to about 18%. Thus, it is beneficial to obtain much of the normally wasted heat from the systems, possibly by combining UTC with photovoltaics. Combination of BIPV/T and UTC systems for building facades is considered in this paper - specifically, the design of a prototype facade-integrated photovoltaic/thermal system with transpired collector (BIPV/T). A full scale prototype is constructed with 70% of UTC area covered with PV modules specially designed to enhance heat recovery and compared to a UTC of the same area under outdoor sunny conditions with low wind. The orientation of the corrugations in the UTC is horizontal and the black-framed modules are attached so as to facilitate flow into the UTC plenum. While the overall combined thermal efficiency of the UTC is higher than that of the BIPV/T system, the value of the generated energy - assuming that electricity is at least four times more valuable than heat - is between 7% and 17% higher. Also, the electricity is always useful while the heat is usually utilized only in the heating season. The BIPV/T concept is applied to a full scale office building demonstration project in Montreal, Canada. The ratio of photovoltaic area coverage of the UTC may be selected based on the fresh air heating needs of the building, the value of the electricity generated and the available building surfaces. (author)

  3. A New Thermal-Conscious System-Level Methodology for Energy-Efficient Processor Voltage Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    A New Thermal-Conscious System-Level Methodology for Energy-Efficient Processor Voltage Selection a thermal-conscious system-level methodology to make energy-efficient voltage selection (VS) for nanometer), thermal resistance, are integrated and considered in our system models, and their impacts on energy

  4. Thermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    temperature, known as the thermal envelope. Exceeding the thermal envelope decreases the drive's reliability relationship between disk RPM and viscous heating. If the drive exceeds the thermal envelope, the drive canThermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans University

  5. Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

  6. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems inEconomic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems insolar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental

  7. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energy and Buildings, [of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage A.of a solar-assisted HVAC system with thermal storage. Energy

  8. On the Amplitude of External Perurbation and Chaos via Devil's Staircasein Muthuswamy-Chua System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadataka Furui; Tomoyuki Takano

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently analyzed the voltage of the memristic circuit proposed by Muthuswamy and Chua by adding an external sinusoidal oscillation $\\gamma\\omega \\cos\\omega t$ to the ${\\dot y}(t)\\simeq {\\dot i_L}(t)$, when the ${\\dot x}(t)\\simeq {\\dot v_C}(t)$ is given by $y(t)/C$. When $f_soscillation for $C=1$ and $C=1.2$

  9. Thermal bremsstrahlung probing the thermodynamical state of multifragmenting systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. G. d'Enterria; L. Aphecetche; A. Chbihi; H. Delagrange; J. Díaz; M. J. van Goethem; M. Hoefman; H. Huisman; A. Kugler; H. Loehner; G. Martínez; R. Ortega; R. Ostendorf; S. Schadmand; Y. Schutz; R. Siemssen; D. Stracener; P. Tlusty; R. Turrisi; M. Volkerts; V. Wagner; H. Wilschut; N. Yahlali

    2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive and exclusive hard-photon (E$_\\gamma >$ 30 MeV) production in five different heavy-ion reactions ($^{36}$Ar+$^{197}$Au, $^{107}$Ag, $^{58}$Ni, $^{12}$C at 60{\\it A} MeV and $^{129}$Xe+$^{120}$Sn at 50{\\it A} MeV) has been studied coupling the TAPS photon spectrometer with several charged-particle multidetectors covering more than 80% of 4$\\pi$. The measured spectra, slope parameters and source velocities as well as their target-dependence, confirm the existence of thermal bremsstrahlung emission from secondary nucleon-nucleon collisions that accounts for roughly 20% of the total hard-photon yield. The thermal slopes are a direct measure of the temperature of the excited nuclear systems produced during the reaction.

  10. Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems with tungsten cermets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, David A.

    Solar thermal, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have high maximum theoretical efficiencies; experimental systems fall short because of losses by selective solar absorbers and TPV selective emitters. To ...

  11. Integrated analysis of nuclear thermal rocket system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buksa, J.J.; Rider, W.J.; Hall, M.; Perry, R.T.; Houts, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engines will play a key transportation role. Although a number of tests of prismatic, solid-core nuclear engines were completed during the ROVER/NERVA program, the estimated cost of completing full-engine tests will severely limit the scope, duration, and number of any such tests in the future. Design optimization by test iteration is unlikely, and an emphasis on computational modeling is a cost-effective alternative. As a consequence of our responsibilities within the US Dept. of Energy's SEI efforts to develop key NTR technologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing the capability to design and verify the safety and performance of NTR systems. Because of the important role that computational modeling will play in the faster, better, and cheaper development of an NTR system, we are pursuing two paths of analysis. The first undertaking is the development of accurate separate-effects codes for design and analysis. Included in this category are thermal-hydraulic and radiation-transport codes. Our other endeavor, which is the focus of this paper, is to develop an advanced computational architecture that can be used to model the entire NTR system.

  12. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  13. Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

  14. The proposed combustion standards and DOE thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFee, J. [IT Corp. (United States); Hinman, M.B. [Carter and Hinman, P.A. (United States); Eaton, D.; NcNeel, K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA) concerning emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the proposed Revised Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors on April 19, 1996 (EPA, 1996). These standards would apply to the existing Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive and mixed waste incinerators, and may be applied to several developing alternatives to incineration. The DOE has reviewed the basis for these regulations and prepared extensive comments to present concerns about the bases and implications of the standards. DOE is now discussing compliance options with the EPA for regulation of radioactive and mixed waste thermal treatment systems.

  15. Study on Commissioning Process for Control Logic of Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shioya, M.; Tsubaki, M.; Nakahara, N.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal storage system in an actual building using the CLT. Introduction In thermal storage systems, as large temperature difference between the supply water and the return water as possible should be maintained in order to ensure high system..., at the secondary water circuit of a heat exchanger installed between the thermal storage system and secondary HVAC system of an actual building. One of the authors, Nakahara, acted as Commissioning Authority during construction phase and later as a consultant...

  16. Thermal management system and method for a solid-state energy storing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Ranger, Michel (Lachine, CA); Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Shiota, Toshimi (St. Bruno, CA); St-Germain, Philippe (Outremont, CA); Sudano, Anthony (Laval, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN); Turgeon, Thomas A. (Fridley, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electrochemical energy storing device includes a number of thin-film electrochemical cells which are maintained in a state of compression through use of an internal or an external pressure apparatus. A thermal conductor, which is connected to at least one of the positive or negative contacts of each electrochemical cell, conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cells and also conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cells and thermally conductive material disposed on a wall structure adjacent the conductors. The wall structure includes electrically resistive material, such as an anodized coating or a thin film of plastic. The thermal conductors are fabricated to include a spring mechanism which expands and contacts to maintain mechanical contact between the electrochemical cells and the thermally conductive material in the presence of relative movement between the electrochemical cells and the wall structure. An active cooling apparatus may be employed external to a hermetically sealed housing containing the electrochemical cells to enhance the transfer of thermal energy into and out of the electrochemical cells. An integrated interconnect board may be disposed within the housing onto which a number of electrical and electro-mechanical components are mounted. Heat generated by the components is conducted from the interconnect board to the housing using the thermal conductors.

  17. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Wen-Ching (Export, PA); Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system (20, 22, 78) and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream (74) and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer (18). The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine.

  18. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Bannister, R.L.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer. The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine. 2 figs.

  19. 336 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 9, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2000 Externally Resonated Linear Microvibromotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

    1 Microelectromechanical Systems Opportunities A Department of Defense Dual-Use Technology Microelectromechanical Systems Opportunities Defense Applications of MEMS Experiences in recent conflicts

  20. Neural Stem Cell-Preserving External-Beam Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)]. E-mail: ibarani@mcvh-vcu.edu; Cuttino, Laurie W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Todor, Dorin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Bump, Edward A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Wu Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Chung, Theodore D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Broaddus, William C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Lin, Peck-Sun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Recent discoveries have implicated neural stem cells (NSC) as the source of plasticity and repair in the mature mammalian brain. Treatment-induced NSC dysfunction may lead to observed toxicity. This study evaluates the feasibility of NSC-preserving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A single computed tomography (CT) dataset depicting a right periventricular lesion was used in this study as this location reflects the most problematic geometric arrangement with respect to NSC preservation. Conventional and NSC preserving radiotherapy (RT) plans were generated for the same lesion using two clinical scenarios: cerebral metastatic disease and primary high-grade glioma. Disease-specific target volumes were used. Metastatic disease was conventionally treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to 3,750 cGy (15 fractions) followed by a single stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost of 1,800 cGy to gross disease only. High-grade glioma was treated with conventional opposed lateral and anterior superior oblique beams to 4,600 cGy (23 fractions) followed by a 1,400 cGy (7 fractions) boost. NSC preservation was achieved in both scenarios with inverse-planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results: Cumulative dose reductions of 65% (metastatic disease) and 25% (high-grade glioma) to the total volume of the intracranial NSC compartments were achieved with NSC-preserving IMRT plans. The reduction of entry and exit dose to NSC niches located contralateral to the target contributed most to NSC preservation. Conclusions: Neural stem cells preservation with current external beam radiotherapy techniques is achievable in context of both metastatic brain disease and high-grade glioma, even when the target is located adjacent to a stem cell compartment. Further investigation with clinical trials is warranted to evaluate whether NSC preservation will result in reduced toxicity.

  1. Automated Modelling of Reactive Discrete Event Systems from External Behavioural Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Petri nets. I. INTRODUCTION Modelling is an important stage during the systems' developing life-cycle

  2. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  3. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  4. Development of an Approach to Compare the `Value' of Electrical and Thermal Output from a Domestic PV/Thermal System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Mandatory Renewable Energy Target" in Australia allows a unit of energy as solar hot water to be counted PV/Thermal System J.S. Coventry and K. Lovegrove Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Canberra 0200 ACT Australia E-mail: joe@faceng.anu.edu.au Abstract When considering

  5. An FPGA-based Distributed Computing System with Power and Thermal Management Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    An FPGA-based Distributed Computing System with Power and Thermal Management Capabilities Hao Shen of New York Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA ABSTRACT Runtime power and thermal management has attracted step in the research of distributed power and thermal management. Compared to software simulation

  6. Distributed Task Migration for Thermal Management in Many-core Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    chip complexity and power envelope elevate peak temperatures of chip and imbalance the thermal gradientDistributed Task Migration for Thermal Management in Many-core Systems Yang Ge, Parth Malani, Qinru York {yge2, pmalani1, qqiu}@binghamton.edu ABSTRACT In the deep submicron era, thermal hot spots

  7. Discrete thermal element modelling of heat conduction in particle systems: Basic formulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    methodology, termed the discrete thermal element method (DTEM), for the effec- tive modelling of heat rights reserved. Keywords: Discrete thermal element method; Circular particle; Thermal contact; Heat conduction; Boundary (integral) equation/element 1. Introduction Heat transfer in particle systems can

  8. Performance contracting for parabolic trough solar thermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, H.; Hewett, R.; Walker, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, R.; May, K. [Industrial Solar Technology, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several applications of solar energy have proven viable in the energy marketplace, due to competitive technology and economic performance. One example is the parabolic trough solar collectors, which use focused solar energy to maximize efficiency and reduce material use in construction. Technical improvements are complemented by new business practices to make parabolic trough solar thermal systems technically and economically viable in an ever widening range of applications. Technical developments in materials and fabrication techniques reduce production cost and expand applications from swimming pool heating and service hot water, to higher-temperature applications such as absorption cooling and process steam. Simultaneously, new financing mechanisms such as a recently awarded US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) indefinite quantity Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) facilitate and streamline implementation of the technology in federal facilities such as prisons and military bases.

  9. Thermal-hydraulics Analysis of a Radioisotope-powered Mars Hopper Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. O'Brien; Andrew C. Klein; William T. Taitano; Justice Gibson; Brian Myers; Steven D. Howe

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulics analyses results produced using a combined suite of computational design and analysis codes are presented for the preliminary design of a concept Radioisotope Thermal Rocket (RTR) propulsion system. Modeling of the transient heating and steady state temperatures of the system is presented. Simulation results for propellant blow down during impulsive operation are also presented. The results from this study validate the feasibility of a practical thermally capacitive RTR propulsion system.

  10. Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

  11. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low and mid temperature solar collectors," Journal of SolarSA Kalogirou, "Solar thermal collectors and applications,"analysis of the solar collector system is presented. Results

  12. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Hassenzahl, William V [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  13. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energyfor rows of fixed solar thermal collectors using flatassisted by a 232 m solar thermal array providing heat to a

  14. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  15. The ASME handbook on water technology for thermal power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, P. (ed.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that a handbook on water technology be developed was initially put forth in 1978 by the ASME Research Committee on Water in Thermal Power Systems. A prospectus was issued in 1979 to solicit funding from industry and government. The preparation of the handbook began in 1980 under the direct control of a Handbook Steering Subcommittee established by the Research Committee and an editor reporting to that subcommittee. Handbook content was carefully monitored by an editorial committee of industry experts and by a special honorary editorial committee from the Chemistry Committee of the Edison Electric Institute. This handbook summarizes the current state of the art of water technology for steam power plant cycles. It is intended to serve both as a training text and a reference volume for power station chemists, engineers, manufacturers, and research and development institutions. While the primary emphasis is on Electric Utility Power Generation cycles (fossil and nuclear), the book will also serve as a valuable reference on high pressure industrial steam system technology.

  16. Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution from a Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Development of Optimal Catalyst...

  17. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentratin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    resistance between the location where phase change occurs and the working fluid of the power cycle. Either thermosyphons or heat pipes can: Provide an effective thermal...

  18. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  19. Traffic-and Thermal-Aware Run-Time Thermal Management Scheme for 3D NoC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    C), the combination of NoC and die-stacking 3D IC technology, is motivated to achieve lower latency, lower power consumption, and higher network bandwidth. However, the length of heat conduction path and power density per the vulnerability of the system in performance, power, reliability, and cost. To ensure both thermal safety and less

  20. Evaluation and improvement on external-hazard proof of JSFR fuel handling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, A.; Chikazawa, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1393 (Japan); Uzawa, M. [Mitsubishi FBR Systems Inc. MFBR, 34-17, Jingumae 2-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responding to the the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (1F-NPP) accident, the earthquake and the tsunami proof of the fuel handling system (FHS) in Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is studied. In the earthquake proof estimation, the margin of seismic resistance against the earthquake of the 1F-envelop condition and the sloshing behavior in the EVST is estimated. In terms of the tsunami proof, the scenario to lead fuel subassemblies into the stable cooling state and the potential of the cooling system is introduced in case of loss of the emergency power supply. As a result, it is clear that JSFR FHS originally could already be prepared to have the potential to prevent the release of radioactive material. (authors)

  1. Robin Hutchinson, Gamil Tadros, Jadwiga Kroman, Sami Rizkalla, "Use of Externally Bonded FRP Systems for Rehabilitation of Bridges in Western Canada," Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems for Rehabilitation of Bridges in Western Canada," Page 1 Use of Externally Bonded FRP Systems for Rehabilitation of Bridges in Western Canada Robin Hutchinson, Gamil Tadros, Jadwiga Kroman, Sami Rizkalla Synopsis: Since its inception in 1995, the ISIS Canada research network has developed design procedures

  2. Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

  3. How to Effectively Compute the Reliability of a Thermal-Hydraulic Nuclear Passive System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 How to Effectively Compute the Reliability of a Thermal- Hydraulic Nuclear Passive System E. Zio1 of a thermal-hydraulic (T-H) passive system of a nuclear power plant can be obtained by i) Monte Carlo (MC be prohibitive because of the large number of (typically long) T-H code simulations that must be performed (one

  4. Operation o Solar Photovoltaic-Thermal (PVT) Hybrid System in KIER 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveed, A.T.; Lee, E. J.; Kang, E. C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The details of the Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) hybrid air heating system, UTC air heating system and its effect on the performance of photovoltaic (PV) module and room temperature in KIER are explained in this paper. Two identical test rooms were...

  5. Operation o Solar Photovoltaic-Thermal (PVT) Hybrid System in KIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveed, A.T.; Lee, E. J.; Kang, E. C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The details of the Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) hybrid air heating system, UTC air heating system and its effect on the performance of photovoltaic (PV) module and room temperature in KIER are explained in this paper. Two identical test rooms were...

  6. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  7. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.F.; Allen, G.C.; Shipers, L.R.; Dobranich, D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Harmon, C.D.; Fan, W.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Todosow, M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  8. A 3kW PV-thermal system for home use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.J.; Sato, Mikihiko; Tsuzuki, Kouye; Amono, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technical Inst., Tempaku, Nagoya (Japan); Izumi, Hisao [IDEX, Seto, Aichi (Japan); Takamoto, Tatsuya [Japan Energy Corp., Saitama (Japan); Matsunaga, Shigenobu

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined 3kW PV-thermal system has been proposed for home use. Combining PV and thermal conversion makes this system economically efficient and competitive with traditional power supplies. GaAs and Si concentrator solar cells have been measured under concentration as candidate for use in this system. InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells designed for 1-sun operation have been examined under concentration. The potential use of GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells has been analyzed for this application. The properties of the thermal transfer unit of this system has been evaluated including the cooling of the solar cell holder.

  9. Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

  10. Similarity and generalized analysis of efficiencies of thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peiwen Li; Jon Van Lew; Cholik Chan; Wafaa Karaki; Jake Stephens; J. E. O'Brien

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examined the features of three typical thermal storage systems including: (1) direct storage of heat transfer fluid in containers, (2) storage of thermal energy in a packed bed of solid filler material, with energy being carried in/out by a flowing heat transfer fluid which directly contacts the packed bed, and (3) a system in which heat transfer fluid flows through tubes that are imbedded into a thermal storage material which may be solid, liquid, or a mixture of the two. The similarity of the three types of thermal storage systems was discussed, and generalized energy storage governing equations were introduced in both dimensional and dimensionless forms. The temperatures of the heat transfer fluid during energy charge and discharge processes and the overall energy storage efficiencies were studied through solution of the energy storage governing equations. Finally, provided in the paper are a series of generalized charts bearing curves for energy storage effectiveness against four dimensionless parameters grouped up from many of the thermal storage system properties including dimensions, fluid and thermal storage material properties, as well as the operational conditions including mass flow rate of the fluid, and the ratio of energy charge and discharge time periods. Engineers can conveniently look up the charts to design and calibrate the size of thermal storage tanks and operational conditions without doing complicated individual modeling and computations. It is expected that the charts will serve as standard tools for thermal storage system design and calibration.

  11. Method and device for predicting wavelength dependent radiation influences in thermal systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kee, Robert J. (864 Lucille St., Livermore, CA 94550); Ting, Aili (7329 Stonedale Dr., Pleasanton, CA 94558)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for predicting the spectral (wavelength-dependent) radiation transport in thermal systems including interaction by the radiation with partially transmitting medium. The predicted model of the thermal system is used to design and control the thermal system. The predictions are well suited to be implemented in design and control of rapid thermal processing (RTP) reactors. The method involves generating a spectral thermal radiation transport model of an RTP reactor. The method also involves specifying a desired wafer time dependent temperature profile. The method further involves calculating an inverse of the generated model using the desired wafer time dependent temperature to determine heating element parameters required to produce the desired profile. The method also involves controlling the heating elements of the RTP reactor in accordance with the heating element parameters to heat the wafer in accordance with the desired profile.

  12. A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

  13. We propose a wearable PIR thermal sensor system that can help users to perceive the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    We propose a wearable PIR thermal sensor system that can help users to perceive the surrounding environment from a thermal perspective. Wireless PIR sensor network technology has been developed to track and recognize multiple moving human subjects, as well as understand their activities. However, the PIR sensor

  14. A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

  15. Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljaèiæ, Marin

    Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems with tungsten cermets David, Massachusetts 02139, USA bermel@mit.edu Abstract: Solar thermal, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic (TPV by selective solar absorbers and TPV selective emitters. To improve these critical components, we study a class

  16. Belgirate, Italy, 28-30 September 2005 A COMPREHENSIVE THERMAL-AWARE POWER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Belgirate, Italy, 28-30 September 2005 A COMPREHENSIVE THERMAL-AWARE POWER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM power techniques due to shortage of battery life. Conventional power management designs focused. In this research, a block-level optimization of comprehensive thermal aware power management is presented

  17. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces 56 (2007) 290295 Thermal response of a microgel system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an inverse power (temperature-dependent) attractive potential. To understand theoretically this thermallyColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces 56 (2007) 290­295 Thermal response of a microgel system K densities each of which is weighed by its respective volume proportion. We show here that by minimizing

  18. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed aims at the cost optimal scheduling of on/o decisions and output levels for generating units. The power

  19. Monitoring solar-thermal systems: An outline of methods and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual discusses the technical issues associated with monitoring solar-thermal systems. It discusses some successful monitoring programs that have been implemented in the past. It gives the rationale for selecting a program of monitoring and gives guidelines for the design of new programs. In this report, solar thermal monitoring systems are classified into three levels. For each level, the report discusses the kinds of information obtained by monitoring, the effort needed to support the monitoring program, the hardware required, and the costs involved. Ultimately, all monitoring programs share one common requirement: the collection of accurate data that characterize some aspect or aspects of the system under study. This report addresses most of the issues involved with monitoring solar thermal systems. It does not address such topics as design fundamentals of thermal systems or the relative merits of the many different technologies employed for collection of solar energy.

  20. Cooled electronic system with thermal spreaders coupling electronics cards to cold rails

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-cooled electronic systems are provided which include an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket or removal of the card from the socket. A liquid-cooled cold rail is disposed at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader couples the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The thermally conductive extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  1. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

  2. Method and apparatus for thermal management of vehicle exhaust systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic converter is surrounded by variable conductance insulation for maintaining the operating temperature of the catalytic converter at an optimum level, for inhibiting heat loss when raising catalytic converter temperature to light-off temperature, for storing excess heat to maintain or accelerate reaching light-off temperature, and for conducting excess heat away from the catalytic converter after reaching light-off temperature. The variable conductance insulation includes vacuum gas control and metal-to-metal thermal shunt mechanisms. Radial and axial shielding inhibits radiation and convection heat loss. Thermal storage media includes phase change material, and heat exchanger chambers and fluids carry heat to and from the catalytic converter.

  3. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in theTheoretical Study onThermalEnergy Analysis

  4. The external design phase of the breeding and multigeneration support system: A tracking and decision support system for NCTR (National Center for Toxicological Research)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strand, R.; Cox, T.L.; Sjoreen, A.; Alvic, D.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) is the basic research arm of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The NCTR has upgraded and standardized its computer operations on Digital Equipment Corporation VAX minicomputers using Software AG's ADABAS data base management system for all research applications. The NCTR is currently performing a large study to improve the functionality of the animal husbandry systems and applications called Breeding/Multigeneration Support System (BMSS). When functional, it will operate on VAX equipment using the ADABAS data base management system, TDMS, and COBOL. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is supporting NCTR in the design, prototyping, and software engineering of the BMSS. This document summarizes the external design elements that include data entry screens, screen reports, summary and status reports, and functional definitions of screen and report data. ORNL will provide research support to NCTR in the additional phases of systems life cycle development for BMSS. ORNL has prepared this document according to NCTR's Standard Operating Procedures for Systems Development. 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M.; Gilbride, T.; Ruiz, K.; Steward, H.; Love, P.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series. It presents information that is useful throughout the United States for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in the first five Best Practices volumes. It provides an introduction to current photovoltaic and solar thermal building practices. Information about window selection and shading is included.

  6. Shift-register coincidence electronics system for thermal neutron counters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved shift-register, coincidence-counting logic circuit, developed for use with thermal neutron well counters, is described in detail. A distinguishing feature of the circuit is its ability to operate usefully at neutron counting rates of several hundred kHz. A portable electronics package incorporating the new coincidence logic and support circuits is also described.

  7. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS...

  9. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Nocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage forof Abiotic Photo-chemical Solar Energy Storage Systems,”

  10. Integrating Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Systems in Whole Building Energy Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces methodologies on how the renewable energy generated by the solar thermal and solar photovoltaic (PV) systems installed on site can be integrated in the whole building simulation analyses, which then can be available to analyze...

  11. Charging-free electrochemical system for harvesting low-grade thermal energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yuan

    Efficient and low-cost systems are needed to harvest the tremendous amount of energy stored in low-grade heat sources (<100 °C). Thermally regenerative electrochemical cycle (TREC) is an attractive approach which uses the ...

  12. Thermal design of humidification dehumidification systems for affordable and small-scale desalination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindan, Prakash Narayan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The humidification dehumidification (HDH) technology is a carrier-gas-based thermal desalination technique ideal for application in a small-scale system but, currently, has a high cost of water production (about 30 $/m³ ...

  13. Optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lizarraga-García, Enrique

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present thesis focuses on the optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems. First, optimization of time-variable operation to maximize revenue through selling and purchasing electricity to/from ...

  14. Implementations of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of solar thermal technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaogang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To build an electric car plus renewable energy system for Singapore, solar thermal technologies were investigated in this report in the hope to find a suitable "green" energy source for this small island country. Among all ...

  15. An experimental measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of a porous solid-liquid system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, James Elliott

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT QF THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND DIFFUSIVITY OF A POROUS SOLID LIQUID SYSTEM By James Elliott Dunn A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the reQuirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1959 Major Sub)ect: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL MEASURFJ1ENT OF THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND DIFFUSIVITY OF A POROUS SOLID LIQUID SYSTEM A Thesis James Elliott Dunn...

  16. Integrating Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Systems in Whole Building Energy Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

    to achieve further energy consumption reductions. To accomplish this, the F- Chart program was used for the solar thermal system analysis and the PV F-Chart program for the solar photovoltaic (PV) system analysis. Authors show how DOE-2.1e simulation... Time series plots of space heating and service hot water loads from SYSTEMS and PLANT simulation runs Due to the fact that the solar thermal systems analysis program, F-Chart, takes into account the system efficiencies in its loads calculation...

  17. Method and apparatus for thermal management of vehicle exhaust systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic converter is surrounded by variable conductance insulation for maintaining the operating temperature of the catalytic converter at an optimum level, for inhibiting heat loss when raising catalytic converter temperature to light-off temperature, for storing excess heat to maintain or accelerate reaching light-off temperature, and for conducting excess heat away from the catalytic converter after reaching light-off temperature. The variable conductance insulation includes vacuum gas control and metal-to-metal thermal shunt mechanisms. Radial and axial shielding inhibits radiation and convection heat loss. Thermal storage media includes phase change material, and heat exchanger chambers and fluids carry heat to and from the catalytic converter. 7 figs.

  18. Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Y. Goswami

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 3000C ���¢�������� 450 0C ) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

  19. A Monolithic Microconcentrator Receiver For A Hybrid PV-Thermal System: Preliminary Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://solar.anu.edu.au Abstract: An innovative hybrid PV-thermal microconcentrator (MCT) system is being jointly developed by Chromasun Inc., San Jose, California, and at the Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University. The MCT aims to develop the small-scale, roof-top market for grid-integrated linear CPV systems

  20. System-Level Modeling of Energy in TLM for Early Validation of Power and Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    System-Level Modeling of Energy in TLM for Early Validation of Power and Thermal Management Tayeb--Modern systems-on-a-chip are equipped with power architectures, allowing to control the consumption of individual; hence the need for early system-level models of power consumption. B. High-Level Models and Simulation

  1. NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes. Potential Impact

  2. Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark K. Gee

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

  3. Adsorption at the nanoparticle interface for increased thermal capacity in solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoms, Matthew W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In concentrated solar power (CSP) systems, high temperature heat transfer fluids (HTFs) are responsible for collecting energy from the sun at the solar receiver and transporting it to the turbine where steam is produced ...

  4. Engineering a thermal squeezed reservoir by system energy modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ephraim Shahmoon; Gershon Kurizki

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a thermal reservoir can effectively act as a squeezed reservoir on atoms that are subject to energy-level modulation. For sufficiently fast and strong modulation, for which the rotating-wave-approximation is broken, the resulting squeezing persists at long times. These effects are analyzed by a master equation that is valid beyond the rotating wave approximation. As an example we consider a two-level-atom in a cavity with Lorentzian linewidth, subject to sinusoidal energy modulation. A possible realization of these effects is discussed for Rydberg atoms.

  5. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Thermal Distribution Bus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit |Infrastructure The foundation ofThermal

  6. NREL's Advanced Thermal Conversion Laboratory at the Center for Buildings and Thermal Systems: On the Cutting-Edge of HVAC and CHP Technology (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes how the unique testing capabilities of NREL's Advanced Thermal Conversion Laboratory at the Center For Buildings and Thermal Systems can help industry meet the challenge of developing the next generation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and combined heat and power (CHP) equipment and concepts.

  7. A full-scale thermal test and analytical evaluation of the beneficial uses shipping system cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moya, J.L.; Akau, R.L.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal test of the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask containing irradiation source capsules was conducted to verify a two-dimensional axisymmetric thermal model developed for the Safety Analysis Report. The BUSS cask is a Type B package developed to transport irradiation source capsules of cesium chloride or strontium fluoride to commercially licensed food and pharmaceutical irradiating facilities. The uniqueness of this test is that it was performed on an internally instrumented, full-scale cask with actual radioactive capsules. This resulted in more realistic system temperatures than those obtained if heaters were used to simulate the large gamma source. In addition, the thermal test provides benchmark data for other thermal codes. 12 refs.; 24 figs.; 2 tabs.

  8. Carbonate fuel cell system with thermally integrated gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinfeld, George (Southbury, CT); Meyers, Steven J. (Huntington Beach, CA); Lee, Arthur (Fishkill, NY)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell system employing a gasifier for generating fuel gas for the fuel cell of the fuel cell system and in which heat for the gasifier is derived from the anode exhaust gas of the fuel cell.

  9. External Authorities and Peers Laboratory Ventilation Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    External Authorities and Peers Laboratory Ventilation Management Program Guidance Document External Authorities and Peers This group encompasses external groups who do not manage laboratory ventilation systems to laboratory ventilation management. Roles Responsibilities Tracking Indicator Laboratory science peers

  10. Analytical evaluation of thermal conductance and heat capacities of one-dimensional material systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saygi, Salih [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, 60200 Turkey (Turkey)] [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, 60200 Turkey (Turkey)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically predict some thermal properties versus temperature dependence of one dimensional (1D) material nanowire systems. A known method is used to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. Predicted formulas are expressed in terms of Bloch-Grüneisen functions and Debye functions. Computing results has proved that the expressions are in excellent agreement with the results reported in the literature even if it is in very low dimension limits of nanowire systems. Therefore the calculation method is a fully predictive approach to calculate thermal conductivity and heat capacities of nanowire material systems.

  11. EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

  12. Apparatus for thermal performance measurements of insulated roof systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, G.E.; Childs, K.W.; Walukas, D.J.; Childs, P.W.; Griggs, E.I.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy conducted thermal performance measurements on low-slope roofs with a recently developed field test apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The apparatus accommodates four 4 ft x 8 ft test specimens and includes the measurement capabilities for specimen temperatures, temperature gradients, heat flows and moisture content. A weather station characterizes outdoor weather conditions. Tests underway include (1) validation of a roof surface temperature model developed to study the effects of wet insulation; (2) measurement of temperature distributions and heat transfer in high R-value roofs; and (3) validation of an analysis of the effectiveness of high reflectance surfaces. Preliminary experimental results are presented and correlations between experiment and modeling are discussed.

  13. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control-oriented dynamic modelThermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications simulation System modeling and control PEMFC a b s t r a c t Temperature changes in PEM fuel cell stacks

  14. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  15. Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH- Input/Output-Procedure Peter Paerisch different solar systems. The simulation model was validated with measured data. The deviation between meas * Tel. +49 (0)5151-999503, Fax: +49 (0)5151-999500, Email: paerisch@isfh.de Abstract Input/Output

  16. Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

  17. Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown....

  18. Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    another Building? Cooling Capacity SUPPLY-AIR SYSTEM CoolingMODE. During cooling operation, the supply temperature swingafter the cooling coil), the supply air temperature rise may

  19. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  20. Energy efficient HVAC system features thermal storage and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bard, E.M. (Bard, Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineering Inc., Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a HVAC system designed to efficiently condition a medical center. The topics of the article include energy efficient design of the HVAC system, incentive rebate program by the local utility, indoor air quality, innovative design features, operations and maintenance, payback and life cycle cost analysis results, and energy consumption.

  1. Carbonate fuel cell system with thermally integrated gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinfeld, G.; Meyers, S.J.; Lee, A.

    1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell system is described which employs a gasifier for generating fuel gas for the fuel cell of the fuel cell system and in which heat for the gasifier is derived from the anode exhaust gas of the fuel cell. 2 figs.

  2. Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal the confidence in solar thermal energy. The so called Input/Output-Procedure is controlling the solar heat systems. The simulation model was validated with measured data and a lot of failures in 11 solar thermal

  3. FY 93 thermal loading systems study final report: Volume 2. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to meet the overall performance requirements for the proposed Mined Geology Disposal System at Yucca Mountain, Nevada requires the two major subsystem (natural barriers and engineered barriers) to positively contribute to containment and radionuclide isolation. In addition to the postclosure performance the proposed repository must meet preclosure requirements of safety, retrievability, and operability. Cost and schedule were also considered. The thermal loading strategy chosen may significantly affect both the postclosure and preclosure performance of the proposed repository. Although the current Site Characterization Plan reference case is 57 kilowatts (kW)/acre, other thermal loading strategies (different areal mass loadings) have been proposed which possess both advantages and disadvantages. The objectives of the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study were to (1) place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading regime that is ``too hot`` and the loading regime that is ``too cold``, to (2) ``grade`` or evaluate the performance, as a function of thermal loading, of the repository to contain high level wastes against performance criteria and to (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability. Additionally, the effort was to (4) identify important uncertainties that need to be resolved by tests and/or analyses in order to complete a performance assessment on the effects of thermal loading. The FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study was conducted from December 1, 1992 to December 30, 1993 and this final report provides the findings of the study. Volume 2 consists of 10 appendices which contain the following: Waste Stream Analysis; Waste Package Design Inputs; Subsurface Design Inputs; Thermal-Hydrologic Model Inputs; Near-Field Calculations; Far-Field; Reliability of Electronics as a Function of Temperature; Cost Analysis Details; Geochemistry; and Areas of Uncertainty in Thermal Loading.

  4. Thermal and mechanical development of the East African Rift System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebinger, Cynthia Joan

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep basins, uplifted flanks, and volcanoes of the Western and Kenya rift systems have developed along the western and eastern margins of the 1300 km-wide East African plateau. Structural patterns deduced from field, ...

  5. ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIALS IN RESIDENTIAL AND SMALL COMMERCIAL THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - AN UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an update of a report (Andrews and Modera 1991) that quantified the amounts of energy that could be saved through better thermal distribution systems in residential and small commercial buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling from the space-conditioning equipment to the conditioned space. This update involves no basic change in methodology relative to the 1991 report, but rather a review of the additional information available in 2003 on the energy-use patterns in residential and small commercial buildings.

  6. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  7. User's manual for DELSOL2: a computer code for calculating the optical performance and optimal system design for solar-thermal central-receiver plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellin, T.A.; Fish, M.J.; Yang, C.L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DELSOL2 is a revised and substantially extended version of the DELSOL computer program for calculating collector field performance and layout, and optimal system design for solar thermal central receiver plants. The code consists of a detailed model of the optical performance, a simpler model of the non-optical performance, an algorithm for field layout, and a searching algorithm to find the best system design. The latter two features are coupled to a cost model of central receiver components and an economic model for calculating energy costs. The code can handle flat, focused and/or canted heliostats, and external cylindrical, multi-aperture cavity, and flat plate receivers. The program optimizes the tower height, receiver size, field layout, heliostat spacings, and tower position at user specified power levels subject to flux limits on the receiver and land constraints for field layout. The advantages of speed and accuracy characteristic of Version I are maintained in DELSOL2.

  8. OSU Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group Citation Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    countries. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 13(6-7):1383- 1394. Li, S., W. Yang, and X. Zhang. 2009-borehole ground-coupled heat pumps: A review of models and systems. Applied Energy 87(1):16-27. Fabrizio, E., M., and S. Wang 2009. Building energy research in Hong Kong: A review. Renewable and Sustainable Energy

  9. Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the simulation and the analysis of a solar flat plate collectors combined with a compression heat pump is carried out. The system suggested must ensure the heating of a building without the recourse to an auxiliary energy source...

  10. Effects of a thermal reservoir on variational functions in open systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig [Laser Physics and Quantum Optics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Alba Nova, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We connect the theory of a Lyapunov functional for an open system with the thermophysical concept of the relative entropy or equivalently with the entropy production rate. In order to do this we consider the environment of the open system as a thermal reservoir, which introduces the temperature as a thermophysical quantity. The general theory of the Lyapunov functional of an open system constructs a metric operator which contains an element of ambiguity in its scaling. This ambiguity can be removed by assuming a thermostatistic environment which fixes the scaling of the metric operator in a unique manner. The Lyapunov functional thus acquires a thermophysical meaning and can be connected with a relative entropy. In this case the metric operator is related to the inverse of the stationary density operator of the system. We illustrate the theory on a two-level atomic system and a degenerate three-level atom which are exposed to a thermal electromagnetic environment.

  11. Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation. [Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

  12. Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

  13. Thermal analysis of directly buried conduit heat-distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.B.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculations of heat losses and temperature field for directly buried conduit heat distribution systems were performed using the finite element computer programs. The finite element analysis solved two-dimensional, steady-state heat transfer problems involving two insulated parallel pipes encased in the same conduit casing and in separate casings, and the surrounding earth. Descriptions of the theoretical basis, computational scheme, and the data input and outputs of the developed computer programs are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out for predicting the temperature distributions within the existing high temperature hot water distribution system and two insulated pipes covered in the same metallic conduit and the surrounding soil. The predicted results generally agree with the experimental data obtained at the test site.

  14. Ground state cooling is not possible given initial system-thermal bath factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lian-Ao Wu; Dvira Segal; Paul Brumer

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we prove that a fundamental constraint on the cooling dynamic implies that it is impossible to cool, via a unitary system-bath quantum evolution, a system that is embedded in a thermal environment down to its ground state, if the initial state is a factorized product of system and bath states. The latter is a crucial but artificial assumption often included in many descriptions of system-bath dynamics. The analogous conclusion holds for 'cooling' to any pure state of the system.

  15. A Prototype Data Archive for the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has an excellent on-line energy data base at: http archive for a selection of building energy data on thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies

  16. Adaptive Thermal Management for Portable System Batteries by Forced Convection Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Adaptive Thermal Management for Portable System Batteries by Forced Convection Cooling Qing Xie}@elpl.snu.ac.kr Abstract-- Cycle life of a battery largely varies according to the battery operating conditions, especially the battery temperature. In particular, batteries age much faster at high temperature. Extensive experiments

  17. Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Thermal Economic Analysis of an Underground Water Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Lin, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the thermal economic analysis of an underground water source heat pump system in a high school building based on usage per exergy cost as an evaluation standard, in which the black box model has been used and the cost...

  19. Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices Toru Kashima, Member of the result [4]. The same can be said for time varying real-time prices. Real-time energy pricing is not yet such as chillers. Energy resources such as electricity or natural gas are bought from suppliers at certain prices

  20. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  1. Analysis of the effective delayed neutron fraction in the coupled fast-thermal system HERBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosevic, M.; Pesic, M.; Avdic, S.; Nikolic, D. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of measurements {beta}{sub eff} and {beta}{sub eff}/{Lambda} and calculation results based on various sets of evaluated six-group delayed neutron parameters for the coupled fast-thermal system HERBE are shown in this paper.

  2. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has · STOP (Structural, Thermal, and Optical Performance) analyses of optical systems Thermal engineers lead evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

  3. An on-line information system for radioisotope thermal generator production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiebel, G.R.; Wiemers, M.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-line production information system has been designed to support radioisotope thermal generator assembly and testing in a new facility being built at the Department of Energy Hanford Site in Washington State. This system is intended to make handling the large volumes of information associated with radioisotope thermal generator production and certification more efficient with less opportunity for error than traditional paper methods. It provides for tracking materials, implementing work procedures directly from computer terminals, and cross referencing among materials, procedures, and other documents related to production. This system will be implemented on a network of microcomputers using UNIX{sup TM} for its operating system. It has been designed to allow increased capabilities to be added as operating experience with the new facility dictates.

  4. Controlling and maximizing effective thermal properties by manipulating transient behaviors during energy-system cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Z J; Merlitz, H; Pagni, P J; Chen, Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient processes generally constitute part of energy-system cycles. If skillfully manipulated, they actually are capable of assisting systems to behave beneficially to suit designers' needs. In the present study, behaviors related to both thermal conductivities ($\\kappa$) and heat capacities ($c_{v}$) are analyzed. Along with solutions of the temperature and the flow velocity obtained by means of theories and simulations, three findings are reported herein: $(1)$ effective $\\kappa$ and effective $c_{v}$ can be controlled to vary from their intrinsic material-property values to a few orders of magnitude larger; $(2)$ a parameter, tentatively named as "nonlinear thermal bias", is identified and can be used as a criterion in estimating energies transferred into the system during heating processes and effective operating ranges of system temperatures; $(3)$ When a body of water, such as the immense ocean, is subject to the boundary condition of cold bottom and hot top, it may be feasible to manipulate transien...

  5. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

  6. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  7. System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

    1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  8. On the optimal feedback control of linear quantum systems in the presence of thermal noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco G. Genoni; Stefano Mancini; Alessio Serafini

    2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility of taking bosonic systems subject to quadratic Hamiltonians and a noisy thermal environment to non-classical stationary states by feedback loops based on weak measurements and conditioned linear driving. We derive general analytical upper bounds for the single mode squeezing and multimode entanglement at steady state, depending only on the Hamiltonian parameters and on the number of thermal excitations of the bath. Our findings show that, rather surprisingly, larger number of thermal excitations in the bath allow for larger steady-state squeezing and entanglement if the efficiency of the optimal continuous measurements conditioning the feedback loop is high enough. We also consider the performance of feedback strategies based on homodyne detection and show that, at variance with the optimal measurements, it degrades with increasing temperature.

  9. Analyzing the Effects of Climate and Thermal Configuration on Community Energy Storage Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.; Coleman, D.; Chen, D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community energy storage (CES) has been proposed to mitigate the high variation in output from renewable sources and reduce peak load on the electrical grid. Thousands of these systems may be distributed around the grid to provide benefits to local distribution circuits and to the grid as a whole when aggregated. CES must be low cost to purchase and install and also largely maintenance free through more than 10 years of service life to be acceptable to most utilities.Achieving the required system life time is a major uncertainty for lithium-ion batteries. The lifetime and immediate system performance of batteries can change drastically with battery temperature, which is a strong function of system packaging, local climate, electrical duty cycle, and other factors. In other Li-ion applications, this problem is solved via air or liquid heating and cooling systems that may need occasional maintenance throughout their service life. CES requires a maintenance-free thermal management system providing protection from environmental conditions while rejecting heat from a moderate electrical duty cycle. Thus, the development of an effective, low-cost, zero-maintenance thermal management system poses a challenge critical to the success of CES. NREL and Southern California Edison have collaborated to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of various CES thermal configurations in multiple climates by building a model of CES based on collected test data, integrating it with an NREL-developed Li-ion degradation model, and applying CES electrical duty cycles and historic location-specific meteorological data to forecast battery thermal response and degradation through a 10-year service life.

  10. Artificial Neural Networks and quadratic Response Surfaces for the functional failure analysis of a thermal-hydraulic passive system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system reliability, artificial neural network, quadratic response surface 1. INTRODUCTION Modern nuclearArtificial Neural Networks and quadratic Response Surfaces for the functional failure analysis of a thermal-hydraulic passive system George Apostolakisa , Nicola Pedronib , Enrico Ziob* a Massachusetts

  11. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough

  12. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcoupled with thermal energy storage," Applied Energy, vol.N. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

  13. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. a. , 2004, “Solar Thermal Collectors and Applications,”86] Schnatbaum L. , 2009, “Solar Thermal Power Plants,” Thefor Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),

  14. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS AND BUILDING ENVELOPE SYSTEMS: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, William L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamic test methods for envelope thermal performance whichtransieu~ thermal behavior of building envelopes, and theof dynamic thermal performance, of layered envelope construe

  15. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcogeneration coupled with thermal energy storage," AppliedN. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

  16. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies,D. , 2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with PhaseW. , 2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic

  17. Field study on the thermal environment of passive cooling system in RC building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Kitayama, Hiroki; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, various passive methods have come to be adopted in architecture design. The rooftop lawn is seen to have merit in the reduction in the air conditioning load of the building, as well as contributing to the mitigation of the heat island phenomenon. The roofs praying system is seen to be an effective method for the roof of low heat insulation performance, and can greatly reduce the heat load in the summer season. However, at present most of the buildings with an RC construction have the insulating material in the roof for providing thermal insulation in the winter season. There has been a trend to adopt the roof spraying system actively in even such a general RC building, but it is not clear how much actual effect it has. In this study, the authors conducted a measurement in an RC building with a rooftop spraying system and roof lawn in order to clarify the effects and problems on the thermal environment.

  18. Full-scale study of a building equipped with phase change material wallboards and a multi-layer rack latent heat thermal energy store system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -layer rack latent heat thermal energy store system Julien Borderon1 , Joseph Virgone2 , Richard Cantin1 installed as wallboard and as latent heat thermal energy storage system coupled with the ventilation system for the ventilation air is efficient. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, thermal energy storage systems are one way for reducing

  19. Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Carbary, Lawrence D [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Such a system would be applicable to new construction and will offer a solution to more challenging retrofit situations as well. Multiple design options were considered to balance the need to protect theVIPs during construction and building operation, while minimizing heat transfer through the wall system. The results reported here encompass an indepth assessment of potential system performances including thermal modeling, detailed laboratory measurements under controlled conditions on the component, and system levels according to ASTM C518 (ASTM 2010). The results demonstrate the importance of maximizing the VIP coverage over the wall face. The results also reveal the impact of both the design and execution of system details, such as the joints between adjacent VIPs. The test results include an explicit modeled evaluation of the system performance in a clear wall.

  20. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  1. Isolated many-body quantum systems far from equilibrium: Relaxation process and thermalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Santos, Lea F. [Physics Department, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of our recent numerical and analytical results on the dynamics of isolated interacting quantum systems that are taken far from equilibrium by an abrupt perturbation. The studies are carried out on one-dimensional systems of spins-1/2, which are paradigmatic models of many-body quantum systems. Our results show the role of the interplay between the initial state and the post-perturbation Hamiltonian in the relaxation process, the size of the fluctuations after equilibration, and the viability of thermalization.

  2. Sizing Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS): A Brief Literature Review and Model Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m 2 /W Thermal resistance of the building envelope, K-m 2 /Wtemperature, envelope, slab and tubing thermal resistance,

  3. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Interaction of a solar space heating system with the thermal behavior of a building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilmer, C.; Warren, M.L.; Auslander, D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal behavior of a building in response to heat input from an active solar space heating system is analyzed to determine the effect of the variable storage tank temperature on the cycling rate, on-time, and off-time of a heating cycle and on the comfort characteristics of room air temperature swing and of offset of the average air temperature from the setpoint (droop). A simple model of a residential building, a fan coil heat-delivery system, and a bimetal thermostat are used to describe the system. A computer simulation of the system behavior has been developed and verified by comparisons with predictions from previous studies. The system model and simulation are then applied to determine the building response to a typical hydronic solar heating system for different solar storage temperatures, outdoor temperatures, and fan coil sizes. The simulations were run only for those cases where there was sufficient energy from storage to meet the building load requirements.

  5. Experience on Commissioning of Heating/Cooling System and Thermal/Air Quality Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokoi, S.; Miura, H.; Huang, Y.; Nakahara, N.; Iwamae, A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the specified performance was realized at the heat-pump, e) whether the pipes for fan-coil units are suitably insulated. Output Heat loss from piping Upward and downward heat flow from hot-water mat Heat loss from piping (boiler - header) Heat loss from...Experience on Commissioning of Heating/Cooling System and Thermal/Air Quality Environment S. Hokoi*, H. Miura*, Y. Huang*, N. Nakahara** and A. Iwamae*** * Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan ** Nakahara Laboratory, Environmental Syst...

  6. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a study of thermal energy storage (TES) systems integrated with combined-cycle gas turbine cogeneration systems. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers two significant advantages. First, electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced. Second, although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. An earlier study analyzed TES integrated with a simple-cycle cogeneration system. This follow-on study evaluated the cost of power produced by a combined-cycle electric power plant (CC), a combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CC/Cogen), and a combined-cycle cogeneration plant integrated with thermal energy storage (CC/TES/Cogen). Each of these three systems was designed to serve a fixed (24 hr/day) process steam load. The value of producing electricity was set at the levelized cost for a CC plant, while the value of the process steam was for a conventional stand-alone boiler. The results presented here compared the costs for CC/TES/Cogen system with those of the CC and the CC/Cogen plants. They indicate relatively poor economic prospects for integrating TES with a combined-cycle cogeneration power plant for the assumed designs. The major reason is the extremely close approach temperatures at the storage media heaters, which makes the heaters large and therefore expensive.

  7. A new Methodology for Multi-Level Thermal Characterization of Complex Electronic Systems : From Die to Board Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the components cause thermal and mechanical stresses which affect circuit reliability. The manufacturing costA new Methodology for Multi-Level Thermal Characterization of Complex Electronic Systems : From Die. Temperature rise due to power dissipation worsens harmful clock skew, jeopardizes reliability and leads

  8. Final Report: Development of a Thermal and Water Management System for PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zia Mirza, Program Manager

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This final program report is prepared to provide the status of program activities performed over the period of 9 years to develop a thermal and water management (TWM) system for an 80-kW PEM fuel cell power system. The technical information and data collected during this period are presented in chronological order by each calendar year. Balance of plant (BOP) components of a PEM fuel cell automotive system represents a significant portion of total cost based on the 2008 study by TIAX LLC, Cambridge, MA. The objectives of this TWM program were two-fold. The first objective was to develop an advanced cooling system (efficient radiator) to meet the fuel cell cooling requirements. The heat generated by the fuel cell stack is a low-quality heat (small difference between fuel cell stack operating temperature and ambient air temperature) that needs to be dissipated to the ambient air. To minimize size, weight, and cost of the radiator, advanced fin configurations were evaluated. The second objective was to evaluate air humidification systems which can meet the fuel cell stack inlet air humidity requirements. The moisture from the fuel cell outlet air is transferred to inlet air, thus eliminating the need for an outside water source. Two types of humidification devices were down-selected: one based on membrane and the other based on rotating enthalpy wheel. The sub-scale units for both of these devices have been successfully tested by the suppliers. This project addresses System Thermal and Water Management.

  9. Geometrical phase of thermal state in hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Qiang Zhu

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the geometric phase of thermal state in hydrogen atom under the effects of external magnetic field is considered. Especially the effects of the temperature upon the geometric phase is discussed. Also we discuss the time evolution of entanglement of the system. They show some similar behaviors.

  10. CEES External Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    External Advisory Committee Photo of Hector Abruna Name Hctor Abrua Institution Cornell University Position(s) Emile M. Chamot Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Link...

  11. Progress in the Integrated Simulation of Thermal-Hydraulic Operation of the ITER Magnet System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagnasco, M; Bessette, D; Marinucci, C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new integrated computer code is being developed for the simulations of the overall behavior of the ITER magnet cryo-system. The existing THEA, FLOWER and POWER codes, assembled as modules of a computational environment (Super-Magnet) have been upgraded to perform global simulations of the cooling circuit for the ITER magnet system. The thermal coupling resulting from the generic geometric configurations has been implemented to realize quasi-three-dimensional simulations of the winding pack. In this paper we present details on the model.

  12. Power enhancement of heat engines via correlated thermalization in multilevel systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Wolfgang Niedenzu; Paul Brumer; Gershon Kurizki

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a heat machine based on a periodically-driven quantum system permanently coupled to hot and cold baths. It is shown that the maximal power output of a degenerate $V$-type three-level heat engine is that generated by two independent two-level systems. For $N$ levels, this maximal enhancement is $(N-1)$-fold. Hence, level degeneracy is a thermodynamic resource that may effectively boost the power output. The efficiency, however, is not affected. We find that coherence is not an essential asset in multilevel-based heat machines. The existence of multiple thermalization pathways sharing a common ground state suffices for power enhancement.

  13. Maximizing Commercial Hydraulic Software Simulation in Thermal Distribution System Continuous Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Water ESL Energy Systems Laboratory HHW Heating Hot Water SS3 South Satellite Plant #3 TAMU Texas A&M University TEP Thermal Energy Plant UTSA University of Texas at San Antonio WC1 West Campus Plant #1 WC2 West Campus Plant #2 WC4 West... Campus Plant #4 INTRODUCTION Continuous Commissioning ® began as part of the Texas LoanSTAR program at the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University (TAMU). Based on current usage, instead of design intent, this process identifies...

  14. A Review of Thermal Acoustical and Special Project Requirements Data in Designing a Duct System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebens, A. F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    less than acceptable environment for occupants could occur. AIR LEAKAGE Probably the most neglected design criteria for duct work is air leakage. Testing by SMACNA (HVAC Air Duct Leakage Test Manual. First Edition, August. 1985), and TIM (Thermal... 48 48 48 Appendix A of the SMACNA HVAC Air Duct Leakage Test Manual gives leakage as a percent of flow in a system by Leakage Class, fan CFM, and static pressure. The leakage in a 1" static pressure system can be as high as 24 percent in Leakage...

  15. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

  16. Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fixed external shade, photo- sensor and occupancy sensorAdequate solar shading, photo sensor and occupancy sensor

  17. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 1, BIPV/T system and house energy concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Athienitis, A.K.; Galal, Khaled [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first of two papers that describe the modeling, design, and performance assessment based on monitored data of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house. This house, with a design goal of near net-zero annual energy consumption, was constructed in 2007 in Eastman, Quebec, Canada - a cold climate area. Several novel solar technologies are integrated into the house and with passive solar design to reach this goal. An air-based open-loop BIPV/T system produces electricity and collects heat simultaneously. Building-integrated thermal mass is utilized both in passive and active forms. Distributed thermal mass in the direct gain area and relatively large south facing triple-glazed windows (about 9% of floor area) are employed to collect and store passive solar gains. An active thermal energy storage system (TES) stores part of the collected thermal energy from the BIPV/T system, thus reducing the energy consumption of the house ground source heat pump heating system. This paper focuses on the BIPV/T system and the integrated energy concept of the house. Monitored data indicate that the BIPV/T system has a typical efficiency of about 20% for thermal energy collection, and the annual space heating energy consumption of the house is about 5% of the national average. A thermal model of the BIPV/T system suitable for preliminary design and control of the airflow is developed and verified with monitored data. (author)

  18. Tuning of the spin pumping in yttrium iron garnet/Au bilayer system by fast thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lichuan, E-mail: lichuanj@udel.edu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu, E-mail: lichuanj@udel.edu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Yang, Qinghui; Tang, Xiaoli; Zhong, Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang, Dainan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Xiao, John Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we investigated the influence of the fast thermal treatment on the spin pumping in ferromagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au bilayer system. The YIG/Au bilayer thin films were treated by fast annealing process with different temperatures from 0 to 800?°C. The spin pumping was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The surface evolution was investigated using a high resolution scanning microscopy and an atomic force microscopy. A strong thermal related spin pumping in YIG/Au bilayer system has been revealed. It was found that the spin pumping process can be enhanced by using fast thermal treatment due to the thermal modifications of the Au surface. The effective spin-mixing conductance of the fast thermal treated YIG/Au bilayer has been obtained.

  19. December 2007 SECURING EXTERNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    devices such as desktop and laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and cell phones. These teleworkers use devices such as desktop and laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and cellDecember 2007 SECURING EXTERNAL COMPUTERS AND OTHER DEVICES USED BY TELEWORKERS SECURING EXTERNAL

  20. Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal. Membrane treatment (nanofiltration or reverse osmosis) can be employed to reduce TDS and sulfate concentrations to acceptable levels for reuse of the blowdown in the cooling systems as makeup water.

  1. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

  2. The design, construction, and monitoring of photovoltaic power system and solar thermal system on the Georgia Institute of Technology Aquatic Center. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, R.C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the feasibility study, design, and construction of a PV and solar thermal system for the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center. The topics of the report include a discussion of site selection and system selection, funding, design alternatives, PV module selection, final design, and project costs. Included are appendices describing the solar thermal system, the SAC entrance canopy PV mockup, and the PV feasibility study.

  3. Thermal stability of nano-structured selective emitters for thermophotovoltaic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Heon Ju, 1977-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental challenge in solar-thermal-electrical energy conversion is the thermal stability of materials and devices at high operational temperatures. This study focuses on the thermal stability of tungsten selective ...

  4. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [Nanotubes as High-Energy Density Solar Thermal Fuels,” Nano

  5. Lead Coolant Test Facility Systems Design, Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Cost Estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli Khericha; Edwin Harvego; John Svoboda; Ryan Dalling

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimate. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  6. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

  7. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Darryl Dickerhoff SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 2 Acknowledgements Our largest debt of gratitude is to our Energy assistance guiding us through the EMCS system of the large commercial test building. The building management

  8. LMS-based Adaptive Temperature Prediction Scheme for Proactive Thermal-aware Three-Dimensional Network-on-Chip Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    temperature, the PDTM can early control the system temperature. To predict the future temperature, adopting of the future temperature estimation. Therefore, the current proactive thermal-aware NoC system still suffers employed to prevent the NoC system from overheating and being damaged. Conventionally, for emergent cooling

  9. Methods and systems to thermally protect fuel nozzles in combustion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helmick, David Andrew; Johnson, Thomas Edward; York, William David; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of assembling a gas turbine engine is provided. The method includes coupling a combustor in flow communication with a compressor such that the combustor receives at least some of the air discharged by the compressor. A fuel nozzle assembly is coupled to the combustor and includes at least one fuel nozzle that includes a plurality of interior surfaces, wherein a thermal barrier coating is applied across at least one of the plurality of interior surfaces to facilitate shielding the interior surfaces from combustion gases.

  10. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 6: High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Steward, Heidi E.; Love, Pat M.

    2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide is was written by PNNL for the US Department of Energy's Building America program to provide information for residential production builders interested in building near zero energy homes. The guide provides indepth descriptions of various roof-top photovoltaic power generating systems for homes. The guide also provides extensive information on various designs of solar thermal water heating systems for homes. The guide also provides construction company owners and managers with an understanding of how solar technologies can be added to their homes in a way that is cost effective, practical, and marketable. Twelve case studies provide examples of production builders across the United States who are building energy-efficient homes with photovoltaic or solar water heating systems.

  11. Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs.

  12. Thermal Characteristics and Systems of Residential Construction in College Station, Texas: 1981-1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Neidinger, P.; Schrock, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    =(l) (MEC) to determine the extent to which current construction meets this code. The best cases were clearly expected to pass the code. However, it was initially expected that some of the units with poorer thermal characteristics and systems..... Heatinq/Coo.linp egyip~~t: All but one of -- the houses examined had air conditioners which met or exceeded the 1986 MEC. The apartments di6 rot r c.c: t l'.c-,ce ~~cpirements. but some did meet the 1983 I.iEC(3) requirements in this area (6.8 SEER...

  13. Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. External Science Review Report of the External Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Mary Eleanor

    1 External Science Review Report of the External Science Review Committee The Nature Conservancy and Design: Lee Meinicke Jonathan Adams Design and Layout: Naomi Nickerson #12;3 External Science Review............................................................................................................................... 10 The Challenge of Changing Conservation and Changing Science

  15. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  16. Performance of quantum data transmission systems in the presence of thermal noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cariolaro; G. Pierobon

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the literature the performance of quantum data transmission systems is usually evaluated in the absence of thermal noise. A more realistic approach taking into account the thermal noise is intrinsically more difficult because it requires dealing with Glauber coherent states in an infinite--dimensional space. In particular, the exact evaluation of the optimal measurement operators is a very difficult task, and numerical approximation is unavoidable. The paper faces the problem by approximating the P-representation of the noisy quantum states with a large but finite number of terms and applying to them the square root measurement (SRM) approach. Comparisons with the exact solution obtained with convex semidefinite programming show that the SRM approach gives quite accurate results. As application, the performance of quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and phase shift keying (PSK) systems is considered. In spite of the fact that the SRM approach is not optimal and overestimates the error probability, also in these cases the quantum detection maintains its superiority with respect to the classical homodyne detection.

  17. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

  18. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  19. RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.B. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Marshall, A.C. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Donald B.; Marshall, Albert C. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I and C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models.

  1. The Accident Externality from Driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edlin, Aaron S.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sex-Divided Mile- age, Accident, and Insurance Cost DataMandic. 2003. “The Accident Externality from Driving. ”Insurance Res. Council. accident externality from driving

  2. Neutron-Deuteron System and Photon Polarization Parameter at Thermal Neutron Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sadeghi

    2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective Field Theory(EFT) is, the unique, model independent and systematic low-energy version of QCD for processes involving momenta below the pion mass. A low-energy photo-nuclear observable in three-body systems, photon polarization parameter at thermal neutron energies is calculated by using pionless EFT up to next-to-next to leading order(N$^2$LO). In order to make a comparative study of this model, we compared our results for photon polarization parameter with the realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Urbana IX or Tucson-Melbourne three-nucleon interactions. Three-body currents give small but significant contributions to some of the observables in the neutron-deuteron radiative capture cross section at thermal neutron energies. In this formalism the three-nucleon forces are needed up to N$^2$LO for cut-off independent results. Our result converges order by order in low energy expansion and also cut-off independent at this order.

  3. Experimental investigation on the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system on water-heating mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Guiyin; Hu, Hainan; Liu, Xu [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study on operation performance of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was conducted in this paper. The experimental system of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure, the condensation pressure and the coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pump air-conditioning system, the water temperature and receiving heat capacity in water heater, the photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and the photovoltaic efficiency were investigated. The experimental results show that the mean photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar heat pump air-conditioning system reaches 10.4%, and can improve 23.8% in comparison with that of the conventional photovoltaic module, the mean COP of heat pump air-conditioning system may attain 2.88 and the water temperature in water heater can increase to 42 C. These results indicate that the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system has better performances and can stably work. (author)

  4. Compact Modeling and Analysis for Electronic and Thermal Effects of Nanometer Integrated and Packaged Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WANG, HAI

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison of the new thermal sensor placement algorithm with the uniform and the k-meanscomparison of the new thermal sensor placement algorithm with the uniform and the k-means

  5. Chaotic itinerancy and thermalization in one-dimensional self-gravitating systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshio Tsuchiya; Naoteru Gouda; Tetsuro Konishi

    1996-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third paper of the series of our studies of the one-dimensional self-gravitating many-body systems. In this paper, we thus study the transition phenomena after the first transition from a quasiequilibrium. We found that irrespective of the initial conditions, the system wanders between many states which yield the same properties of the quasiequilibrium as the water-bag. This itinerancy is most prominent in the time scale $t\\sim 10^5 \\sim 10^6 t_c$. In the midway between two succeeding quasiequilibria, the system experiences a transient state, where one particle keeps exclusive high energy and its motion decouples with the others. Though the transient state is not the thermally relaxed equilibrium, its distribution quite resembles the isothermal distribution. Thus the macroscopic relaxation we discussed in the previous papers corresponds to the transition from one of quasiequilibria to a transient state. Averaging the behavior over a time scale much longer than the macroscopic relaxation time gives the isothermal distribution. Distribution of lifetime $\\tau$ of the transient states yields a power-law distribution of $\\tau^{-2}$. The transient state gives a clear example of chaotic itinerancy in conserved dynamical systems. The mechanism of the onset of itinerancy is examined.

  6. Detailed modeling of the evaporation and thermal decomposition of urea-water-solution in SCR systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on the UWS evaporation is taken into account using a NRTL activity model. The thermal decomposition model

  7. Video and thermal imaging system for monitoring interiors of high temperature reaction vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei V. (Chicago, IL); Zelepouga, Serguei A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for real-time monitoring of the interior of a combustor or gasifier wherein light emitted by the interior surface of a refractory wall of the combustor or gasifier is collected using an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end. Color information in the light is captured with primary color (RGB) filters or complimentary color (GMCY) filters placed over individual pixels of color sensors disposed within a digital color camera in a BAYER mosaic layout, producing RGB signal outputs or GMCY signal outputs. The signal outputs are processed using intensity ratios of the primary color filters or the complimentary color filters, producing video images and/or thermal images of the interior of the combustor or gasifier.

  8. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  9. Thermal Characterization and Analysis of A123 Systems Battery Cells, Modules and Packs: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-243

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the A123 Systems battery development program with USABC/DOE, NREL provided technical support in thermal characterization, analysis and management of batteries. NREL's effort was part of Energy Storage Project funded by DOE Vehicle Technologies Program. The purpose of this work was for NREL to perform thermal characterization and analysis of A123 Systems cells and modules with the aim for Al23 Systems to improve the thermal performance of their battery cells, modules and packs.

  10. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. Dynamic Thermal Modeling of a Radiant Panels System and its Environment for Commissioning: Application to Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, N. F.; Bertagnolio, S.; Andre, P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and radiation heat exchanges are not aggregated in the present model and air convective and mean radiant temperatures are computed. Radiant ceiling system model As shown in Figure 2, a detailed R-C model is used to simulate the thermal behavior... below the tube. Figure 2. R-C model scheme The radiant ceiling can be considers therefore as a fin where only the dry regime is considered. The thermal balance of this sub-system considers the convective heat transfer on the water side (in...

  12. External Research Funding Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 External Research Funding Agreements University Policy No: RH8200 Classification: Research and university employees under Research Funding Agreements. DEFINITIONS 2.00 Research Funding Agreement means funding provided through an agreement with the university to be used for research purposes, whether

  13. Microsoft External Research Backgrounder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    are undeniable. M icrosoft Research believes that collaboration between the public and private sectors, combined with the power of computing, can help researchers as they work to solve the most urgent challenges in medicine, Building the Future of Technology Microsoft External Research Backgrounder #12;The team promotes research

  14. 25 kWe solar thermal stirling hydraulic engine system: Final conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to the 11-meter Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made by Pioneer Engineering and Manufacturing. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000-hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, >33.3% overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs of $300/kW. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high-pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk. The engine design is based on a highly refined Stirling hydraulic engine developed over 20 years as a fully implantable artificial heart power source. 4 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The rationale/benefits of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion for NASA's lunar space transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borowski, S.K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradin, Michael; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  17. Course Course Title Area Leader Frequency 09 Fall 10 Spr 10 Fall 11 Spr 11 Fall 12 Spr 12 Fall 13 Spr MMAE 433 Design of Thermal System Thermal Sciences Yagoobi 2 x x x x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    468 Introduction to Ceramic Materials Materials Science & Eng Gonczy 2 x x x x MMAE 470 Introduction Processes Materials Science & Eng Tin 2 x x x x MMAE 486 Properties of Ceramics Materials Science & Eng Systems Thermal Sciences Ostrogorsky TBD x MMAE 523 Fundamentals of Power Generation Thermal Sciences

  18. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  19. Optimizing wettability of externally wetted microfabricated silicon electrospray thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Tanya Cruz

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrospray propulsion devices with externally wetted architectures have shown favorable performance. The design of microfabricated silicon thrusters and their feed systems requires an understanding of propellant flow ...

  20. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  1. Proceedings: National conference on environmental externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of the National Conference on Environmental Externalities. A environmental externality is the environmental impact of a process or a plant that society must endure. It is a social cost and is paid, but not by the company who produced it or the company`s customers who endure it. The main purpose of this report is to gather the many designs and ideas of how and why to internalize the externalities into the pricing systems of the public utility commissions, especially that of the electric utilities. Economic and sociological aspects of the internalization of these externalities are given in these proceedings. Individual papers are processed separately for databases. (MB)

  2. Financing alternatives and incentives for solar-thermal central-receiver systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bos, P.B.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of various recently enacted incentive and regulatory legislation combined with the new administration policy and budgetary guidelines, the commercialization of solar thermal central receiver systems will involve financing alternatives other than conventional utility financing. This study was conducted to identify these potential financing alternatives and the associated requirements and impacts on the Department of Energy program. Based upon this analysis, it is concluded that the current alternative financing window is extremely short (through 1985), and that an extension or at the least a gradual phasing out, of the solar tax credits is necessary for the successful transfer of the central receiver technology to the private sector. Furthermore, throughout this time period, continued government support of the R and D activities is necessary to provide the necessary confidence in this technology for the private (financial) sector to underwrite this technology transfer. Consequently, even though the central receiver technology shows high promise for replacing a significant fraction of the oil/gas-fired utility industry peaking and intermediate generation, the current readiness status of this technology still requires further direct and indirect government support for a successful technology transfer. The direct government research and development support will provide the basis for a technological readiness and confidence, whereas the indirect tax incentive support serves to underwrite the extraordinary risks associated with the technology transfer. These support requirements need only be limited to and decreasing during this technology transfer phase, since as the systems approach successful full-scale commercialization, the extraordinary risks will be gradually eliminated. At the time of commercialization the system's value should be on a par with the installed system's cost.

  3. Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the coupled model is illustrated for geotechnical applications in energy-resource related areas. Examples in the areas of nuclear waste isolation and cut-and-fill mining are cited.

  4. Thermally induced local failures in quasi-one-dimensional systems: collapse in carbon nanotubes, neckling in nanowires, bubbles in DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisoli, Cristiano [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lookman, Turab [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saxena, Avadh [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abraham, Douglas [RUDOLF PEIERLS CENTRE

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi one dimensional systems can suffer local structural failures-broadly defined-along their length: for instance, carbon nanotubes can collapse, nanowires can show bottlenecks below which conductance drops, bubbles open in DNA. We present a formalism to explore the occurrence of those thermally activated failures in complete generality, to calculate the average length between them as a function of the thermodynamic observables.

  5. Regularity criteria and uniform estimates for the Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jishan Fan; Fucai Li; Gen Nakamura

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we establish some regularity criteria for the 3D Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity. We also obtain some uniform estimates for the corresponding 2D case when the fluid viscosity coefficient is a positive constant.

  6. Thermal environment in indoor spaces with under-floor air distribution systems: 2. Determination of design parameters (1522-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Thermal environment in indoor spaces with under-floor air distribution systems: 2. Determination of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA 2 Building Energy and Environment Engineering LLP, Lafayette, Indiana 47905, USA 3 School of Environmental Science and Engineering

  7. This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Outdoor Coils of Air-Source Heat Pumps. Proceedings of ASME-ATI-UIT. Conference on Thermal and Environmental Issues in Energy Systems 16 ­ 19 May, 2010, Sorrento, Italy INTRODUCTION Air source heat pump and have low installation cost. An air source heat pump exchanges heat directly from the indoor environment

  8. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  9. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  10. Statistical properties of the energy exchanged between two heat baths coupled by thermal fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    particles kept at different temperatures and coupled by an elastic force. We measure the heat flowingStatistical properties of the energy exchanged between two heat baths coupled by thermal systems in contact with a single heat bath and driven out of equilibrium by external forces [1, 2, 3, 4, 5

  11. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K. [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

  12. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    128] V Minea, "Using Geothermal Energy and Industrial Wastesuch as solar thermal and geothermal energy will become ansolar field, and geothermal energy, where energy is obtained

  13. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature solar thermal electric generation with Organicthermal- photovoltaic co-generation scheme could have potentially very high solar-to-electric

  14. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    focus only on the solar collector and catalytic converterfluid, a microfluidic solar collector, and a catalytic heatS. a. , 2004, “Solar Thermal Collectors and Applications,”

  15. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:of various energy storage technologies. Here only batterieseffective solar energy storage technologies makes the sun,

  16. To cite this document: Bennani , Lokman and Villedieu, Philippe and Salan, Michel Two Dimensional Model of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System. (2013) In: 5th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System. (2013) In: 5th AIAA Atmospheric and Space of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System L. Bennani Airbus Operations SAS, Toulouse, 31000, France P shall focus on the main governing equations and building blocks of the M.A.D (Anti-icing Deicing

  17. THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: thermal hydraulics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    -fluid modeling of nuclear reactor systems. Thermal-hydraulic analysis codes such as RELAP5-3D ~Ref. 1! and FLICA regions of the system. In fact, the CFD code FLUENT has previously been coupled to RELAP5-3D ~Refs. 3

  18. Ambient variation-tolerant and inter components aware thermal management for mobile system on chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    by 2D/3D rendering and arithmetic computations to exercise the SoC. As inter- component dependency, we) thermal interaction between the components on the printed circuit board and 2) the influence of phone. The thermal study of the entire working phone has not been conducted. In [6], power and energy analysis

  19. Evaluation and Optimization of Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP)- A Project within the new German R&D- Framework EnBop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelmann, F.; Kipry, H.; Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.

    of these research projects and presents detailed results of project WKSP. The performance of buildings with systems for underground thermal energy storage is analysed in this project. As the analyses show several systems work worse than expected. Within the project...

  20. Comparison of Different Upscaling Methods for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Complex Heterogeneous Materials System: Application on Nuclear Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop a strategy in thermal conductivity prediction of a complex heterogeneous materials system, loaded nuclear waste forms, the computational efficiency and accuracy of different upscaling methods have been evaluated. The effective thermal conductivity, obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components, is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling method, were developed and implemented. Microstructure based finite element method (FEM) prediction results were used to as benchmark to determine the accuracy of the different upscaling methods. Micrographs from waste forms with varying waste loadings were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity in FEM and homogenization methods. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (e.g., Taylor model and Sachs model) are stronger than the self-consistent model, statistical upscaling method, and finite element method. However, when balancing computational efficiency and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a useful method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste forms.

  1. Video imaging system and thermal mapping of the molten hearth in an electron beam melting furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miszkiel, M.E.; Davis, R.A.; Van Den Avyle, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated to develop an enhanced video imaging system for the Liquid Metal Processing Laboratory Electron Beam Melting (EB) Furnace at Sandia and to use color video images to map the temperature distribution of the surface of the molten hearth. In a series of test melts, the color output of the video image was calibrated against temperatures measured by an optical pyrometer and CCD camera viewing port above the molten pool. To prevent potential metal vapor deposition onto line-of-sight optical surfaces above the pool, argon backfill was used along with a pinhole aperture to obtain the vide image. The geometry of the optical port to the hearth set the limits for the focus lens and CCD camera`s field of view. Initial melts were completed with the pyrometer and pinhole aperture port in a fixed position. Using commercially available vacuum components, a second flange assembly was constructed to provide flexibility in choosing pyrometer target sights on the hearth and to adjust the field of view for the focus lens/CCD combination. RGB video images processed from the melts verified that red wavelength light captured with the video camera could be calibrated with the optical pyrometer target temperatures and used to generate temperature maps of the hearth surface. Two color ratio thermal mapping using red and green video images, which has theoretical advantages, was less successful due to probable camera non-linearities in the red and green image intensities.

  2. Test procedures and protocols: Their relevance to the figure of merit for thermal distribution systems. Volume 1: Informal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J.W.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual framework is developed that categorizes measurement protocols for forced-air thermal distribution systems in small buildings. This framework is based on the distinction between two generic approaches. The {open_quote}system-comparison{close_quote} approach seeks to determine, via a pair of whole-house energy-use measurements, the difference in energy use between the house with the as-found duct system and the same house with no energy losses attributable to the thermal distribution system. The {open_quote}component loss-factor{close_quote} approach identifies and measures the individual causes of duct losses, and then builds up a value for the net overall duct efficiency, usually with the help of computer simulation. Examples of each approach are analyzed and related to a proposed Figure of Merit for thermal distribution systems. This Figure of Merit would serve as the basis for a Standard Method of Test analogous to those already in place for furnaces, boilers, air conditioners, and heat pumps.

  3. External Technical Review Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732 DOEDepartment of EnergyEric J.ExploringExternal Technical

  4. ARM - External Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYouQuality ProgramgovExternal Data Center

  5. Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

  6. Phase lag deduced information in photo-thermal actuation for nano-mechanical systems characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bijster, R. J. F., E-mail: roy.bijster@tno.nl; Vreugd, J. de [Department of Optomechatronics, TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Sadeghian, H. [Department of Optomechatronics, TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In photo-thermal actuation, heat is added locally to a micro-cantilever by means of a laser. A fraction of the irradiation is absorbed, yielding thermal stresses and deformations in the structure. Harmonic modulation of the laser power causes the cantilever to oscillate. Moreover, a phase lag is introduced which is very sensitive to the spot location and the cantilever properties. This phase lag is theoretically predicted and experimentally verified. Combined with thermo-mechanical properties of the cantilever and its geometry, the location of the laser spot, the thermal diffusivity, and the layer thicknesses of the cantilever can be extracted.

  7. Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    by their very nature represent a reduced fire hazard compared to dry filter booth systems. NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) fire safety codes require the use of fire suppression automatic sprinklers on dry filter booths but not on water wash booths...Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs Mike McGinness VP-R&D EcoShield Environmental Systems, Inc. Houston, Texas ABSTRACT HAP (Hazardous Air Pollutant) and VOC (Volatile...

  8. A FRAMEWORK FOR THERMAL SPRAY SHAPE DEPOSITION: THE MD*SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lee E.

    . Siewiork The Robotics Institute and The Engineering Design Research Center Carnegie Mellon University.egrated electronic/mechanical structures are feasible. J(eywords: Thermal Spray, Net Shape Manufacture, Rapid Pl'ot.ot

  9. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water temperatures. With the method of enthalpy , the PCM thermal storage time is studied under different supply water temperatures, supply water flows, distances between water wipe in the floor construction, floor covers and insulation conditions....

  10. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c,e Low-Intermediate Gas turbine exhaust, boiler exhaust,cycles for micro-gas turbines," Applied Thermal Engineering,Tiba, "Optimization of gas-turbine combined cycles for solar

  11. Thermal and lighting performance of toplighting systems in the hot and humid climate of Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harntaweewongsa, Siritip

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , light distribution, and uniformity. EnergyPlus was used as the thermal analysis tool, and RADIANCE, along with a physical scale model, was used as the lighting performance analysis tool. The sky conditions tested were overcast, clear sky...

  12. Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loferski, J.J. (ed.)

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

  13. Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions between the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very effective in removing decay heat. By removing the limit on the decay heat removal capability due to the limited available surface area as in a RVACS, the reactor power and power density can be significantly increased, without losing the passive heat removal feature. This paper will introduce the concept of using DRACS to enhance VHTR passive safety and economics. Three design options will be discussed, depending on the cooling pipe locations. Analysis results from a lumped volume based model and CFD simulations will be presented.

  14. Design, demonstration and evaluation of a thermal enhanced vapor extraction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, J.; Reavis, B.; Swanson, J. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES), which combines powerline frequency heating (PLF) and radio frequency (RF) heating with vacuum soil vapor extraction, was used to effectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from a pit in the chemical waste landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) within a two month heating period. Volume average temperatures of 83{degrees}C and 112{degrees}C were reached for the PLF and RF heating periods, respectively, within the 15 ft x 45 ft x 18.5 ft deep treated volume. This resulted in the removal of 243 lb of measured toxic organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), 55 gallons of oil, and 11,000 gallons of water from the site. Reductions of up to 99% in total chromatographic organics (TCO) was achieved in the heated zone. Energy balance calculations for the PLF heating period showed that 36.4% of the heat added went to heating the soil, 38.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 4.2% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.1% went to heating the extracted air, and 6.6% was lost. For the RF heating period went to heating the soil, 23.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 2.4% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.5% went to heating extracted air, and 9.7% went to losses. Energy balance closure was 92.8% for the PLF heating and 98% for the RF heating. The energy input requirement per unit soil volume heated per unit temperature increase was 1.63 kWH/yd{sup 3}-{degrees}C for PLF heating and 0.73 kWH/yd{sup 3}{degrees}C for RF heating.

  15. Bevalac external beamline optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested.

  16. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  17. This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group that is typically only the case for envelope-dominated buildings in a given location. · Reasonably constant ground thermal properties between locations for which the rule-of-thumb would be applied. The main example

  18. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Thermal Control Systems (TCS) operate by applying an electric field to a dielectric fluid that, in turn, generates a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Thermal Control Systems (TCS) operate by applying an electric field to a dielectric fluid that, in turn, generates a force that can be used to pump fluids and separate liquid Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Based Thermal Control Subsytems at NASAGSFC Jeffrey R. Didion Mathew Showalter NASA Goddard

  19. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

  20. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

  1. Development of US Navy Shipboard Systems for solid and liquid waste thermal treatment. Report for July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullet, B.K.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the U.S. Navy`s shipboard environmental challenges and a few of its research programs for meeting its needs for solid and liquid waste treatment. This objective is particularly important in environmentally sensitive areas, such as the Mediterranean Sea, where fleet deployment time is significant. Prohibitions on ocean dumping and anticipated requirements on effluent discharge quality have led the Navy to continue the research, development, and demonstration of shipboard systems to treat their unpreventable wastes. For solid, non-hazardous wastes, post-minimization efforts are geared toward long-term development of systems to thermally pyrolyze and oxidize the wastes into significantly reduced volume and weight.

  2. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, Y., E-mail: shibata.yoshihide@jaea.go.jp; Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ?4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  3. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN); Mihalczo, John T (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  4. An experimental measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of a porous solid-liquid system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, James Elliott

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 6. The Relation of to SE for Values of K Calculated by the Heat Neter K SE Nethod 10 13 15 17 22 7. The Relation of the Thermal Conductivity of Fluid Saturated Sandstone to the Thermal Conductivity of the Saturating Fluid 8. The Variation... of pressures and temperatures and at flow and non-flow states (3)~(6), (7), The advent of widespread interest in increasing petroleum recovery from subterranean reservoirs by applying heat to an oil-bearing for- mation (8), (9), (10) has created a need...

  5. Analysis and System Design of a Large Chiller Plant for Korea, with or without Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, C.; Simmonds, P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % was provided by thermal storage as in the previous scheme. Electric centrifugal chillers, two (2) at 950 tons each, were still required to charge the ice tanks at night, because gas-fired absorption chillers cannot make the 28°F (-2.2"C) glycol solution... simulated. C. Electric Centrifugal Chillers with Thermal Storage: Local code requires that a maximum of 60% of the peak cooling load be satisfied "real-time" by electricity. Therefore, two (2) 1,020-ton electric centrifugal chillers provided 2,040 tons...

  6. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Industrial

  7. The Accident Externality from Driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edlin, Aaron S.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to which this externality results from increases in accidentrates, accident severity or both remains unclear. Itpertains to underinsured accident costs like fatality risk.

  8. JV Task 46 - Development and Testing of a Thermally Integrated SOFC-Gasification System for Biomass Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip Hutton; Nikhil Patel; Kyle Martin; Devinder Singh

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has designed a biomass power system using a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermally integrated with a downdraft gasifier. In this system, the high-temperature effluent from the SOFC enables the operation of a substoichiometric air downdraft gasifier at an elevated temperature (1000 C). At this temperature, moisture in the biomass acts as an essential carbon-gasifying medium, reducing the equivalence ratio at which the gasifier can operate with complete carbon conversion. Calculations show gross conversion efficiencies up to 45% (higher heating value) for biomass moisture levels up to 40% (wt basis). Experimental work on a bench-scale gasifier demonstrated increased tar cracking within the gasifier and increased energy density of the resultant syngas. A series of experiments on wood chips demonstrated tar output in the range of 9.9 and 234 mg/m{sup 3}. Both button cells and a 100-watt stack was tested on syngas from the gasifier. Both achieved steady-state operation with a 22% and 15% drop in performance, respectively, relative to pure hydrogen. In addition, tar tolerance testing on button cells demonstrated an upper limit of tar tolerance of approximately 1%, well above the tar output of the gasifier. The predicted system efficiency was revised down to 33% gross and 27% net system efficiency because of the results of the gasifier and fuel cell experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of thermally integrating a gasifier and a high-temperature fuel cell in small distributed power systems.

  9. Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the Univerity of Utah

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team contributed to the Desert Peak project, focusing largely on a geomechanical investigation of the Desert Peak reservoir, tracer testing between injectors 21-2 and 22-22 and the field�s main producers, and the chemical stimulation of target well 27-15.

  10. Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team contributed to the Desert Peak project, focusing largely on a geomechanical investigation of the Desert Peak reservoir, tracer testing between injectors 21-2 and 22-22 and the field�������¢����������������s main producers, and the chemical stimulation of target well 27-15.

  11. Final Report: Use of Graphite Foam as a Thermal Performance Enhancement of Heavy Hybrid Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, James William [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's graphite foam has the potential to be used as a heat exchanger for the Army's Future Combat System Manned Ground Vehicle and thus has the potential to improve its thermal performance. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program FLOW3D was used to develop a new CFD model for the graphite foam to be used in the development of a proper heat exchanger. The program was calibrated by first measuring the properties of the solid foams and determining the parameters to be used in the CFD model. Then the model was used to predict within 5% error the performance of finned foam heat sinks. In addition, the f factors and j factors commonly used to predict pressure drop and heat transfer were calculated for both the solid and finned structures. There was some evidence that corrugating the foams would yield higher j/f ratios than state of the art heat exchangers, confirming previously measured data. Because the results show that the CFD model was validated, it is recommended that the funding for Phases 2 through 5 be approved for the design of both the finned heat exchanger using tubes and round fin structures and the solid foam design using corrugated foams. It was found that the new CFD model using FLOW3D can predict both solid foam heat transfer and finned foam heat transfer with the validated model parameters. In addition, it was found that the finned foam structures exhibited j/f ratios that indicate that significant heat transfer is occurring within the fin structures due to aerodynamically induced flow, which is not present in solid aluminum fin structures. It is possible that the foam surfaces can act as turbulators that increase heat transfer without affecting pressure drop, like the vortex generators seen in state of the art heat exchangers. These numbers indicate that the foam can be engineered into an excellent heat exchanger. It was also found that corrugating the solid foams would increase the j/f ratio dramatically, allowing the solid foams to compete directly with standard heat exchangers. Although corrugated L1 foam samples have not been produced (attempts are under way), it is possible that their j/f ratio can be even higher than those of the finned structures.

  12. Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

  13. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

  15. A Comparison of Open Versus Closed Systems in Thermal Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salbodkin, A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thermal storage, by its very nature, requires a large storage vessel. Depending upon the technology employed, this can vary from as little as 1.6cuft./ton-hour, up to 15cuft./ton-hour. The result can be storage tanks with volumes...

  16. Vessel thermal map real-time system for the JET tokamak R. Felton,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature than the formerly installed carbon fiber composite tiles, imposes strict thermal restrictions of the tritium retention levels when compared with the previous carbon fiber composite (CFC)-based wall [1]. JET of international thermonuclear experimental reactor-relevant materials for the plasma facing components (PFCs

  17. Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

  18. This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (www.hvac.okstate.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    to reductions in electrical energy usage, and allow more effective demand-side management. However, comparedThis paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group

  19. Chiller Start/Stop Optimization for a Campus-wide Chilled Water System with a Thermal Storage Tank Under a Four-Period Electricity Rate Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.; Contreras, O.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a 1.4-million-gallon chilled water thermal storage tank greatly increases the operational flexibility of a campuswide chilled water system under a four-part electricity rate structure. While significant operational savings can...

  20. Impact of the Position of a Radiator to Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-IC-10/05-35 1 Impact of the Position of the Radiator on Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System Xiangyang Gong David E... the energy consumption and thermal comfort distribution in a typical office with a mixed radiant and convective heating system for two different locations of radiant heat sources. Accurately estimating the energy consumption in a mixed heating space...

  1. Impact of the Position of a Radiator to Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-IC-10/05-35 1 Impact of the Position of the Radiator on Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System Xiangyang Gong David E... the energy consumption and thermal comfort distribution in a typical office with a mixed radiant and convective heating system for two different locations of radiant heat sources. Accurately estimating the energy consumption in a mixed heating space...

  2. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar thermal and heat storage on CO 2 emissions and annual energyenergy costs, heat storage does not directly support solar thermal /energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  4. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eere.energy.gov * energy.govsunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving...

  5. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Thermal Control Technologies Advanced Vehicle Systems Technology Transfer Jet Cooling Alternative Coolants TIM Low R Structure Phase Change Spray Cooling Air Cooling...

  6. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  7. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  8. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  9. Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the findings of a technology market assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) in space cooling applications. The potential impact of TES in Federal facilities is modeled using the Federal building inventory with the appropriate climatic and energy cost data. In addition, this assessment identified acceptance issues and major obstacles through interviews with energy services companies (ESCOs), TES manufacturers, and Federal facility staff.

  10. Stability of planar reactive fronts in external fields Arkady B. Rovinsky,* Anatol M. Zhabotinsky,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    in reactive systems due to external fields such as electric fields or pressure gradients, may significantlyStability of planar reactive fronts in external fields Arkady B. Rovinsky,* Anatol M. Zhabotinsky arise naturally in systems sub- jected to external fields, such as electric fields or pressure gradients

  11. Control mechanism for attenuation of thermal energy pulses using cold circulators in the cryogenic distribution system of fusion devices in tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382-428 (India)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation and control of superconducting (SC) magnets in the fusion devices having tokamak configuration opens up the domain of varying peak thermal energy environment as a function of time, commensurate with the plasma pulses. The varied thermal energy environment, thus propagated to upstream of the cooling system, is responsible for the system level instability of the overall cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system, the regime of first impact point, therefore, has to be tuned so as to stay at the nearly stable zone of operation. The configuration of the cryogenic distribution system, considered in the present study, involves a liquid helium (LHe) bath as a thermal buffer, LHe submerged heat exchangers and cold circulator apart from the valves for implementations of the precise controls. The cold circulator supplies the forced flow supercritical helium, used for the cooling of SC magnets. The transients of the thermal energy pulses can be attenuated in the cryogenic distribution system by various methodologies. One of the adopted methodologies in the present study is with the precise speed control of the cold circulators. The adopted methodology is applied to various configurations of arrangements of internal components in the distribution system for obtaining system responses with superior attenuation of energy pulses. The process simulation approach, assumptions, considered inputs and constraints, process modeling with different configuration as well as results to accomplish the control scheme for the attenuation of the thermal energy pulses are described.

  12. Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 of the ``Survey of Strong Motion Earthquake Effects on Thermal Power Plants in California with Emphasis on Piping Systems`` contains Appendices which detail the detail design and seismic response of several power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes. The particular plants considered include the Ormond Beach, Long Beach and Seal Beach, Burbank, El Centro, Glendale, Humboldt Bay, Kem Valley, Pasadena and Valley power plants. Included is a typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical piping and support installations for the plants surveyed. Detailed piping support spacing data are also included.

  13. Ventilation efficiencies and thermal comfort results of a desk-edge-mounted task ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.; Sullivan, D.P.; Lee, S.M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDGE-MOUNTED TASK VENTILATION SYSTEM D Faulkner, WJ Fisk, DPDESK-EDGE-MOUNTED TASK VENTILATION SYSTEM D Faulkner * , WJcomfort of a task ventilation system with an air supply

  14. PV Fact Sheets Argument B1Some people state that "The external costs of PV electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PV Fact Sheets Argument B1Some people state that "The external costs of PV electricity is much and the low one to thin-film cadmium telluride PV systems. Fossil fuel power plants PV displaces. 5.8 External

  15. Utility External Disconnect Switch: Practical, Legal, and Technical Reasons to Eliminate the Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report documents the safe operation of PV systems without a utility external disconnect switch in several large jurisdictions. It includes recommendations for regulators contemplating utility external disconnect switch requirements.

  16. Using thermal boundary conditions to engineer the quantum state of a bulk magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Schmidt; D. M. Silevitch; G. Aeppli; T. F. Rosenbaum

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of contact between a system and the external environment can alter dramatically its proclivity to quantum mechanical modes of relaxation. We show that controlling the thermal coupling of cubic centimeter-sized crystals of the Ising magnet $LiHo_xY_{1-x}F_4$ to a heat bath can be used to tune the system between a glassy state dominated by thermal excitations over energy barriers and a state with the hallmarks of a quantum spin liquid. Application of a magnetic field transverse to the Ising axis introduces both random magnetic fields and quantum fluctuations, which can retard and speed the annealing process, respectively, thereby providing a mechanism for continuous tuning between the destination states. The non-linear response of the system explicitly demonstrates quantum interference between internal and external relaxation pathways.

  17. Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

  18. Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    building systems for low energy buildings: System analysismeasurement of six low energy buildings in different partspointed out that low energy buildings may under- perform

  19. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  20. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ronald J. (Latham, NY)

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  1. Thermal balance of a wall with PCM-enhanced thermal insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Kossecka, Elizabeth [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences] [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences; Williams, Teresa [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: PCM insulation mixtures function as lightweight thermal mass components. It is expected that these types of dynamic insulation systems will contribute to the objective of reducing energy use in buildings. In this paper, dynamic thermal properties of a material in which phase hange occurs are analyzed, using the temperature-dependent specific heat model. Integral formula for the total heat flow in finite time interval, across the surface of a slab of the phase change material, was derived. Simulations have been performed to analyze heat transfer through a light-weight wall assembly with PCM-enhanced insulation, in different external climate thermal conditions. Results of simulations indicate that for cyclic processes, the effect of PCM in an insulation layer results rather in time shifting of the heat flux extreme values than in reduction of the total heat flow. The heat gains maxima, resulting in high cooling loads, are shifted in time by about two hours and reduced about 15% to 30% for not very high external sol-air temperatures.

  2. Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

  3. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems - Revison 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330 C (535-625 F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350 C (554-633 F). The correlations for estimating the change in tensile stress, including the Ramberg/Osgood parameters for strain hardening, are also described. The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The extent or degree of thermal embrittlement at 'saturation,' i.e., the minimum impact energy that can be achieved for a material after long-term aging, is determined from the chemical composition of the steel. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of JIC are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common 'predicted lower-bound' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  4. The Volatility and the Thermal Storage Performance of Binary Polyalcohol Systems Used in the Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Q.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The structural and chemical analyses of a kind of shape-stabilized paraffin. ACTA Energiae Solaris Sinica. 2000, 21(4):4 421. (in Chinese) Qin Penghua, Yang Rui, Zhang Yinping etc.. Thermal performance of shape-stabilized phase change materials. J (in... Chinese) Fan Yaofeng, Zhang Xinxiang. Progress in studies of solid-solid phase change materials. REVIEW OF MATERIALS. 2003,17(7):50-53. (in Ch [10] Ruan Deshui?Zhang Taiping. DSC Research of phase change materials. ACTA Energiae Solaris Sinica...

  5. Project Profile: Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermalDepartment of

  6. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  7. AN EXTERNAL ORIGIN FOR CARBON MONOXIDE ON URANUS FROM HERSCHEL/SPIRE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom)] [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Irwin, P. G. J., E-mail: n.teanby@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: irwin@atm.ox.ac.uk [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have demonstrated an external source of CO on Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. However, it has not been possible to demonstrate this on Uranus because of its low CO abundance, low upper-tropospheric temperatures, and low stratospheric thermal gradient, which make detection very challenging. Here we use 17 Herschel/SPIRE observation sequences spanning 3 yr (2009-2012), which cover 14.6-51.8 cm{sup –1} with a combined integration time of 5 hr. These spectra were originally taken for routine calibration purposes, so were corrected for continuum offsets prior to analysis. The final stacked spectra had an extremely low noise level of 10-50 pW cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1}/cm{sup –1}. Despite this, CO was not observed, but we were able to obtain stringent 3? upper limits at the 0.1-0.2 bar level of 2.1 ppb for a uniform profile, and 9.4 ppb for a stratosphere-only profile—an order of magnitude improvement over previous studies. Comparison with observed CO fluorescence by Encrenaz et al. suggests the majority of Uranus' stratospheric CO has an external origin. It thus appears that external supply of oxygen species—via comets, micrometeorites, or dust—is an important process on all giant planets in our solar system.

  8. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 5: External RHR Break Near Inlet Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report.

  9. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 4: External Pressurizer Surge Line Break Near Inlet Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of reports documenting accident scenario simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal systems. The simulations were performed in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the APT.

  10. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Min Kim, Hyung [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  11. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and higher efficiency photovoltaic systems. However, forphotovoltaic system such that reasonable solar-to-electric conversion efficienciesphotovoltaic co-generation scheme could have potentially very high solar-to-electric efficiency.

  12. The development of a solar thermal water purification, heating, and power generation system: A case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    implemented in several desalination systems through the use of coal or gas-fired boilers. To date, however

  13. Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of Energy InvestingS10IS007ofDepartmentPilotImportantVehicles |

  14. A 20-SUN HYBRID PV-THERMAL LINEAR MICRO-CONCENTRATOR SYSTEM FOR URBAN ROOFTOP APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ACT, Australia P. Le Livre 2 , M. Greaves 2 , A. Tanner 2 2 Chromasun Inc, San Jose, CA, United States of America ABSTRACT A unique, linear, low-concentration, hybrid `micro- concentrator' (MCT) system concept, system output of 500 Wpe and 2 kWpt is expected, for a combined system efficiency of up to 75%. The MCT

  15. Thermal Issues Associated with the Lighting Systems, Electronics Racks, and Pre-Amplifier Modules in the National Ignition System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. C. Owen; J. D. Bernardin; K. L. Lam

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an investigation of the thermal issues related to the National Ignition Facility. The influence of heat sources such as lighting fixtures, electronics racks, and pre-amplifier modules (PAMs) on the operational performance of the laser guide beam tubes and optical alignment hardware in the NE laser bays were investigated with experiments and numerical models. In particular, empirical heat transfer data was used to establish representative and meaningful boundary conditions and also serve as bench marks for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Numerical models, constructed with a commercial CFD code, were developed to investigate the extent of thermal plumes and radiation heat transfer from the heat sources. From these studies, several design modifications were recommended including reducing the size of all fluorescent lights in the NIF laser bays to single 32 W bulb fixtures, maintaining minimum separation distances between light fixtures/electronics racks and beam transport hardware, adding motion sensors in areas of the laser bay to control light fixture operation during maintenance procedures, properly cooling all electronics racks with air-water heat exchangers with heat losses greater than 25 W/rack to the M1 laser bay, ensuring that the electronics racks are not overcooked and thus maintain their surface temperatures to within a few degrees centigrade of the mean air temperature, and insulating the electronic bays and optical support structures on the PAMs.

  16. Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  17. Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR) System Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolley, Robert D [PPPL; Miller, Laurence F [PPPL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Can the hybrid system combination of (1) a critical fission Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) having a thermal spectrum and a high Conversion Ratio (CR) with (2) an external source of high energy neutrons provide an attractive solution to the world's expanding demand for energy? The present study indicates the answer is an emphatic yes.

  18. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

  19. Lubricating system for thermal medium delivery parts in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling steam delivery tubes extend axially along the outer rim of a gas turbine rotor for supplying cooling steam to and returning spent cooling steam from the turbine buckets. Because of the high friction forces at the interface of the tubes and supporting elements due to rotor rotation, a low coefficient of friction coating is provided at the interface of the tubes and support elements. On each surface, a first coating of a cobalt-based alloy is sprayed onto the surface at high temperature. A portion of the first coating is machined off to provide a smooth, hard surface. A second ceramic-based solid film lubricant is sprayed onto the first coating. By reducing the resistance to axial displacement of the tubes relative to the supporting elements due to thermal expansion, the service life of the tubes is substantially extended.

  20. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of Storage Systems Xunfei Jiang, Mohammed I. Alghamdi, Ji Zhang, Maen Al Assaf, Xiaojun Ruan, Tausif Muzaffar, and Xiao Qin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    systems' temperature on cooling costs of data centers, 3) the growing importance of reducing thermal the energy efficiency of data centers [17][26]. For instance, energy cost of cooling systems in data centers@wcupa.edu Abstract--Recognizing that power and cooling cost for data centers are increasing, we address in this study

  1. A NEW MEASUREMENT STRATEGY FOR in situ TESTING OF WALL THERMAL PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condon, P.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conservation, Dynamic thermal envelope thermal performanceTHERHAL TEST UNIT The envelope thermal test unit (ETTU) is athe thermal resistance of building envelope systems through

  2. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage forof Abiotic Photo-chemical Solar Energy Storage Systems,”Power Plants,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, 124 (2),

  3. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [Nocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage forof Abiotic Photo-chemical Solar Energy Storage Systems,”

  4. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    large tanks of hot molten salt are stored in containments soreceiver and the liquid molten salt coolant being heated;system; for example, high molten salt temperatures increases

  5. A 40KW ROOF MOUNTED PV THERMAL CONCENTRATOR SYSTEM J.F.H. Smeltink1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 0200, Australia email: 1 John.Smeltink@anu.edu.au, 2 Andrew.Blakers@anu.edu.au, 3 Joe.Coventry@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT: The Australian National University, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems (ANU-CSES) has developed a photovoltaic

  6. Thermal Inertia: Towards An Energy Conservation Room Management System (Technical report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    increasing attention to energy conservation around the world. The heating and air-conditioning systems-dissipated cool or heated air and conserve energy. We develop a green room management system with three main expenses of the heating or air-conditioning devices. Second, we build an energy-temperature correlation

  7. Extended Abstract Draft THERMES II 2007 2007 Thermal Challenges in Next Generation Electronic System II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that micro-refrigeration systems can be used for electronics cooling but further research in the area AND CHALLENGES OF FUTURE REFRIGERATION COOLING TECHNIQUES AS ELECTRONICS COOLING SYSTEMS Lorenzo Cremaschi, Eckhard A Groll*, and Suresh V Garimella Cooling Technologies Research Center, School of Mechanical

  8. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy...

  9. Blister Threshold Based Thermal Limits for the U-Mo Monolithic Fuel System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Wachs; I. Glagolenko; F. J. Rice; A. B. Robinson; B. H. Rabin; M. K. Meyer

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel failure is most commonly induced in research and test reactor fuel elements by exposure to an under-cooled or over-power condition that results in the fuel temperature exceeding a critical threshold above which blisters form on the plate. These conditions can be triggered by normal operational transients (i.e. temperature overshoots that may occur during reactor startup or power shifts) or mild upset events (e.g., pump coastdown, small blockages, mis-loading of fuel elements into higher-than-planned power positions, etc.). The rise in temperature has a number of general impacts on the state of a fuel plate that include, for example, stress relaxation in the cladding (due to differential thermal expansion), softening of the cladding, increased mobility of fission gases, and increased fission-gas pressure in pores, all of which can encourage the formation of blisters on the fuel-plate surface. These blisters consist of raised regions on the surface of fuel plates that occur when the cladding plastically deforms in response to fission-gas pressure in large pores in the fuel meat and/or mechanical buckling of the cladding over damaged regions in the fuel meat. The blister temperature threshold decreases with irradiation because the mechanical properties of the fuel plate degrade while under irradiation (due to irradiation damage and fission-product accumulation) and because the fission-gas inventory progressively increases (and, thus, so does the gas pressure in pores).

  10. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  11. Modeling and analysis of hybrid geothermal-solar thermal energy conversion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenhut, Andrew David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative solar-geothermal hybrid energy conversion systems were developed for low enthalpy geothermal resources augmented with solar energy. The goal is to find cost-effective hybrid power cycles that take advantage of ...

  12. High-temperature microfluidic systems for thermally-efficient fuel processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arana, Leonel R

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniaturized fuel cell systems have the potential to outperform batteries in powering a variety of portable electronics. The key to this technology is the ability to efficiently process an easily-stored, energy-dense fuel. ...

  13. Clock-Driven Quantum Thermal Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur S. L. Malabarba; Anthony J. Short; Philipp Kammerlander

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an isolated autonomous quantum machine, where an explicit quantum clock is responsible for performing all transformations on an arbitrary quantum system (the engine), via a time-independent Hamiltonian. In a general context, we show that this model can exactly implement any energy-conserving unitary on the engine, without degrading the clock. Furthermore, we show that when the engine includes a quantum work storage device we can approximately perform completely general unitaries on the remainder of the engine. This framework can be used in quantum thermodynamics to carry out arbitrary transformations of a system, with accuracy and extracted work as close to optimal as desired, whilst obeying the first and second laws of thermodynamics. We thus show that autonomous thermal machines suffer no intrinsic thermodynamic cost compared to externally controlled ones.

  14. Dynamics of a system of two coupled quibts in interaction with a thermal bath: A comparative study using different models for the system-bath interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Deçordi; A. Vidiella-Barranco

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a system constituted by two interacting qubits having one of them isolated and the other coupled to a thermal reservoir. We analyze the dynamics of the system considering two different models of system-reservoir interaction: i) a "microscopic" model, in which the master equation is derived taking into account the interaction between the two subsystems (qubits); ii) a "phenomenological" model, in which the master equation consists of a dissipative term simply added to the unitary evolution term. We obtain an analytical solution of the microscopic model without performing the rotating wave approximation for the qubit-qubit interaction; this allows us to compare the results from both models for a wide range of inter-qubit coupling constants. We show that in the strong coupling regime, the expected thermal equilibrium steady state for the two-qubit system naturally arises in the framework of the microscopic model, while in the phenomenological approach it is obtained a steady state density operator which is not correct. We also make a comparative study of the dynamics of the qubit-qubit entanglement and the quantum coherence associated to the isolated qubit. Furthermore, we find that even in the weak coupling regime, there are also important disagreements between the predictions of the two models. Namely, while according to the microscopic model the isolated qubit would approach a maximally mixed state faster for higher temperatures, the phenomenological model gives just the opposite behavior, i.e., it would take longer for the qubit state to become maximally mixed for higher temperatures of the reservoir.

  15. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  16. Color superconductivity in a strong external magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Manuel

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of an applied strong external magnetic field in a three flavor massless color superconductor. The long-range component of the B field that penetrates the superconductor enhances some quark condensates, leading to a different condensation pattern. The external field also reduces the flavor symmetries in the system, and thus it changes drastically the corresponding low energy physics. Our considerations are relevant for the study of highly magnetized compact stars.

  17. Technical basis document for external events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and presents the technical basis for the frequencies of externally initiated accidents. The consequences of externally initiated events are discussed in other documents that correspond to the accident that was caused by the external event. The external events include aircraft crash, vehicle accident, range fire, and rail accident.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Hot Water Efficiency Plumbing System Using Thermal Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cha, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Seo, H. Y.

    hot water piping system, Thermo controlled valve, Circulation, Mixing water pipe, Recirculation water pipe INTRODUCTION Finding ways to conserve energy while heating a building?s water supply can be approached from a number of angles. Still...?s disadvantage is that so much water is wasted until the optimal tap temperature is reached.(6) We tried to solve this problem by developing a water-saving hot water plumbing system that utilizes a thermo-controlled valve. The goal was to not allow...

  19. Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 3 Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds New physics is often discovered by pushing energies. With the current large mixing angle-MSW oscillation parameters, Borexino expects to observe 0.35 neutrino events per day per ton from 7Be in the energy window. Because there are so few events

  20. System-level, Unified In-band and Out-of-band Dynamic Thermal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the decrease in computation capacity. Less studied are out-of-band techniques (e.g. CPU cooling fans [10]) that operate completely outside the critical performance path of an application. Out-of-band techniques cool system slowdowns or shutdowns. Techniques such as dynamically scaling down the voltage of the CPUs

  1. Use of plasma fuel systems at thermal power plants in Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, E.I.; Karpenko, Y.E.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Ude (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermal Physics

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of plasma ignition of solid fuels is described, as well as its creation and development steps, the technoeconomic characteristics of plasma igniter systems, schemes of their installation in pulverized-coal boilers, and results of their application at pulverized coal-fired power plants.

  2. The Design and Analysis of Thermal-Resilient Hard-Real-Time Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Nathan W.

    temperature, an IMD will have to reduce its computational load to prevent tissue damage due to heat1 . However transitions between modes. Furthermore, our system design permits the calculation of a new metric called/vision). However, recent studies [2], [3] have shown that the heat dissipated from IMDs due to the microprocessor

  3. ALD System UCLA Nanoelectronic Facility Fiji Thermal and Plasma Atomic Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    not be heated above that temperature. Center heater maximum temperature is 400o C, while outer heater should temperature of the chemical used. Maximum for the precursor heater jacket is 200o C. #12;ALD System UCLA steps shown in Figure 1. Step. 1: Put in a sample which is hydroxylated from exposure to air, oxygen

  4. 303:20130618.1036 Thermal Engineering Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    303:20130618.1036 Thermal Engineering Group LASP's Thermal Engineering Group is involved in all of the component, as well as on-orbit trending and operations planning. Design Experience The Thermal Engineering Systems Engineering The group has formulated general thermal design and thermal interface requirements

  5. Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

  6. Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of radiant barriers and low-emittance surface coatings in residential building attics can significantly reduce conditioning loads from heat flow through attic floors. The roofing industry has been developing and using various radiant barrier systems and low-emittance surface coatings to increase energy efficiency in buildings; however, minimal data are available that quantifies the effectiveness of these technologies. This study evaluates performance of various attic radiant barrier systems under simulated summer daytime conditions and nighttime or low solar gain daytime winter conditions using the large scale climate simulator (LSCS). The four attic configurations that were evaluated are 1) no radiant barrier (control), 2) perforated low-e foil laminated oriented strand board (OSB) deck, 3) low-e foil stapled on rafters, and 4) liquid applied low-emittance coating on roof deck and rafters. All test attics used nominal RUS 13 h-ft2- F/Btu (RSI 2.29 m2-K/W) fiberglass batt insulation on attic floor. Results indicate that the three systems with radiant barriers had heat flows through the attic floor during summer daytime condition that were 33%, 50%, and 19% lower than the control, respectively.

  8. Experimental Study of the Thermal-Hydraulic Phenomena in the Reactor Cavity Cooling System and Analysis of the Effects of Graphite Dispersion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaghetto, Rodolfo

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental activity was performed to observe and study the effects of graphite dispersion and deposition on thermal hydraulic phenomena in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The small scale RCCS experimental facility (16.5cm x 16.5cm x 30...

  9. This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (www.hvac.okstate.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental systems. The accuracy ofthe thermal load calculation procedure is, therefore, ofconcern to heating oftwo newproceduresfor design cooling load calculations: the heat balance method (HBM) andradiant time (Spitler et al. 1997) is a simplified, heat balance-based design cooling load method intended

  10. Improving the Thermal Output Availability of Reciprocating Engine Cogeneration Systems by Mechanical Vapor Compression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, F. E.; DiBella, F. A.; Lamphere, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these surveys hav been performed by and/or for the Department of En rgy (DOE) or the Gas Research Institute (GRI). Tree assessments of cogeneration system potential (one each conducted by Dun & Bradstreet Technical Econo mic Services; Hagler, Bailly... in the 500- or 1000-kW size, there could be a mar ket for as many as 10,000 to 15,000 units. An analysis by Dun & Bradstreet Technical Economic S~rvices (2) indicates that a substantial number, approximately 4700 of the 20,800 industries used...

  11. Hybrid Photovoltaic/Thermal Systems with a Solar-Assisted Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kush, E. A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An outline of possibilities for effective use of PV/T collectors with a Solar Assisted Heat Pump is given. A quantitative analysis of the performance and cost of the various configurations as a function of regional climates, using up-to-date results from solar heat pump and PV/T collector studies, will be required for more definitive assessment; and it is recommended that these be undertaken in the PV/T Program. Particular attention should be paid to development of high performance PV/T collectors, matching of heat pump electrical system to PV array and power conditioning characteristics, and optimization of storage options for cost effectiveness and utility impact.

  12. Improving the Thermal Output Availability of Reciprocating Engine Cogeneration Systems by Mechanical Vapor Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, F. E.; DiBella, F. A.; Lamphere, F.

    HEAT RECOVERY AND STEAM SUPPLY PROCESS GAS COMPRESSION AND GENERAnoN OF REQUIRED ELECTRIC POWER 728 has also projected that by the year 2000, approxi mately 5000 units of the 1500-kW size could be sold. Thus, considering modular IMVRS-COGEN units.... Heat Recovery Equipment Module Exhaust Gas Boiler Condensate Return System 3. Heat Rejection Module Excess Low-Pressure Steam Condens Air-Cooled Radiator to Provide Co for Turbocharger Intercooling, En Oil Cooling and Compressor Oil Co 4...

  13. Design and experimental testing of the performance of an outdoor LiBr/H{sub 2}O solar thermal absorption cooling system with a cold store

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agyenim, Francis; Knight, Ian; Rhodes, Michael [The Welsh School of Architecture, Bute Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3NB Wales (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A domestic-scale prototype experimental solar cooling system has been developed based on a LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption system and tested during the 2007 summer and autumn months in Cardiff University, UK. The system consisted of a 12 m{sup 2} vacuum tube solar collector, a 4.5 kW LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, a 1000 l cold storage tank and a 6 kW fan coil. The system performance, as well as the performances of the individual components in the system, were evaluated based on the physical measurements of the daily solar radiation, ambient temperature, inlet and outlet fluid temperatures, mass flow rates and electrical consumption by component. The average coefficient of thermal performance (COP) of the system was 0.58, based on the thermal cooling power output per unit of available thermal solar energy from the 12 m{sup 2} Thermomax DF100 vacuum tube collector on a hot sunny day with average peak insolation of 800 W/m{sup 2} (between 11 and 13.30 h) and ambient temperature of 24 C. The system produced an electrical COP of 3.6. Experimental results prove the feasibility of the new concept of cold store at this scale, with chilled water temperatures as low as 7.4 C, demonstrating its potential use in cooling domestic scale buildings. (author)

  14. Evaluation of PFP Furnace Systems for Thermal Stabilization of Washed High Chloride Plutonium Oxide Items

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Christopher M.; Elmore, Monte R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    High chloride content plutonium (HCP) oxides are impure plutonium oxide scrap which contains NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and/or CaCl2 salts at potentially high concentrations and must be stabilized at 950 C per the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000. The chlorides pose challenges to stabilization because volatile chloride salts and decomposition products can corrode furnace heating elements and downstream ventilation components. A high-temperature furnace (same make and model as used at the RMC at Plutonium Finishing Plant) and the associated offgas system were set up at PNNL to identify system vulnerabilities and to investigate alternative materials and operating conditions that would mitigate any corrosion and plugging of furnace and offgas components. The key areas of interest for this testing were the furnace heating elements, the offgas line located inside the furnace, the offgas line between the furnace and the filter/knockout pot, the filter/knockout pot, the sample boat, and corrosion coupons to evaluate alternative materials of construction. The evaluation was conducted by charging the furnace with CeO2 that had been impregnated with a mixture of chloride salts (selected to represent the expected residual chloride salt level in washed high chloride items) and heated in the furnace in accordance with the temperature ramp rates and hold times used at PFP.

  15. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  16. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  17. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purohit, S., E-mail: pshishir@ipr.res.in; Joisa, Y. S.; Raval, J. V.; Ghosh, J.; Tanna, R.; Shukla, B. K.; Bhatt, S. B. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  18. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  19. Critical experiments on an enriched uranium solution system containing periodically distributed strong thermal neutron absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of 62 critical and critical approach experiments were performed to evaluate a possible novel means of storing large volumes of fissile solution in a critically safe configuration. This study is intended to increase safety and economy through use of such a system in commercial plants which handle fissionable materials in liquid form. The fissile solution`s concentration may equal or slightly exceed the minimum-critical-volume concentration; and experiments were performed for high-enriched uranium solution. Results should be generally applicable in a wide variety of plant situations. The method is called the `Poisoned Tube Tank` because strong neutron absorbers (neutron poisons) are placed inside periodically spaced stainless steel tubes which separate absorber material from solution, keeping the former free of contamination. Eight absorbers are investigated. Both square and triangular pitched lattice patterns are studied. Ancillary topics which closely model typical plant situations are also reported. They include the effect of removing small bundles of absorbers as might occur during inspections in a production plant. Not taking the tank out of service for these inspections would be an economic advantage. Another ancillary topic studies the effect of the presence of a significant volume of unpoisoned solution close to the Poisoned Tube Tank on the critical height. A summary of the experimental findings is that boron compounds were excellent absorbers, as expected. This was true for granular materials such as Gerstley Borate and Borax; but it was also true for the flexible solid composed of boron carbide and rubber, even though only thin sheets were used. Experiments with small bundles of absorbers intentionally removed reveal that quite reasonable tanks could be constructed that would allow a few tubes at a time to be removed from the tank for inspection without removing the tank from production service.

  20. Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  1. Vulnerability of nuclear power plant structures to large external fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.E.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the inherent vulnerability of nuclear power plant structures to the thermal environments arising from large, external fires. The inherent vulnerability is the capacity of the concrete safety-related structures to absorb thermal loads without exceeding the appropriate thermal and structural design criteria. The potential sources of these thermal environments are large, offsite fires arising from accidents involving the transportation or storage of large quantities of flammable gases or liquids. A realistic thermal response analysis of a concrete panel was performed using three limiting criteria: temperature at the first rebar location, erosion and ablation of the front (exterior) surface due to high heat fluxes, and temperature at the back (interior) surface. The results of this analysis yield a relationship between incident heat flux and the maximum allowable exposure duration. Example calculations for the break of a 0.91 m (3') diameter high-pressure natural gas pipeline and a 1 m/sup 2/ hole in a 2-1/2 million gallon gasoline tank show that the resulting fires do not pose a significant hazard for ranges of 500 m or greater.

  2. CTF Surface Contamination and External Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 9 CTF Surface Contamination and External Backgrounds The preceding chapter included Contamination and External Backgrounds 424 it can do so), leading to a low-energy tail of events in the energy Runs 2300­2563 unless stated otherwise. #12;Chapter 9. CTF Surface Contamination and External

  3. UNBC Library External Review 2012 Library Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Library External Review 2012 Library Response November 2, 2012 An external review was conducted of the UNBC Library services in April 2012 by Dr. Vicki Williamson of University of Saskatchewan is available at https://library.unbc.ca/external- review/ . Below is the Library's planned followup

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

  5. Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

  6. A Thermal Sensation Index for Real-Time Tuning and Energy-Optimal Control of HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, C. C.; Norford, L.

    the thermal sensation index in a way that minimizes power consumption is investigated. The simplified index provides a quantitative means for determining the most energy efficient comfortable conditions. The analysis demonstrates that for low to moderate...

  7. The long wavelength limit of hard thermal loop effective actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F T Brandt; J Frenkel; J C Taylor

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a closed form expression for the long wavelength limit of the effective action for hard thermal loops in an external gravitational field. It is a function of the metric, independent of time derivatives. It is compared and contrasted with the static limit, and with the corresponding limits in an external Yang-Mills field.

  8. Model of Thermal Wavefront Distortion in Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Detectors I: Thermal Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Beausoleil; E. D'Ambrosio; W. Kells; J. Camp; E K. Gustafson; M. M. Fejer

    2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a steady-state analytical and numerical model of the optical response of power-recycled Fabry-Perot Michelson laser gravitational-wave detectors to thermal focusing in optical substrates. We assume that the thermal distortions are small enough that we can represent the unperturbed intracavity field anywhere in the detector as a linear combination of basis functions related to the eigenmodes of one of the Fabry-Perot arm cavities, and we take great care to preserve numerically the nearly ideal longitudinal phase resonance conditions that would otherwise be provided by an external servo-locking control system. We have included the effects of nonlinear thermal focusing due to power absorption in both the substrates and coatings of the mirrors and beamsplitter, the effects of a finite mismatch between the curvatures of the laser wavefront and the mirror surface, and the diffraction by the mirror aperture at each instance of reflection and transmission. We demonstrate a detailed numerical example of this model using the MATLAB program Melody for the initial LIGO detector in the Hermite-Gauss basis, and compare the resulting computations of intracavity fields in two special cases with those of a fast Fourier transform field propagation model. Additional systematic perturbations (e.g., mirror tilt, thermoelastic surface deformations, and other optical imperfections) can be included easily by incorporating the appropriate operators into the transfer matrices describing reflection and transmission for the mirrors and beamsplitter.

  9. Evaluation and Optimization of Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP)- A Project within the new German R&D- Framework EnBop 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelmann, F.; Kipry, H.; Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation and optimization of underground thermal energy storage systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP) - A project within the new German R&D-framework EnBop Dipl.-Ing. Franziska Bockelmann IGS ? Institute of Building Services... and Energydesign, Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany Dipl.-Ing. Herdis Kipry IGS ? Institute of Building Services and Energydesign, Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany Dipl.-Ing. Stefan Plesser Head of Energy Efficient Non...

  10. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Lei L [ORNL; Pan, Yun-Long [Smart Papers, Hamilton, OH 45013; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Peterson, Robert C. [Miami University, Oxford, OH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  11. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    services. Power generation Coal increasingly dominates28 Thermal coal electricity generation efficiency alsostudy examines four coal-thermal generation technology types

  12. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  13. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  14. Development of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Birmingham; Crispin Debellis; Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW External Fuel Processor was developed and tested that will supply the gases needed by a pipeline natural gas fueled, solid oxide fuel cell during all modes of operation. The fuel processor consists of three major subsystems--a desulfurizer to remove fuel sulfur to an acceptable level, a synthesis gas generator to support plant heat-up and low load fuel cell operations, and a start gas generator to supply a non-flammable, reducing gas to the fuel cell during startup and shutdown operations. The desulfurization subsystem uses a selective catalytic sulfur oxidation process that was developed for operation at elevated pressure and removes the fuel sulfur to a total sulfur content of less than 80 ppbv. The synthesis gas generation subsystem uses a waterless, catalytic partial oxidation reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich mixture from the natural gas and air. An operating window was defined that allows carbon-free operation while maintaining catalyst temperatures that will ensure long-life of the reactor. The start gas subsystem generates an oxygen-free, reducing gas from the pipeline natural gas using a low-temperature combustion technique. These physically and thermally integrated subsystems comprise the 250 kW External Fuel Processor. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was tested at the Rolls-Royce facility in North Canton, Ohio to verify process performance and for comparison with design specifications. A step wise operation of the automatic controls through the startup, normal operation and shutdown sequences allowed the control system to be tuned and verified. A fully automated system was achieved that brings the fuel processor through its startup procedure, and then await commands from the fuel cell generator module for fuel supply and shutdown. The fuel processor performance met all design specifications. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was shipped to an American Electric Power site where it will be tested with a Rolls-Royce solid oxide fuel cell generator module.

  15. Device for thermal transfer and power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Arik, Mehmet (Niskayuna, NY)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided. The system includes a device that includes top and bottom thermally conductive substrates positioned opposite to one another, wherein a top surface of the bottom thermally conductive substrate is substantially atomically flat and a thermal blocking layer disposed between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates. The device also includes top and bottom electrodes separated from one another between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates to define a tunneling path, wherein the top electrode is disposed on the thermal blocking layer and the bottom electrode is disposed on the bottom thermally conductive substrate.

  16. A channel Brownian pump powered by an unbiased external force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-quan Ai; Liang-gang Liu

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Brownian pump of particles in an asymmetric finite tube is investigated in the presence of an unbiased external force. The pumping system is bounded by two particle reservoirs. It is found that the particles can be pumped through the tube from a reservoir at low concentration to one at the same or higher concentration. There exists an optimized value of temperature (or the amplitude of the external force) at which the pumping capacity takes its maximum value. The pumping capacity decreases with increasing the radius at the bottleneck of the tube.

  17. Nanofluids for vehicle thermal management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, S. U.-S.; Yu, W.; Hull, J. R.; Zhang, Z. G.; Lockwood, F. E.; Energy Technology; The Valvoline Co.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying nanotechnology to thermal engineering, ANL has addressed the interesting and timely topic of nanofluids. We have developed methods for producing both oxide and metal nanofluids, studied their thermal conductivity, and obtained promising results: (1) Stable suspensions of nanoparticles can be achieved. (2) Nanofluids have significantly higher thermal conductivities than their base liquids. (3) Measured thermal conductivities of nanofluids are much greater than predicted. For these reasons, nanofluids show promise for improving the design and performance of vehicle thermal management systems. However, critical barriers to further development and application of nanofluid technology are agglomeration of nanoparticles and oxidation of metallic nanoparticles. Therefore, methods to prevent particle agglomeration and degradation are required.

  18. A Comparison of Real-Time Thermal Rating Systems in the U.S. and the U.K.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S. Myers; Jason W. Bush; Isaac J. West; David M. Greenwood; Grant L. Ingram; Peter J. Davison; Matthias C.M. Troffaes

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time thermal rating is a smart-grid technology that allows the rating of electrical conductors to be increased based on local weather conditions. Overhead lines are conventionally given a conservative, constant seasonal rating based on seasonal and regional worst case scenarios rather than actual, say, local hourly weather predictions. This paper provides a report of two pioneering schemes-one in the U.S. and one in the U.K.-where real-time thermal ratings have been applied. Thereby, we demonstrate that observing the local weather conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. Second, we critically compare both approaches and discuss their limitations. In doing so, we arrive at novel insights which will inform and improve future real-time thermal rating projects.

  19. Nonlinear thermal control in an N-terminal junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvira Segal

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate control over heat flow in an N-terminal molecular junction. Using simple model Hamiltonians we show that the heat current through two terminals can be tuned, switched, and amplified, by the temperature and coupling parameters of external gating reservoirs. We discuss two models: A fully harmonic system, and a model incorporating anharmonic interactions. For both models the control reservoirs induce thermal fluctuations of the transition elements between molecular vibrational states. We find that a fully harmonic model does not show any controllability, while for an anharmonic system the conduction properties of the junction strongly depend on the parameters of the gates. Realizations of the model system within nanodevices and macromolecules are discussed.

  20. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  1. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  2. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment  of  Thermal  Energy   Storage  under  Diverse  Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems and applicationsin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  3. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012. [8] Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, InternationalLF. Overview of thermal energy storage (TES) potential

  4. Active Thermal Extraction of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Ding

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative heat transport between materials supporting surface-phonon polaritons is greatly enhanced when the materials are placed at sub-wavelength separation as a result of the contribution of near-field surface modes. However, the enhancement is limited to small separations due to the evanescent decay of the surface waves. In this work, we propose and numerically demonstrate an active scheme to extract these modes to the far-field. Our approach exploits the monochromatic nature of near-field thermal radiation to drive a transition in a laser gain medium, which, when coupled with external optical pumping, allows the resonant surface mode to be emitted into the far-field. Our study demonstrates a new approach to manipulate thermal radiation that could find applications in thermal management.

  5. This work is partly supported by NSF CNS #1059212. A WEARABLE PIR SENSOR SYSTEM FOR THERMAL SITUATION PERCEPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    ___________________________ This work is partly supported by NSF CNS #1059212. A WEARABLE PIR impaired people to adapt themselves well to the situation. In this paper, we propose a wearable PIR thermal. Today, PIR sensors have been widely installed in many buildings for human motion detection

  6. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 14, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2005 1023 Micromachined Thermal Shear-Stress Sensor for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Qiao

    detection of unmanned aerial vehicles [4]­[6]. The wall shear stress can be determined directly using Shear-Stress Sensor for Underwater Applications Yong Xu, Member, IEEE, Qiao Lin, Member, IEEE, Guoyu Lin Abstract--This paper reports the development of microma- chined thermal shear-stress sensors for underwater

  7. 318 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 17, NO. 2, APRIL 2008 A MEMS Thermal Biosensor for Metabolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Qiao

    monitoring of glucose and other metabolites. [2007-0085] Index Terms--Biological thermal factors, biosensors are in general rather complicated in construction and require large sample volumes (e.g., milliliters- lows batch fabrication and integration of miniaturized devices at low cost, and has been used to create

  8. The design, construction, and testing of a nuclear fuel rod thermal simulation system to study gallium/Zircaloy interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Christopher Curtis

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of gallium in weapons grade plutonium has raised many questions concerning its use in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods. The biggest concern is that the gallium will migrate down the thermal gradient in the fuel rod and deposit...

  9. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Sun-Heet nontracking solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Sun-Heet nontracking, line-focusing parabolic trough collector at five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  10. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was simulated. The radiant cooling system was an exposedcooling + radiant cooling system alone may not be able toembedded surface radiant cooling systems. Table 3 summarizes

  11. Spectrally selective beam splitters designed to decouple quantum and thermal solar energy conversion in hybrid concentrating systems: Final report, Phase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, D.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility and flexibility of developing elements that separate concentrated solar irradiation into specific spectral regions matched to specific photoquantum processes have been shown. These elements, spectrally selective beam splitters or filters, are designed to decouple quantum and thermal solar energy conversion in hybrid concentrating systems. Both interference filters and liquid absorption filters were investigated for use as spectrally selective beam splitters. Spectral selectivity is investigated for a variety of quantum systems with various spectral windows utilizing interference and absorption filters designed. Detailed analysis of one typical quantum system is provided consisting of a model of the silicon cell photovoltaic/photothermal hybrid system using spectral selectivity. The performance benefits of this approach are shown. Interference filters show the greatest flexibility and ability to match specific spectral windows. Liquid absorption filters appear to be a lower cost option, when an appropriate spectrally selective solution that can be used as a heat transfer fluid is available. 18 refs., 88 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 14, NO. 5, MAY 2006 501 HotSpot: A Compact Thermal Modeling Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    -chip interconnect self-heating power and thermal model such that the thermal impacts on interconnects can also computationally efficient. Index Terms--Compact thermal model, early design stages, in- terconnect self-heating

  13. Assessment of organic compound exposures, thermal comfort parameters, and HVAC system-driven air exchange rates in public school portable classrooms in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shendell, Derek Garth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the ASHRAE 55 (1992) thermal comfort envelope provided inASHRAE 55 (1992) thermal comfort envelope values provided inthe ASHRAE 55 (1992) thermal comfort envelope of 30-60% RH.

  14. accident research thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal comfort in high to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes. Potential Impact 15 Applications of thermal infrared imaging...

  15. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration...

  16. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

  17. Thermal Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

  18. Health and Wellbeing The Microsoft External Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Health and Wellbeing The Microsoft External Research Division within Microsoft Research partners to support every stage of the research process. Efforts are focused in four research areas--including Health about their health. Microsoft External Research http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/ collaboration

  19. Organizational Setting II.A External

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    Chapter II Organizational Setting II.A External CEPH Criterion The School shall be an integral part to professional schools in that institution #12;External Organizational Setting CEPH Expected Documentation 1 bodies (other than CEPH) to which the institution responds 2 An organizational chart of the University

  20. LE CONTRLE EXTERNE DES ASSOCIATIONS PAR LES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , which can be used equally to evaluate public policies, - an external control through new rules of accountancy of the public subsidies, This article shows that the management control can influence financial to internal users like managers. Mots clés. - Secteur public, contrôle externe, association, gestion