Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Thermal Storage Systems at IBM Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1979, IBM commissioned its first large scale thermal storage system with a capacity of 2.7 million gallons of chilled water and 1.2 million gallons of reclaimed, low temperature hot water. The stored cooling energy represents approximately 27,000 ton hours. Through reduced chiller plant capacity and annual operating cost savings in primarily electric demand charges the payback will be approximately 3 1/2 years. The water is stored in multiple, insulated tanks, located above the ground. A similar but smaller system at IBM's Charlotte, North Carolina plant has no provisions for heat reclaim. Instead, it uses cooling tower water directly in the chilled water circuit when outside conditions permit. This paper presents system designs, control modes and economic considerations and describes IBM's experience to date with large volume storage systems.

Koch, G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to...

4

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Storage System Basics Thermal Storage System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics August 21, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to this challenge. In a concentrating solar power (CSP) system, the sun's rays are reflected onto a receiver, which creates heat that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables CSP systems to be cost-competitive options for providing clean, renewable energy. Several thermal energy storage technologies have been tested and

6

Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage is becoming a standard consideration in HVAC and process cooling systems. As the technology is refined, more attention is being given to minimize the energy consumption and power demand requirements. This paper addresses a method for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown.

Knebel, D. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

SunShot Initiative: Thermal Storage R&D for CSP Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Storage R&D for CSP Systems to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Thermal Storage R&D for CSP Systems on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Thermal Storage...

9

Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, H.R. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chemical energy storage system for SEGS solar thermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1988, a symposium was held in Helendale, California, to discuss thermal energy storage (TES) concepts applicable to medium-temperature (200 to 400{degrees}C) solar thermal electric power plants, in general, and the solar electric generating system (SEGS) plants developed by Luz International, in particular. Chemical reaction energy storage based on the reversible reaction between metal oxides and metal hydroxides was identified as a leading candidate for meeting Luz International's cost and performance requirements. The principal objectives of this study were to identify the design conditions, requirements, and potential feasibility for a chemical energy storage system applied to a SEGS solar thermal power plant. The remaining sections of this report begin by providing an overview of the chemical reaction energy storage concept and a SEGS solar thermal power plant. Subsequent sections describe the initial screening of alternative evaporation energy sources and the more detailed evaluation of design alternatives considered for the preferred evaporation energy source. The final sections summarize the results, conclusions, and recommendations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 13 tabs.

Brown, D.R.; LaMarche, J.L.; Spanner, G.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act

13

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants on Facebook Tweet about...

16

Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Performance verification tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal energy storage system have been conducted. This system is being developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for future space stations. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space along with an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the surface of the heat pipe elements of the ORC-SDPS receiver and is internally transferred by the potassium vapor for use and storage. Part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was fabricated that employs axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the wicked TES units and the heater to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to verify the heat pipe operation and to evaluate the heat pipe/TES units/heater tube operation by interfacing the heater unit to a heat exchanger.

Keddy, E.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Options for thermal energy storage in solar-cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current effort concentrates on design requirements of thermal storage subsystems for active solar cooling systems. The use of thermal storage with respect to absorption, Rankine, and desiccant cooling technologies is examined.

Curran, H.M.; DeVries, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A thermal energy storage system for adsorbent low-pressure natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-based adsorbents were determined to be the best enhanced storage media that would store more natural gas at low pressures than achieved with compression only. Thermal energy storage (TES) was previously demonstrated to be a potentially promising technique to mitigate heat effects associated with low-pressure carbon adsorption systems for natural gas storage. Further investigations were conducted to develop information for the design of an optimized adsorption system that incorporates TES heat management. The selection of appropriate phase-change materials and nucleating agents, encapsulant materials, and corrosion inhibitors for a TES heat management system are discussed and the results of extended thermal cyclic behavior are presented. Engineering analyses and finite element analyses are employed to calculate adsorption rates, heat generation, temperatures, and heat transfer within the adsorbent bed. The size, volume, and arrangement of components for an operational TES system designed to accommodate fast-fill within a defined time limit is presented.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.; Kountz, K.J.; Tiller, A.J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gauthier, S.W.; Takagishi, S.K. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dynamic Thermal Management for High-Performance Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal-aware design of disk drives is important because high temperatures can cause reliability problems. Dynamic Thermal Management (DTM) techniques have been proposed to operate the disk at the average case temperature, rather than at the worse case by modulating the activities to avoid thermal emergencies. The thermal emergencies can be caused by unexpected events, such as fan-breaks, increased inlet air temperature, etc. One of the DTM techniques is a delay-based approach that adjusts the disk seek activities, cooling down the disk drives. Even if such a DTM approach could overcome thermal emergencies without stopping disk activity, it suffers from long delays when servicing the requests. Thus, in this chapter, we investigate the possibility of using a multispeed disk-drive (called dynamic rotations per minute (DRPM)) that dynamically modulates the rotational speed of the platter for implementing the DTM technique. Using a detailed performance and thermal simulator of a storage system, we evaluate two possible DTM policies (- time-based and watermark-based) with a DRPM disk-drive and observe that dynamic RPM modulation is effective in avoiding thermal emergencies. However, we find that the time taken to transition between different rotational speeds of the disk is critical for the effectiveness of the DRPM based DTM techniques.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gurumurthi, Dr Sudhanva [University of Virginia; Sivasubramaniam, Anand [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

Blahnik, D.E.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems. Project 8981, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450/sup 0/ to 535/sup 0/C (850/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/F) in the form of latent heat of fusion has been examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures are attractive as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. An equimolar mixture of Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, which melts at 505/sup 0/C with a latent heat of 148 Btu/lb, was chosen for experimental study. The cyclic charge/discharge behavior of laboratory- and engineering-scale systems was determined and compared with predictions based on a mathematical heat-transfer model that was developed during this program. The thermal performance of one engineering-scale unit remained very stable during 1400 hours of cyclic operation. Several means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored. Areas requiring further investigation have been identified.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A thermal energy storage system for adsorbent low-pressure natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) was previously demonstrated to be a potentially promising technique to mitigate heat effects associated with low-pressure carbon adsorption systems for natural gas storage. Further investigations were conducted to develop information for the design of an optimized adsorption system that incorporates TES heat management. The selection of appropriate phase-change materials and nucleating agents, encapsulant materials, and corrosion inhibitors for a TES heat management system are discussed and the results of extended thermal cyclic behavior are presented. Engineering analyses and finite element analyses are employed to calculate adsorption rates, heat generation, temperatures, and heat transfer within the adsorbent bed. The size, volume, and arrangement of components for an operational TES system designed to accommodate fast-fill within a defined time limit is presented.

Jasionowski, W.J.; Kountz, K.J.; Blazek, C.F.; Tiller, A.J. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gauthier, S.W.; Takagishi, S.K. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation hours) by utilizing a large amount of the thermal capacity of building structures such as beams, columns and floors composed of concrete. These BSTS systems have recently been considered as one method for leveling hourly electricity demands for HVAC on a day-to-day basis. Through a simulation using a model developed with experimental data, this paper describes how various factors for the design and operation of a BSTS quantitatively affect the charge/discharge performances of a HVAC system. As a result, the following was revealed: the thermal performance of the system is strongly influenced by the daily heat storage operation hours, supply air volume and supply air temperature during the nighttime operation hours, stored heat caused the total daytime cooling extraction to decrease by 11% to 58% and the daily total cooling extraction through nighttime to daytime to increase by 4% to 17% compared with the values of non- thermal storage HVAC system.

Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Similarity and generalized analysis of efficiencies of thermal energy storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the features of three typical thermal storage systems including: (1) direct storage of heat transfer fluid in containers, (2) storage of thermal energy in a packed bed of solid filler material, with energy being carried in/out by a flowing heat transfer fluid which directly contacts the packed bed, and (3) a system in which heat transfer fluid flows through tubes that are imbedded into a thermal storage material which may be solid, liquid, or a mixture of the two. The similarity of the three types of thermal storage systems was discussed, and generalized energy storage governing equations were introduced in both dimensional and dimensionless forms. The temperatures of the heat transfer fluid during energy charge and discharge processes and the overall energy storage efficiencies were studied through solution of the energy storage governing equations. Finally, provided in the paper are a series of generalized charts bearing curves for energy storage effectiveness against four dimensionless parameters grouped up from many of the thermal storage system properties including dimensions, fluid and thermal storage material properties, as well as the operational conditions including mass flow rate of the fluid, and the ratio of energy charge and discharge time periods. Engineers can conveniently look up the charts to design and calibrate the size of thermal storage tanks and operational conditions without doing complicated individual modeling and computations. It is expected that the charts will serve as standard tools for thermal storage system design and calibration.

Peiwen Li; Jon Van Lew; Cholik Chan; Wafaa Karaki; Jake Stephens; J. E. O'Brien

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

27

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Technical Research of Thermal Adjusting in Pulverizing System Intermediate Storage Bunker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the temperature change effect of the primary air and powder mixture in storage-type milling system, it is difficult to obtain accurate results of the direct measurement of the primary wind speed, resulting in this type of boiler system, the thermal ... Keywords: pulverizing system intermediate storage bunker, thermal adjustment, coal concentration, heat balance

Zhenning Zhao; Yaqin Ge; Hongwei Chen; Ying Zhang; Tao Sun; Xiao Lu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermal Management of Onboard Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan: (A) System Weight and Volume (C) Efficiency (E) ChargingDischarging Rates (J) Thermal Management Technical Targets In this project, studies are being conducted to develop...

34

Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are provided for controlling the storing and release of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

Ortega, J.K.E.

1981-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

The use of thermal energy storage for energy system based on cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of thermal energy storage together with cogeneration technology provides an attractive solution by allowing the production of electricity in the periods, when heat load is low and later consumption of heat, when load is high. The purpose of the ... Keywords: CHP, cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy system, thermal storage

Anna Volkova; Andres Siirde

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Worker health and safety in solar thermal power systems. III. Thermal energy storage subsystems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of the use of thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems in solar thermal power systems (STPS) on operating failures and on worker health and safety are examined. Revelant near- and medium-term designs for TES subsystems are reviewed. Generic failure events are considered by an event tree methodology. Three generic categories of initiating events are identified which can lead to release of storage fluids and other hazards. Three TES subsystem designs are selected for, and subjected to, analysis. A fluid release event tree for a sensible heat TES subsystem using mixed media organic oil/crushed rock and sand, designed for the Barstow, CA, 10 MWe pilot plant, is developed. Toxicology and flammability hazards are considered. The effect of component failures, including ullage and fluid maintenance units, on subsystem safety is considered. A latent heat subsystem using NaNO/sub 3//NaOH as the working medium is studied, and relevant failure events delineated. Mechanical equipment failures including the scraped wall heat exchangers, are examined. Lastly, a thermochemical TES subsystem using SO/sub 2//SO/sub 3/ interconversion is considered. Principle hazards identified include mechanical failures and storage fluid release. The integrity of the system is found to depend on catalyst and heat exchanger reliability. Dynamic response to off-normal system events is considered.

Ullman, A.Z.; Sokolow, B.B.; Daniels, J.; Hurt, P.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Systems analysis techniques for annual cycle thermal energy storage solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Community-scale annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) solar systems are promising options for building heat and cooling. A variety of approaches are feasible in modeling ACTES solar systems. The key parameter in such efforts, average collector efficiency, is first examined, followed by several approaches for simple and effective modeling. Methods are also examined for modeling building loads for structures based on both conventional and passive architectural designs. Two simulation models for sizing solar heating systems with annual storage are presented next. Validation is presented by comparison with the results of a study of seasonal storage systems based on SOLANSIM, an hour-by-hour simulation. These models are presently being used to examine the economic trade-off between collector field area and storage capacity. Finally, programs in the US Department of Energy directed toward developing either other system components such as improved tanks and solar ponds or design tools for ACTES solar systems are examined.

Baylin, F.; Sillman, S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Analysis of a Retrofitted Thermal Energy Storage Air-conditioning System of a Marine Museum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermal energy storage(TES) air-conditioning system is a electrical load management technology with great potential to shift load from peak to off-peak utility periods. TES is… (more)

Yu, Po-wen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present thesis focuses on the optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems. First, optimization of time-variable operation to maximize revenue through selling and purchasing electricity to/from ...

Lizarraga-García, Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of thermal energy storage materials for advanced compressed air energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced Compressed-Air Energy Storage (ACAS) plants have the near-term potential to reduce the fuel consumption of compressed-air plants from 33 to 100%, depending upon their design. Fuel is saved by storing some or all of the heat of compression as sensible heat which is subsequently used to reheat the compressed air prior to expansion in the turbine generator. The thermal storage media required for this application must be low cost and durable. The objective of this project was to screen thermal store materials based on their thermal cycle durability, particulate formation and corrosion resistant characteristics. The materials investigated were iron oxide pellets, Denstone pebbles, cast-iron balls, and Dresser basalt rock. The study specifically addressed the problems of particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicate that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possibly stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants, and more in-depth longer term thermal cycling and materials testing of Dresser basalt is recommended. Also recommended is the redesign and costing analysis of both the hybrid and adiabatic ACAS facilities based upon the use of Dresser basalt as the thermal store material.

Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 15. 2013 | Singh April 15. 2013 | Singh * Thermal modeling will be conducted to establish the benefits of using a high thermal conducting graphite foams in conjunction with PCM and to develop a design for a laboratory scale prototype. * Variety of characterizations will be carried out to qualify the materials (PCMs, alloys, coatings) for the prototype construction. * Process to infiltrate selected PCM into the foam will be developed. * Using the appropriate brazing/joining techniques, prototype will be assembled. * Performance testing of the TES system prototype to ensure a full- scale system will meet the SunShot goals. * Complete cost analysis of the proposed TES system * Complete laboratory scale prototype design * Develop SiC coating using polycarbosilanes for graphite

44

Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

None

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS&GSHP system can serve as cold energy thermal storage at night, produce chilled water in the daytime in summer and provide hot water for heating in winter. This is followed by its schematic and characteristic description. Then the various operation modes of such system according to different operational strategies are demonstrated in sequence. The system, firstly seen in open literature, is energy-saving, environmental-friendly and promising in the field of air-conditioning systems, and will help solve the problems currently existing with the GSHP system and ITES air conditioning system.

Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thermal storage HVAC system retrofit provides economical air conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an EMS-controlled HVAC system that meets the ventilation and cooling needs of an 18,000-seat indoor ice hockey arena. The Buffalo Memorial Auditorium (affectionately referred to as the Aud) was built in 1937 under the Works Project Administration of the federal government. Its original configuration included a 12,000-seat arena with an ice skating rink. By the late 1980s, the city was unsuccessfully attempting to attract events and tenants to the auditorium, which lacked air conditioning and other modern amenities. Thus, it was decided to renovate the facility to make it marketable. The first phase of the renovation included installing an air-conditioning system in the arena and repairing the existing building systems that were inoperable because of deferred maintenance. After considering the existing conditions (such as size of the space, intermittent usage, construction restrictions, operating budgets and the limited operations staff), the engineering team designed an innovative HVAC system. The system's features include: a carbon dioxide monitoring device that controls the intake of outside air; an ice storage system that provides chilled water and shifts electrical demand to off-peak hours; and a design that uses the building mass as a heat sink. A new energy management system (EMS) determines building cooling needs based on the type of event, ambient conditions and projected audience size. Then, it selects the most economical method to obtain the desired arena temperature.

Smith, S.F. (Wendel Engineers, P.C., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Engineering and cost analysis of a dry cooling system augmented with a thermal storage pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and cost study of the capacitive thermal storage pond added to a state-of-the-art dry cooling system is described. The purpose of the study was to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for thermal electric power plants using a dry cooling system that includes a thermal storage pond. Using the modified BNW-I computer code, the effect of varying significant design parameters was investigated. The parametric study included studying the effects of varying turbine type, pond size, replacement energy costing, capacity penalty methodology, pond location with respect to the dry cooling tower, design temperature, and site location (meteorology). Incremental power production costs for dry cooling (i.e., the portion of the cost of bus-bar electricity from the plant which is attributable to the cost of building and operating the heat rejection system) with a thermal storage pond system were determined for meteorologies of both Wyodak, Wyoming and Phoenix, Arizona. For Wyodak the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 2.81 mills/kWh as compared to 2.55 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. For Phoenix the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 3.66 mills/kWh as compared to 4.31 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. If the use of a modified conventional turbine with the dry-cooled system is stipulated in order to stay with proven technology for large turbines, then results of this study show that in extremely hot climates the thermal storage pond can reduce the cost of dry cooling. If no cost penalty is assigned to high back pressure turbines and it can be used, then the thermal storage pond has no advantage in hot climates. However, collateral use of the pond for makeup or emergency cooling water storage may decreae the cost. (LCL)

Drost, M.K.; Allemann, R.T.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 3000C ���¢�������� 450 0C ) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

D. Y. Goswami

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage to concentrating solar thermal power plants expands both the amount of power and the timing of production. With thermal energy storage, plant power output can be firmed and shaped to better match consumer demand for electricity. Thermal storage associated with these plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity productio...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

Jonemann, M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage can be interfaced with a variety of high temperature heat generating systems, e.g. nuclear

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

High-temperature thermal storage systems for advanced solar receivers materials selections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced space power systems that use solar energy and Brayton or Stirling heat engines require thermal energy storage (TES) systems to operate continuously through periods of shade. The receiver storage units, key elements in both Brayton and Stirling systems, are designed to use the latent heat of fusion of phase-change materials (PCMs). The power systems under current consideration for near-future National Aeronautics and Space Administration space missions require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1400 K range. The PCMs under current investigation that gave liquidus temperatures within this range are the fluoride family of salts. However, these salts have low thermal conductivity, which causes large temperature gradients in the storage systems. Improvements can be obtained, however, with the use of thermal conductivity enhancements or metallic PCMs. In fact, if suitable containment materials can be found, the use of metallic PCMs would virtually eliminate the orbit associated temperature variations in TES systems. The high thermal conductivity and generally low volume change on melting of germanium and alloys based on silicon make them attractive for storage of thermal energy in space power systems. An approach to solving the containment problem, involving both chemical and physical compatibility, preparation of NiSi/NiSi{sub 2}, and initial results for containment of germanium and NiSi/NiSi{sub 2}, are presented. 7 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Wilson, D.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Howell, M.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 15, 2013 | Singh * Thermal modeling will be conducted to establish the benefits of using a high thermal conducting graphite foams in conjunction with PCM and to develop a...

55

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report March 31, 2012 Michael Schuller, Frank Little, Darren Malik, Matt Betts, Qian Shao, Jun Luo, Wan Zhong, Sandhya Shankar, Ashwin Padmanaban The Space Engineering Research Center Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University Abstract We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials,

56

Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with ``conventional`` HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with conventional'' HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables...

59

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP ANL logo Photo of a black and white porous material magnified 50 times by a microscope. Microstructure of the highly thermal conductive foam that will be used for the prototype TES system. Image from ANL Argonne National Laboratory and project partner Ohio Aerospace Institute, under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, will design, develop, and test a prototype high-temperature and high-efficiency thermal energy storage (TES) system with rapid charging and discharging times. By increasing the efficiency of TES systems, this project aims to lower the capital costs of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Approach The research team is developing and evaluating a novel approach for TES at temperatures greater than 700ËšC for CSP systems. The approach uses high thermal conductivity and high-porosity graphite foams infiltrated with a phase change material (PCM) to provide TES in the form of latent heat.

60

Encapsulated sink-side thermal energy storage for pulsed space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In sprint mode space applications, which require high power for relatively short durations, energy storage devices may be employed to reduce the size and mass of the thermal management system. This is accomplished by placing the reject heat in the thermal store during the sprint mode. During the remaining nonoperational portion of the orbit the stored heat is dissipated to space. The heat rejection rate is thus reduced, and this results in a smaller radiator being required. Lithium hydride (LiH) has been identfied as the best candidate for use in power system sink-side thermal energy storage applications due to its superior heat storage properties and suitable melt temperature (T/sub m/ = 962K). To maximize storage density, both sensible and latent modes of heat storage are used. This paper focuses on the use of encapsulated lithium hydride shapes in a packed bed storage unit with lithium or NaK as the heat transport fluid. Analytical and experimental development work associated with the concept is described. Since the program is in its early stages, emphasis thus far has been on feasibility issues associated with encapsulating lithium hydride spheres. These issues include shell stress induced by phase-change during heating, hydrogen diffusion through the encapsulating shell, heat transfer limitations due to poor conductivity of the salt, void behavior, and material constraints. The impact of these issues on the design of encapsulated lithium hydride spheres has been evaluated, and design alternatives have been identified for circumventing key problem areas.

Foote, J.P.; Morris, D.G.; Olszewski, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of thermal-energy-storage materials for advanced compressed-air energy-storage systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Proposed designs of adiabatic and hybrid advanced compressed air energy storage (ACAS) plants have utilized sensible heat storage systems to store the heat developed during air compression for subsequent use during the power generation phase of operation. This experimental study was performed to screen four porposed heat storage materials for performance and durability: 3/8-in. sintered iron oxide pellets, 1/2-in. Denstone pellets, 1-in. cast iron alloy balls, and crushed Dresser basalt. Specific concerns addressed included particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicated that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possible stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants.

Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Thermal Energy Storage Systems Operation and Control Strategies Under Real Time Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a methodology that was developed for evaluation of operation and control strategies for thermal energy storage (TES) systems under emerging real-time price (RTP) rate structures. The methodology was demonstrated on a prototype office building in two southeastern United States climates.

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Title Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Publication Type...

65

Preliminary screening of thermal storage concepts for water/steam and organic fluid solar thermal receiver systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparison of thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications was done generically for large and small solar systems with sensible and latent heat and two-stage storage concepts. Concepts were ranked based on the cost of delivered energy. A +- 20% uncertainty in subsystem cost was included in the analysis. Water/steam and organic fluid collector/receivers were studied separately. For the water/steam concept, Barstow technology (100 MW/sub e/) was examined. A nitrite/nitrate salt with a low-cost solid medium was best for buffer storage; for diurnal storage, the two-stage draw salt/low-cost media and oil/rock concept was best. Phase change concepts require improvements on the concept analyzed to be attractive. For the organic fluid system, a Shenandoah total energy system was examined. The Syltherm trickle charge taconite concept was the most favorable and may be improved by replacing the taconite with a lower-cost oil-compatible medium. Salt concepts can be competitive with this system only if there is a low-cost solid medium that is compatible with the salt and the end use requires a large amount of storage. The phase change concept examined was found to be quite poor for this total energy application.

Copeland, R.J.; Karpuk, M.E.; Ullman, J.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy Basics: Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Concentrating Solar Power One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds....

68

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: system design. [LiKCO/sub 3/ mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-task research program aimed at the development of molten salt thermal energy storage systems commenced in June 1976. The first topical report, covering Task 1, the selection of suitable salt systems for storage at 850 to 1000/sup 0/F, was issued in August 1976. It was concluded that a 35 Wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 Wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (LiKCO/sub 3/) mixture was most suitable for the purpose. Interrelationships between various design parameters were examined using the available solutions, and an engineering-scale storage unit was designed. This unit has an annular configuration with a 1-ft OD, 1.5-ft high, 2-in. dia heat transfer well. Preliminary experiments on a pilot size (3-in. OD) unit showed that temperature profiles and progress of the solid-liquid interface agreed with those predicted theoretically. Also, no supercooling was observed during cooldown, and the presence of significant convective mixing was indicated by negligible temperature gradients. Use of a lithium aluminate volume-change suppressor was investigated, but it appears to be nonessential because of the low volume-change in the LiKCO/sub 3/ system. Consideration of the relative heat-transfer resistances under practical conditions suggested that the use of a conductivity promoter will enhance the heat-transfer rates, thereby requiring smaller heat-transfer areas. Different configurations and materials were considered for this application; an aluminum wool appears to be most suitable. The corrosion resistance of various construction materials was investigated. Stainless steels and aluminum appear to be suitable construction materials for carbonates in the 850 to 1000/sup 0/F range. Testing of the engineering-scale system (Task 3) and verification of the conclusions derived under Task 2 are in progress.

Maru, H.C.; Kardas, A.; Huang, V.M.; Dullea, J.F.; Paul, L.; Marianowski, L.G.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of a Predictive Optimal Controller for Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and simulation of a predictive optimal controller for thermal energy storage systems. The `optimal' strategy minimizes the cost of operating the cooling plant over the simulation horizon. The particular case of a popular ice storage system (ice-on-coil with internal melt) has been investigated in a simulation environment. Various predictor models have been analyzed with respect to their performance in forecasting cooling load data and information on ambient conditions (dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures). The predictor model provides load and weather information to the optimal controller in discrete time steps. An optimal storage charging and discharging strategy is planned at every time step over a fixed look-ahead time window utilizing newly available information. The first action of the optimal sequence of actions is executed over the next time step and the planning process is repeated at every following time step. The effect of the length of the...

Gregor Henze; Robert H. Dodier; Moncef Krarti

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Second thermal storage applications workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems. Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study of thermal energy storage (TES) systems integrated with combined-cycle gas turbine cogeneration systems. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers two significant advantages. First, electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced. Second, although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. An earlier study analyzed TES integrated with a simple-cycle cogeneration system. This follow-on study evaluated the cost of power produced by a combined-cycle electric power plant (CC), a combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CC/Cogen), and a combined-cycle cogeneration plant integrated with thermal energy storage (CC/TES/Cogen). Each of these three systems was designed to serve a fixed (24 hr/day) process steam load. The value of producing electricity was set at the levelized cost for a CC plant, while the value of the process steam was for a conventional stand-alone boiler. The results presented here compared the costs for CC/TES/Cogen system with those of the CC and the CC/Cogen plants. They indicate relatively poor economic prospects for integrating TES with a combined-cycle cogeneration power plant for the assumed designs. The major reason is the extremely close approach temperatures at the storage media heaters, which makes the heaters large and therefore expensive.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sensitivity analysis of a community solar system using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to assess the sensitivity of design parameters for a community solar heating system having annual thermal energy storage to factors including climate, building type, community size, and collector type and inclination. The system under consideration uses a large, water-filled, concrete-constructed tank for providing space heating, and domestic hot water (DHW). Collector field area and storage volume have been sized for 440 community designs in 10 geographic locations. Analysis of the data has allowed identification of those parameters that have first order effects on component sizing. Two linear relationships were derived which allow system sizing. The average ambient temperature is used to determine average yearly collector efficiency. This parameter combined with estimates of space/DHW loads, storage/distribution losses, and total yearly insolation per square meter allows estimation of collector area. Storage size can be estimated from the winter net load which is based on space and DHW loads, storage/distribution losses, and collector solar heat for the winter months. (MHR)

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Annual-cycle thermal energy storage for a community solar system: details of a sensitivity analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results and conclusions of a simulation and sensitivity analysis of community-sized, annual-cycle thermal-energy-storage (ACTES) solar energy systems. The analysis which is based on an hourly simulation is used to (1) size systems in 10 locations, (2) identify critical design parameters, and (3) provide a basic conceptual approach for future studies and designs. This research is a forerunner to an economic analysis of this particular system (based on large constructed tanks) and a general analysis of the value of ACTES technologies for solar applications. A total of 440 systems were sized for 10 locations in the United States. Three different building types and four different community sizes were modeled. All designs used each of two collector types at each of two different tilt angles. Two linear relationships were derived which simplify system sizing. The average ambient temperature is used to determine average yearly collector efficiency. This parameter combined with estimates of space/DHW loads, storage/distribution losses, and total yearly insolation per square meter allows estimation of collector area. Storage size can be estimated from the winter net load which is based on space and DHW loads, storage and distribution losses, and collector solar heat gain for the winter months.

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ice Bear30 Hybrid Air Conditionerthermal energy storage system150uses smart integrated controls, ice storage, and a dedicated compressor for cooling. The system is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard unitary air conditioner. The Ice Bear 30 is a relatively small size (5 ton), intended for use in residential and light commercial applications. This report describes EPRI tests of the Ice Bear 30, which is manu...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermal analysis of heat storage canisters for a solar dynamic, space power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal analysis was performed of a thermal energy storage canister of a type suggested for use in a solar receiver for an orbiting Brayton cycle power system. Energy storage for the eclipse portion of the cycle is provided by the latent heat of a eutectic mixture of LiF and CaF/sub 2/ contained in the canister. The chief motivation for the study is the prediction of vapor void effects on temperature profiles and the identification of possible differences between ground test data and projected behavior in microgravity. The first phase of this study is based on a two-dimensional, cylindrical coordinates model using an interim procedure for describing void behavior in 1/minus/g and microgravity. The thermal anaylsis includes the effects of solidification front behavior, conduction in liquid/solid salt and canister materials, void growth and shrinkage, radiant heat transfer across the void, and convection in the melt due to Marangoni-induced flow and, in 1/minus/g, flow due to density gradients. A number of significant differences between 1/minus/g and 0/minus/g behavior were found. These resulted from differences in void location relative to the maximum heat flux and a significantly smaller effective conductance in 0/minus/g due to the absence of gravity-induced convection.

Wichner, R.P.; Solomon, A.D.; Drake, J.B.; Williams, P.T.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

SciTech Connect

Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of community-scale solar systems that incorporate a centralized annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) coupled to a distribution system is examined. Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single-unit dwellings, 10-unit, and 200-unit apartment complexes in 50-, 200-, 400-, and 1000-unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: (1) identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and (2) identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system. In more northerly locations, collectors are a larger component of cost. In southern locations, distribution networks are a larger proportion of total cost. Larger, more compact buildings are, in general, less expensive to heat. For the two smaller-scale building configurations, a broad minima in total costs versus system size is often observed.

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dynamic thermal testing of lead-acid batteries for the PREPA battery energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A test is being carried out to determine the thermal load that will be present in a 20 MW battery energy storage system (BESS) facility being built by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA). Efforts were made to duplicate, on a smaller scale, the arrangement of the flooded lead-acid cells in the BESS and to generate ambient temperatures typical of Puerto Rico through use of an environmental chamber. A utility energy storage (UES) test cycle for the 12-cell series string was set up based on projected operating parameters scaled from the BESS for frequency regulation and spinning reserve operating modes. Battery temperatures were measured during UES cycling and fit to a thermal model for the system. Cell temperatures increased slowly over a week-long utility cycle and eventually were elevated by 13{degrees}C (23{degrees}F) in the most extreme case observed to date. Temperature increases are expected to be lower in the BESS facility due to a much higher air flow rate than in the test chamber.

Jungst, R.G.; Freese, J.M.; Rodriguez, G.P.; Dykhuizen, R.C.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Woods, C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Development of an integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system for a solar receiver  

SciTech Connect

The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) is one of the candidates for Space Station prime power application. In the low earth orbit of the Space Station approximately 34 minutes of the 94-minute orbital period is spent in eclipse with no solar energy input to the power system. For this period the SDPS will use thermal energy storage (TES) material to provide a constant power output. Sundstrand Corporation is developing a ORC-SDPS candidate for the Space Station that uses toluene as the organic fluid and LiOH as the TES material. An integrated heat-pipe thermal storage receiver system is being developed as part of the ORC-SDPS solar receiver. This system incorporates potassium heat pipe elements to absorb and transfer the solar energy within the receiver cavity. The heat pipes contain the TES canisters within the potassium vapor space with the toluene heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the heat pipe in the ORC-SDPS receiver cavity. The heat pipe transforms the non-uniform solar flux incident in the heat pipe surface within the receiver cavity to an essentially uniform flux at the potassium vapor condensation interface in the heat pipe. During solar insolation, part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the balance stored in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.; Heidenreich, G.; Johnson, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analyzing the Effects of Climate and Thermal Configuration on Community Energy Storage Systems (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Community energy storage (CES) has been proposed to mitigate the high variation in output from renewable sources and reduce peak load on the electrical grid. Thousands of these systems may be distributed around the grid to provide benefits to local distribution circuits and to the grid as a whole when aggregated. CES must be low cost to purchase and install and also largely maintenance free through more than 10 years of service life to be acceptable to most utilities.Achieving the required system life time is a major uncertainty for lithium-ion batteries. The lifetime and immediate system performance of batteries can change drastically with battery temperature, which is a strong function of system packaging, local climate, electrical duty cycle, and other factors. In other Li-ion applications, this problem is solved via air or liquid heating and cooling systems that may need occasional maintenance throughout their service life. CES requires a maintenance-free thermal management system providing protection from environmental conditions while rejecting heat from a moderate electrical duty cycle. Thus, the development of an effective, low-cost, zero-maintenance thermal management system poses a challenge critical to the success of CES. NREL and Southern California Edison have collaborated to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of various CES thermal configurations in multiple climates by building a model of CES based on collected test data, integrating it with an NREL-developed Li-ion degradation model, and applying CES electrical duty cycles and historic location-specific meteorological data to forecast battery thermal response and degradation through a 10-year service life.

Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.; Coleman, D.; Chen, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar applications of thermal energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology assessment is presented on solar energy systems which use thermal energy storage. The study includes characterization of the current state-of-the-art of thermal energy storage, an assessment of the energy storage needs of solar energy systems, and the synthesis of this information into preliminary design criteria which would form the basis for detailed designs of thermal energy storage. (MHR)

Lee, C.; Taylor, L.; DeVries, J.; Heibein, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Results from a workshop on research needs for modeling aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system modeling was conducted in Seattle, Washington, on November 30 and December 1, 1989 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the workshop was to develop a list of high-priority research activities that would facilitate the commercial success of ATES. During the workshop, participants reviewed currently available modeling tools for ATES systems and produced a list of significant issues related to modeling ATES systems. Participants assigned a priority to each issue on the list by voting and developed a list of research needs for each of four high-priority research areas; the need for a feasibility study model, the need for engineering design models, the need for aquifer characterization, and the need for an economic model. The workshop participants concluded that ATES commercialization can be accelerated by aggressive development of ATES modeling tools and made specific recommendations for that development. 2 tabs.

Drost, M K

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Macroencapsulation of Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of a latent heat storage system using phase change materials (PCMs) is an effective way of storing thermal energy. Latent heat storage enables… (more)

Pendyala, Swetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. [Sensible heat storage using Caloria HT43 and mixture of gravel and sand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 100-MWe Commercial Plant Thermal Storage System (TSS) employs sensible heat storage using dual liquid and solid media for the heat storage in each of four tanks, with the thermocline principle applied to provide high-temperature, extractable energy independent of the total energy stored. The 10-MW Pilot Plant employs a similar system except uses only a single tank. The high-temperature organic fluid Caloria HT43 and a rock mixture of river gravel and No. 6 silica sand were selected for heat storage in both systems. The system design, installation, performance testing, safety characteristics, and specifications are described in detail. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. California EnergyTest Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large OfficeStorage System and Demand Response at the University of

Granderson, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride sink-side thermal energy storage for pulsed space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Value analysis indicates that inclusion of thermal energy storage (TES) as an element in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. A candidate design for the TES component utilizes lithium hydride (LiH) encapsulated in 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Critical concerns with this concept are the need to (1) accommodate shell stresses induced by volumetric expansion of the melting salt or surface gripping by the freezing salt and (2) minimize hydrogen loss through the shell due to LiH dissociation at high temperatures. Experimental observation of significant cracking of the LiH during cooling mitigates the first of these issues by providing a leakage path into the interior void as melting occurs at the salt-containment interface, thus allowing use of thin shells.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.; Whittaker, J.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage (TES) reduces electric costs by shifting chilling activities to off-peak times. Water is chilled or ice is made during the night to either replace or augment operation of cooling equipment during the day. Off-peak demand and consumption rates produce significant dollar savings. TES requires favorable electric rate structures, available space to house the associated equipment, and either variation in buildings cooling loads or favorable climatic conditions. TES can be implemented anywhere cooling loads can be shifted to off-peak housrs with the best applications being office buildings, hospitals, and schools. Most TES projects are implemented inconjunction with an existing cooling system expansion, replacement of older cooling equipment, or new construction, thus reducing energy costs, consumption, and demand.

Chvala, William D.

2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the summer of previous years, Kuwait faced a series of power shortages emphasizing the need for urgent commissioning of power generation projects. It is estimated that the demand for electricity is growing at an average of 6.2% per year, encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS) system is one of the available techniques that can be utilized to reduce peak electricity demand of buildings when national electricity consumption is at its highest level. This paper demonstrates that the use of CWTS system reduces the peak power demand and energy consumption of AC systems for design day conditions by 36.7% - 87.5% and 5.4% - 7.2%, respectively. This reduction depends on selected operating strategies as compared with conventional AC system. Furthermore, results show that the annual energy consumption of CWTS systems decreases by between 4.5% and 6.9% compared with conventional systems, where chillers and pumps significantly contribute to this reduction.

Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effect of design parameter changes on the performance of thermal storage wall passive systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hour-by-hour computer simulations based on one year of solar radiation and temperature data are used to analyze annual energy savings in thermal storage wall passive designs, both Trombe wall and water wall cases. The calculations are rerun many times changing various parameters one at a time to assess the effect on performance. Parameters analyzed are: night insulation R-value, number of glazings, wall absorptance and emittance, thermal storage capacity, Trombe wall properties and vent area size, additional building mass, and temperature control set points. Calculations are done for eight cities.

McFarland, R.D.; Balcomb, J.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transient thermal analysis of three fast-charging latent heat storage configurations for a space-based power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A space-based thermal storage application must accept large quantities of heat in a short period of time at an elevated temperature. A model of a lithium hydride phase change energy storage system was used to estimate reasonable physical dimensions for this application which included the use of a liquid metal heat transfer fluid. A finite difference computer code was developed and used to evaluate three methods of enhancing heat transfer in the PCM energy storage system. None of these three methods, inserting thin fins, reticulated nickel, or liquid lithium, significantly improved the system performance. The use of a 95% void fraction reticulated nickel insert was found to increase the storage capacity (total energy stored) of the system slightly with only a small decrease in the system energy density (energy storage/system mass). The addition of 10% liquid lithium was found to cause minor increases in both storage density and storage capacity with the added benefit of reducing the hydrogen pressure of the lithium hydride. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Stovall, T.K.; Arimilli, R.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Case Study on Thermal Energy Storage: Gemasolar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19.9-MW Gemasolar plant is the first commercial concentrating-solar thermal power plant to use a central receiver tower and a two-tank molten-salt thermal energy storage system. The initial plant operation has demonstrated the feasibility of the technology to operate under commercial conditions at utility scale and verified continuous 24-hour operation. The storage capacity makes the plant output dispatchable and improves the plant’s capacity factor and profitability. This white paper ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage reduces electric costs by shifting chilling activities to off-peak times. Water is chilled or ice is made during the night to either replace or augment operation of cooling equipment during the day. Off-peak demand and consumption rates produce significant dollar savings. TES requires favorable electric rate structures, available space to house the associated equipment, and either variation in buildings cooling loads or favorable climatic conditions. TES can be implemented anywhere cooling loads can be shifted to off-peak hours with the best applications being office buildings, hospitals, and schools. Most TES projects are implemented in conjunction with an existing cooling system expansion, replacement of older cooling equipment, or new construction, thus reducing energy costs, consumption, and demand. Various options are available for funding TES projects in Federal facilities, including direct agency funding, capital improvement funds, utility financing, and alternative financing. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) should promote TES through demonstrations, success stories, and by distributing the FEMP Technology Alert (March 2000). Federal Facilities should, as standard practice, evaluate TES options whenever a chiller retrofit or replacement is performed.

Chvala, William D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The team’s design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lightweight concrete materials and structural systems for water tanks for thermal storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermally efficient hot water storage tanks were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The tanks were made using cellular concrete at a nominal density of 100 lb/ft/sup 3/ for the structural elements and at a 30 lb/ft/sup 3/ density for the insulating elements. Thermal performance testing of the tanks was done using a static decay test since the test procedure specified in ASHRAE 94-77 was not experimentally practical. A series of composition modifications to the cellular concrete mix were investigated and the addition of alkaline resistant glass fibers was found to enhance the mechanical properties at no sacrifice in thermal behavior. Economic analysis indicated that cellular concrete provides a cost-effective insulating material. The total portability of the plant for producing cellular concrete makes cellular concrete amenable to on-site fabrication and uniquely adaptable to retrofit applications.

Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Elia, G.G.; Ichikawa, Y.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids— substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system during the day and released at night—when the sun is not shining—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

None

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Improved thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a thermal storage apparatus and more particularly to an apparatus for use in conjunction with solar dynamic energy storage systems. The invention is comprised of a thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, R.L.; Lauf, R.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improved thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a thermal storage apparatus and more particularly to an apparatus for use in conjunction with solar dynamic energy storage systems. The invention is comprised of a thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, R.L.; Lauf, R.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Potential benefits of thermal energy storage in the proposed Twin Cities district heating-cogeneration system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new, large, cogeneration-district heating system has been proposed for the Twin Cities area, using hot water in a closed-loop system. The proposed system, as described by Studsvik Energiteknik AB of Sweden, does not employ thermal energy storage (TES). Four cases have been developed, describing system configurations which would employ TES, to evaluate the potential benefits of incorporating annual-cycle TES into the Twin Cities system. The potential benefits are found to be substantial, confirming results of earlier, generic studies of aquifer TES. The reference (Studsvik) system employs oil-fired boilers to supplement cogenerated heat, for handling peak loads and providing standby reserve. TES can serve the same function, with net energy savings in spite of heat losses during storage, by making it possible to operate the cogeneration equipment at higher capacity factors. Coal replaces oil as the fuel consumed. Energy savings of the reference system are impressive; energy savings with TES are 2 to 22% better. Capital cost requirements for boilers, cogeneration equipment, and pipelines are reduced by $66 to $258 million. The breakeven capital cost of TES is estimated to range from $43 to $76 per kilowatt peak thermal input to or withdrawal from aquifer TES. A factor in evaluating the breakeven operating cost of TES is the $14 to $31 million per year saving in cost of fuel. Abatement of air pollution and thermal pollution are concomitant benefits.

Meyer, C.F.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thermal Modeling of Hybrid Storage Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lack of thermal models for storage clusters; most existing thermal models do not take into account the utilization of hard drives (HDDs) and solid state disks (SSDs). To address this problem, we build a thermal model for hybrid storage clusters ... Keywords: Cluster, Hybrid, Model, Storage, Thermal

Xunfei Jiang; Maen M. Al Assaf; Ji Zhang; Mohammed I. Alghamdi; Xiaojun Ruan; Tausif Muzaffar; Xiao Qin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

Moens, L.; Blake, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of candidate fluids and phase-change materials (PCM) to serve as thermal energy storage media in the temperature range of 300 C to 800 C. Knowledge of thermophysical properties such as melting point, heat of fusion, density, viscosity, thermal stability are essential for understanding how candidate materials could be deployed in CSP plants. The laboratory runs high-temperature instruments for the analysis of thermophysical properties. Small samples of candidate materials are prepared and characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and other specialized analytical methods. Instrumentation capabilities are being expanded to allow for analysis of samples up to 1,200 C. Higher temperature operation is one method to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of CSP systems.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source scheme in economical, technical, and environmental aspects, it is determined that the scheme of the groundwater source heat pump has better energy efficiency than others. The GHPWTS can take full advantage of the heat source from groundwater and benefit of electricity difference pricing during a day. Its character is a combination of a strength and another strength. It is the lowest cycle cost of all chide and heat source schemes. The GHPWTS has the best economic benefit and runs stably and reliably. Its advantage is clearly compared with other schemes. There is a real value for the project that is similar to the characteristic of this project and the condition of the water source.

Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO sub 4 systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

Wentworth, W.E. (Houston Univ., TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thermal Modeling and Analysis of Storage Systems Xunfei Jiang, Mohammed I. Alghamdi, Ji Zhang, Maen Al Assaf, Xiaojun Ruan, Tausif Muzaffar, and Xiao Qin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, data center designers need to urgently address the energy efficiency issues [11]. The electricity Al Assaf, Xiaojun Ruan§, Tausif Muzaffar, and Xiao Qin Department of Computer Science and Software the thermal impact of storage systems. In the first phase of this work, we generate the thermal profile

Qin, Xiao

138

Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Dual Path HVAC System Demonstration in School: Leveraging Thermal Energy Storage and Cold Air Distribution to Enhance System Perform ance in a Florida Elementary School  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on a novel dual-path, low-temperature air distribution system demonstrated in a Florida elementary school. This system addresses high humidity levels and indoor air quality problems normally found in schools due to their large ventilation requirements, especially in humid climates. The dual-path system is also integrated with synergistic use of thermal energy storage and low-temperature air distribution, reduced energy use, and initial cost. The field data confirmed that the system ...

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods, further complicating demand response scenarios. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced is described and its participation in a demand response event during 2008 is detailed. Second, a set of demand response strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated demand response during a 2009 event, which is also evaluated. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility’s DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs.

Granderson, J.; Dudley, J. H.; Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Guidelines for sampling and analyzing solutions from aquifer thermal-energy-storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful aquifer storage and retrieval of energy in the form of heated or chilled water require that the engineered system be compatible with the natural ground-water system. The composition of the ground water must be well known to predict and avoid potential problems that heating or cooling the water may create for operation of the plant. This paper presents a set of guidelines for sampling and analyzing solutions from simulated or real groundwater energy storage systems. Sampling guidelines include methods for flushing wells of stagnant water and monitoring selective solution parameters (pH, Eh, temperature or conductivity) as indicators of the efficiency of flushing. Certain unstable groundwater parameters (temperature, pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity) should be measured onsite. It is recommended that alkalinity, sulfide, and ammonia determinations be done within 24 hr of sampling. In addition to these field measurements, samples of the ground water should be filtered, preserved, and stored for laboratory analysis of major cations, anions, trace metals, organic and inorganic carbon and certain redox couples (Fe/sup 2 +//Fe/sup 3 +/ and As/sup 3 +//As/sup 5 +/). The final results of the analysis should be verified by computing the cation-anion balance and comparing measured conductivity with the solution analysis.

Deutsch, W.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersA. 1957. Steady State Free Thermal Convection of Liquid in a1958. An Experiment on Free Thermal Convection of Water in

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael Ray (Knoxville, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced technology thermal energy storage and heat exchange systems for solar applications: a survey of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey is presented of the advanced research and development projects underway in the U.S. in all of the known media and methods for storing and transferring thermal energy in solar applications. The technologies reviewed include innovative heat exchange and heat transport methods, advanced sensible heat storage in water, rocks, earth and combinations of these for both short term and annual storage, phase change materials, and reversible chemical reactions. This survey is presented in a structure of categories and subcategories of thermal energy storage and heat transfer technology. Within a given subcategory the project descriptions are listed under the name of the organizations conducting the work, arranged in alphabetical order.

Michaels, A. I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated SolarMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either constructing thermal storage or using it on a day-by-day basis. This presentation will discuss three technologies for thermal storage systems noting the particular advantages of each. Thermal storage technologies are selected by the temperature range of the storage media. This is not a design-oriented presentation, but an overview of what one utility sees taking place in the commercial and industrial refrigeration market place.

Knipp, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Solar energy thermalization and storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Thermal Analysis of Refrigeration Systems Used for Vaccine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Thermal Analysis of Refrigeration Systems Used for Vaccine Storage ... Suitability of commercial refrigerators for vaccine storage not ...

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

PCM energy storage during defective thermal cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incomplete thermal cycling affects storage capacities of phase change materials (PCMs). Existing PCM measuring methods are presented with their drawbacks. A new device named “the… (more)

Koekenbier, S.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal energy storage for solar applications: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of current technology and programs including some economic studies in low, intermediate, and high temperatre thermal energy storage for solar applications and an assessment of key problem areas. Previous studies of the economic role of storage for solar home heating and stand-alone electric plants are examined first and factors which affect the economics of storage are discussed. Next, the costs and storage capacities of representative sensible and latent heat storage materials are summarized. Various modes of operation are also presented for thermal storage by reversible chemical reactions, but this technology is at such an immature stage of development that its economic and technical potential are not clearly understood. Some new ideas in containers and heat exchangers are reviewed to illustrate possible innovative approaches to reducing storage costs. A more detailed examination is then made of reversible reaction storage, and gas-solid reactions are shown to have desirable attributes for solar energy storage. However, there are problems with heat transfer and heat exchanger for these systems that must be solved to make such systems more economically attractive. The DOE programs in thermal energy storage are reviewed in light of this review, and recommendations are made for future program directions which appear at this time to have the greatest potential impact on reducing technical and economic barriers to thermal storage utilization.

Wyman, C.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Concentrating Solar Program; Session: Thermal Storage - Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project overview of this presentation is: (1) description--(a) laboratory R and D in advanced heat transfer fluids (HTF) and thermal storage systems; (b) FOA activities in solar collector and component development for use of molten salt as a heat transfer and storage fluid; (c) applications for all activities include line focus and point focus solar concentrating technologies; (2) Major FY08 Activities--(a) advanced HTF development with novel molten salt compositions with low freezing temperatures, nanofluids molecular modeling and experimental studies, and use with molten salt HTF in solar collector field; (b) thermal storage systems--cost analysis and updates for 2-tank and thermocline storage and model development and analysis to support near-term trought deployment; (c) thermal storage components--facility upgrade to support molten salt component testing for freeze-thaw receiver testing, long-shafted molten salt pump for parabolic trough and power tower thermal storage systems; (d) CSP FOA support--testing and evaluation support for molten salt component and field testing work, advanced fluids and storage solicitation preparation, and proposal evaluation for new advanced HTF and thermal storage FOA.

Glatzmaier, G.; Mehos, M.; Mancini, T.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an average efficiency of 0.5 for solar thermal and 0.13 forefficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SunShot Initiative: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution...

162

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

163

SunShot Initiative: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power...

164

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Applications of cogeneration with thermal energy storage technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the U.S. Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. Several of these storage technologies can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of the TES technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included a study of both heat storage and cool storage systems for different utility-scale applications. The study reported here has shown that an oil/rock diurnal TES system, when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system, can produce on-peak power for $0.045 to $0.06 /kWh, while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, certain advanced TES concepts and storage media could substantially improve the performance and economic benefits. In related study of a chill TES system was evaluated for precooling gas turbine inlet air, which showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.; Williams, H.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Real-Time Forcast Model Analysis of Daily Average Building Load for a Thermal Storage System Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage systems were originally designed to shift the on-peak cooling production to off-peak cooling production to reduce the on-peak demand. Based on the current electricity charging structure, the reduction of both on-peak and off-peak demands is becoming an exceedingly important issue. Reduction of both on-peak and off-peak demands can also extend the life span and defer or eliminate the replacement of power transformers due to potential shortage of building power capacity with anticipated equipment load increases. The next day daily average electricity demand is a critical set point to operate chillers and associated pumps at the appropriate time. For this paper, a mathematic analysis was conducted for annual daily average cooling of a building and three real-time building load forecasting models were developed. They are first-order autogressive model, random walk model and linear regression model. Finally, the comparison of results show the random walk model provides the best forecast.

Song, L.; Joo, I. S.; Guwana, S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Thermochemical seasonal energy storage for solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the many years that thermochemical energy storage has been under investigation, the concept has been plagued with two persistent problems: high capital cost and poor efficiency. Literally hundreds of chemical reactions have also been carried out. For short-term storage, thermochemical systems suffer in comparison with highly efficient sensible storage media such as molten salts. Long-term storage, on the other hand, is not cost-competitive with systems employing fossil backup power. Thermochemical storage will play a significant role in solar thermal electric conversion only under highly select circumstances. The portion of electric demand served by solar plants must be sufficiently high that the balance of the grid cannot fully supplant seasonal storage. High fossil fuel costs must preclude the use of gas turbines for backup power. Significant breakthroughs in the development of one or more chemical reaction systems must occur. Ingeniously integrated systems must be employed to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of thermochemical storage. A promising integration scheme discussed herein consists of using sensible storage for diurnal cycling in parallel with thermochemical seasonal storage. Under the most favorable circumstances, thermochemical storage can be expected to play a small but perhaps vital role in supplying baseload energy from solar thermal electric conversion plants.

Barnhart, J.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Role of Thermal Energy Storage in Industrial Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Storage for Industrial Applications is a major thrust of the Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with process or reject heat recovery systems has been shown to be extremely beneficial for several applications. Recent system studies resulting from contracts awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE) have identified four especially; significant industries where TES appears attractive - food processing, paper and pulp, iron and steel, and cement. Potential annual fuel savings with large scale implementation of near term TES systems for these industries is over 9 x 106 bbl of oil. This savings is due to recuperation and storage in the food processing industry, direct fuel substitution in the paper and pulp industry and reduction in electric utility peak fuel use through in-plant production of electricity from utilization of reject heat in the steel and cement industries.

Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity

173

Stratified thermal storage in residential solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The benefits of thermal stratification in sensible heat storage were investigated for several residential solar applications. The operation of space heating, air conditioning and water heating systems with water storage was simulated on a computer. The performance of comparable systems with mixed and stratified storage was determined in terms of the fraction of the total load supplied by solar energy. The effects of design parameters such as collector efficiency, storage volume, tank geometry, etc., on the relative advantage of stratified over well-mixed storage were assessed. The results show that significant improvements in system performance (5 to 15%) may be realized if stratification can be maintained in the storage tank. The magnitude of the improvement is greatest and the sensitivity to design variables is smallest in the service hot water application. The results also show that the set of design parameters which describes the optimum system is likely to be substantially different for a system employing stratified storage than for a mixed storage system. In both the water heating and space heating applications collector flowrates lower than currently suggested for mixed storage systems were found to yield optimum performance for a system with stratified storage.

Sharp, M.K.; Loehrke, R.I.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage and Recovery in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Storage III: Materials, Systems and Applications Symposium ... storage (LHTES) devices, particularly for solar energy storage applications.

176

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Analysis of community solar systems for combined space and domestic hot water heating using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified design procedure is examined for estimating the storage capacity and collector area for annual-cycle-storage, community solar heating systems in which 100% of the annual space heating energy demand is provided from the solar source for the typical meteorological year. Hourly computer simulations of the performance of these systems were carried out for 10 cities in the United States for 3 different building types and 4 community sizes. These permitted the use of design values for evaluation of a more simplified system sizing method. Results of this study show a strong correlation between annual collector efficiency and two major, location-specific, annual weather parameters: the mean air temperature during daylignt hours and the total global insolation on the collector surface. Storage capacity correlates well with the net winter load, which is a measure of the seasonal variation in the total load, a correlation which appears to be independent of collector type.

Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.; Cook, J.D.; Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Long-duration thermal storage for solar-thermal high-pressure steam IPH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal central-receiver systems are cost effective for electric-power and industrial process-heat applications. Systems employing molten nitrate salt as both receiver working fluid and storage have previously been evaluated for diurnal thermal storage. This study evaluates the potential of employing a molten salt receiver for a baseload industrial process plant requiring saturated steam at 68 atm (1000 psi). Two types of thermal storage are evaluated: molten salt, and air and rock. When thermal storage of six hours or less is used, molten nitrate salt alone is the optimum storage. For more than six hours, the optimum storage is a combination of molten salt and air and rock. The air and rock system uses a molten-salt-to-air heat exchanger and a thermocline rock bed heated and cooled by the air. The economic potential of the system is determined. The results depend on the relative cost of fossil fuel and the solar thermal energy costs. The optimum quantity of storage is highly variable, and the range is from no storage to a long duration capacity - 48 hours.

Copeland, R.J.; Stern, C.; Leach, J.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fact that the off-peak power plant might be coal and substitute "clean" on- peak natural gas plants@lbl.gov Keywords Combined heat and power, CO2 emissions, demand response, electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal systems Abstract The addition

180

Water-storage-tube systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar collection/storage/distribution systems were surveyed, designed, fabricated, and mechanically and thermally tested. The types studied were clear and opaque fiberglass tubes, metal tubes with plastic liners, and thermosyphoning tubes. (MHR)

Hemker, P.

1981-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technical and economic feasibility of thermal storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of various thermal energy storage alternatives is determined by comparing the system performance and annualized cost which result from each storage alternative operating with the same solar collector model, the same building load model, and the same heating system and controls model. Performance and cost calculations are made on the basis of an hour-by-hour time step using actual weather bureau data for Albuquerque, N. M., and New York City for a single six-month heating season. The primary approach to comparing various storage alternatives is to allow the collector area and storage mass to vary until a minimum cost combination is achieved. In the Albuquerque location collector area of 325 ft/sup 2/, water storage mass of 12.5 lb/ft/sup 2/ of collector area, and phase change mass of 6.25 lb/ft/sup 2/ of collector area results in minimum cost systems, each of which delivers about 50% of the total building demand. The primary conclusion is that, using current costs for materials and containers, water is the cheapest storage alternative for heating applications in both Albuquerque and New York City. The cost of containing or encapsulating phase change materials, coupled with their small system performance advantage, is the main reason for this conclusion. The use of desiccant materials for thermal storage is considered to be impractical due to irreversibilities in thermal cycling.

Shelpuk, B.; Joy, P.; Crouthamel, M.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.a central solar thermal power plant. A variety of heliostatSTORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

LiH thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

Blahnik, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermophysical Properties In our Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, we use a variety of instruments to measure the thermophysical properties of heat transfer fluids and storage...

189

Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat

Szmolyan, Peter

191

INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride makes it difficult to remove the heat of reaction, especially in the relatively short target refueling times, see Attachment 3. This document describes a detailed numerical model for general metal hydride beds that couples reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer, for both hydriding and dehydriding of the bed. The detailed model is part of a comprehensive methodology for the design, evaluation and modification of hydrogen storage systems. In Hardy [2007], scoping models for reaction kinetics, bed geometry and heat removal parameters are discussed. The scoping models are used to perform a quick assessment of storage systems and identify those which have the potential to meet DOE performance targets. The operational characteristics of successful candidate systems are then evaluated with the more detailed models discussed in this document. The detailed analysis for hydrogen storage systems is modeled in either 2 or 3-dimensions, via the general purpose finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics{reg_sign}. The two-dimensional model serves to provide rapid evaluation of bed configurations and physical processes, while the three-dimensional model, which requires a much longer run time, is used to investigate detailed effects that do not readily lend themselves to two-dimensional representations. The model is general and can be adapted to any geometry or storage media. In this document, the model is applied to a modified cylindrical shell and tube geometry with radial fins perpendicular to the axis, see Figures 4.1-1 and 4.1-2. Sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4}, is used as the hydrogen storage medium. The model can be run on any DOS, LINUX or Unix based system.

Hardy, B

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, LawrenceF.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer- Second

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194. Edwards,modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers, ProceedingsAquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in preparation).

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Phase Diagram Studies on Thermal Energy Storage Materials - tris ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These two thermal energy storage materials (organic crystalline materials) undergo a solid-solid phase transition before melting which will store the thermal  ...

197

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Thermal analysis of simulated Pantex pit storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates potential pit storage configurations that could be used at the Mason and Hanger Pantex Plant. The study utilizes data from a thermal test series performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that simulated these storage configurations. The heat output values used in the LLNL test series do not represent actual pits but are rounded numbers that were chosen for convenience to allow parameter excursions. Specifically in this project, we are modeling the heat transfer and air flow around cylindrical storage containers in Pantex magazines in order to predict container temperatures. This difficult problem in thermal- fluid mechanics involves transient, three-dimensional (3-D) natural convection and thermal radiation around interacting containers with various heat generation rates. Our approach is to link together two computational methods in order to synthesize a modeling procedure for a large array of pit storage containers. The approach employs a finite element analysis of a few containers, followed by a lumped- parameter model of an array of containers. The modeling procedure we developed was applied in the simulation of a recent experiment where temperatures of pit storage containers were monitored in a steady- state, controlled environment. Our calculated pit container temperatures are comparable with data from that experiment. We found it absolutely necessary to include thermal radiation between containers in order to predict temperatures accurately, although the assumption of black-body radiation appears to be sufficient. When radiation is neglected the calculated temperatures are 4 to 6 {degrees}C higher than temperature data from the experiment. We also investigated our model`s sensitivity to variations in the natural convection heat transfer coefficient and found that with a 50% drop in the coefficient, calculated temperatures are approximately I {degree}C higher. Finally, with a modified lumped-parameter model, we demonstrate how an entire Pantex magazine can be simulated.

Aceves, S.M., Kornblum, B.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Feasibility studies of aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for a particular heating or cooling application is an interdisciplinary effort, requiring (at a minimum) expertise in engineering and hydrology. The feasibility study should proceed in two distinct stages. The first stage, which is limited in scope and detail, is intended to show if an ATES system is technically and economically suited to the application. Focus of this preliminary investigation is on revealing the existence of factors that might weigh heavily against the use of ATES methods, and, in the absence of such factors, on choosing a suitable scale for the ATES plant and well field. The results of the preliminary investigation are used to determine if more detailed investigation--including field studies--are justified, and to facilitate comparing the advantages of ATES to those of other means of providing heating or cooling. The second stage of the feasibility study focuses on detailed aquifer characterization, refinement of engineering design and cost estimates, and economic and environmental risk analysis. The results of this investigation, if favorable, will be used to justify the expense of constructing the ATES system.

Hall, S H

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

State of Solar Thermal Energy Storage Development 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage (TES) to concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants expands both the amount and timing of power delivered to the grid. Thermal storage associated with CSP plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity production cost and increase the solar plant capacity factor, enabling the availability of solar electricity during p...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Thermal storage material and process for making  

SciTech Connect

A thermal storage structure and process for making the same comprises a base material of a substantially open cell structure, with the pores interconnected and open to the surface. The open cell structure may be a volcanic rock or alternatively may be a synthetically made structure such as foamed glass, foamed concrete or foamed metal. The open cell material is completely saturated with a latent heat storage component such as a salthydrate or eutectic salts. In the process of making the latent heat storage structure, the latent heat storage component is melted in a container and the open cell structure is placed therein, whereupon the melt is spontaneously imbibed by the structure, replacing the air in the open cell structure with the liquid latent heat storage component. The structure, after cooling, is packaged or encapsulated with a vapor impermeable material. In a preferred embodiment of foamed glass material, the structure is sealed in an aluminum foil, and in an alternative embodiment, the foamed aluminum material is sealed with an aluminum foil.

Boardman, B.J.

1981-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermal energy storage in utility-scale applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Progran focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. TES technology can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of this technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included studies of both heat and cool storage systems for different, utility-scale applications. For example, one study showed that a molten salt TES system can substantially reduce the cost of coal-fired peak and intermediate load power production in an integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The levelized energy cost (LEC) of an IGCC/TES plant can be reduced by as much as 20% over the LEC of a conventional IGCC plant. This concept produces lower-cost power than the natural-gas-fired alternative if significant escalation rates in the fuel price are assumed. In another study, an oil/rock diurnal TES system when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system was shown to produce on-peak power,for $0.045 to $0.06/kWh while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, in both the IGCC and the cogeneration plant applications, advanced TES concepts could substantially improve performance and economic benefits. An evaluation of TES options for precooling gas turbine inlet air showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

Somasundaram, S.; Drost, M.K.; Brown, D.R.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation and Optimization of Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP)- A Project within the new German R&D- Framework EnBop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Until 2003 the research on buildings in operation in Germany focused mainly on demonstration buildings. Starting with the EVA project managed by IGS the attention is shifting towards performance in operation. The paper gives a general review of these research projects and presents detailed results of project WKSP. The performance of buildings with systems for underground thermal energy storage is analysed in this project. As the analyses show several systems work worse than expected. Within the project most of the systems could be significantly improved in operation. The scientific work on building performance in operation will be broadened within the new R&D framework EnBop. IGS will coordinate the framework funded by the German Ministry of Economics and Technology.

Bockelmann, F.; Kipry, H.; Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stores or releases thermal energy. This subsystem consistsGas - 436 MW Annual Thermal Energy Absorbed by the Heatof Storage Tanks, m Thermal Energy Stored per Cycle. MW -hr

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Strong Case for Thermal Energy Storage and Utility Incentives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the general increase in electricity rates, commercial and industrial customers have become strongly motivated to seek innovative methods of achieving reductions of their electric bills. At the same time, utilities have been faced with rising construction costs, more stringent regulations, and increasing environmental constraints regarding development of new generating facilities. As the thermal cooling storage technology has matured, more and more utilities are recognizing that widespread use of cool storage will provide an inexpensive alternative to new generating capacity. Every megawatt of load shift from peak to off-peak hours is equivalent to a megawatt of new generating capacity. This paper will review the state-of-the-art of cool storage technology, the economic benefits and utility programs designed to encourage the application of cool storage systems.

McCannon, L. W.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Transportable Energy Storage Systems Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project will define the requirements and specification for a transportable energy storage system and then screen various energy storage options and assess their capability to meet that specification. The application will be designed to meet peak electrical loads (3-4 hours of storage) on the electrical distribution system.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

214

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. The purpose of the study was to develop and screen a list of potential entry market applications for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Several initial screening criteria were used to identify promising ATES applications. These include the existence of an energy availability/usage mismatch, the existence of many similar applications or commercial sites, the ability to utilize proven technology, the type of location, market characteristics, the size of and access to capital investment, and the number of decision makers involved. The in-depth analysis identified several additional screening criteria to consider in the selection of an entry market application. This analysis revealed that the best initial applications for ATES are those where reliability is acceptable, and relatively high temperatures are allowable. Although chill storage was the primary focus of this study, applications that are good candidates for heat ATES were also of special interest. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Hattrup, M.P.; Weijo, R.O.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose for this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in solar heating systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating system, and stand-alone domestic hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M [eds.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a working molecular solar energy conversion system where noEnergy Storage and Conversion System ..74Thermal (MOST) Energy Storage and Conversion System In this

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program...

220

Evaluation of thermal-storage concepts for solar-cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various configuration concepts for utilizing thermal energy storage to improve the thermal and economic performance of solar cooling systems for buildings were analyzed. The storage concepts evaluated provide short-term thermal storage via the bulk containment of water or salt hydrates. The evaluations were made for both residential-size cooling systems (3-ton) and small commercial-size cooling systems (25-ton). The residential analysis considers energy requirements for space heating, space cooling and water heating, while the commercial building analysis is based only on energy requirements for space cooling. The commercial building analysis considered a total of 10 different thermal storage/solar systems, 5 each for absorption and Rankine chiller concepts. The residential analysis considered 4 thermal storage/solar systems, all utilizing an absorption chiller. All 14 systems were simulated in Miami, Phoenix, Forth Worth and Washington, D.C. The trade-offs considered include: cold-side versus hot-side storage, single vs multiple stage storage, and phase-change vs sensible heat storage. This report describes the methodology, models and system configurations utilized, and presents thermal and economic results.

Hughes, P.J.; Morehouse, J.H.; Choi, M.K.; White, N.M.; Scholten, W.B.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies Marissa Hummon 3 rd International Solar Power Integration Workshop October 20-22, 2013...

222

Carbon Foam Infused with Pentaglycerine for Thermal Energy Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A thermal energy storage device that uses pentaglycerine as a phase change material was developed. This solid-state phase change material was embedded in a carbon… (more)

Johnson, Douglas James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Use of Hybrid Nanoparticles to Enhance Thermal Energy Storage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Use of Hybrid Nanoparticles to Enhance Thermal Energy Storage Capacity for Concentrated Solar Power. Author(s), Dileep Singh, Sreeram ...

224

title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proceedings title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike journal ECEEE Summer Study textendash June...

225

Review of the aquifer seasonal thermal energy storage building HVAC system at the Melville, New York, Mid-Island Mail Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on the effectiveness with which the experiences gained from early full-scale systems are used as guides in the design, installation and operation of future projects. One such early system from which both anecdotal and quantitative information is available is the Mid-Island Postal Facility in Melville, New York. At this facility, built in the mid-1980s, an ATES system has been integrated with the building's central heating and cooling plant. Cold'' wells are charged with water that is cooled during the winter by heat pump and closed circuit cooler operation. Water from these cold wells is then used to meet the facility's cooling load during the summer, before being pumped back into the ground at Warm'' wells. Dehumidification during summer operation is accomplished by a liquid desiccant system that uses propane boilers to provide a heat source for desiccant regeneration. This system will also add water to the air during periods of low humidity. This paper provides an overview of the project, and describes the analysis being performed to assess energy and economic merits of this innovative system.

Marseille, T.J.; Wilke, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Review of the aquifer seasonal thermal energy storage building HVAC system at the Melville, New York, Mid-Island Mail Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful widespread commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in the United States will depend on the effectiveness with which the experiences gained from early full-scale systems are used as guides in the design, installation and operation of future projects. One such early system from which both anecdotal and quantitative information is available is the Mid-Island Postal Facility in Melville, New York. At this facility, built in the mid-1980s, an ATES system has been integrated with the building`s central heating and cooling plant. ``Cold`` wells are charged with water that is cooled during the winter by heat pump and closed circuit cooler operation. Water from these cold wells is then used to meet the facility`s cooling load during the summer, before being pumped back into the ground at ``Warm`` wells. Dehumidification during summer operation is accomplished by a liquid desiccant system that uses propane boilers to provide a heat source for desiccant regeneration. This system will also add water to the air during periods of low humidity. This paper provides an overview of the project, and describes the analysis being performed to assess energy and economic merits of this innovative system.

Marseille, T.J.; Wilke, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Other Innovative Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid Oxide Cells: Scott Barnett1; Gareth Hughes1; Kyle Yakal-Kremski1; Zhan Gao1; 1 Northwestern ...

228

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Thermal Energy Storage Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage Technology One advantage of parabolic trough power plants is their potential for storing solar thermal energy to use during non-solar periods and to dispatch...

229

A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification efficiency is calculated based on entropy balances or based on exergy balances. In practice, however, exergy balances are less affected by measurement uncertainties, whereas entropy balances can not be recommended if measurement uncertainties are not corrected in a way that the energy balance of the storage process is in agreement with the first law of thermodynamics. A comparison of the stratification efficiencies obtained from experimental results of charging, standby, and discharging processes gives meaningful insights into the different mixing behaviors of a storage tank that is charged and discharged directly, and a tank-in-tank system whose outer tank is charged and the inner tank is discharged thereafter. The new method has a great potential for the comparison of the stratification efficiencies of thermal energy storages and storage components such as stratifying devices. (author)

Haller, Michel Y.; Streicher, Wolfgang [Institute of Thermal Engineering, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 25/B, 8010 Graz (Austria); Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon [Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Brovej, Building 118, DK-2800, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bales, Chris [Solar Energy Research Center SERC, Hoegskolan Dalarna, 781 88 Borlaenge (Sweden)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Composite materials for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Composite materials for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground water was pumped into the storage tank from the well,be withdrawn from storage, HTW is pumped from the hot well,storage well. However, both wells are capable of being pumped and

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely important for industries. However, HAN decomposition involves complicated reaction pathways due to its autocatalytic behavior and therefore presents a challenge for definition of safe boundaries of HAN storage and handling. This research focused on HAN decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel with titanium, or stainless steel was examined in an Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). n-th order kinetics was used for initial reaction rate estimation. Because stainless steel is a commonly used material for HAN containers, isothermal aging tests were conducted in a stainless steel cell to determine the maximum safe storage time of HAN. Moreover, by changing thermal inertia, data for HAN decomposition in the stainless steel cell were examined and the experimental results were simulated by the Thermal Safety Software package. This work offers useful guidance for industries that manufacture, handle, and store HAN. The experimental data acquired not only can help with aspects of process safety design, including emergency relief systems, process control, and process equipment selection, but also is a useful reference for the associated theoretical study of autocatalytic decomposition behavior.

Zhang, Chuanji

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.R. Tek. 1970. Storage of Natural Gas in Saline Aquifers.petroleum, underground storage of natural gas, large scale

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Thermal Energy Storage: Assessment of Ice Bear 30 Hybrid Air Conditioner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes and documents the construction, performance, and application of a thermal energy storage system that uses ice as the storage medium. The system, Ice Bear 30 manufactured by Ice Energy Inc. located in Windsor, Colorado, is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard roof-top air conditioner. Ice storage systems exist, but what makes the Ice Bear 30 unique is its relatively small size (5 ton) for us...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Survey of solar thermal energy storage subsystems for thermal/electric applications  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the current technology and estimated costs of subsystems for storing the thermal energy produced by solar collectors is presented. The systems considered were capable of producing both electricity and space conditioning for three types of loads: a single-family detached residence, an apartment complex of 100 units, and a city of 30,000 residents, containing both single-family residences and apartments. Collector temperatures will be in four ranges: (1) 100 to 250/sup 0/F (used for space heating and single-cycle air conditioners and organic Rankine low-temperature turbines); (2) 300 to 400/sup 0/F (used for dual-cycle air conditioners and low-temperature turbines); (3) 400 to 600/sup 0/F (using fluids from parabolic trough collectors to run Rankine turbines); (4) 800 to 1000/sup 0/F (using fluids from heliostats to run closed-cycle gas turbines and steam Rankine turbines). The solar thermal energy subsystems will require from 60 to 36 x 10/sup 5/ kWhr (2.05 x 10/sup 5/ to 1.23 x 10/sup 10/ Btu) of thermal storage capacity. In addition to sensible heat and latent heat storage materials, several other media were investigated as potential thermal energy storage materials, including the clathrate and semiclathrate hydrates, various metal hydrides, and heat storage based on inorganic chemical reactions.

Segaser, C. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated that a utility could start the design of a demonstration plant in 2 to 3 years if research regarding TES system design is undertaken in a timely manner. (LCL)

Hobson, M. J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thermal energy storage market-oriented background paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage (TES) technologies and their applications are discussed. The markets and commercialization status and potential are explored. ERDA TES program plans are presented. It is concluded that the only TES systems ready for immediate commercialization are storage water heating and space heating charged with off-peak electricity. All that is needed for commercialization to occur is the introduction of appropriate split electricity rates or load management contracts. In the near-term, solar water heating and space heating, electric utility TES and TES space cooling with off-peak electricity may prove economic. Technology for these systems is available now or will be soon. The most promising of these is TES space cooling for commercial buildings where the economies of scale may make the systems very attractive. Again, electric rate structures must be altered for commercialization to occur. Increasing energy costs and tax incentives will help commercialize solar systems. The systems also must be proven reliable and performance accurately predicted for general market acceptance to occur. More research must be done on seasonal storage, industrial uses of TES, heat battery powered vehicles and solar thermal power for electrical generation to determine their commercial potential. Of these, current estimates for heat vehicles are the most promising, although a prototype has not yet been built and the concept must await development of the Stirling engine. If industrial and agricultural use of TES are shown to be economic, there should be no problems with commercialization as this sector is very cost conscious and tends to have available capital. Solar thermal power for electrical generation does not look economical currently, but needs further study as an inexhaustible energy source.

None

1977-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-9459. experimental Thermal energy storage in confinedAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

Douglas C. Hittle

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Electric rate structures for thermal energy storage evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Future electric rate structures are critical to thermal energy storage (TES) technologies that are specifically designed to take advantage of electric energy costs that vary depending on the magnitude, duration, and timing of power demand (e.g., cool storage). In fact, rate structure characteristics may affect the TES system design and operating approach as well as economic feasibility. The objective of this study, conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, was to define reference electric utility rate structures to be used in technical assessments of TES technologies. Electric rate structures were characterized for residential, commercial and industrial sectors. A range of conditions for several alternative rate structures was identified for each sector to capture the variability of likely conditions. Individual rate structure characteristics include demand charges and energy charges applicable during different months of the year, days of the week, and hours of the day. 7 refs., 21 tabs.

Brown, D R; Garrett, S M; Sedgewick, J M

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

H2O[underscore]TREAT users' manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20[underscore]TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO[sub 2] injection. The H2O[underscore]TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO[sub 2] precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

H2O{underscore}TREAT users` manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20{underscore}TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO{sub 2} injection. The H2O{underscore}TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO{sub 2} precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program...

248

Development of Energy Management Strategies for Automated Real- Time Pricing: Control System Enhancements for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Modulating Building Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many prominent electric utilities throughout the United States are currently investigating real-time pricing rate structures (RTP) as a means of giving their large customers an economic incentive to reduce their electricity usage during periods when the utility's cost of providing power is high. This report summarizes the results of an engineering study of the technical approach and potential benefits of optimizing thermal energy storage in response to real-time pricing of electricity. The program is com...

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and...

250

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power plants, thermal power plants(fuel, nuclear),reject heat from thermal power plants can only be re-protection is the thermal electric power plant. Electric

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept definition study for solar Brayton power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and operating criteria to be used in the Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Study are described. The storage system operating requirements and design standards are outlined and the corresponding power plant interface requirements are given. Each of the three alternative high temperature thermal energy storage systems (phase change, thermochemical, and sensible heat) is described. The approach and criteria to be used in developing energy cost numbers are described, and the systems requirements data and the requirements perturbations to be used in the trade studies are summarized. All of the requirements data to be used are compiled. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

Minor, J.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Demonstration Development Project: Solar Thermocline Storage Systems: Preliminary Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy storage (TES) has the potential to significantly increase the operating flexibility of solar power. TES allows solar power plant operators to adjust electricity production to match consumer demand, enabling the sale of electricity during peak demand periods and boosting plant revenues. To date, TES systems have been prohibitively expensive except in certain markets. Two of the most significant capital costs in a TES system are the storage medium (typically molten salt) and the storag...

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low temperature thermal energy storage: a state-of-the-art survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary version of an analysis of activities in research, development, and demonstration of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technologies having applications in renewable energy systems is presented. Three major categories of thermal storage devices are considered: sensible heat; phase change materials (PCM); and reversible thermochemical reactions. Both short-term and annual thermal energy storage technologies based on prinicples of sensible heat are discussed. Storage media considered are water, earth, and rocks. Annual storage technologies include solar ponds, aquifers, and large tanks or beds of water, earth, or rocks. PCM storage devices considered employ salt hydrates and organic compounds. The sole application of reversible chemical reactions outlined is for the chemical heat pump. All program processes from basic research through commercialization efforts are investigated. Nongovernment-funded industrial programs and foreign efforts are outlined as well. Data describing low temperature TES activities are presented also as project descriptions. Projects for all these programs are grouped into seven categories: short-term sensible heat storage; annual sensible heat storage; PCM storage; heat transfer and exchange; industrial waste heat recovery and storage; reversible chemical reaction storage; and models, economic analyses, and support studies. Summary information about yearly funding and brief descriptions of project goals and accomplishments are included.

Baylin, F.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings Intern. Conf. Solar Heating and --------------jCPower Generation," on Solar Heating and Cooling, Ed. ,as in the case of solar heating, seasonal storage offers the

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future Speaker(s): Klaus Schiess Date: June 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is a technology that stores "cooling" energy in a thermal storage mass. In the eighties and early nineties the utilities in California incentivised this technology to shift electrical on-peak power to off-peak. Thereafter, for various reasons TES became the most neglected permanent load shifting opportunity. It is only now with the challenges that the renewables provide that TES may have a come- back because it is basically the best and most economical AC battery available with a round trip efficiency of 100% or even better. This presentation gives some background to this development and shows the interdependence of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper describes a methodology to design a successful thermal energy storage program for electric utilities. The design process is addressed beginning with the market research phase. The research includes information obtained from utilities having successful thermal storage programs. In addition, information is gathered from interviews with local architects and engineers, air conditioning contractors and potential thermal energy storage customers. From this information a marketing plan is developed that addresses the target market, market penetration, promotional methods, incentive types and levels, internal and external training requirements and optimal organizational structure. The marketing plan also includes various rate structures, program procedures and evaluation techniques. In addition to the marketing plan, several case histories are addressed.

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL-TP-6A2-45833 February 2010 The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage Ramteen Sioshansi The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Paul Denholm National...

265

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archival Storage at NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group nabalthaser@lbl.gov NERSC User Training March 8, 2011 * NERSC Archive Technologies Overview * Use Cases for the...

267

System design description PFP thermal stabilization  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a system design description and design basis for the Plutonium Finishing P1ant (PFP) Thermal Stabilization project. The sources of material for this project are residues scraped from glovebox floors and materials already stored in vault storage that need further stabilizing to meet the 3013 storage requirements. Stabilizing this material will promote long term storage and reduced worker exposure. This document addresses: function design, equipment, and safety requirements for thermal stabilization of plutonium residues and oxides.

RISENMAY, H.R.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

270

Energy Programs | Advanced Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Storage Systems Advanced Storage Systems Tapping Into Fuel Cells and Batteries Page 1 of 2 Imagine being able to drive a forty-mile round-trip commute every day without ever going near a gas pump. As the United States moves towards an energy economy with reduced dependence on foreign oil and fewer carbon emissions, development of alternative fuel sources and transmission of the energy they provide is only part of the equation. An increase in energy generated from intermittent renewable sources and the growing need for mobile energy will require new, efficient means of storing it, and technological advancements will be necessary to support the nation's future energy storage needs. A change toward alternative transportation - hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric

271

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

272

Storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm atomic vapor  

SciTech Connect

We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light. Finally, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of the thermal light beam in the EIT medium. The direct measurement of the photon number statistics of the retrieved light field shows that the photon number statistics are preserved during the storage and retrieval processes.

Cho, Young-Wook; Kim, Yoon-Ho [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat. flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the ofpossibility of land subsidence or upliftu thermal pollution,flow, land uplift or subsidence 1 water chemistry and

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides a first-look at the system elements involved in: (1) creating a market; (2) understanding and deriving the requirements; (3) performing analytical effort; (4) specifying equipment; and (5) synthesizing applications for a thermal energy storage (TES) function. The work reviews implicated markets, energy consumption patterns, TES technologies, and applications. Further, several concepts are developed and evaluated in some detail. Key findings are: (1) there are numerous technical opportunities for TES in the residential and industrial market sectors; (2) apart from sensible heat storage and transfer, significant R and D is required to fully exploit the superior heat densities of latent heat-based TES systems, particularly at temperatures above 600/sup 0/F; (3) industrial energy conservation can be favorably impacted by TES where periodic or batch-operated unit functions characterize product manufacturing processes, i.e. bricks, steel, and ceramics; and (4) a severe data shortage exists for describing energy consumption rates in real time as related to plant process operations--a needed element in designing TES systems.

Glenn, D.R.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Gossiping over storage systems is practical  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gossip-based mechanisms are touted for their simplicity, limited resource usage, robustness to failures, and tunable system behavior. These qualities make gossiping an ideal mechanism for storage systems that are responsible for maintaining and updating ... Keywords: distributed storage, durability, gossip-based storage, gossiping, mobile ad hoc networks, persistent storage, update propagation, wide-area networks, wireless sensor networks

Hakim Weatherspoon; Hugo Miranda; Konrad Iwanicki; Ali Ghodsi; Yann Busnel

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above, intermetallic compounds can precipitate between, and within, the grains of nickel alloys. The precipitation leads to an increase in tensile strength, and a decrease in ductility. Whether the proposed tube materials can provide the required low cycle fatigue life for the supercritical H2O and CO2 receivers is an open question. 4) A ranking of the plants, in descending order of technical and economic feasibility, is as follows: i) Supercritical nitrate salt and baseline nitrate salt: equal ratings ii) Low temperature supercritical H2O iii) Low temperature supercritical CO2 iv) High temperature supercritical CO2 v) High temperature supercritical H2O 5) The two-tank nitrate salt thermal storage systems are strongly preferred over the thermocline systems using supercritical heat transport fluids.

Kelly, Bruce D.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sizing a water softener for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) installations, ground water is circulated between an aquifer and heat exchangers via a well field. It is often necessary to soften the water to prevent carbonate scaling in pipes, heat exchangers, and well screens. Most ATES projects requiring water softening will be best served by using synthetic ion-exchange resins. The size of the resin beds, the resin regeneration cycle, and the amount of NaCl brine used in each regeneration depend on several factors. These are (1) the chemistry of the native ground water, (2) allowable residual hardness after softening, (3) the maximum flow rate of water through the ATES plant, and (4) exchange characteristics of the resin. Example calculations are given for a three-bed water softening system.

Hall, S.H.; Jenne, E.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Initial study of thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. [UCATES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Convective heat transport in unconfined aquifers is modeled in a semi-analytic way. The transient groundwater flow is modeled by superposition of analytic functions, whereby changes in the aquifer storage are represented by a network of triangles, each with a linearly varying sink distribution. This analytic formulation incorporates the nonlinearity of the differential equation for unconfined flow and eliminates numerical dispersion in modeling heat convection. The thermal losses through the aquifer base and vadose zone are modeled rather crudely. Only vertical heat conduction is considered in these boundaries, whereby a linearly varying temperature is assumed at all times. The latter assumption appears reasonable for thin aquifer boundaries. However, assuming such thin aquifer boundaries may lead to an overestimation of the thermal losses when the aquifer base is regarded as infinitely thick in reality. The approach is implemented in the computer program UCATES, which serves as a first step toward the development of a comprehensive screening tool for ATES systems in unconfined aquifers. In its present form, the program is capable of predicting the relative effects of regional flow on the efficiency of ATES systems. However, only after a more realistic heatloss mechanism is incorporated in UCATES will reliable predictions of absolute ATES efficiencies be possible.

Haitjema, H.M.; Strack, O.D.L.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low-temperature thermal energy storage program annual operating plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LTTES program operating plans for FY 1978 are described in terms of general program objectives and the technical activities being implemented to achieve these objectives. The program structure provides emphasis on several principal thrusts; namely, seasonal thermal storage, daily/short-term thermal storage, and waste heat recovery and reuse. A work breakdown structure (WBS) organizes the efforts being carried out in-house or through subcontract within each thrust area. Fiscal data are summarized in respect to thrust area, individual efforts, and funding source.

Hoffman, H. W.; Eissenberg, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Storage Systems TIAX LLC 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2390 Tel. 617- 498-5000 Fax 617-498-7200 www.TIAXLLC.com Reference:...

284

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

285

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

286

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

287

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

288

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Poster Session Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3: Poster Session The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking...

289

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

290

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, Session 4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

291

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

292

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

293

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Session 4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

294

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

295

APS storage ring vacuum system  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquifers of Hot Water from Solar Power Systems," presentedof hot water from solar power systems. Lawrence BerkeleyAquifers of Hot Water from Solar Power Systems," Proceedings

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Phase change thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

BALDR-1: a solar thermal system simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar thermal system simulation (BALDR-1) was written in a modular fashion to facilitate expansion and modification. The flexibility of the simulation is derived, in part, from the use of three separate models to constitute the system simulation: FIELD, POWER, and ECON. Each model can be run independently, or they may be coupled and run as a set. The FIELD code models the optical and thermal performance of the collector field. It has separate optical and thermal performance routines for each generic collector type. Meteorological data is read in 15-minute or hourly increments. The POWER code models the performance of power conversion and storage components. It calculates the total thermal and/or electrical energy produced during the year for a set of plant configurations comprised of different collector field sizes, thermal storage sizes, and electrical storage sizes. The POWER code allows the selection of one of several control strategies in the dispatch of thermal and electrical storage. The ECON code calculates the initial capital cost of each power plant configuration modelled in POWER. This capital cost is combined with operations and maintenance costs to calculate a life-cycle busbar energy cost and simple payback period for each plant.

Finegold, J.G.; Herlevich, F.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors.of International Solar Energy Congress, New Delhi, India.Thermal Storage of Solar Energy 11 , Amsterdam, The

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermal analysis of solar thermal energy storage in a molten-salt thermocline  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive, two-temperature model is developed to investigate energy storage in a molten-salt thermocline. The commercially available molten salt HITEC is considered for illustration with quartzite rocks as the filler. Heat transfer between the molten salt and quartzite rock is represented by an interstitial heat transfer coefficient. Volume-averaged mass and momentum equations are employed, with the Brinkman-Forchheimer extension to the Darcy law used to model the porous-medium resistance. The governing equations are solved using a finite-volume approach. The model is first validated against experiments from the literature and then used to systematically study the discharge behavior of thermocline thermal storage system. Thermal characteristics including temperature profiles and discharge efficiency are explored. Guidelines are developed for designing solar thermocline systems. The discharge efficiency is found to be improved at small Reynolds numbers and larger tank heights. The filler particle size strongly influences the interstitial heat transfer rate, and thus the discharge efficiency. (author)

Yang, Zhen; Garimella, Suresh V. [Cooling Technologies Research Center, NSF I/UCRC, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage Applications: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To store thermal energy, sensible and latent heat storage materials are widely used. Latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) systems using phase change materials (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation. Molten salt PCM candidates for cascaded PCMs were evaluated for the temperatures near 320 degrees C, 350 degrees C, and 380 degrees C. These temperatures were selected to fill the 300 degrees C to 400 degrees C operating range typical for parabolic trough systems, that is, as one might employ in three-PCM cascaded thermal storage. Based on the results, the best candidate for temperatures near 320 degrees C was the molten salt KNO3-4.5wt%KCl. For the 350 degrees C and 380 degrees C temperatures, the evaluated molten salts are not good candidates because of the corrosiveness and the high vapor pressure of the chlorides.

Gomez, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Starace, A.; Turchi, C.; Ortega, J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Peak Load Shifting by Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reviews the technology of storing energy in hot water and explores the potential for implementing this form of thermal energy storagethrough means of smart electric water heatersas a way to shift peak load on the electric grid. The report presents conceptual background, discusses strategies for peak load shifting and demand response, documents a series of laboratory tests conducted on a representative model of smart water heater, and...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

An evaluation of thermal energy storage options for precooling gas turbine inlet air  

SciTech Connect

Several approaches have been used to reduce the temperature of gas turbine inlet air. One of the most successful uses off-peak electric power to drive vapor-compression-cycle ice makers. The ice is stored until the next time high ambient temperature is encountered, when the ice is used in a heat exchanger to cool the gas turbine inlet air. An alternative concept would use seasonal thermal energy storage to store winter chill for inlet air cooling. The objective of this study was to compare the performance and economics of seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers with diurnal ice thermal energy storage for gas turbine inlet air cooling. The investigation consisted of developing computer codes to model the performance of a gas turbine, energy storage system, heat exchangers, and ancillary equipment. The performance models were combined with cost models to calculate unit capital costs and levelized energy costs for each concept. The levelized energy cost was calculated for three technologies in two locations (Minneapolis, Minnesota and Birmingham, Alabama). Precooling gas turbine inlet air with cold water supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage system provided lower cost electricity than simply increasing the size of the turbine for meteorological and geological conditions existing in the Minneapolis vicinity. A 15 to 20% cost reduction resulted for both 0.05 and 0.2 annual operating factors. In contrast, ice storage precooling was found to be between 5 and 20% more expensive than larger gas turbines for the Minneapolis location. In Birmingham, aquifer thermal energy storage precooling was preferred at the higher capacity factor and ice storage precooling was the best option at the lower capacity factor. In both cases, the levelized cost was reduced by approximately 5% when compared to larger gas turbines.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Systems Analysis Storage Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: System Level Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Options Project ID: 202 Principal Investigator: Rajesh K. Ahluwalia Keywords: Hydrogen storage; compressed hydrogen tanks Purpose ANL is developing models to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on approaches with unique characteristics (thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge, kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved) and to evaluate their potential to meet DOE targets for on-board applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Rajesh K. Ahluwalia Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Address: 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439 Telephone: 630-252-5979 Email: walia@anl.gov Additional Performers: T.Q. Hua, Argonne National Laboratory; Romesh Kumar, Argonne National Laboratory; J-C Peng, Argonne National Laboratory

307

STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated Hydrogen Storage System Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WSRC-TR-2007-00440, REVISION 0 WSRC-TR-2007-00440, REVISION 0 Keywords: Hydrogen Kinetics, Hydrogen Storage Vessel Metal Hydride Retention: Permanent Integrated Hydrogen Storage System Model Bruce J. Hardy November 16, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DEAC09-96-SR18500 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information,

309

Thermal Analysis of Storage Cans Containing Special Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of thermal analyses have been completed for ten storage can configurations representing various cases of materials stored in F-Area. The analyses determine the temperatures of the cans, the special nuclear material, and the air sealed within the cans. Analyses to aid in understanding the effect of oxide accumulation and metal aging on temperatures are also included.

Jerrell, J.W.

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal storage applications workshop. Volume 1. Plenary session analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 14 and 15, 1978, a workshop on solar power development and thermal and thermochemical energy storage technology was held at Golden, Colorado. These proceedings contain the record of this workshop. They are divided into two volumes. Volume I presents an analysis and condensation of information discussed in round-table plenary sessions.

Not Available

1979-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Olszewski, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with which ground water source heat pumps can be counted onResearch into ground water source heat pump systems has beenwell domestic ground water source heat pump system where

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thermal Energy Storage at a Federal Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility partnership upgrades energy system to help meet the General Services Administration's (GSA) energy-saving goals

Not Available

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

Allen, R.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

baseload power and oil-fired boilers for peak and standbyoil-fired boilers used in the conventional system as a backup, and to meet peak

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation or perhaps for a gas turbine. And lastly, Figurewill then be described. Gas-Turbine System Cogeneration ofusing a combus- tion gas turbine can be accomplished with

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive system of cooling towers or ponds to avoid thermalcold from winter air have cooling towers 0 dry coolers, andtechnical analyses; of cooling towers, coolers, and ponds as

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern food processing operations often require that the temperature of the processed foodstuff be raised or lowered. These operations result in energy consumption by refrigeration or heating systems, and a portion of this energy can be recovered from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry processing plant sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and conducted by Georgia Tech is used as an illustrative example of potential applications of heat recovery and thermal energy storage.

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants were recently encountered which offered the potential for full storage. The first plant, a textile weaving operation, has over 5,000 tons of installed chiller capacity used for strict control of temperature and humidity. Measurements of peak load indicated the units were less than 50 percent loaded. Because of the excess chiller capacity, summer demand can be met by operating the units fully loaded during off-peak hours and storing unneeded chilled water in a storage tank for daytime usage. The second plant is a single shift poultry processing operation that uses large amounts of ice to preserve the product during shipping. In this case, ice making during off-peak times for use during production was analyzed. Despite the fact that both options offered significant savings, the paybacks were higher than acceptable due to the significant investment required. While the projects are not economically feasible at the present time, the analysis verifies the technical feasibility of thermal storage. Future changes in electricity cost could make the concept more attractive economically.

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy… (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Switzerland, district heating accounts for 50% of totalproposed hot-water district heating system in the St. Paul/an industrial in a district heating Washington Market and

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directly through air-water heat exchangers. However, in casebe desirable to use a heat exchanger between the well waterat JFK. Such a double heat exchanger system is shown in

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jamaica Bay water nor cooling tower "agothy Fm, Elevation ofJFK. Investment Cost of Cooling Tower Case. Table 3. Annualthe JFK Aquifer System. I. Cooling Tower Case Winter Cooling

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Thermal energy storage for coal-fired power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an engineering and economic evaluation of using thermal energy storage (TES) with coal-fired conventional and combined cycle power plants. In the first case, conventional pulverized coal combustion equipment was assumed to continuously operate to heat molten nitrate salt which was then stored in a tank. During intermediate-load demand periods, hot salt was withdrawn from storage and used to generate steam for a Rankine steam power cycle. This allowed the coal-fired salt heater to be approximately one-third the size of a coal-fired boiler in a conventional cycling plant. The use of nitrate salt TES also reduced the levelized cost of power by between 5% and 24% depends on the operating schedule. The second case evaluate the use of thermal energy storage with an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this concept, the nitrate salt was heated by a combination of the gas turbine exhaust and the hot fuel gas. The IGCC plant also contained a low-temperature storage unit that uses a mixture of oil and rock as the thermal storage medium. Thermal energy stored in the low-temperature TES was used to preheat the feedwater after it leaves the condenser and to produce process steam for other applications in the IGCC plant. This concept study also predicted a 5% to 20% reduction in levelized cost of power compared to other coal-fired alternatives. If significant escalation rates in the price of fuel were assumed, the concept could be competitive with natural-gas-fired intermediate-load power generation. A sensitivity analysis of using a direct-contact heat exchanger instead of the conventional finned-tube design showed a significant reduction in the installed capital cost. 3 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems By Andrewof Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems by Andrew

Duffin, Andrew Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi-energy district boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi- energy district boiler Julien of the OptiEnR research project, the present paper deals with optimizing the multi-energy district boiler to the complexity of the district boiler as a whole and the strong interactions between the sub-systems, previous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

331

Metal Hydrides for Thermal Energy Storage Applications - A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications. Presentation Title ... Hydrogen Generation Using Cyclic Redox Reaction of Iron Oxide ... The Effect the Distribution of the Conducting Phase on SiCO-Li+ Anode Performance.

332

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Key Technologies, Thermal Management, and Prototype Testing for Advanced Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Joseph W. Reiter (Primary Contact), Alexander Raymond, Channing C. Ahn (Caltech), Bret Naylor, Otto Polanco, Rajeshuni Ramesham, and Erik Lopez Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 79-24 Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 Phone: (818) 354-4224; Email: Joseph.W.Reiter@jpl.nasa.gov DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Subcontractor: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA Project Start Date: February, 2009 Project End Date: September, 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify state-of-art concepts and designs for * cryosorbent-based hydrogen storage systems

334

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Method and apparatus for thermal energy storage. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for storing energy by converting thermal energy to potential chemically bound energy in which a first metal hydride is heated to dissociation temperature, liberating hydrogen gas which is compressed and reacted with a second metal to form a second metal hydride while releasing thermal energy. Cooling the first metal while warming the second metal hydride to dissociation temperature will reverse the flow of hydrogen gas back to the first metal, releasing additional thermal energy. The method and apparatus are particularly useful for the storage and conversion of thermal energy from solar heat sources and for the utilization of this energy for space heating purposes, such as for homes or offices.

Gruen, D.M.

1975-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

An assessment methodology for thermal energy storage evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents an assessment methodology for evaluating the cost, performance, and overall economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The methodology was developed by Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program personnel at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use by PNL and other TES concept evaluators. The methodology is generically applicable to all TES concepts; however, specific analyses may require additional or more detailed definition of the ground rules, assumptions, and analytical approach. The overall objective of the assessment methodology is to assist in preparing equitable and proper evaluations of TES concepts that will allow developers and end-users to make valid decisions about research and development (R and D) and implementation. The methodology meets this objective by establishing standard approaches, ground rules, assumptions, and definitions that are analytically correct and can be consistently applied by concept evaluators. 15 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Drost, M.K.; Spanner, G.E.; Williams, T.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

On-Board Storage Systems Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Board Storage Systems Analysis On-Board Storage Systems Analysis R. K. Ahluwalia, J-K Peng and T. Q. Hua DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop Washington, DC 25 January 2006 Work sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies 2 ANL ANL ' ' s Role in H s Role in H 2 2 Storage Systems Development Storage Systems Development Working with DOE contractors and Centers of Excellence researchers: Model and analyze various developmental hydrogen storage systems Analyze hybrid systems that combine features of more than one concept Develop models that can be used to "reverse-engineer" particular technologies Identify interface issues and opportunities, and data

339

Thermal Analysis of BORAL(R) in Storage Racks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of thermal analyses showing that the BORAL neutron absorber in the Seabrook storage racks is unlikely to experience conditions sufficient to induce boiling in the water trapped within the internal porosity of the core material. This finding makes it likely that the observed blister formation in BORAL coupons in spent fuel pools actually results from an alternative mechanism involving hydrogen generation and internal pressure build-up.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

340

Investigation of thermal storage and steam generator issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review and evaluation of steam generator and thermal storage tank designs for commercial nitrate salt technology showed that the potential exists to procure both on a competitive basis from a number of qualified vendors. The report outlines the criteria for review and the results of the review, which was intended only to assess the feasibility of each design, not to make a comparison or select the best concept.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources From the DOE Press Release: "High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage (HEATS). More than 90% of energy technologies involve the transport and conversion of thermal energy. Therefore, advancements in thermal energy storage - both hot and cold - would dramatically improve performance for a variety of critical energy applications. ..." From the Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge DOE Green Energy WorldWideScience.org More information Secretary Chu announces $130 Million for Advanced Research Projects, April 20, 2011 From Zero to $180 Million in Five Days DOE Blog ARPA-E's High Density Thermal Storage Workshop, January 2011 Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage Grant Synopsis

342

Survey of Thermal Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants; Period of Performance: September 13, 1999 - June 12, 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify and selectively review previous work done on the evaluation and use of thermal energy storage systems applied to parabolic trough power plants. Appropriate storage concepts and technical options are first discussed, followed by a review of previous work.

Pilkington Solar International GmbH

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction to HPSS at NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group nabalthaser@lbl.gov Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA Feb 10, 2011 * NERSC Archive Technologies...

344

Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 29, 2011 ... The transition from the fossil economy to a greener, sustainable economy cannot, however, be realized without efficient energy storage systems ...

345

Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s) for Capturing Intermittent Renewable Energy ­ Analysis of Test Results for Hydrogen Storage Systems By Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean of Kahua Ranch Hydrogen Storage System 3 3.1 Kahua Ranch Power System 3 3.2 Electrolyzer Experimental

347

Cooling Strategies Based on Indicators of Thermal Storage in Commercial Building Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building thermal mass and multi-day regimes of hot weather are important, yet poorly understood, contributors to cooling energy requirements. This paper develops load-shifting sub-cooling and precooling equipment operating strategies to address a specific instance of this phenomenon, in which thermal storage by building mass over weekends exacerbates Monday cooling energy requirements. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large, office building prototype in El Paso, TX using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program. The economic value of the strategies is evaluated with direct reference to utility rate schedules and a crude measure of thermal storage is related to the energy impacts of the strategies. The indicators are based on core zone air temperatures, which are sampled a t night when HVAC systems are not in use. The suggestion is made that the results and proposed strategies could be adapted for use by computerized energy management systems to reduce building energy operating costs.

Eto, J. H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study using computer simulations to determine the physical and economic performance of combined photovoltaic/thermal collector heat-pump solar systems for a single-family residence are presented. Economic analyses are based upon projected costs for a 1986 system installation. The results show that PV/T collector systems can be economically competitive for a cold climate residence, that systems employing on-site electrical storage batteries are not economically competitive with utility-interactive systems, and that an ambient-air-source heat-pump system has a lower life-cycle cost than a solar-source heat-pump system.

Russell, M.C.

1979-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has been steadilya Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a key challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has beena Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Field Evaluation of Unitary Thermal Energy Storage: Ice Bear Final Report for CPS Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage devices can be used by electric utility companies to shift load to off-peak hours. This report investigates ice storage as a method of shifting cooling loads to overnight periods. Three Ice Bear systems were installed in San Antonio, Texas, at an office, a convenience store, and a university campus building. These devices were used to offset a nominal 5-ton  stage of cooling during set hours by using ice, which had been made overnight. The systems were integrated with ...

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encapsulated Phase Change Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on

353

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

354

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and installed DG equipment (PV, solar thermal, natural gas5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal price run; and 6. aenergy sources such as PV or solar thermal. However, this

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Distributed Energy Storage Systems: Deployments and Learnings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed Energy Storage Systems (DESS) or so-called “edge-of-grid” systems are small scale energy storage systems that are positioned at the edge of the distribution grid, downstream of the distribution transformer, on the utility side of the meter. These systems have the potential to significantly improve power quality for the consumer, while also having the capability to provide distribution system support. Several field trials of these systems are presently underway or are being ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Peak Load Management of Thermal Loads Using Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 50% of electric energy delivered to residences is converted into some sort of thermal energy—hot water, air conditioning, and refrigeration. Storing energy in thermal form is cheaper especially when the medium used to store the energy is an end-use medium for example, hot water. This technical update evaluates two different technologies for storing energy—in cold water and in hot water.GreenPeak technology, a storage condensing unit (SCU) from IE Technologies, uses an ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydrogen/halogen energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen/chlorine energy storage system has been considered at BNL for large scale energy storage. In FY1978 work included an assessment of system safety and cost, investigations of cell performance under conditions elevated pressure and temperature, determination of the transport properties of Nafion membranes and electrochemical engineering studies. Results are summarized.

Spaziante, P M; Sioli, G C; Trotta, R; Perego, A; McBreen, J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Buildings have a large thermal capacity and it affects much on building thermal load for the HVAC system. The thermal mass can be utilized also to control the thermal load by storing thermal energy before HVAC operation. There are two ways to store thermal energy. One is by operating the HVAC system and the other is by natural ventilation, mainly at night. The latter could be combined with daily HVAC operation as a hybrid ventilation. Thermal mass storage is useful to decrease the hourly peak load and the daily thermal load and can be used for both cooling and heating purpose.

360

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model includes a realistic plant model. The savings associated with passive building thermal storage inventory proved to be small be-cause the test facility is not an ideal candidate for the investigated control technology. Moreover, the facility's central plant revealed the idiosyncratic behavior that the chiller operation in the ice-making mode was more energy efficient than in the chilled-water mode. Field experimentation (Phase III) is now required in a suitable commercial building with sufficient thermal mass, an active TES system, and a climate conducive to passive storage utilization over a longer testing period to support the laboratory findings presented in this topical report.

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Towards Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While mass storage systems have been used for several decades to store large quantities of scientific data, there has been little work on devising standard ways of measuring them. Each system is hand-tuned using parameters that seem to work best, but it is difficult to gauge the potential effect of similar changes on other systems. The proliferation of storage management software and policies has made it difficult for users to make the best choices for their own systems. The introduction of benchmarks will make it possible to gather standard performance measurements across disparate systems, allowing users to make intelligent choices of hardware, software, and algorithms for their mass storage system. This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short-term and long-term behav...

Ethan L. Miller

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties - keep it cool with thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool thermal energy storage (TES) is described as a means for electric utilities to provide electricity from off-peak times, particularly in the summer when air-conditioning accounts for 50% or more of electricity consumption. Cool TES uses off-peak power to provide cooling capacity by extracting heat from a storage medium such as ice or other phase change material. A refrigeration system may may be utilized at night to provide a reservoir of cold material. During the day, the reservoir is tapped to provide cooling capacity. The advantages of TES are discussed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Literature review of market studies of thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a review of market studies of thermal energy storage (TES). This project was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). PNL staff reviewed and consolidated the findings of existing TES market studies conducted in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. The purpose of this project was to review and assess previous work and to use the information obtained to help provide direction for future technology transfer planning activities and to identify additional economic research needed within those three sectors. 37 refs.

Hattrup, M.P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Assessment of energy storage concepts for use in pulsed space power systems  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary assessments have been completed for thermal energy storage in heat rejection systems as well as for regenerable electrical storage modules in systems having nuclear sources with Rankine power conversion and solar sources with Brayton and Rankine power conversion. Storage technologies considered for the regenerable modules include flywheels, batteries, fuel cells, superconducting magnets and capacitors. Both source and sink thermal storage were examined for the solar energy based systems. Benefits derived from incorporating thermal storage in the heat rejection system depend on the storage density and the radiator specific mass. The analysis shows that inclusion of a thermal store results in heat rejection system mass reductions for generation times of up to 1100 seconds. Results show that the storage system value (mass reduction) increases with decreasing total generation time. In general, the value is greatest for generation times of 600 seconds or less although mass savings are realized for generation times nearly twice as long. For a total generation time of 500 seconds, incorporating storage in a nuclear Rankine power system results in a mass reduction of 50%. System masses similar to the nuclear Rankine are obtainable for solar Rankine and Brayton cycles using regenerable electrical storage modules. However, a 100-orbit recharge time is required, when the constraint of keeping concentrator areas smaller than 1000 m/sup 2/ is also imposed.

Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Summary of seasonal thermal energy storage field test projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storage of available heat or chill for distribution at a later time to meet thermal loads. STES can reduce energy consumption, peak energy demand, and emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere over conventional systems. It is estimated that full-scale application of STES would provide 2% to 4% of total energy needs in the United States. One STES technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), has been determined to be the most cost-effective option in the United States when site conditions enable its use. ATES has been analyzed in the laboratory and investigated in the field in the United States since the program was established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1979. Two field test facilities (FTFs), one for heating ATES at the University of Minnesota and the other for cooling ATES at the University of Alabama, have been primary testing grounds for US ATES research. Computer models have been developed to analyze the complex thermal and fluid dynamics. Extensive monitoring of FTFs has provided verification of and refinements to the computer models. The areas of geochemistry and microbiology have been explored as they apply to the aquifer environment. In general, the two FTFs have been successful in demonstrating the steps needed to make an ATES system operational.

Johnson, B.K.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

Carr, P.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Frugal storage for cloud file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprises are moving their IT infrastructure to cloud service providers with the goal of saving costs and simplifying management overhead. One of the critical services for any enterprise is its file system, where users require real-time access to files. ... Keywords: caching, cloud computing, storage, storage cost

Krishna P.N. Puttaswamy; Thyaga Nandagopal; Murali Kodialam

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

THERMAL PERFORMANCE SENSITIVITY STUDIES IN SUPPORT OF MATERIAL MODELING FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Considerations and measurements of latent-heat-storage salts for secondary thermal battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given its potential benefits, the practicality of using a latent heat-storage material as the basis for a passive thermal management system is being assessed by Chloride Silent Power Ltd. (CSPL) with technical assistance from Beta Power, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Based on the experience gained in large-scale solar energy storage programs, fused salts were selected as the primary candidates for the heat-storage material. The initial phase of this assessment was directed to an EV battery being designed at CSPL for the ETX-II program. Specific tasks included the identification and characterization of potential fused salts, a determination of placement options for the salts within the battery, and an assessment of the ultimate benefit to the battery system. The results obtained to date for each of these tasks are presented in this paper.

Koenig, A.A.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Armijo, J.R.

1988-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to electricity. Pumped-hydroelectric storage and batteryis pumped between the heat exchangers and the storage unit.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Solar thermal power systems. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work accomplished by the Aerospace Corporation from April 1973 through November 1979 in the mission analysis of solar thermal power systems is summarized. Sponsorship of this effort was initiated by the National Science Foundation, continued by the Energy Research and Development Administration, and most recently directed by the United States Department of Energy, Division of Solar Thermal Systems. Major findings and conclusions are sumarized for large power systems, small power systems, solar total energy systems, and solar irrigation systems, as well as special studies in the areas of energy storage, industrial process heat, and solar fuels and chemicals. The various data bases and computer programs utilized in these studies are described, and tables are provided listing financial and solar cost assumptions for each study. An extensive bibliography is included to facilitate review of specific study results and methodology.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program was held in Washington DC on...

377

Modeling a leadership-scale storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exascale supercomputers will have the potential for billion-way parallelism. While physical implementations of these systems are currently not available, HPC system designers can develop models of exascale systems to evaluate system design points. Modeling ... Keywords: exascale computing, parallel discrete-event simulation, storage system design

Ning Liu; Christopher Carothers; Jason Cope; Philip Carns; Robert Ross; Adam Crume; Carlos Maltzahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies,D. , 2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with PhaseW. , 2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

SERI Solar Energy Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program provides research on advanced technologies, system analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications.

Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal power (CSP) systems. Background and motivation2 Figure 2: Schematic of Sensible Heat Based CSP Plant[3 Figure 3: Schematic of PCM Based CSP Plant[

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov H 2 and FC Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Renaissance Hotel, Washington, DC August 11-12, 2011 Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage Ned T....

383

Energy Storage Systems 2005 Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on October 20, 2005 in San Francisco, CA. The agenda and ESS program overview presentation are below.

384

Encapsulation of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermal energy storage is a major contributor to bridge the gap between energy demand (consumption) and energy production (supply) by concentrating solar power. The utilization… (more)

Nath, Rupa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage with Embedded Heat Pipes for Concentrating Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An innovative, novel concept of combining heat pipes with latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications is explored. The… (more)

Robak, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test… (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): National Lab Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...

388

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced Title Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at...

389

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark...

390

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September...

391

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Electronics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer...

392

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

393

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 2 morning presentations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Peer Review - Day 2 morning presentations Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 2 morning presentations The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems...

394

NERSC Increases System Storage and Security for Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increases System Storage and Security for Users NERSC Increases System Storage and Security for Users April 28, 2009 Franklin Upgrades Improve IO Performance Throughout the month...

395

Why Systems Analysis for Energy Storage?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, DNV KEMA Modeling for CPUC Energy Storage Proceeding Energy Storage Panel, EAC Meeting June 6, 2013 Common Pitfalls  Using historical prices - Prices are likely to change due to rule modifications, changes in regulation supply resources over time, changes in regulation needs over time - Depending on the amount of storage added to the market, the introduction of storage can change market prices  Modeling deterministic behavior (perfect performance assuming knowledge of upcoming prices) - Future prices are unknown and actual revenues will likely not reflect strategy that gets maximum revenue 100% of the time  Ignoring system effects - In addition to affecting prices, certain amounts of storage can affect imports/exports

396

Energy storage for hybrid remote power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage can be a cost-effective component of hybrid remote power systems. Storage serves the special role of taking advantage of intermittent renewable power sources. Traditionally this role has been played by lead-acid batteries, which have high life-cycle costs and pose special disposal problems. Hydrogen or zinc-air storage technologies can reduce life-cycle costs and environmental impacts. Using projected data for advanced energy storage technologies, LLNL ran an optimization for a hypothetical Arctic community with a reasonable wind resource (average wind speed 8 m/s). These simulations showed the life-cycle annualized cost of the total energy system (electric plus space heating) might be reduced by nearly 40% simply by adding wind power to the diesel system. An additional 20 to 40% of the wind-diesel cost might be saved by adding hydrogen storage or zinc-air fuel cells to the system. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of water using intermittent, renewable power provides inexpensive long-term energy storage. Conversion back to electricity with fuel cells can be accomplished with available technology. The advantages of a hydrogen electrolysis/fuel cell system include low life-cycle costs for long term storage, no emissions of concern, quiet operation, high reliability with low maintenance, and flexibility to use hydrogen as a direct fuel (heating, transportation). Disadvantages include high capital costs, relatively low electrical turn-around efficiency, and lack of operating experience in utility settings. Zinc-air fuel cells can lower capital and life-cycle costs compared to hydrogen, with most of the same advantages. Like hydrogen systems, zinc-air technology promises a closed system for long-term storage of energy from intermittent sources. The turn around efficiency is expected to exceed 60%, while use of waste heat can potentially increase overall energy efficiency to over 80%.

Isherwood, W., LLNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

Pesaran, A. A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

Pesaran, A. A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Test report : Princeton power systems prototype energy storage system.  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage...

402

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

403

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Application of Thermal Storage, Peak Shaving and Cogeneration for Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy costs of hospitals can be managed by employing various strategies to control peak electrical demand (KW) while at the same time providing additional security of operation in the event that an equipment failure or a disruption of power from the electric utility occurs. Some electric utilities offer their customers demand (KW) reduction rate incentives. Many hospitals have additional emergency back-up needs for electrical energy. Demand is relatively constant in many hospitals due to high internal loads. These factors coupled with the present competitive alternate fuel market and present opportunities for hospitals to significantly reduce operating costs and provide additional stand-by or back-up electric sources. This paper employs a hospital case study to define and illustrate three energy planning strategies applicable to hospitals. These strategies are peak shaving, thermal storage, cogeneration and/or paralleling with the electric utility.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.; Estes, M. C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Purpose: Identify R&D needs and technical pathways associated with the continued development and validation of cryo-compressed and cryo-sorption hydrogen storage technologies, highlighting those aspects common to both technologies as well as identifying their unique requirements and issues that should be addressed. 8:30 Welcome/Introductions/Workshop objectives/Recap of previous day Ned Stetson, DOE 9:00 OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H 2 Storage (20 min presentation/20 min discussion) Tobias Brunner, BMW 9:40 Performance Comparison and Cost Review (20 min presentation/20 min discussion) Rajesh Ahluwalia, ANL 10:20 Break (10 minutes) 10:30 Expert Panel Discussion (Members will each have 15 minutes for presentations)

409

Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 Ă?ÂşC to 600 Ă?ÂşC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy storage systems cost update : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the methodology for calculating present worth of system and operating costs for a number of energy storage technologies for representative electric utility applications. The values are an update from earlier reports, categorized by application use parameters. This work presents an update of energy storage system costs assessed previously and separately by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program. The primary objective of the series of studies has been to express electricity storage benefits and costs using consistent assumptions, so that helpful benefit/cost comparisons can be made. Costs of energy storage systems depend not only on the type of technology, but also on the planned operation and especially the hours of storage needed. Calculating the present worth of life-cycle costs makes it possible to compare benefit values estimated on the same basis.

Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Menlo Park, CA)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, t

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tankthe chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tank,of thermal energy storage in building cooling systems.

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

None

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of a Procedure for the Predictive Control Strategy of a Chilled Water Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage systems store the thermal energy produced by the chiller plant in periods of off-peak electrical demand or when cheaper electricity is available. The stored thermal energy is then withdrawn from the reservoir to satisfy cooling load during peak demand periods. This paper discusses the development of a simplified predictive control strategy for a 7000 ton-hour chilled water storage system serving a hospital. Control strategies are developed for both on-peak and off-peak months to minimize demand charges. By optimizing the operation of the building air handling units (AHUs), chilled water pumps, chiller plant and the thermal storage system, the storage tank is better charged while chiller run time is reduced. Both on-peak and off-peak electrical demands are expected to be reduced significantly.

Wei, G.; Sakuri, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Thermal energy storage tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-powered water desalination pilot plant at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a unique project in terms of its size, purpose, objectives, and scope. The plant uses a combination of solar thermal energy and fossil-fuel energy to provide the shaft horsepower necessary to operate the indirect heat-transfer freeze desalination process developed and patented by Chicago Bridge and Iron Inc. (CBandI) to produce potable water. The thermal storage acts as a buffer between the energy collection subsystem and the energy delivery subsystem. This report describes the thermal storage subsystem. One of the objectives of the desalination research project is to publish a series of reports on the performance of its various subsystems. The authors of this report do not claim that it is exhaustive and complete in all respects, for more than one reason. Any research activity is like an open-ended problem and during the tenure of its investigation it raises more problems than can be solved. However, the authors believe that the storage system behavior has posed no serious problem and that the report adequately covers all the facets of the investigation. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

FRASH: Exploiting storage class memory in hybrid file system for hierarchical storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we develop a novel hybrid file system, FRASH, for storage-class memory and NAND Flash. Despite the promising physical characteristics of storage-class memory, its scale is an order of magnitude smaller than the current storage device scale. ... Keywords: Flash storage, log-structured file system

Jaemin Jung; Youjip Won; Eunki Kim; Hyungjong Shin; Byeonggil Jeon

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Optimization and analysis of LiH thermal energy storage device configurations for space power applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage (TES) can be used to reduce the area and mass of the heat rejection system for space-based sprint power systems. During the sprint mode power cycle, reject heat is placed into storage. The heat is then rejected to the ultimate sink over the much longer non-operational portion of the orbits, through a correspondingly smaller radiator. Preliminary analysis has shown significant weight advantage for the heat storage plus radiator concept over the radiator only concept. Thermal performance analysis and optimization of five heat sink TES configurations using LiH was completed. The configurations are: (a) LiH encapsulated spheres in the packed bed, (b) standard tube and shell arrangement with LiH on the tube side, (c) tube and shell with LiH on the shell side, (d) alternating concentric rings of LiH and heat transport fluid, and (e) parallel slabs of LiH. System performance was calculated for a wide range of parameters and included effects of prespecified internal voids, enhanced conductivity and internal fins.

Siman-Tov, M.; Williams, P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage application to the brick/ceramic industry. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An initial project to study the technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in the three major consumer markets, namely, the residential, commercial and industrial sectors is described. A major objective of the study was to identify viable TES applications from which a more concise study could be launched, leading to a conceptual design and in-depth validation of the TES energy impacts. This report documents one such program. The brick/ceramic industries commonly use periodic kilns which by their operating cycle require time-variant energy supply and consequently variable heat rejection. This application was one of the numerous TES opportunities that emerged from the first study, now available from the ERDA Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identified as Report No. COO-2558-1.

Glenn, D.R.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, specifications, and diagrams for the thermal storage subsystem for the 10-MW pilot tower focus power plant are presented in detail. The Honeywell thermal storage subsystem design features a sensible heat storage arrangement using proven equipment and materials. The subsystem consists of a main storage containing oil and rock, two buried superheater tanks containing inorganic salts (Hitec), and the necessary piping, instrumentation, controls, and safety devices. The subsystem can provide 7 MW(e) for three hours after twenty hours of hold. It can be charged in approximately four hours. Storage for the commercial-scale plant consists of the same elements appropriately scaled up. Performance analysis and tradeoff studies are included.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reassessment of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) Transmission System Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reassesses the benefits of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for enhancing transmission system performance.

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using ...  

Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies United States Patent

423

STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL SYSTEM FOR USED NUCLEAR ...  

STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL SYSTEM FOR USED NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES United States Patent Application

424

Investigation of metal fluoride thermal energy storage materials: availability, cost, and chemistry. Final report, July 15, 1976--December 15, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of thermal energy in the 400 to 1000/sup 0/C range is attracting increasing consideration for use in solar power, central power, vehicular, and commercial process systems. This study investigates the practicality of using metal fluorides as the heat storage medium. The projected availability of metal fluorides has been studied and is shown to be adequate for widespread thermal storage use. Costs are projected and discussed in relation to thermal energy storage applications. Phase diagrams, heats of fusion, heat capacities, vapor pressures, toxicity, stability, volume changes, thermal conductivities, fusion kinetics, corrosion, and container materials of construction for a wide range of fluorides have been examined. Analyses of these data in consideration of thermal energy storage requirements have resulted in selection of the most cost-effective fluoride mixture for each of 23 temperature increments between 400 and 1000/sup 0/C. Thermo-physical properties of these 23 materials are presented. Comparison of fluoride with non-fluoride materials shows that the fluorides are suitable candidates for high temperature applications on the bases of cost, heat capacity/unit volume, heat capacity/unit weight, corrosive properties, and availability.

Eichelberger, J.L.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview  

SciTech Connect

Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Development of a complex compound chill storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system applicable to industrial refrigeration needs at temperatures as low as {minus}28{degree}C has been developed. The system is based on the chemical bonding between a gaseous refrigerant and a solid salt. The system has been tested successfully in the laboratory and a small unit capable of holding 4 ton-h has been constructed in a factory environment. Much of the development efforts have centered on designing the reactor/heat exchanger where the salt and the refrigerant are combined. Economic evaluations have been made and show an estimated simple rate of return between 30 and 50%. 6 refs., 30 figs.

Rockenfelleer, U.; Kirol, L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

Alan C. Cooper

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Uses for Distributed Photovoltaic and Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A range of factors are driving increases in the quantity of distributed photovoltaics connected to utility distribution systems. Going forward, it is anticipated that this growth will continue and that battery storage systems may also become common. These systems are expected to be both customer and utility owned. In either case, there is interest in understanding the full range of ways in which these systems might be used to maximize their value, to enable their integration in large numbers, and to opti...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

429

Magnetic Energy Storage System: Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GRIDS Project: ABB is developing an advanced energy storage system using superconducting magnets that could store significantly more energy than today’s best magnetic storage technologies at a fraction of the cost. This system could provide enough storage capacity to encourage more widespread use of renewable power like wind and solar. Superconducting magnetic energy storage systems have been in development for almost 3 decades; however, past devices were designed to supply power only for short durations—generally less than a few minutes. ABB’s system would deliver the stored energy at very low cost, making it ideal for eventual use in the electricity grid as a costeffective competitor to batteries and other energy storage technologies. The device could potentially cost even less, on a per kilowatt basis, than traditional lead-acid batteries.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Lighting system with thermal management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

Understanding Energy Storage Solutions and Capabilities on Utility Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of storage will require better grid integration tools to plan for the optimal size, use, and location of energy storage systems. Also important will be a coordinated effort between technology developers and utilities to ensure that storage systems are designed to adequately address utility needs. Utilities must understand the technical attributes and grid operational benefits of energy storage systems. Such operational benefits can also improve the definition of storage system functional r...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

434

Potential energy savings from aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers developed an aggregate-level model to estimate the short- and long-term potential energy savings from using aquifer thermal storage (ATES) in the United States. The objectives of this effort were to (1) develop a basis from which to recommend whether heat or chill ATES should receive future research focus and (2) determine which market sector (residential, commercial, or industrial) offers the largest potential energy savings from ATES. Information was collected on the proportion of US land area suitable for ATES applications. The economic feasibility of ATES applications was then evaluated. The potential energy savings from ATES applications was calculated. Characteristic energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors was examined, as was the relationship between waste heat production and consumption by industrial end-users. These analyses provided the basis for two main conclusions: heat ATES applications offer higher potential for energy savings than do chill ATES applications; and the industrial sector can achieve the highest potential energy savings for the large consumption markets. Based on these findings, it is recommended that future ATES research and development efforts be directed toward heat ATES applications in the industrial sector. 11 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Anderson, M.R.; Weijo, R.O.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Improved Gas Storage Carbon with Enhanced Thermal Conductivity  

... (DOE target storage value) of methane at standard temperature and pressure is used in adsorbed natural gas applications, including vehicles. ...

438

Balanced reconfiguration of storage banks in a hybrid electrical energy storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared with the conventional homogeneous electrical energy storage (EES) systems, hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems provide high output power and energy density as well as high power conversion efficiency and low self-discharge at a low ... Keywords: bank reconfiguration, hybrid electrical energy storage system

Younghyun Kim; Sangyoung Park; Yanzhi Wang; Qing Xie; Naehyuck Chang; Massimo Poncino; Massoud