Sample records for thermal storage solar

  1. Solar energy thermalization and storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

  2. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

  3. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

  4. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  6. Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  7. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

  8. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Received Entrepreneurial Spirit Awards On April 3, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Renewable...

  10. Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The team’s design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

  11. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

  12. Concentrating Solar Program; Session: Thermal Storage - Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.; Mehos, M.; Mancini, T.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project overview of this presentation is: (1) description--(a) laboratory R and D in advanced heat transfer fluids (HTF) and thermal storage systems; (b) FOA activities in solar collector and component development for use of molten salt as a heat transfer and storage fluid; (c) applications for all activities include line focus and point focus solar concentrating technologies; (2) Major FY08 Activities--(a) advanced HTF development with novel molten salt compositions with low freezing temperatures, nanofluids molecular modeling and experimental studies, and use with molten salt HTF in solar collector field; (b) thermal storage systems--cost analysis and updates for 2-tank and thermocline storage and model development and analysis to support near-term trought deployment; (c) thermal storage components--facility upgrade to support molten salt component testing for freeze-thaw receiver testing, long-shafted molten salt pump for parabolic trough and power tower thermal storage systems; (d) CSP FOA support--testing and evaluation support for molten salt component and field testing work, advanced fluids and storage solicitation preparation, and proposal evaluation for new advanced HTF and thermal storage FOA.

  13. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  14. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  15. Transient-heat-transfer and stress analysis of a thermal-storage solar cooker module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zengeni, Hazel C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the analysis carried out in Solidworks to determine the best material and configuration of a thermal-storage solar cooker module.The thermal-storage solar cooker utilizes the high-latent-heat lithium ...

  16. Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neti, Sudhakar; Oztekin, Alparslan; Chen, John; Tuzla, Kemal; Misiolek, Wojciech

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies that are to be developed in this work will enable storage of thermal energy in 100 MWe solar energy plants for 6-24 hours at temperatures around 300oC and 850oC using encapsulated phase change materials (EPCM). Several encapsulated phase change materials have been identified, fabricated and proven with calorimetry. Two of these materials have been tested in an airflow experiment. A cost analysis for these thermal energy storage systems has also been conducted that met the targets established at the initiation of the project.

  17. Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

  18. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

  19. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  20. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energy and Buildings, [of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage A.of a solar-assisted HVAC system with thermal storage. Energy

  1. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process configurations for solar power plants with sensible-heatsolar power plant with sensible-heat storage since the chemical~heat storage processsolar power plant with a sulfur-oxide storage process. chemical~heat

  2. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

  3. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

  4. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

  5. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  6. Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

  7. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

  8. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010, Graz,STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submitted

  9. Title COMBINATION OF THERMAL SOLAR COLLECTORS, HEAT PUMP AND THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR DWELLINGS IN BELGIUM.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contact Raf; De Herdt; Roel De Coninck; Filip Van Den Schoor; Lieve Helsen

    The amount of available solar energy in Belgium is more than sufficient to meet local heat demand for space heating and domestic hot water in a dwelling. However, the timing of both the availability of solar energy and the need for thermal energy, match only to a limited extent. Therefore, compact storage of the surplus of thermal energy is a critical issue. Depending on the temperature at which this energy is available, directly from the sun or indirectly through the storage, different combinations with a heat pump can be considered. By combining solar energy with a heat pump one may benefit on both sides since the fraction of solar energy increases as well as the performance of the heat pump. The aim of this thesis is to select the best out of three configurations that combine thermal solar collectors, heat pump and thermal energy storage for heating purposes in dwellings in Belgium, based on model simulations. Energetic, exergetic and economic criteria are used to evaluate the different configurations, while thermal comfort and domestic hot water tap profiles should be met. One (or more) performance index (indices) is (are) defined enabling an objective comparison between different systems. Today several systems are already commercially available on the international market [4]. Since these systems consist of different components, the system design is a crucial issue. Therefore, special attention should be paid to the sizing of the individual components, the interaction of the components within the global system, and the strategy for operational control. To study the interaction with the building, three types of buildings (already defined in a previous project) are considered.

  10. Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

  11. Optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lizarraga-García, Enrique

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present thesis focuses on the optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems. First, optimization of time-variable operation to maximize revenue through selling and purchasing electricity to/from ...

  12. Experimental investigation of an innovative thermochemical process operating with a hydrate salt and moist air for thermal storage of solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and moist air for thermal storage of solar energy: global performance Benoit Michela, *, Nathalie Mazeta-gas reaction, hydration, thermal storage, seasonal storage, solar energy * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet Der energy density of the reactor, Jm -3 thermal conductivity, Wm -1 .K -1 G reactive gas

  13. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  14. Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

  15. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Efficiency of Generation, Discharging, Gross Electric Generation,e 1% of the gross electric generation. Thermal losses fromNet Electric Power Generation, Discharging, MWe Net Thermal

  16. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sites suitable for a solar plant with sulfur oxide TableProcess for a Steam Solar Electric Plant Report No. LBL-Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact

  17. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insure constant output from a solar power plant. However. aoutput from the steam turbines is maintained. Equipment design for the proposed solar power

  18. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

  19. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage,” Angewandtescale molecular solar thermal energy storage system, in

  20. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Ramana G. [The University of Alabama] [The University of Alabama

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222șC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go/no-go goals stipulated by the DOE for this project. Energy densities of all salt mixtures were higher than that of the current solar salt. The salt mixtures costs have been estimated and TES system costs for a 2 tank, direct approach have been estimated for each of these materials. All estimated costs are significantly below the baseline system that used solar salt. These lower melt point salts offer significantly higher energy density per volume than solar salt – and therefore attractively smaller inventory and equipment costs. Moreover, a new TES system geometry has been recommended A variety of approaches were evaluated to use the low melting point molten salt. Two novel changes are recommended that 1) use the salt as a HTF through the solar trough field, and 2) use the salt to not only create steam but also to preheat the condensed feedwater for Rankine cycle. The two changes enable the powerblock to operate at 500°C, rather than the current 400°C obtainable using oil as the HTF. Secondly, the use of salt to preheat the feedwater eliminates the need to extract steam from the low pressure turbine for that purpose. Together, these changes result in a dramatic 63% reduction required for 6 hour salt inventory, a 72% reduction in storage volume, and a 24% reduction in steam flow rate in the power block. Round trip efficiency for the Case 5 - 2 tank “direct” system is estimated at >97%, with only small losses from time under storage and heat exchange, and meeting RFP goals. This attractive efficiency is available because the major heat loss experienced in a 2 tank “indirect” system - losses by transferring the thermal energy from oil HTF to the salt storage material and back to oil to run the steam generator at night - is not present for the 2 tank direct system. The higher heat capacity values for both LMP and HMP systems enable larger storage capacities for concentrating solar power.

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  4. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  5. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  6. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy TEES logoSolar Power | Department

  7. Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermal EnergyGeneration |

  8. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  9. Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation University of South Florida logo...

  10. Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

  11. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been considered for solar thermal energy storages. These arePCMs for thermal energy storage in solar driven residentialfluid and thermal energy storage medium in the solar heat

  12. Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Mehos, M.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

  13. Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  15. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  16. Evaluation of annual efficiencies of high temperature central receiver concentrated solar power plants with thermal energy storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Brian David; Gill, David Dennis

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study has examined four cases of a central receiver concentrated solar power plant with thermal energy storage using the DELSOL and SOLERGY computer codes. The current state-of-the-art base case was compared with a theoretical high temperature case which was based on the scaling of some input parameters and the estimation of other parameters based on performance targets from the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This comparison was done for both current and high temperature cases in two configurations: a surround field with an external cylindrical receiver and a north field with a single cavity receiver. There is a fairly dramatic difference between the design point and annual average performance, especially in the solar field and receiver subsystems, and also in energy losses due to the thermal energy storage being full to capacity. Additionally, there are relatively small differences (<2%) in annual average efficiencies between the Base and High Temperature cases, despite an increase in thermal to electric conversion efficiency of over 8%. This is due the increased thermal losses at higher temperature and operational losses due to subsystem start-up and shut-down. Thermal energy storage can mitigate some of these losses by utilizing larger thermal energy storage to ensure that the electric power production system does not need to stop and re-start as often, but solar energy is inherently transient. Economic and cost considerations were not considered here, but will have a significant impact on solar thermal electric power production strategy and sizing.

  17. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  18. Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  20. Advanced research in solar-energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luft, W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy Storage Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute is reviewed. The program provides research, systems analyses, and economic assessments of thermal and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Current activities include experimental research into very high temperature (above 800/sup 0/C) thermal energy storage and assessment of novel thermochemical energy storage and transport systems. The applications for such high-temperature storage are thermochemical processes, solar thermal-electric power generation, cogeneration of heat and electricity, industrial process heat, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems. The research results for five high-temperature thermal energy storage technologies and two thermochemical systems are described.

  1. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

  2. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  4. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [Nanotubes as High-Energy Density Solar Thermal Fuels,” Nano

  5. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. a. , 2004, “Solar Thermal Collectors and Applications,”86] Schnatbaum L. , 2009, “Solar Thermal Power Plants,” Thefor Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),

  6. Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Donghyun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal efficiency of concentrated solar power (CSP) system depends on the maximum operating temperature of the system which is determined by the operating temperature of the TES device. Organic materials (such as synthetic oil, fatty acid...

  7. Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Donghyun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal efficiency of concentrated solar power (CSP) system depends on the maximum operating temperature of the system which is determined by the operating temperature of the TES device. Organic materials (such as synthetic oil, fatty acid...

  8. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energyfor rows of fixed solar thermal collectors using flatassisted by a 232 m solar thermal array providing heat to a

  9. Mechanism of Thermal Reversal of the (Fulvalene)tetracarbonyldiruthenium Photoisomerization: Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, Y; Srinivasan, V; Meier, S K; Vollhardt, K P; Grossman, J C

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the currently intensifying quest to harness solar energy for the powering of our planet, most efforts are centered around photoinduced generic charge separation, such as in photovoltaics, water splitting, other small molecule activation, and biologically inspired photosynthetic systems. In contrast, direct collection of heat from sunlight has received much less diversified attention, its bulk devoted to the development of concentrating solar thermal power plants, in which mirrors are used to focus the sun beam on an appropriate heat transfer material. An attractive alternative strategy would be to trap solar energy in the form of chemical bonds, ideally through the photoconversion of a suitable molecule to a higher energy isomer, which, in turn, would release the stored energy by thermal reversal. Such a system would encompass the essential elements of a rechargeable heat battery, with its inherent advantages of storage, transportability, and use on demand. The underlying concept has been explored extensively with organic molecules (such as the norbornadiene-quadricyclane cycle), often in the context of developing photoswitches. On the other hand, organometallic complexes have remained relatively obscure in this capacity, despite a number of advantages, including expanded structural tunability and generally favorable electronic absorption regimes. A highly promising organometallic system is the previously reported, robust photo-thermal fulvalene (Fv) diruthenium couple 1 {l_reversible} 2 (Scheme 1). However, although reversible and moderately efficient, lack of a full, detailed atom-scale understanding of its key conversion and storage mechanisms have limited our ability to improve on its performance or identify optimal variants, such as substituents on the Fv, ligands other than CO, and alternative metals. Here we present a theoretical investigation, in conjunction with corroborating experiments, of the mechanism for the heat releasing step of 2 {yields} 1 and its Fe (4) and Os (6) relatives. The results of the combined study has enabled a rigorous interpretation of earlier and new experimental measurements and paint a surprising picture. First-principles calculations were employed based on spin unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) with a non-empirical gradient corrected exchange-correlation functional. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials were used to describe the valence-core interactions of electrons, including scalar relativistic effects of the core. Wavefunctions and charge densities were expanded in plane waves with kinetic energies up to 25 and 200 Rydberg, respectively. Reaction pathways were delineated with the string method, as implemented within the Car-Parrinello approach. This method allows for the efficient determination of the minimum energy path (MEP) of atomistic transitions and thus also saddle points (transition states, TSs), which are the energy maxima along the MEP. All geometries were optimized until all forces on the atoms were less than 0.02 eV/{angstrom}. The calculated structures of 1 and 2 were in good agreement with their experimental counterparts.

  10. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Industrial

  11. Second thermal storage applications workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar Thermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & CapabilitiesCapabilitiesSandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt...

  13. Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids and Novel Thermal Storage Concepts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Acciona Solar: Indirect,...

  14. The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, Matthew

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy funded a project to determine if the specific heat of thermal energy storage materials could be improved by adding nanoparticles. The standard thermal energy storage materials are molten salts. The chosen molten salt was a...

  15. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  16. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    materials (PCM) in solar thermal concentrating technologyeffective and efficient solar thermal electricity generatorbeen considered for solar thermal energy storages. These are

  17. Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gawlik, Keith

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

  18. Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  19. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~Symposium, "Thermal Storage of Solar Energy 11 , Amsterdam,TNO~Symposium "Thermal Storage of Solar Energy" 5~6 NovemberSolar Energy, Office of Advanced Conservation Technology, Division of Thermal

  20. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 Ă?ÂșC to 600 Ă?ÂșC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

  1. Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qui, Songgang [Temple University] [Temple University; Galbraith, Ross [Infinia] [Infinia

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the final results of the Phase II Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation project being performed by Infinia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FC36-08GO18157 during the project period of September 1, 2009 - August 30, 2012. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the practicality of integrating thermal energy storage (TES) modules, using a suitable thermal salt phase-change material (PCM) as its medium, with a dish/Stirling engine; enabling the system to operate during cloud transients and to provide dispatchable power for 4 to 6 hours after sunset. A laboratory prototype designed to provide 3 kW-h of net electrical output was constructed and tested at Infinia's Ogden Headquarters. In the course of the testing, it was determined that the system's heat pipe network - used to transfer incoming heat from the solar receiver to both the Stirling generator heater head and to the phase change salt - did not perform to expectations. The heat pipes had limited capacity to deliver sufficient heat energy to the generator and salt mass while in a charging mode, which was highly dependent on the orientation of the device (vertical versus horizontal). In addition, the TES system was only able to extract about 30 to 40% of the expected amount of energy from the phase change salt once it was fully molten. However, the use of heat pipes to transfer heat energy to and from a thermal energy storage medium is a key technical innovation, and the project team feels that the limitations of the current device could be greatly improved with further development. A detailed study of manufacturing costs using the prototype TES module as a basis indicates that meeting DOE LCOE goals with this hardware requires significant efforts. Improvement can be made by implementing aggressive cost-down initiatives in design and materials, improving system performance by boosting efficiencies, and by refining cost estimates with vendor quotes in lieu of mass-based approaches. Although the prototype did not fully demonstrate performance and realize projected cost targets, the project team believes that these challenges can be overcome. The test data showed that the performance can be significantly improved by refining the heat pipe designs. However, the project objective for phase 3 is to design and test on sun the field ready systems, the project team feels that is necessary to further refine the prototype heat pipe design in the current prototype TES system before move on to field test units, Phase 3 continuation will not be pursued.

  2. EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because-scale thermal energy storage via hot compressed liquid water. Such a cycle is potentially interesting becauseEXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM Paul T. O'Brien 1 , and John Pye 2 1

  3. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eere.energy.gov * energy.govsunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal power plant components

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  5. active solar thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunspot fine structure observed with Swedish Solar Telescope (SST) Sunspot 7 CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  6. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in MicrogridsEnvironmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgridsa) ABSTRACT The addition of solar thermal and heat storage

  7. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Nocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage forof Abiotic Photo-chemical Solar Energy Storage Systems,”

  8. Using Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (EPCM-TES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Technologies LLC, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrafore successfully demonstrated and optimized the manufacturing of capsules containing phase-changing inorganic salts. The phase change was used to store thermal energy collected from a concentrating solar-power plant as latent heat. This latent heat, in addition to sensible heat increased the energy density (energy stored per unit weight of salt) by over 50%, thus requiring 40% less salt and over 60% less capsule container. Therefore, the cost to store high-temperature thermal energy collected in a concentrating solar power plant will be reduced by almost 40% or more, as compared to conventional two-tank, sensible-only storage systems. The cost for thermal energy storage (TES) system is expected to achieve the Sun Shot goal of $15 per kWh(t). Costs associated with poor heat-transfer in phase change materials (PCM) were also eliminated. Although thermal energy storage that relies on the latent heat of fusion of PCM improves energy density by as much as 50%, upon energy discharge the salt freezes and builds on the heat transfer surfaces. Since these salts have low thermal conductivity, large heat-transfer areas, or larger conventional heat-exchangers are needed, which increases costs. By encapsulating PCM in small capsules we have increased the heat transfer area per unit volume of salt and brought the heat transfer fluid in direct contact with the capsules. These two improvements have increased the heat transfer coefficient and boosted heat transfer. The program was successful in overcoming the phenomenon of melt expansion in the capsules, which requires the creation of open volume in the capsules or shell to allow for expansion of the molten salt on melting and is heated above its melting point to 550°C. Under contract with the Department of Energy, Terrafore Inc. and Southwest Research Institute, developed innovative method(s) to economically create the open volume or void in the capsule. One method consists of using a sacrificial polymer coating as the middle layer between the salt prill and the shell material. The selected polymer decomposes at temperatures below the melting point of the salt and forms gases which escape through the pores in the capsule shell thus leaving a void in the capsule. We have demonstrated the process with a commonly used inorganic nitrate salt in a low-cost shell material that can withstand over 10,000 high-temperature thermal cycles, or a thirty-year or greater life in a solar plant. The shell used to encapsulate the salt was demonstrated to be compatible with molten salt heat transfer fluid typically used in CSP plants to temperatures up to 600 °C. The above findings have led to the concept of a cascaded arrangement. Salts with different melting points can be encapsulated using the same recipe and contained in a packed bed by cascading the salt melting at higher melting point at the top over the salt melting at lower melting point towards the bottom of the tank. This cascaded energy storage is required to effectively transfer the sensible heat collected in heat transfer fluids between the operating temperatures and utilize the latent heat of fusion in the salts inside the capsule. Mathematical models indicate that over 90% of the salts will undergo phase change by using three salts in equal proportion. The salts are selected such that the salt at the top of the tank melts at about 15°C below the high operating-temperature, and the salt at the bottom of the tank melts 15°C above the low operating-temperature. The salt in the middle of tank melts in-between the operating temperature of the heat transfer fluid. A cascaded arrangement leads to the capture of 90% of the latent-heat of fusion of salts and their sensible heats. Thus the energy density is increased by over 50% from a sensible-only, two-tank thermal energy storage. Furthermore, the Terrafore cascaded storage method requires only one tank as opposed to the two-tanks used in sensible heat storage. Since heat is transferred from the heat transfer fluid by direct contact with capsules, external heat-exchangers are not required

  9. Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include...

  10. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' InformationLarge-Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  14. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  15. Solar thermal power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

  16. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  17. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:of various energy storage technologies. Here only batterieseffective solar energy storage technologies makes the sun,

  18. Tuning energy transport in solar thermal systems using nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar thermal energy conversion can harness the entire solar spectrum and theoretically achieve very high efficiencies while interfacing with thermal storage or back-up systems for dispatchable power generation. Nanostructured ...

  19. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  20. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar thermal and heat storage on CO 2 emissions and annual energyenergy costs, heat storage does not directly support solar thermal /energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal

  1. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or (2) from solar energy collectors, and to retrieve the hotof Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors," Proceedings of

  3. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  4. Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

  5. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  6. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF ENERGY STORAGE INTEGRATED WITH A SOLAR DISH FIELD IN WHYALLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy storage into the thermal cycle is a key point of differentiation between solar thermalDEMONSTRATION OF ENERGY STORAGE INTEGRATED WITH A SOLAR DISH FIELD IN WHYALLA Joe Coventry 1-of-a-kind demonstration of an integrated solar dish and molten- salt storage system, using the superheated steam energy

  8. Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

  9. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

  10. California Solar Initiative- Solar Thermal Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Originally restricted to just solar water heaters, the prorgam was expanded by CPUC Decision 13-02-018 in February 2013 to include other solar thermal technologies, including solar process heatin...

  11. Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids— substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system during the day and released at night—when the sun is not shining—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

  12. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  13. Solar thermal financing guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

  14. Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

  15. Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of candidate fluids and phase-change materials (PCM) to serve as thermal energy storage media in the temperature range of 300 C to 800 C. Knowledge of thermophysical properties such as melting point, heat of fusion, density, viscosity, thermal stability are essential for understanding how candidate materials could be deployed in CSP plants. The laboratory runs high-temperature instruments for the analysis of thermophysical properties. Small samples of candidate materials are prepared and characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and other specialized analytical methods. Instrumentation capabilities are being expanded to allow for analysis of samples up to 1,200 C. Higher temperature operation is one method to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of CSP systems.

  16. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  17. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  18. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," SeminarTHERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGS OF COMMERCIAL

  19. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

  20. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

  1. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

  2. Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, David Bryan

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , nuclear fission, fusion, geo- thermal energy, and solar energy as potential alternate energy sources to replace natural gas and oil. Of these, soIar energy is one of the most promisino alternate energy sources for space heating and cooling. Solar...MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979...

  3. Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Engine Solar Power Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  4. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

  5. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

  6. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  7. Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combined with heat pump improve the thermal performance of the heat pump and the global system. The performances of the heating system combining heat pump and solar collectors are higher than that of solar heating system with solar collectors and storage...

  8. The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, Matthew

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic, commercially called Hitec Solar Salt. Two nanoparticle types were chosen, alumina and silica. The nanoparticle composite materials were fabricated by mixing the components in an aqueous solution, mixing...

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

  10. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seunghwan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    maximizing the thermal conductivity of the nanomaterial (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size varying between ~ 20-30nm) and maximizing the specific heat capacity (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size less than 5nm), while simultaneously...

  11. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seunghwan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    cause significant enhancement in the specific heat capacity of nanofluids and nanocomposites. The interfacial thermal resistance (also known as Kapitza resistance, or “Rk”) between a nanoparticle and the surrounding solvent molecules (for these molten...

  12. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems inEconomic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems insolar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental

  13. Short term thermal energy storage Institut fr Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, FRG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    477 Short term thermal energy storage A. Abhat Institut fĂŒr Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme the problem of short term thermal energy storage for low temperature solar heating applications. The techniques of sensible and latent heat storage are discussed, with particular emphasis on the latter

  14. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

  15. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  16. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  17. Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    commercial sector marketing efforts, are synthesized into a set of lessons of experience and guidelines for those who are considering developing a thermal storage marketing effort....

  18. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with â??Kalwallâ?? building panels. An added feature of the â??Kalwallâ? system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  19. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by utilizing thermal energy storage such as ice storage orThermal Storage Utilization. ” Journal of Solar Energy

  20. Final Report-- A Novel Storage Method for Concentrating Solar Power Plants Allowing Storage at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the proposed work was the development and testing of a storage method that has the potential to fundamentally change the solar thermal industry. The development of a mathematical model that describes the phenomena involved in the heat storage and recovery was also a main objective of this work. Therefore, the goal was to prepare a design package allowing reliable scale-up and optimization of design.

  1. City of Dubuque- Solar Thermal Licensing Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Dubuque requires a Solar Thermal License in order for a person to install a solar thermal project on a home or business. The requirement does not apply to solar photovoltaics. The...

  2. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Laboratories Amir Faghri, University of Connecticut Judith Gomez, NREL National Solar Thermal Test Facility: World Class Capabilities at Your Service Testing 5MW...

  3. CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program....................................................................................3 2.1.1 Host Customer

  4. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, Materials Science, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, Systems...

  6. The Role of Thermal Energy Storage in Industrial Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Storage for Industrial Applications is a major thrust of the Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with process or reject heat recovery systems has been shown to be extremely...

  7. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  8. U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), September 2003 U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES)...

  9. Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer Fluid Containment Materials Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer...

  10. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

  11. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  12. Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's presentation about passive solar building design and solar thermal space heating technologies and applications.

  13. Solar Thermal Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers incentives for the installation of solar water heating systems to residential and non-residential customers of the...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal electric technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar thermal electric technologies Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) On April 13, 2011, in CSP R&D at Sandia Testing Facilities Software & Tools Resources Contacts News...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Thermal Test Facility NASA's Solar Tower Test of the 1-Meter Aeroshell On August 23, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test...

  16. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaic, software, solar thermal systems Abstract Theinteractions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systemsstorage, PV, as well as solar thermal system adoption, two

  17. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper, Colorado1991). Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solarR. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling, Pacific

  18. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

  19. Dish Sterling High Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage Sandia National Laboratories SNLAndrakaA: FY13Q2: Charles E. Andraka * 2-D PCM model extended to include realistic heat pipe boundary...

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric generation plant for a co-generation program utilizing Thermalthermal energy storage would make it possible to produce heat as a by- product of electric generation,thermal storage at suffi- ciently high temperature and pressure, and with suffi- cient transfer rates, that electric power generation

  1. Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavell, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical...

  2. Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavell, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical...

  3. Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significant challenge for solar thermal energy generation issolar thermal, cogeneration of electrical and thermal energy,for efficient energy production. Solar thermal plants, such

  4. Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

  5. THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially replaces some of the primary oxide cations with selected secondary cations. This causes a lattice charge imbalance and increases the anion vacancy density. Such vacancies enhance the ionic mass transport and lead to faster re-oxidation. Reoxidation fractions of Mn3O4 to Mn2O3 and CoO to Co3O4 were improved by up to 16 fold through the addition of a secondary oxide. However, no improvement was obtained in barium based mixed oxides. In addition to enhancing the short term re-oxidation kinetics, it was found that the use of mixed oxides also help to stabilize or even improve the TES properties after long term thermal cycling. Part of this improvement could be attributed to a reduced grain size in the mixed oxides. Based on the measurement results, manganese-iron, cobalt-aluminum and cobalt iron mixed oxides have been proposed for future engineering scale demonstration. Using the cobalt and manganese mixed oxides, we were able to demonstrate charge and discharge of the TES media in both a bench top fixed bed and a rotary kiln-moving bed reactor. Operations of the fixed bed configuration are straight forward but require a large mass flow rate and higher fluid temperature for charging. The rotary kiln makes direct solar irradiation possible and provides significantly better heat transfer, but designs to transport the TES oxide in and out of the reactor will need to be defined. The final reactor and system design will have to be based on the economics of the CSP plant. A materials compatibility study was also conducted and it identified Inconel 625 as a suitable high temperature engineering material to construct a reactor holding either cobalt or manganese mixed oxides. To assess the economics of such a CSP plant, a packed bed reactor model was established as a baseline. Measured cobalt-aluminum oxide reaction kinetics were applied to the model and the influences of bed properties and process parameters on the overall system design were investigated. The optimal TES system design was found to be a network of eight fixed bed reactors at 18.75 MWth each with charge and

  6. Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review by Paul Denholm and Mark Mehos of NREL on April 23, 2013. Entitled "Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage," the presenters seek to answer the question, "What is the addition of TES to a CSP plant actually worth?" Ultimately they conclude that CSP with TES can actually complement other variable generation sources including solar PV and act as an enabling technology to achieve higher overall penetration of renewable energy.

  7. Solar energy storage researchers information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar energy storage are described. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 2 groups of researchers are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers and Non-DOE-Funded Researchers. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Thermal Test Facility Pratt Whitney Rocketdyne Testing On December 19, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News,...

  9. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1971, storage of Solar Energy in a Bandy- Gravel Ground. 2.Aquifer Storage of Heated Water: A Field Experuuent. GroundStorage of Heated Water: Part II - Numerical Simulation of Field Results. Ground

  10. Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

  11. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  12. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  13. LiH thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

  14. Selecting Thermal Storage Systems for Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, C. L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement at six equally spaced elevations. Charged by chiller or hydronic vent cycle. B. Hot Water Storage Tank - Concrete lined steel 17,000 gallon with four headers arranged for dual temperature storage. C. Chiller - Variable frequency drive, 196... for Thermal Storage Projects since 1985: KW SCHOOL REDUCTION Kimball E.S. 7 1 Poteet H.S. 210 Phases I & I1 AC New M.S. 18 4 Pirrung E.S. 7 6 Poteet H.S. 14 0 Phase I11 Kimball E.S. 2 0 Phase I1 Black E.S. 3 7 Cannaday E.S. 9 0 Austin E.S. 94 N...

  15. Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other Applications D. Bank, M. Maurer, J. Penkala, K. Sehanobish, A. Soukhojak Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation...

  16. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    storage methods that would be applicable for large-scale implementation of thermal energy storage. The team aims to: Develop two methodologies with different designs and...

  17. Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 2.2.2. Solar Thermal Versus Photovoltaic ..…………..…………doi:10.1038/nmat2090. 17. Solar Thermal Technology on anFigure 2.5: An eSolar solar thermal system in Burbank,

  18. INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Solar Thermal Test Facility SolarReserve Is Testing Prototype Heliostats at NSTTF On March 3, 2015, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar...

  20. Thermal Storage Systems at IBM Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, IBM commissioned its first large scale thermal storage system with a capacity of 2.7 million gallons of chilled water and 1.2 million gallons of reclaimed, low temperature hot water. The stored cooling energy represents approximately 27...

  1. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

  2. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment  of  Thermal  Energy   Storage  under  Diverse  Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems and applicationsin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

  4. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  5. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  6. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcoupled with thermal energy storage," Applied Energy, vol.N. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

  7. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012. [8] Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, InternationalLF. Overview of thermal energy storage (TES) potential

  8. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  9. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcogeneration coupled with thermal energy storage," AppliedN. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

  10. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  11. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Q1 High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  12. Accepted for publication in Energy and Buildings. 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.03.056 Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .03.056 1 Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on Experimental and Modelling Results Thermal Energy Storage appears to be an attractive solution for solar thermal energy storage. The SOLARGEOTHERM research project aimed to evaluate the energetic potential of borehole thermal energy storage

  13. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael Ray (Knoxville, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-15A NA7.5.14 Thermal Energy Storage (TES) System THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  15. TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    energy efficiency of data centers housing storage clusters. Disks have non-negligible thermal impactTIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters Ajit Chavan, Xunfei Jiang, Mohemmad I/O performance. I. INTRODUCTION Thermal management for power-dense storage clusters can address cooling problems

  16. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  17. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  18. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 86, pp. 451-Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,

  19. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [Nocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage forof Abiotic Photo-chemical Solar Energy Storage Systems,”

  20. New phase-change thermal energy storage materials for buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.K.; Christensen, C.B.; Burrows, R.W.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of phase-change thermal energy storage materials is under development at SERI. These materials are unusual in two ways. They reversibly absorb large amounts of heat during a solid-state, crystal transformation more than 70/sup 0/C below their melting temperatures, and their solid-state transformation temperatures may be adjusted over a range from 7/sup 0/C to 188/sup 0/C by varying the ratios of binary mixtures of the components. Because these storage materials remain solid throughout the range of their service temperatures, unique opportunities exist for incorporating them into building materials. Composites have been made with ordinary, porous construction materials such as wood, gypsum board, and lightweight concrete as the matrix and with the solid-state phase change materials (SS PCM) filling the void space. The thermal storage capacities of such composites are thereby increased by more than 100% without changing the basic nature and workability of the matrix, construction material. Parametric analyses have been conducted to determine what combination of properties would be optimum for certain solar and energy conserving building applications including Trombe wall, direct gain, and distributed cool storage (combined with night ventilation).

  1. A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iuision, Ext. 6782 A New Solar Thermal Receiver UtilizingI \\D \\. }J F--' A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL94720 ABSTRACT A new type of solar thermal receiver is being

  2. Pv-Thermal Solar Power Assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ansley, Jeffrey H. (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, Jonathan D. (El Cerrito, CA); Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

    2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible solar power assembly includes a flexible photovoltaic device attached to a flexible thermal solar collector. The solar power assembly can be rolled up for transport and then unrolled for installation on a surface, such as the roof or side wall of a building or other structure, by use of adhesive and/or other types of fasteners.

  3. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalfor application of solar thermal and recovered heat to end-absorption chiller solar thermal photovoltaics Results

  4. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electricelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric

  5. Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators to eventually optimise the reactor geometry for ammonia-based solar energy storage with troughs, which.1. Storing Solar Energy with Ammonia H2 / N2 gas liquid NH3 Heat Exchangers Power Generation (Steam Cycle

  6. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

  7. Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Melissa Kara

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

  8. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,in crystalline silicon solar cells," Renewable Energy, vol.

  9. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    output electricity. Solar cells panels that employ opticalsurfaces such as the solar cell back panel and a heat panelbe shaped as a flat panel below a solar cells array with fin

  10. Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Y. Goswami

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 3000C ���¹�������� 450 0C ) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

  11. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ratio of the solar cell output power to the incident lightpower to operate the fan. Natural cooling is preferred for solar

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter A team from Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) recently won a first place Excellence Award in the...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On November 2, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Solar Recently, personnel from the Air...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wins Funding for High-Temperature Falling-Particle Solar-Energy Receiver On August 8, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test...

  15. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

  16. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cells by cooling and concentration techniques," inheat. Different techniques of cooling solar cells have been

  17. California Solar Initiative- Solar Thermal Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program was modified by AB 2249, signed in September 2012. The bill allows for non-residential solar pool heating to qualify for incentives, and requires program administrators to...

  18. Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

  19. Thermal Energy Storage for Vacuum Precoolers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugent, D. M.

    for load shifting. Using thermal energy storage results in a load shift of 174.5 kw. With TES, total energy consumption and operating costs are reduced by $13,400 per season. This is a result of low off-peak energy rates and increased compressor... because the compressors ran fully loaded, had a higher average suction temperature, a lower average discharge pressure, and benefitted from increased subcooling. The average on-peak COP was 4.36. On-peak head pressures as high as 204.2 psig were...

  20. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the ratio of the solar cell output power to the incidentmaximum power output at: The fill factor of a solar cell FFsolar cell temperature by about 15°C, which increases the output power

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: molten salt energy storage demonstration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molten salt energy storage demonstration Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power,...

  2. July 17 ESTAP Webinar: Resilient Solar-Storage Systems for Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    July 17 ESTAP Webinar: Resilient Solar-Storage Systems for Homes and Commercial Facilities July 17 ESTAP Webinar: Resilient Solar-Storage Systems for Homes and Commercial...

  3. Cogenerating Photovoltaic and Thermal Solar Collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    · Solar Energy and Alternative Energy can contribute to the energy supply ­ Renewable, doesn't emitCogenerating Photovoltaic and Thermal Solar Collector Jinny Rhee and Jim Mokri COE Faculty Development Grant 9/26, 2008 #12;Motivation · Many Contemporary Applications use power and heat ­ Power

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities,...

  5. EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dayan, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRICCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRICprocess Boeing solar receiver [5J Internal detail of Boeing solar receiver [5J . 2.4 Heat

  6. PV/thermal solar power assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ansley, Jeffrey H.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible solar power assembly (2) includes a flexible photovoltaic device (16) attached to a flexible thermal solar collector (4). The solar power assembly can be rolled up for transport and then unrolled for installation on a surface, such as the roof (20, 25) or side wall of a building or other structure, by use of adhesive and/or other types of fasteners (23).

  7. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    studies Goal: * Demonstrate the feasibility of significant thermal storage for dish Stirling systems to leverage their existing high performance to greater capacity * Demonstrate...

  8. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975. Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test.1975. "Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test,"

  9. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough

  10. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings on thermal energy storage and energy conversion;polymer microcomposites for thermal energy storage. SAE SocLow temperature thermal energy storage: a state of the art

  11. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies,D. , 2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with PhaseW. , 2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic

  12. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  13. Thermal metastabilities in the solar core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Grandpierre; Gabor Agoston

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear stability analysis indicates that solar core is thermally stable for infinitesimal internal perturbations. For the first time, thermal metastabilities are found in the solar core when outer perturbations with significant amplitude are present. The obtained results show that hot bubbles generated by outer perturbations may travel a significant distance in the body of the Sun. These deep-origin hot bubbles have mass, energy, and chemical composition that may be related to solar flares. The results obtained may have remarkable relations to activity cycles in planets like Jupiter and also in extrasolar planetary systems.

  14. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Mills, "Cooling of photovoltaic cells under concentratedelectric performance of a photovoltaic cells by cooling andSolar Cell A photovoltaic cell is a semiconductor that

  15. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage forof Abiotic Photo-chemical Solar Energy Storage Systems,”Power Plants,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, 124 (2),

  16. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [and Photovoltaic Solar Energy Converters,” American ChemicalNocera D. G. , 2010, “Solar Energy Supply and Storage for

  17. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  18. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  19. Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice thermal storage is promising technology to reduce energy costs by shifting the cooling cost from on-peak to off-peak periods. The paper discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, demand, and total...

  20. Eurotherm Seminar #99 Advances in Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Eurotherm Seminar #99 Advances in Thermal Energy Storage 1 EUROTHERM99-01-103 Convection Energy Storage 2 Nussel number. This study shows that an increase in the convection coefficient leads in this paper consists in horizontal PCM plates separated by an air flow. This is a storage system dedicated

  1. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    must be if mal energy storage technologies as means for con-Robert Thorne. Energy Storage is more technology-orientedEnergy with Heat Storage Wells," Environmental Science and Technology,

  2. MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experimental Thermal energy storage in confined aquifers. ©lAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

  3. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  4. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, Internationalpp177–189, 2002. [PG&E] Thermal Energy Storage Strategies

  5. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy produced by the solar collectors A. t::.T/2. )- (lAwith heat pumps and solar collectors Vertical cylinderA trickle type of solar collector heats the water in the

  6. SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

  7. Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Electrical Cogeneration ……………………. …………… 16 2.4.OptimalELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A thesis submitted inFOR ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A solar tracker and

  8. Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

  9. Comparison of experimental and simulated thermal ratings of drain-back solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.H.; Carlson, W.T.; Duff, W.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Schaefer, P.J.; Beckman, W.A.; Klein, S.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-term experimental tests of drain-back solar water heaters are compared to ratings obtained using TRNSYS to determine if computer simulations can effectively replace laboratory thermal ratings of solar domestic hot water heating systems. The effectiveness of TRNSYS in predicting changes in rating due to limited changes in collector area, collector flow rate, recirculation flow rate, storage tank volume, and storage tank design is validated to within [plus minus]10 percent. Storage tank design is varied by using a stratification manifold in place of the standard drop tube. Variations in other component sizes and operating factors are based on current industry standards.

  10. The solar thermal report. Volume 3, Number 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is published by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the DOE Solar Thermal Technology Division to provide an account of work sponsored by the Division and to aid the community of people interested in solar thermal technology in gaining access to technical information. Contents include articles entitled the following: Solar system supplies thermal energy for producing chemicals at USS plant; Solar thermal power module designed for small community market; Roof-mounted trough system supplies process heat for Caterpillar plant; Solar thermal update -- 10 MW(e) pilot plant and 3-MW(t) total energy system; Solar steam processes crude oil; New York investigates solar ponds as a source of thermal energy; On-farm solar -- Finding new uses for the sun; and Topical index of solar thermal report articles.

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

  12. Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade September 10, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis This power tower is part of the...

  13. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order to get accurate measurements of the total of their small mass and therefore large thermal speed, the solar wind electrons are expected to play a major role

  14. SUBMITTED TO GRL 1 Thermal Anisotropies in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    SUBMITTED TO GRL 1 E Thermal Anisotropies in the Solar Wind: vidence of Heating by Interstellar cyclotron instabilit s generated by newly created pickup ions and heats the thermal solar wind protons TO GRL 2 T Introduction he thermal anisotropy of the solar wind is the ratio between the temperatures p

  15. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hebert, Peter H. (Glendale, CA); Brandt, Randolph J. (Palmdale, CA)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  16. Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The Strong Case for Thermal Energy Storage and Utility Incentives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L. W.

    construction costs, more stringent regulations, and increasing environmental constraints regarding development of new generating facilities. As the thermal cooling storage technology has matured, more and more utilities are recognizing that widespread use...

  18. Energy Storage R&D - Thermal Management Studies and Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review Energy Storage R&D Thermal Management Studies and Modeling Ahmad A. Pesaran, Ph. D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado February 25-28, 2008 DOE...

  19. An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Glenn Baker

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change in the storage material. Telkes and Raymond [1] investigated storing thermal energy in a sodium sulfate solution contained in sealed drums. Other salt solutions were tested [2], providing further evidence that phase-change materials are capable...

  20. An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Glenn Baker

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change in the storage material. Telkes and Raymond [1] investigated storing thermal energy in a sodium sulfate solution contained in sealed drums. Other salt solutions were tested [2], providing further evidence that phase-change materials are capable...

  1. Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niehus, T. L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

  2. Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

  3. Project Profile: Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy Storage Module Project Profile: Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy Storage Module Acciona logo Acciona Solar, under...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events,...

  5. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

  6. COUPLING SUPERCRITICAL AND SUPERHEATED DIRECT STEAM GENERATION WITH THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COUPLING SUPERCRITICAL AND SUPERHEATED DIRECT STEAM GENERATION WITH THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Joe a suitable turbine available. Overall, energy transport and storage concepts are presented that maximise dishes, in particular, minimisation of molten salt quantities in storage, and maximisation of thermal

  7. Advanced Glass Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  9. Value of solar thermal industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: dispatch solar energy night or...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dispatch solar energy night or day Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power,...

  11. Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed. Design guidelines are given.

  12. Storage and Retrieval of Thermal Light in Warm Atomic Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Cho; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed-propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light. Finally, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of thermal light beam in the EIT medium. The direct measurement of the photon number statistics of the retrieved light field shows that the photon number statistics is preserved during the storage and retrieval process.

  13. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  14. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    batteries. Solar Water Heater Solar water heater is becomingSolar Water Heater heaters, thermal protection for electronics, spacecrafts, and solar

  15. Solar heat storages in district heating Klaus Ellehauge Thomas Engberg Pedersen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    References 45 Appendix 1 Danish companies 48 #12;6/50 Solar heat storages in district heating networksJuly 2007 . #12;#12;Solar heat storages in district heating networks July 2007 Klaus Ellehauge 97 22 11 tep@cowi.dk www.cowi.com #12;#12;Solar heat storages in district heating networks 5

  16. A solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal collector J.S. Coventry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal collector J.S. Coventry Centre for Sustainable Energy.Coventry@anu.edu.au Abstract Australia is a good location for solar concentrator applications. Current activities in Australia OF THE SOLAR RESOURCE IN AUSTRALIA Australia has relatively high solar insolation, as shown in figure 1

  17. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, E. E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand which results in lower electrical costs. The effectiveness of this 'Thermal Retention System" is determined by its design characteristics, its operational efficiency and comparative system analysis. Today's computer technology has provided...

  18. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

  19. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  20. Interaction of a solar space heating system with the thermal behavior of a building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilmer, C.; Warren, M.L.; Auslander, D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal behavior of a building in response to heat input from an active solar space heating system is analyzed to determine the effect of the variable storage tank temperature on the cycling rate, on-time, and off-time of a heating cycle and on the comfort characteristics of room air temperature swing and of offset of the average air temperature from the setpoint (droop). A simple model of a residential building, a fan coil heat-delivery system, and a bimetal thermostat are used to describe the system. A computer simulation of the system behavior has been developed and verified by comparisons with predictions from previous studies. The system model and simulation are then applied to determine the building response to a typical hydronic solar heating system for different solar storage temperatures, outdoor temperatures, and fan coil sizes. The simulations were run only for those cases where there was sufficient energy from storage to meet the building load requirements.

  1. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in each of the volumes. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for...

  2. Solar Storage Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSodaAtlassource History ViewSolar

  3. The Solar Storage Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreen DataTheMine JumpSolarPalo

  4. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

    1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  5. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

  6. Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Solar Still Coupled With Solar Collector and Storage Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M, Rajesh A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acute shortage of good, clean drinking water is a major problem for most developing countries of the world. In most cases, ponds, streams, wells and rivers are often polluted that they are unsafe for direct use as drinking water >.Often water sources are brackish and or contain harmful bacteria. Therefore cannot be used for drinking .In addition there are many coastal locations where sea water is abundant but potable water is not available. Solar distillation is one of the important methods of utilizing solar energy for the supply of potable water to small communities where natural supply of fresh water is inadequate or of poor quality .In this direction an experimental performance analysis was carried out on a single basin still compared with FPC coupled one. Test were carried out for different water samples namely borewell water, sea water, river water for a water depth of 20 mm

  8. Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipp, R. L.

    of the future may yet en courage such unique designs. For more information: Richard N. Poirier CBI Industries (815) 436-2912 I'it,jure 7 CASCADED CARBONDIOXIDE THERMAL STORAGE llYSTEM TRIPLE POINT OF CO2 (60 PSIG) (-7Oo...

  9. Continuous Commissioning(SM) of a Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be costly, which can result in turning on chillers during on-peak hours in order to provide cooling to the buildings. In this paper the optimization of a thermal storage system operation through Continuous CommissioningSM is presented. Detailed building...

  10. Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

  11. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle Suspensions for Solar Energy Collection A.Sensible Heat Storage for a Solar Thermal Power Plant T.and A. Pfeiffhofer • . Solar Heated Gas Turbine Process

  12. Solar wind electron density and temperature over solar cycle 23: Thermal noise measurements on Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    upstream of the EarthĂ?s bow shock. The WIND/WAVES thermal noise receiver was specially designed to measureSolar wind electron density and temperature over solar cycle 23: Thermal noise measurements on Wind the in situ plasma thermal noise spectra, from which the electron density and temperature can be accurately

  13. Rules of thumb for passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rules of thumb are given for passive solar systems for: (1) sizing solar glazing for 219 cities, (2) sizing thermal storage mass, and (3) building orientation.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

  15. Cool Trends in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in District Energy Utility Applications, June 2005 Cool Trends in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use...

  16. Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District Energy Systems, May 2005 Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District...

  17. Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap...

  18. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    could be acquired, e.g. battery storage, the costs for whichlead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withis limited by battery size - Heat storage is limited by

  19. Solar thermal powered desalination: membrane versus distillation technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar thermal powered desalination: membrane versus distillation technologies G. Burgess and K Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA E-mail: greg.burgess@anu.edu.au Multiple Effect Distillation (MED) is generally assisted) desalination has been conducted. Solar thermal driven Multiple Effect Distillation (MED) has been

  20. Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

  1. A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING A SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report LBL 8520. ) A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING Aenergy. A new type of solar thermal receiver based on thisThe success of the solar thermal electric power program

  2. Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  3. Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  4. Long-Distance Interconnection as Solar Resource Intermittency Solution: Optimizing the Use of Energy Storage and the Geographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Storage and the Geographic Dispersion + Interconnection of Solar Generating Facilities. Marc J. R energy storage and Long-distance interconnection coupled with geographic dispersion of solar generating and serve predetermined load requirements. Index Terms -- Energy Storage, variability, intermittency

  5. Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    , Germany 2 Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg, Germany Abstract. The exploitation of solar power for energy supply is of in- creasing importance. While technical development mainly takes, wind, and biomass energy. Among such tech- nologies, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants

  6. Solar-Thermal Fluid-Wall Reaction Processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, A. W.; Dahl, J. K.; Lewandowski, A. A.; Bingham, C.; Raska Buechler, K. J.; Grothe, W.

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal dissociation reactions requiring rapid-heating and short residence times using solar energy. In particular, the present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal reactions such as dissociation of hydrocarbon containing gases and hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and dry reforming of hydrocarbon containing gases with carbon dioxide. In the methods of the invention where hydrocarbon containing gases are dissociated, fine carbon black particles are also produced. The present invention also provides solar-thermal reactors and solar-thermal reactor systems.

  7. Solar-thermal fluid-wall reaction processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Buechler, Karen J.; Grothe, Willy

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal dissociation reactions requiring rapid-heating and short residence times using solar energy. In particular, the present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal reactions such as dissociation of hydrocarbon containing gases and hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and dry reforming of hydrocarbon containing gases with carbon dioxide. In the methods of the invention where hydrocarbon containing gases are dissociated, fine carbon black particles are also produced. The present invention also provides solar-thermal reactors and solar-thermal reactor systems.

  8. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Solar Thermal and Solar Photovoltaic Installations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR SOLAR THERMAL AND SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLATIONS Juan-Carlos Baltazar Research Associate Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Associate Director Don R. Gilman, P.E. Senior... the potential emission reductions due to the electricity savings from the application of some of the most common solar thermal and solar photovoltaic systems. The methodology to estimate the potential NOx emission reduction integrates legacy analysis tools...

  9. Exergetic analysis of a steam-flashing thermal storage Paul T. O'Brien

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @vipac.com.au 2 PhD, Australian National University ABSTRACT Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of the performance of a cycle that uses large-scale thermal energy storage via hot compressed liquid waterExergetic analysis of a steam-flashing thermal storage system Paul T. O'Brien 1 and John Pye 2 1

  10. COMPARISON OF PROPORTIONAL AND ON/OFF SOLAR COLLECTOR LOOP CONTROL STRATEGIES USING A DYNAMIC COLLECTOR MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Steven R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.A. and Beckman, W.A. Solar Energy Thermal Processes. (NY:Heilbein, s. "Solar Applications of Thermal Energy Storage."

  11. Zero Energy Communities with Central Solar Plants using Liquid Desiccants and Local Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.; Boranian, A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zero energy community considered here consists of tens to tens-of-thousands of residences coupled to a central solar plant that produces all the community's electrical and thermal needs. A distribution network carries fluids to meet the heating and cooling loads. Large central solar systems can significantly reduce cost of energy vs. single family systems, and they enable economical seasonal heat storage. However, the thermal distribution system is costly. Conventional district heating/cooling systems use a water/glycol solution to deliver sensible energy. Piping is sized to meet the peak instantaneous load. A new district system introduced here differs in two key ways: (i) it continuously distributes a hot liquid desiccant (LD) solution to LD-based heating and cooling equipment in each home; and (ii) it uses central and local storage of both LD and heat to reduce flow rates to meet average loads. Results for piping sizes in conventional and LD thermal communities show that the LD zero energy community reduces distribution piping diameters meeting heating loads by {approx}5X and meeting cooling loads by {approx}8X for cooling, depending on climate.

  12. Performance of a Thermally Stable Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon in a Simulated Concentrating Solar Power Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL] [ORNL; Bell, Jason R [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Joseph III, Robert Anthony [ORNL] [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL] [ORNL; Weaver, Samuel P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbon thermal fluids showing thermally stability to 600 C have been tested for solar thermal-power applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C indicated that the fluid isomerized and degraded at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components in trough solar electric generating systems, such as the waste heat rejection exchanger, may become coated or clogged affecting loop performance. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene, without addition of stabilizers, does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the temperatures greater than 500 C. The performance of a concentrating solar loop using high temperature fluids was modeled based on the National Renewable Laboratory Solar Advisory Model. It was determined that a solar-to-electricity efficiency of up to 30% and a capacity factor of near 60% could be achieved using a high efficiency collector and 12 h thermal energy storage.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating...

  14. Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating...

  15. Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

  16. Temperature-dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Randy L.; Iverson, Brian D.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Bronowski, David R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts. Interest in raising the operating temperature of concentrating solar technologies and the incorporation of thermal storage has motivated studies on the implementation of molten salt as the system working fluid. Recently, salt has been considered for use in trough-based solar collectors and has been shown to offer a reduction in levelized cost of energy as well as increasing availability (Kearney et al., 2003). Concerns regarding the use of molten salt are often related to issues with salt solidification and recovery from freeze events. Differences among salts used for convective heat transfer and storage are typically designated by a comparison of thermal properties. However, the potential for a freeze event necessitates an understanding of salt mechanical properties in order to characterize and mitigate possible detrimental effects. This includes stress imparted by the expanding salt. Samples of solar salt, HITEC salt (Coastal Chemical Co.), and a low melting point quaternary salt were cast for characterization tests to determine unconfined compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Experiments were conducted at multiple temperatures below the melting point to determine temperature dependence.

  17. PV/thermal solar power assembly | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVthermal solar power assembly Re-direct Destination: A flexible solar power assembly (2) includes a flexible photovoltaic device (16) attached to a flexible thermal solar...

  18. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    focus only on the solar collector and catalytic converterfluid, a microfluidic solar collector, and a catalytic heatS. a. , 2004, “Solar Thermal Collectors and Applications,”

  19. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Storage for a Solar Thermal Power Plant T. Baldwin, S.A. J. Hunt, "A new solar thermal receiver utilizing small9317. A. J. Hunt, "A new solar thermal receiver utilizing a

  20. Futurestock'2003 9 International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    381 Futurestock'2003 9 th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND is also needed when designing a BTES (Borehole Thermal Energy Storage) system. The ground thermal Thermal Response Test for BTES Applications - State of the Art 2001 Signhild GEHLIN1 and Jeff D. SPITLER2

  1. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.S. [Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, New Delhi (India). Solar Energy Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  2. Studies of Perovskite Materials for High-Performance Storage Media, Piezoelectric, and Solar Energy Conversion Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    Studies of Perovskite Materials for High-Performance Storage Media, Piezoelectric, and Solar Energy of applications, such as sensing, data storage, and energy conversion. For example, perovskite solid solutions

  3. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trates a design load profile for a partial storage system.load management / full storage / ice storage / partialfor partial storage) because part of the cooling load is

  4. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

  5. Sustainable and Holistic Integration of Energy Storage and Solar PV (SHINES) Funding Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable and Holistic Integration of Energy Storage and Solar PV (SHINES) solution as envisioned by SunShot will have the following features:

  6. Optimization of storage in passive solar heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahm, R.J.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for a simple method of estimating the optimum amount of storage for passive solar space heating system designs and the results of that search are described. The project goals, and why the project is important are described. The major project results are presented in the order of their importance with respect to meeting the project goal. A narrative description of the project is given. Here the various approaches attempted are described, giving the reasons for failure in those areas that were not successful. The Appendices contain the bulk of data generated by this project. Most of the data is presented in graphical form. (MHR)

  7. Similarity and generalized analysis of efficiencies of thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peiwen Li; Jon Van Lew; Cholik Chan; Wafaa Karaki; Jake Stephens; J. E. O'Brien

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examined the features of three typical thermal storage systems including: (1) direct storage of heat transfer fluid in containers, (2) storage of thermal energy in a packed bed of solid filler material, with energy being carried in/out by a flowing heat transfer fluid which directly contacts the packed bed, and (3) a system in which heat transfer fluid flows through tubes that are imbedded into a thermal storage material which may be solid, liquid, or a mixture of the two. The similarity of the three types of thermal storage systems was discussed, and generalized energy storage governing equations were introduced in both dimensional and dimensionless forms. The temperatures of the heat transfer fluid during energy charge and discharge processes and the overall energy storage efficiencies were studied through solution of the energy storage governing equations. Finally, provided in the paper are a series of generalized charts bearing curves for energy storage effectiveness against four dimensionless parameters grouped up from many of the thermal storage system properties including dimensions, fluid and thermal storage material properties, as well as the operational conditions including mass flow rate of the fluid, and the ratio of energy charge and discharge time periods. Engineers can conveniently look up the charts to design and calibrate the size of thermal storage tanks and operational conditions without doing complicated individual modeling and computations. It is expected that the charts will serve as standard tools for thermal storage system design and calibration.

  8. Storage tank heat losses through thermosiphoning in two SFBP (the Solar in Federal Buildings Program) solar systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francetic, J.S.; Robinson, K.S.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive monitoring and performance analyses of Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP) quality sites indicated that storage tank heat losses were significantly higher than design estimates. In some cases, measured losses were as much as 10 times the calculated losses. One potentially significant source of heat loss in solar systems is thermosiphoning. A series of tests was conducted at two SFBP quality solar systems to investigate the existence and magnitude of thermosiphon losses from storage subsystems.

  9. Statement of work for solar thermal power systems and photovoltaic solar-energy systems technical support services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is broken down in the following areas: solar thermal central receiver systems analysis; advanced solar thermal systems analysis and engineering; thermal power systems support; total energy systems mission analysis; irrigation and small community mission analysis; photovoltaics mission analysis; Solar Thermal Test Facility and Central Receiver Pilot Plant systems engineering. (LEW)

  10. Impact of component selection and operation on thermal ratings of drain-back solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.H.; Carlson, W.T.; Duff, W.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a half-factorial, two-level experimental design is used to determine the effects of changes in collector area, storage tank volume, collector flow rate, recirculation flow rate, and storage tank design on thermal rating of a solar drain-back water heating system. Experimental ratings are determined in accordance with the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation guidelines. Storage tank design is varied by using a stratification manifold in place of the standard drop tube. Variations in other component sizes and operating factors are based on current industry standards. Statistical analyses indicate that a change in collector area accounts for nearly 90 percent of the variation in heat output. Doubling collector area from 2.78 m[sup 2] to 5.56 m[sup 2] increases delivered solar energy by 31 percent. Use of a stratification manifold increases the delivery of solar energy by six percent. Doubling collector flow rate from 0.057 to 0.114 1/s increases solar output by aproximately three percent; however, the increase in pumping energy outweighs the benefits of increasing collector flow rate. The effects of recirculation flow rate and tank volume are obscured by experimental error.

  11. Sneak peek at electrofuels: Geobacter team aims for bio-based solution to solar energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Sneak peek at electrofuels: Geobacter team aims for bio-based solution to solar energy storage a hybrid of solar and bio-power and also solve the most perplexing problem facing solar energy: energy compounds, and oxygen is released as a byproduct," Lovley explains. Solar energy powers the microbes

  12. Thermal Analysis of a Dry Storage Concept for Capsule Dry Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPHSON, W S

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 1,936 cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) capsules stored in pools at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). These capsules will be moved to dry storage on the Hanford Site as an interim measure to reduce risk. The Cs/Sr Capsule Dry Storage Project is conducted under the assumption that the capsules will eventually be moved to the repository at Yucca Mountain, and the design criteria include requirements that will facilitate acceptance at the repository. The storage system must also permit retrieval of capsules in the event that vitrification of the capsule contents is pursued. The Capsule Advisory Panel (CAP) was created by the Project Manager for the Hanford Site Capsule Dry Storage Project (CDSP). The purpose of the CAP is to provide specific technical input to the CDSP; to identify design requirements; to ensure design requirements for the project are conservative and defensible; to identify and resolve emerging, critical technical issues, as requested; and to support technical reviews performed by regulatory organizations, as requested. The CAP will develop supporting and summary documents that can be used as part of the technical and safety bases for the CDSP. The purpose of capsule dry storage thermal analysis is to: (1) Summarize the pertinent thermal design requirements sent to vendors, (2) Summarize and address the assumptions that underlie those design requirements, (3) Demonstrate that an acceptable design exists that satisfies the requirements, (4) Identify key design features and phenomena that promote or impede design success, (5) Support other CAP analyses such as corrosion and integrity evaluations, and (6) Support the assessment of proposed designs. It is not the purpose of this report to optimize or fully analyze variations of postulated acceptable designs. The present evaluation will indicate the impact of various possible design features, but not systematically pursue design improvements obtainable through analysis refinements and/or relaxation of conservatisms. However, possible design improvements will be summarized for future application. All assumptions and related design features, while appropriate for conceptual designs, must be technically justified for the final design. The pertinent thermal design requirements and underlying assumptions are summarized in Section 1.3. The majority of the thermal analyses, as described in Sections 4.2 and 4.3, focus on an acceptable conceptual design arrived at by refinement of a preliminary but unacceptable design. The results of the subject thermal analyses, as presented in Section 4.0, satisfy items 3 and 4 above.

  13. Marshall Municipal Utilities- Solar Thermal Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marshall Municipal Utilities (MMU) offers residential customers rebates for installing a ENERGY STAR Solar Thermal Water Heater. Rebates are based on the size of the system; MMU offers $20 per...

  14. Minnesota Power- Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings;...

  15. Decarbonizing the Electric Sector: Combining Renewable and Nuclear Energy using Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; King, J.; Kutscher, C.; Wilson, P.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both renewable and nuclear energy can provide significant contributions to decarbonizing the electric sector. However, a grid employing large amounts of wind and solar energy requires the balance of the system to be highly flexible to respond to the increased variability of the net load. This makes deployment of conventional nuclear power challenging both due to the technical challenges of plant cycling and economic limits of reduced capacity factor. In the United States nuclear power plants generally provide constant, base load power and are most economic when operated at constant power levels. Operating nuclear power plants in load-following modes decreases the plants' annual energy output and increases the levelized cost of energy, decreasing economic competitiveness. One possible solution is to couple thermal energy storage to nuclear power plants. This would enable the reactor to remain at nearly constant output, while cycling the electrical generator in response to the variability of the net load. This paper conceptually explores combinations of wind, solar, and nuclear that can provide a large fraction of a system's electricity, assuming the use of thermal energy storage that would allow nuclear power to provide load following and cycling duty while operating at a constant reactor power output.

  16. Development of Thermal Analysis Capability of Dry Storage Cask for Spend Fuel Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu-Kuang Ko; Liang, Thomas K.S.; Chung-Yu Yang [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As most of the nuclear power plants, on-site spent fuel pools (SFP) of Taiwan's plants were not originally designed with a storage capacity for all the spent fuel generated over the operating life by their reactors. For interim spent fuel storage, dry casks are one of the most reliable measures to on-site store over-filled assemblies from SFPs. The NUHOMS{sup R}-52B System consisting of a canister stored horizontally in a concrete module is selected for thermal evaluation in this paper. The performance of each cask in criticality, radioactive, material and thermal needs to be carefully addressed to ensure its enduring safety. Regarding the thermal features of dry storage casks, three different kinds of heat transfer mechanisms are involved, which include natural convection heat transfer outside and/or inside the canister, radiation heat transfer inside and outside the canister, and conduction heat transfer inside the canister. To analyze the thermal performance of dry storage casks, RELAP5-3D is adopted to calculate the natural air convection and radiation heat transfer outside the canister to the ambient environment, and ANSYS is applied to calculate the internal conduction and radiation heat transfer. During coupling iteration between codes, the heat energy across the canister wall needs to be conserved, and the inner wall temperature of the canister needs to be converged. By the coupling of RELAP5-3D and ANSYS, the temperature distribution within each fuel assembly inside canisters can be calculated and the peaking cladding temperature can be identified. (authors)

  17. National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and performance improvements across all major concentrating solar power (CSP) subsystems-solar fields, power plants, receivers, and thermal storage-are necessary to achieve the...

  18. Assessment and Prediction of the Thermal Performance of a Centralized Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Utilizing Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sawi, A.; Haghighat, F.; Akbari, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation tool is developed to analyze the thermal performance of a centralized latent heat thermal energy storage system (LHTES) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The LHTES system is integrated with a mechanical ventilation system...

  19. technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential

  20. Solar thermal program summary: Volume 1, Overview, fiscal year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the solar thermal program is to improve overall solar thermal systems performance and provide cost-effective energy options that are strategically secure and environmentally benign. Major research activities include energy collection technology,energy conversion technology, and systems and applications technology for both CR and DR systems. This research is being conducted through research laboratories in close coordination with the solar thermal industry, utilities companies, and universities. The Solar Thermal Technology Program is pursuing the development of critical components and subsystems for improved energy collection and conversion devices. This development follows two basic paths: for CR systems, critical components include stretched membrane heliostats, direct absorption receivers (DARs), and transport subsystems for molten salt heat transfer fluids. These components offer the potential for a significant reduction in system costs; and for DR systems, critical components include stretched membrane dishes, reflux receivers, and Stirling engines. These components will significantly increase system reliability and efficiency, which will reduce costs. The major thrust of the program is to provide electric power. However, there is an increasing interest in the use of concentrated solar energy for applications such as detoxifying hazardous wastes and developing high-value transportable fuels. These potential uses of highly concentrated solar energy still require additional experiments to prove concept feasibility. The program goal of economically competitive energy reduction from solar thermal systems is being cooperatively addressed by industry and government.

  1. PERFORMANCE OF A CONCENTRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC/THERMAL SOLAR COLLECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200, Australia +612 6125 3976, +612 increased solar energy conversion and potential cost benefits (Fujisawa and Tani, 1997, 2001, Huang et alPERFORMANCE OF A CONCENTRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC/THERMAL SOLAR COLLECTOR Joe S Coventry Centre

  2. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  3. Thermal efficiency of single-pass solar air collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Zamry; Ibarahim, Zahari; Yatim, Baharudin [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz [Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of a finned single-pass solar air collector was studied. This paper presents the experimental study to investigate the effect of solar radiation and mass flow rate on efficiency. The fins attached at the back of absorbing plate to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. The results show that the efficiency is increased proportional to solar radiation and mass flow rate. Efficiency of the collector archived steady state when reach to certain value or can be said the maximum performance.

  4. Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobson, M. J.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated that a utility could start the design of a demonstration plant in 2 to 3 years if research regarding TES system design is undertaken in a timely manner. (LCL)

  5. Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

  6. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    outstanding technical challenges focused on applicability to heat pipes to Concentrated Solar Power production. These include * Counter gravity physics * Counter gravity...

  7. Thermally Induced Vibrations of a Solar Wing with Bowed STEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagler, Shawn 1983-

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    undergo thermal excitations due to a thermal gradient through the cross-section when entering and exiting solar eclipse. These vibrations can greatly reduce pointing accuracy and lead to mission failure. Boeing obtained a patent in 2006 for the High Power...

  8. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  9. Use of Renewable Energy in Buildings: Experiences With Solar Thermal Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, R.; Zhai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar energy is receiving much more attention in building energy systems in recent years. Solar thermal utilization should be based on the integration of solar collectors into buildings. The facades of buildings can be important solar collectors...

  10. High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

  11. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  12. DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the practicality of integrating a thermal energy storage module with a dish stirling engine, enabling the system to operate during cloud transients and to provide...

  13. Study on Commissioning Process for Control Logic of Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shioya, M.; Tsubaki, M.; Nakahara, N.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal storage system in an actual building using the CLT. Introduction In thermal storage systems, as large temperature difference between the supply water and the return water as possible should be maintained in order to ensure high system..., at the secondary water circuit of a heat exchanger installed between the thermal storage system and secondary HVAC system of an actual building. One of the authors, Nakahara, acted as Commissioning Authority during construction phase and later as a consultant...

  14. Implementations of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of solar thermal technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaogang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To build an electric car plus renewable energy system for Singapore, solar thermal technologies were investigated in this report in the hope to find a suitable "green" energy source for this small island country. Among all ...

  15. Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Gerald W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is the key element in the national effort to establish solar thermal conversion technologies within the major sectors of the national energy market. It provides for the development of concentrating mirror/lens heat collection and conversion technologies for both central and dispersed receiver applications to produce electricity, provide heat at its point of use in industrial processes, provide heat and electricity in combination for industrial, commercial, and residential needs, and ultimately, drive processes for production of liquid and gaseous fuels. This report is the second Annual Technical Progress Report for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program and is structured according to the organization of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program on September 30, 1979. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program, a brief history, the significant achievements and real progress during FY 1979, also future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements are forecast. (WHK)

  16. Long-term goals for solar thermal technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of $0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

  17. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of sealed storage cask containing spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitten, P.F.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PWR spent fuel assembly was encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in a instrumented above surface storage cell during December 1978 for thermal testing. Instrumentation provided to measure canister, liner and concrete temperatures consisted of thermocouples which were inserted into tubes on the outside of the canister and liner and in three radial positions in the concrete. Temperatures from the SSC test assembly have been recorded throughout the past 16 months. Canister and liner temperatures have reached their peak values of 200{sup 0}F and 140{sup 0}F, respectively. Computer predictions of the transient and steady-state temperatures show good agreement with the test data.

  18. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

  19. Tehachapi solar thermal system first annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A. [Southwest Technology Development Inst., Las Cruces, NM (US)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), in conjunction with the staff of Industrial Solar Technology (IST), have analyzed the performance, operation, and maintenance of a large solar process heat system in use at the 5,000 inmate California Correctional Institution (CCI) in Tehachapi, CA. This report summarizes the key design features of the solar plant, its construction and maintenance histories through the end of 1991, and the performance data collected at the plant by a dedicated on-site data acquisition system (DAS).

  20. TRANSFORMATION AND STORAGE OF SOLAR ENERGY 780 CHIMIA 2007, 61, No. 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRANSFORMATION AND STORAGE OF SOLAR ENERGY 780 CHIMIA 2007, 61, No. 12 Chimia 61 (2007) 780, with a view to assess the potential of this attractive solar energy technology. The edge fluorescence collection efficiency Solar energy similar refractive index can be used to make up the collector, dividing

  1. Solar energy in the context of energy use, energy transportation, and energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    Solar energy in the context of energy use, energy transportation, and energy storage By David J C to the following journal article, published July 2013: MacKay DJC. 2013 Solar energy in the context of energy use, converting, and delivering sustainable energy, looking in particular detail at the potential role of solar

  2. 19th International Conference on Photochemical Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    IPS-19 19th International Conference on Photochemical Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy 29@caltech.edu Prof. Harry Gray hbg@caltech.edu Prof. Jonas Peters jpeters@caltech.edu Dye-Sensitized & Polymer Solar Cells Advanced Photovoltaics Photocatalysis Solar Fuels Production Photoelectrochemistry

  3. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Solar Thermal and Solar Photovoltaic Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the University of Wisconsin, which is used to select and analyze solar thermal systems. The program provides monthly- average performance for selected system, including: domestic water heating systems, space heating systems, pool heating systems and others... savings from photovoltaic systems using the PV F-CHART program, and a second procedure that uses the F-CHART program to calculate the thermal savings. The solar systems are simulated as specified for the user, no optimization or modification...

  4. Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

  5. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Songgang

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this project is to develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia’s family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar TES systems based on latent heat of fusion rather than molten salt temperature differences, have many advantages that include up to an order of magnitude higher energy storage density, much higher temperature operation, and elimination of pumped loops for most of Infinia’s design options. DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other Infinia awarded project using heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the salt. The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES/pool boiler heat transfer system that is the simplest approach identified to date and arguably has the best potential for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The Phase 1 objectives are to design, build and test a 1-hour TES proof-of-concept lab demonstrator integrated with an Infinia 3 kW Stirling engine, and to conduct a preliminary design of a 12-hour TES on-sun prototype.

  6. Photon management in thermal and solar photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Lu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaics is a technology that directly converts photon energy into electrical energy. Depending on the photon source, photovoltaic systems can be categorized into two groups: solar photovoltaics (PV) and thermophotovoltaics ...

  7. System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

    1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  8. Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems with tungsten cermets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, David A.

    Solar thermal, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have high maximum theoretical efficiencies; experimental systems fall short because of losses by selective solar absorbers and TPV selective emitters. To ...

  9. Thermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    temperature, known as the thermal envelope. Exceeding the thermal envelope decreases the drive's reliability relationship between disk RPM and viscous heating. If the drive exceeds the thermal envelope, the drive canThermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans University

  10. Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Bruce D.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above, intermetallic compounds can precipitate between, and within, the grains of nickel alloys. The precipitation leads to an increase in tensile strength, and a decrease in ductility. Whether the proposed tube materials can provide the required low cycle fatigue life for the supercritical H2O and CO2 receivers is an open question. 4) A ranking of the plants, in descending order of technical and economic feasibility, is as follows: i) Supercritical nitrate salt and baseline nitrate salt: equal ratings ii) Low temperature supercritical H2O iii) Low temperature supercritical CO2 iv) High temperature supercritical CO2 v) High temperature supercritical H2O 5) The two-tank nitrate salt thermal storage systems are strongly preferred over the thermocline systems using supercritical heat transport fluids.

  11. Solar thermal energy contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the national Solar Thermal Technology Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of solar thermal technology as an energy option for the United States. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name. Amount of funding milestones are listed.

  12. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  13. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  14. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  15. Solar Thermal Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolar Energy sro JumpProjectsSolar

  16. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SECTION A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUTATION OF BOTHStandards for Testing Solar Collectors and Thermal StorageSelective Coating Applied to Collector Design, Proceedings

  17. A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

  18. A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

  19. Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage-term thermal storage, second law analysis * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet@univ-perp.fr Nomenclature c Energy Tecnosud, Rambla de la thermodynamique, 66100 Perpignan, France b Université de Perpignan Via

  20. A Comparison of Open Versus Closed Systems in Thermal Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salbodkin, A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thermal storage, by its very nature, requires a large storage vessel. Depending upon the technology employed, this can vary from as little as 1.6cuft./ton-hour, up to 15cuft./ton-hour. The result can be storage tanks with volumes...

  1. THERMAL DEGRADATION OF A BLACK CHROME SOLAR SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATING: SHORT TERM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    black show appreciable degradation ically or mechanically upGA, May ety THERMAL DEGRADATION A BLACK CHROME SOLARis ion, Ext. 781 THERMAL DEGRADATION OF A BLACK CHROME SOLAR

  2. Ris Energy Report 5 Solar thermal 41 by the end of 2004 about 110 million m2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    area decrease with the size of the system. solar thermal systems connected to a district heating network are therefore more cost-effective than systems for single family houses. solar thermal systems) Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wind Power #12;

  3. Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Frontier Research Center of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences SOLID-STATE SOLAR-THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CENTER Progress from DOE EFRC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal...

  4. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M.; Gilbride, T.; Ruiz, K.; Steward, H.; Love, P.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series. It presents information that is useful throughout the United States for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in the first five Best Practices volumes. It provides an introduction to current photovoltaic and solar thermal building practices. Information about window selection and shading is included.

  5. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

  6. EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dayan, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flows and stream conditions in steam power cycle. Table 4.1in the low-temperature reactor system. Steam power cycle 8.1Heat Storage System for a Solar Steam Power Plant." 12th

  7. EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dayan, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D1ST2630 3Z FORMATI/3X. *HEAT INPUT TO KEBOILER IS NOTlargest source of heat input into the storage system (theresults in a ratio of solar heat input to the two systems of

  8. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy...

  9. Use of Renewable Energy in Buildings: Experiences With Solar Thermal Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, R.; Zhai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    collectors on the south tilted roofs, south walls, balconies or awnings. Experiences on solar thermal utilization are mainly introduced in this paper, which include solar hot water systems with different design methods in residential buildings and solar-powered...

  10. Where solar thermal meets photovoltaic for high-efficiency power conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierman, David M. (David Matthew)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop disruptive techniques which generate power from the Sun, one must understand the aspects of existing technologies that limit performance. Solar thermal and solar photovoltaic schemes dominate today's solar market ...

  11. Development and characterization of a new MgSO4-zeolite composite for long-term thermal energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the material. For that specific purpose, a new thermal energy storage composite material has been developed expanded structure for MgSO4, with energy densities of 150-400 kWh.m-3 at a storage temperature compatible. Keywords: thermal energy storage; thermochemical process; long-term storage; zeolites; magnesium sulphate

  12. Genetic algorithms used for the optimization of light-emitting diodes and solar thermal collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    Genetic algorithms used for the optimization of light-emitting diodes and solar thermal collectors developed for the optimization of light-emitting diodes (LED) and solar thermal collectors. The surface a light-extraction efficiency of only 3.7%). The solar thermal collector we considered consists

  13. Performance contracting for parabolic trough solar thermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, H.; Hewett, R.; Walker, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, R.; May, K. [Industrial Solar Technology, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several applications of solar energy have proven viable in the energy marketplace, due to competitive technology and economic performance. One example is the parabolic trough solar collectors, which use focused solar energy to maximize efficiency and reduce material use in construction. Technical improvements are complemented by new business practices to make parabolic trough solar thermal systems technically and economically viable in an ever widening range of applications. Technical developments in materials and fabrication techniques reduce production cost and expand applications from swimming pool heating and service hot water, to higher-temperature applications such as absorption cooling and process steam. Simultaneously, new financing mechanisms such as a recently awarded US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) indefinite quantity Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) facilitate and streamline implementation of the technology in federal facilities such as prisons and military bases.

  14. Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 3~5, the system performance is optimal for many places in China; 3) the obtained solar heat is mainly dependent on the solar irradiance, length of heating period and ambient temperature...

  15. Experimental Research on Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Z.; Zheng, M.; Liu, W.; Wang, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage. In this system, solar energy is the major heat source for a heat pump, and the supplementary heat source is soil. The disagreement in time between the space heat load and heat collected by solar...

  16. Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, and a solar heating system...

  17. Enhanced regeneration of degraded polymer solar cells by thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); Bilen, Chhinder; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); Feron, Krishna [Centre for Organic Electronics, Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW-2308 (Australia); CSIRO Energy Technology, P. O. Box 330, Newcastle NSW 2300 (Australia)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation and thermal regeneration of poly(3-hexylethiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and P3HT:indene-C{sub 60} bisadduct (ICBA) polymer solar cells, with Ca/Al and Ca/Ag cathodes and indium tin oxide/poly(ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate anode have been investigated. Degradation occurs via a combination of three primary pathways: (1) cathodic oxidation, (2) active layer phase segregation, and (3) anodic diffusion. Fully degraded devices were subjected to thermal annealing under inert atmosphere. Degraded solar cells possessing Ca/Ag electrodes were observed to regenerate their performance, whereas solar cells having Ca/Al electrodes exhibited no significant regeneration of device characteristics after thermal annealing. Moreover, the solar cells with a P3HT:ICBA active layer exhibited enhanced regeneration compared to P3HT:PCBM active layer devices as a result of reduced changes to the active layer morphology. Devices combining a Ca/Ag cathode and P3HT:ICBA active layer demonstrated ?50% performance restoration over several degradation/regeneration cycles.

  18. Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the plant, including solar collectors, receivers and heat transfer fluids, thermal energy storage, power cycles, as well as operations and maintenance. The total federal...

  19. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  20. Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

  1. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  2. Methanol-based heat pump for solar heating, cooling, and storage. Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offenhartz, P O'D; Rye, T V; Malsberger, R E; Schwartz, D

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of CH/sub 3/OH vapor with solid (pellet) CaCl/sub 2/ to form the solid phase compound CaCll/sub 2/ . 2CH/sub 3/OH can be used as the basis of a combined solar heat pump/thermal energy storage system. Such a system is capable of storing heat indefinitely at ambient temperature, and can be used for space and domestic hot water heating, and for air conditioning with forced air (dry) heat rejection. It combines all features required of a residential or commercial space conditioning system except for solar collection. A detailed thermal analysis shows that the coefficient of performance for heating is greater than 1.5, and for cooling, greater than 0.5. This has been confirmed by direct experimental measurement on an engineering development test unit (EDTU). The experimental rate of CH/sub 3/OH absorption is a strong function of the absorber-evaporator temperature difference. The minimum practical hourly rate, 0.10 moles CH/sub 3/OH per mole CaCl/sub 2/, was observed with the salt-bed heat transfer fluid at 40/sup 0/C and the CH/sub 3/OH evaporator at -15/sup 0/C. a detailed performance and economic analysis was carried out for a system operated in Washington, DC. With 25 square meters of evacuated tube solar collectors, the CaCl/sub 2/-CH/sub 3/OH chemical heat pump should be capable of meeting over 90% of the cooling load, 80% of the heating load, and 70% of the domestic hot water load with nonpurchased energy in a typical well-insulated single family residence, thus saving about $600 per year. In small-scale production, the installed cost of the system, including solar collectors and backup, is estimated to be about $10,000 greater than a conventional heating and cooling system, and a much lower cost should be possible in the longer term.

  3. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  4. Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS...

  5. State-of-the-Art Thermal Energy Storage Retrofit at a Large Manufacturing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D.

    This paper will describe the existing conditions, strategic planning, feasibility study, economic analysis, design, specification, construction, and project management for the 2.9 megawatt “full shift” chilled water thermal energy storage retrofit...

  6. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  7. Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry...

  8. Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

  9. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.] [Terrafore Inc.

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

  10. Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, E.K.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this potential, considered in terms of the end-use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.

  11. Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stidham, Paul Emery

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

  12. Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi-energy district boiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi- energy district boiler Julien energy storage. 1. Introduction Managing energy demand, promoting renewable energy and finding ways of the OptiEnR research project, the present paper deals with optimizing the multi-energy district boiler

  13. Thermal-hydraulic assessment of concrete storage cubicle with horizontal 3013 canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The FIDAP computer code was used to perform a series of analyses to assess the thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of the concrete plutonium storage cubicles, as modified for the horizontal placement of 3013 canisters. Four separate models were developed ranging from a full height model of the storage cubicle to a very detailed standalone model of a horizontal 3013 canister.

  14. Wave propagation and thermodynamic losses in packed-bed thermal reservoirs for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Alexander; McTigue, Joshua; Markides, Christos

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

     .     The  reservoirs  of  interest  here  typically  comprise  a  cylindrical  pressure  vessel  containing  the  solid  storage  medium  in  the  form  of  a  packed  bed  of  pebbles  or  gravel,  or  a  uniform... WAVE  PROPAGATION  AND  THERMODYNAMIC  LOSSES  IN  PACKED-­?BED  THERMAL  RESERVOIRS  FOR  ENERGY  STORAGE       Alexander  White1,  Joshua  McTigue1,  Christos  Markides2   1  Cambridge  University...

  15. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance of the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  16. Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown....

  17. STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

  18. Thermochemical process for seasonal storage of solar energy: characterization and modeling of a high-density reactive bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Thermochemical process for seasonal storage of solar energy: characterization and modeling to maximize the use of solar energy for house heating, it is interesting to valorize the solar energy excess efficiency, and a 20 per cent share of renewable). The use of renewable energies and in particular solar

  19. Hybrid chromophore/template nanostructures: A customizable platform material for solar energy storage and conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolpak, Alexie M.

    Challenges with cost, cyclability, and/or low energy density have largely prevented the development of solar thermal fuels, a potentially attractive alternative energy technology based on molecules that can capture and ...

  20. Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SoljaĂšiĂŠ, Marin

    Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems with tungsten cermets David, Massachusetts 02139, USA bermel@mit.edu Abstract: Solar thermal, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic (TPV by selective solar absorbers and TPV selective emitters. To improve these critical components, we study a class

  1. Propagation of three--dimensional Alfv'en waves in a stratified, thermally conducting solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Propagation of three--dimensional Alfv'en waves in a stratified, thermally conducting solar wind S to the well--known thermal expansion of the solar corona [Parker, 1958, 1963, 1991]. In particular Alfv'en waves in the solar atmosphere and wind, taking into account relevant physical effects

  2. Biomass Gasification using Solar Thermal Energy M. Munzinger and K. Lovegrove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Gasification using Solar Thermal Energy M. Munzinger and K. Lovegrove Solar Thermal Group technical pathways for biomass gasification and shows their advantages and disadvantages especially in connection with the use of solar heat as energy source for the conversion reaction. Biomass gasification

  3. High Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  4. Innovative Phase hange Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  5. Thermal analysis of adsorptive natural gas storages during dynamic charge phase at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridha, Firas N.; Yunus, Rosli M.; Rashid, Mohd. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Technology Malaysia, 81310 UTM, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Ismail, Ahmad F. [Department of Gas Engineering, University of Technology Malaysia, 81310 UTM, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal behavior of an adsorptive natural gas (ANG) vessel pressurized continuously with light hydrocarbon gases and their mixture at 27 C was analyzed using two different activated carbons. Activated carbon AC-L showed better isothermal storage capacity than AC-D due to its sufficient porous structure. However, higher adsorption capacity claimed more extreme thermal fluctuation represented by a temperature rise of 99.2 C at the center region of the bed charged continuously with methane at 1 L min{sup -1} up to pressure of 4 MPa, corresponding to 82.5 C in AC-D bed. Higher charge rate of 5 L min{sup -1} claimed severer thermal fluctuation of 116 C in AC-L/methane system calling for a serious reduction of 26.9% in the dynamic storage capacity with respect to the isothermal storage capacity. This reduction brought the storage system to a working pressure of about 2.5 MPa rather than the desired working pressure of {proportional_to}4 MPa (about 40% reduction in storage pressure). The severest temperature rise was at the center region caused by bed poor thermal conductivity leading to limited heat transfer. High ethane and propane portions in natural gas may contribute to the thermal fluctuation of the storage system as their heats of adsorption are higher than that for methane. (author)

  6. Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems -- Energy Storage (SEGIS-ES).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, Charles J.; Ton, Dan T. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.); Boyes, John D.; Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the concept for augmenting the SEGIS Program (an industry-led effort to greatly enhance the utility of distributed PV systems) with energy storage in residential and small commercial applications (SEGIS-ES). The goal of SEGIS-ES is to develop electrical energy storage components and systems specifically designed and optimized for grid-tied PV applications. This report describes the scope of the proposed SEGIS-ES Program and why it will be necessary to integrate energy storage with PV systems as PV-generated energy becomes more prevalent on the nation's utility grid. It also discusses the applications for which energy storage is most suited and for which it will provide the greatest economic and operational benefits to customers and utilities. Included is a detailed summary of the various storage technologies available, comparisons of their relative costs and development status, and a summary of key R&D needs for PV-storage systems. The report concludes with highlights of areas where further PV-specific R&D is needed and offers recommendations about how to proceed with their development.

  7. Thermal Energy Storage for Space Cooling--Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy-intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off peak hours when electricity rates are lower. This Federal Technology Alert, which is sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. In addition, it defines the savings potential in the federal sector, presents application advice, and describes the performance experience of specific federal users. The results of a case study of a GSA building using cool storage technology are also provided.

  8. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Performance of Steam Turbine Generators 16.500 KWPeriod, hours Steam Turbine Beat Rate, Discharging, !! WGeneral Electric Company, Steam Turbine-Generator Products

  9. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Code Section IEngineers, ASME BOILER AND PRESSURE VESSEL CODE, An Americangiven in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code: Section

  10. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Brayton-cycle gas turbine topping . • , • . . • , , • -Effect of Brayton Cycle. Gas Turbine Topping on the Grossof either Brayton-cycle gas turbines or Rankine-cycle steam

  11. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Performance of Steam Turbine Generators 16.500 KWbeen developed, turbine performance and steam turbine flowPeriod, hours Steam Turbine Beat Rate, Discharging, !! W

  12. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16.500 KW and Larger. General Electric Company Reprint GER-communication with General Electric Company. Power Genera-New York, (1960). General Electric Company, Steam Turbine-

  13. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topping of the Steam-Cycle Power Plant . A COMPARISON OFTOPPING OF THE STEAM-CYCLE POWER PLANT The proposed solarreceiver and a steam-cycle power plant. To transport heat, a

  14. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsystem Summary Heat Input to the Receiver - 513 MW Heathours, assuming constant heat input to the receiver, Enoughwhich assumed constant heat input to the central receiver 8

  15. Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow Workshop ReportJungle |Energy Concentrating

  16. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel...

  17. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely...

  18. Integrating Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Systems in Whole Building Energy Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces methodologies on how the renewable energy generated by the solar thermal and solar photovoltaic (PV) systems installed on site can be integrated in the whole building simulation analyses, which then can be available to analyze...

  19. Fifth parabolic dish solar thermal power program annual review: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Review was to present the results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Module/Systems Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program. The Review consisted of nine technical sessions covering overall Project and Program aspects, Stirling and Brayton module development, concentrator and engine/receiver development, and associated hardware and test results to date; distributed systems operating experience; international dish development activities; and non-DOE-sponsored domestic dish activities. A panel discussion concerning business views of solar electric generation was held. These Proceedings contain the texts of presentations made at the Review, as submitted by their authors at the beginning of the Review; therefore, they may vary slightly from the actual presentations in the technical sessions.

  20. OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest RuralNujiraSolar Thermal World Portal

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: metal hydride storage thermal-management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal-management issues ECIS, Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting Applications On March 29, 2013, in Capabilities, CRF, Energy, Energy Efficiency,...

  2. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentratin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    resistance between the location where phase change occurs and the working fluid of the power cycle. Either thermosyphons or heat pipes can: Provide an effective thermal...

  3. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capture solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy.solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (solar thermal collector ( kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (

  4. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capture solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy.solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (

  5. Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal the confidence in solar thermal energy. The so called Input/Output-Procedure is controlling the solar heat systems. The simulation model was validated with measured data and a lot of failures in 11 solar thermal

  6. Anomalous thermal conduction characteristics of phase change composites with single walled carbon nanotube inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    , solar energy storage, etc.1, 2 The latent heat energy storages requires high thermal conductivity to the presence of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets. Thermal energy storages using phase change materials of the phase change materials, because low thermal conductivity hinders the rate of energy storage and release

  7. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: II. Thermal Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aschwanden, M J; Ryan, D; Caspi, A; McTiernan, J M; Warren, H P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the second part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and CMEs that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO during the first 3.5 years of its mission. In this Paper II we compute the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution functions and associated multi-thermal energies, using a spatially-synthesized Gaussian DEM forward-fitting method. The multi-thermal DEM function yields a significantly higher (by an average factor of $\\approx 14$), but more comprehensive (multi-)thermal energy than an isothermal energy estimate from the same AIA data. We find a statistical energy ratio of $E_{th}/E_{diss} \\approx 2\\%-40\\%$ between the multi-thermal energy $E_{th}$ and the magnetically dissipated energy $E_{diss}$, which is an order of magnitude higher than the estimates of Emslie et al.~2012. For the analyzed set of M and X-class flares we find the following physical parameter ranges: $L=10^{8.2}-10^{9.7}$ cm for the length scale of the flare areas, $T_p=10^{5.7}-...

  8. Midtemperature solar systems test faclity predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  9. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  10. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a con- centrating solar plant, ",hen the plant is describedHeat Storage for a Solar Thermal Power Plant T. Baldwin, S.process for a steam solar electric plant," Lawrence Berkeley

  11. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standards for ~sting Solar Collectors and Thermal StorageLBL-6974 Rev. e. ' A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF+ 0.66 Fig. L r2 r2 Solar test collector flow chart. Type

  12. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  13. Comparison of domestic olivine and European magnesite for electrically charged thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W.R.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H.; Schoenhals, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically charged thermal energy storage (TES) heaters employing high heat capacity ceramic refractories for sensible heat storage have been in use in Europe for several years. With these devices, low cost off-peak electrical energy is stored by heating a storage core composed of ceramic material to approximately 800/sup 0/C. During the peak period, no electrical energy is used as the building heating needs are supplied by extracting the stored energy from the core by forced air circulation. The recent increase in use of off-peak TES units in the U.S. has led to the search for a domestic supply of high heat capacity ceramic refractory material. North Carolina's extensive but underutilized supply of refractory grade olivine has been proposed as a source of storage material for these units. In this paper the suitability of North Carolina olivine for heat storage applications is assessed by comparing its thermal performance with that of European materials. Using the method of ASHRAE Standard 94.2, the thermal performance of two commercially available room-size TES units was determined experimentally with two different storage materials, North Carolina olivine and German magnesite. Comparisons are made and conclusions are drawn.

  14. Method of making improved gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making an adsorbent carbon fiber based monolith having improved methane gas storage capabilities is disclosed. Additionally, the monolithic nature of the storage carbon allows it to exhibit greater thermal conductivity than conventional granular activated carbon or powdered activated carbon storage beds. The storage of methane gas is achieved through the process of physical adsorption in the micropores that are developed in the structure of the adsorbent monolith. The disclosed monolith is capable of storing greater than 150 V/V of methane [i.e., >150 STP (101.325 KPa, 298K) volumes of methane per unit volume of storage vessel internal volume] at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi).

  15. Legal and regulatory issues affecting the aquifer thermal energy storage concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of legal and regulatory issus that potentially can affect implementation of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) concept are examined. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  16. Analysis and System Design of a Large Chiller Plant for Korea, with or without Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, C.; Simmonds, P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % was provided by thermal storage as in the previous scheme. Electric centrifugal chillers, two (2) at 950 tons each, were still required to charge the ice tanks at night, because gas-fired absorption chillers cannot make the 28°F (-2.2"C) glycol solution... simulated. C. Electric Centrifugal Chillers with Thermal Storage: Local code requires that a maximum of 60% of the peak cooling load be satisfied "real-time" by electricity. Therefore, two (2) 1,020-ton electric centrifugal chillers provided 2,040 tons...

  17. The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory Angelo P. Verdonia and Carsten Denkera aNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102, US ABSTRACT We present the basic design of the THermal Control System

  18. STDAC: Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center annual report fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia is a resource provided by the DOE Solar Thermal Program. The STDAC`s major objective is to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems by providing direct technical assistance to users in industry, government, and foreign countries; cooperating with industry to test, evaluate, and develop renewable energy systems and components; and educating public and private professionals, administrators, and decision makers. This FY94 report highlights the activities and accomplishments of the STDAC. In 1994, the STDAC continued to provide significant direct technical assistance to domestic and international organizations in industry, government, and education, Applying solar thermal technology to solve energy problems is a vital element of direct technical assistance. The STDAC provides information on the status of new, existing, and developing solar technologies; helps users screen applications; predicts the performance of components and systems; and incorporates the experience of Sandia`s solar energy personnel and facilities to provide expert guidance. The STDAC directly enhances the US solar industry`s ability to successfully bring improved systems to the marketplace. By collaborating with Sandia`s Photovoltaic Design Assistance Center and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory the STDAC is able to offer each customer complete service in applying solar thermal technology. At the National Solar Thermal Test Facility the STDAC tests and evaluates new and innovative solar thermal technologies. Evaluations are conducted in dose cooperation with manufacturers, and the results are used to improve the product and/or quantify its performance characteristics. Manufacturers, in turn, benefit from the improved design, economic performance, and operation of their solar thermal technology. The STDAC provides cost sharing and in-kind service to manufacturers in the development and improvement of solar technology.

  19. Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

  20. Loss analysis of thermal reservoirs for electrical energy storage schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Alexander

    2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    phase. HX1 and HX2 are heat exchangers used to reject heat at near-ambient conditions. The compressor, C, and expander, E, may be turbomachines as in Ref. [5] or reciprocating devices, as in Ref. [4] 33 2 Schematic view of heat transfer within... are heat exchangers used to reject heat at near-ambient conditions. The compressor, C, and expander, E, may be turboma- chines as in Ref. [5] or reciprocating devices, as in Ref. [4] 33 T2 x hot 1 T ? T ? T x gas front storage m edia Tg + Tg sT Q . ? Tg...

  1. Thermal Modeling Studies for Active Storage Modules in the Calvert Cliffs ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature measurements obtained for two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE) were used to perform validation and sensitivity studies on detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the concrete storage modules, including the dry storage canister within the modules. The storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s ISFSI are a site-specific version of the standard NUHOMSź HSM. The two modules inspected each contained a 24P DSC loaded with 24 CE 14x14 spent fuel assemblies. The thermal analysis was performed using the STAR-CCM+ package, and the models developed for the specific ISFSI modules yielded temperature predictions in actual storage conditions for the concrete structure, the DSC and its contents, including preliminary estimates of fuel cladding temperatures for the used nuclear fuel. The results of this work demonstrate that existing CFD modeling tools can be used to obtain reasonable and accurate detailed representations of spent fuel storage systems with realistic decay heat loadings when the model omits specific conservatisms and bounding assumptions normally used in design-basis and safety-basis calculations. This paper presents sensitivity studies on modeling detail (for the storage module and the DSC), boundary conditions, and decay heat load, to evaluate the effect of the modeling approach on predicted temperatures and temperature distributions. Because nearly all degradation mechanisms for materials and structures comprising dry storage and transportation systems are dependent on temperature, accurate characterization of local temperatures and temperature gradients that the various components of these systems will experience over the entire storage period has been identified as a primary requirement for evaluation of very long term storage of used nuclear fuel.

  2. Passive solar design handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Passive Solar Design Handbook, Volume Three updates Volume Two by presenting extensive new data on the optimum mix of conservation and solar direct gain, sunspaces, thermal storage walls, and solar radiation. The direct gain, thermal storage wall, and solar radiation data are greatly expanded relative to the Volume 2 coverage. The needed flexibility to analyze a variety of system designs is accommodated by the large number of reference designs to be encompassed - 94 in contrast to 6 in Volume two - and the large amount of sensitivity data for direct gain and sunspace systems - approximately 1100 separate curves.

  3. Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand...

  4. External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

  5. Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

  6. Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  8. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  9. Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

  10. Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices Toru Kashima, Member of the result [4]. The same can be said for time varying real-time prices. Real-time energy pricing is not yet such as chillers. Energy resources such as electricity or natural gas are bought from suppliers at certain prices

  11. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  12. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Modelling Concentrating Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;9 Production Cost Modeling Objective: Balance generation and load, every hour, at least cost · Natural-gas Solar Power Solar Energy Solar Field Steam Turbine Generator #12;13 Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy StorageSolar Energy Solar Field Storage Tank Steam Turbine Generator #12;14 Another

  13. Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in num- ber. Wind and solar power hold promise for some day in the future, but they are generally not cost effective today with the exception of remote, off-grid locations. They are also not the most reliable forms of electrical genera- tion. One...- tion of new technologies and/or changes in be- havior. This is generally acceptable to regu- lators and provides a means for the utilities to meet their requirement to provide reliable service to their customer base. At the same time, demand side...

  14. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentrating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy TEES logoSolar Power | Department of

  15. Sulfur Based Thermochemical Heat Storage for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    wong, bunsen

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigates the engineering and economic feasibility of supplying baseload power using a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant integrated with sulfur based thermochemical heat storage. The technology stores high temperature solar heat in the chemical bonds of elemental sulfur. Energy is recovered as high temperature heat upon sulfur combustion. Extensive developmental and design work associated with sulfur dioxide (SO2) disproportionation and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) decomposition chemical reactions used in this technology had been carried out in the two completed phases of this project. The feasibility and economics of the proposed concept was demonstrated and determined.

  16. Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Materials in Corrugated Copper Panels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aigbotsua, Clifford Okhumeode

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    variations (Lane [2]; Abhat [3]). Latent heat storage has been researched and pioneered by Dr. Telkes in the 1940s (Lane [2]) and others. It did not receive much attention until the energy crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s when it was researched for use... in different applications especially for solar heating. The first application of PCM described in literature was their use for the heating and cooling of buildings by Telkes [4]. The storage capacity of a LHS system incorporating a PCM medium is given...

  17. Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Materials in Corrugated Copper Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aigbotsua, Clifford Okhumeode

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    variations (Lane [2]; Abhat [3]). Latent heat storage has been researched and pioneered by Dr. Telkes in the 1940s (Lane [2]) and others. It did not receive much attention until the energy crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s when it was researched for use... in different applications especially for solar heating. The first application of PCM described in literature was their use for the heating and cooling of buildings by Telkes [4]. The storage capacity of a LHS system incorporating a PCM medium is given...

  18. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

  19. Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structure. Figure 3.1: Solar tracking system. Figure 3.2:for the Figure 3.1: Solar tracking system: 1. Receiver and3.1.2. Tracking Frame The solar tracking frame used in this

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trough Systems CLFR Power Towers Acciona Abengoa Sener Solar Millennium SkyFuel Siemens Ausra SPGMann SkyFuel Abengoa Brightsource Energy SolarReserve eSolar Dish Engine...

  1. A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of advanced concept solar power plants. For conditions ofthe operation of a solar power plant is very small. Plantof the plant is minimal. CONCLUSIONS A new type of solar

  2. Numerical Simulation of a Latent Heat Storage System of a Solar-Aided Ground Source Heat Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Zheng, M.; Li, Z.; Lei, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the rectangular phase change storage tank (PCST) linked to a solar-aided ground source heat pump (SAGSHP) system is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The container of the phase change material (PCM) is the controlling...

  3. Numerical Simulation of a Latent Heat Storage System of a Solar-Aided Ground Source Heat Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Zheng, M.; Li, Z.; Lei, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the rectangular phase change storage tank (PCST) linked to a solar-aided ground source heat pump (SAGSHP) system is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The container of the phase change material (PCM) is the controlling...

  4. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermal Energy

  5. Temperature dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, Brian DeVon; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts.

  6. An overview of water disinfection in developing countries and the potential for solar thermal water pasteurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Thomas, K.E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study originated within the Solar Buildings Program at the U.S. Department of Energy. Its goal is to assess the potential for solar thermal water disinfection in developing countries. In order to assess solar thermal potential, the alternatives must be clearly understood and compared. The objectives of the study are to: (a) characterize the developing world disinfection needs and market; (b) identify competing technologies, both traditional and emerging; (c) analyze and characterize solar thermal pasteurization; (d) compare technologies on cost-effectiveness and appropriateness; and (e) identify research opportunities. Natural consequences of the study beyond these objectives include a broad knowledge of water disinfection problems and technologies, introduction of solar thermal pasteurization technologies to a broad audience, and general identification of disinfection opportunities for renewable technologies.

  7. STA'IfEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ABENGOA SOLAR INC. ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled , Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants." According to ASI's...

  8. Review Article Solar-Thermal Powered Desalination: Its Significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    @kau.edu.sa Abstract Solar-desalination systems are desalination systems that are powered by solar energy review the technologies for solar energy systems used for capturing and concentrating heat energy- desalination systems that (i) first transform solar energy into electrical energy and then (ii) employed

  9. Under Review for Publication in ASME J. Solar Energy Engineering SOL-12-1058 Life Estimation of Pressurized-Air Solar-Thermal Receiver Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Under Review for Publication in ASME J. Solar Energy Engineering SOL-12-1058 Life Estimation of Pressurized-Air Solar-Thermal Receiver Tubes David K. Fork 1 e-mail: fork@google.com John Fitch e-mail: fitch.ziaei@gmail.com Robert I. Jetter e-mail: bjetter@sbcglobal.net The operational conditions of the solar thermal receiver

  10. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  11. Line-focus solar thermal energy technology development. FY 79 annual report for Department 4720

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, K D; Champion, R L; Hunke, R W [eds.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary role of the Solar Energy Projects Department II (4720) is the development, evaluation, and testing of line-focus solar thermal technology. This report of FY 79 progress and accomplishments is divided into two parts: (1) Component and Subsystem Development including the design and analysis of collector modules, their components, and associated materials and processes, and (2) Systems and Applications Development, involving larger configurations of solar thermal line-focus systems. The emphasis is on parabolic troughs, but significant efforts on hemispherical bowls, compound parabolic collectors, and dishes for the Solar Total Energy Project are also described.

  12. Concentrated solar power on demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel Shawn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten salt pool, which also functions ...

  13. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K. [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

  14. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  15. Evaluation of olivine ceramic refractories for thermal-energy-storage application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmour, H. III; Gay, B.M.; Cochran, R.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-heat capacity refractory ceramics have been employed in European electric heat storage furnaces for over two decades. In these systems, ceramic refractories are heated to approximately 1500/sup 0/F, using low-cost electric energy during the off-peak demand hours. During the peak demand hours, heat is extracted as needed by controlled circulation of air through the core to meet space conditioning requirements. Heat storage or thermal energy storage (TES) furnaces represent (a) valuable load-leveling capabilities for electric utilities and (b) safe, convenient, reliable heat sources for consumers. Because of its relatively high-heat capacity and relatively low cost, olivine is one of the more attractive candidate materials for such ceramics. This paper includes a discussion of the goals of the current study, along with results achieved to date. Further, here is a discussion of future work to be undertaken as a part of this study.

  16. Optimization of central receiver concentrated solar thermal : site selection, heliostat layout & canting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noone, Corey J. (Corey James)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, two new models are introduced for the purposes of (i) locating sites in hillside terrain suitable for central receiver solar thermal plants and (ii) optimization of heliostat field layouts for any terrain. ...

  17. Monitoring solar-thermal systems: An outline of methods and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual discusses the technical issues associated with monitoring solar-thermal systems. It discusses some successful monitoring programs that have been implemented in the past. It gives the rationale for selecting a program of monitoring and gives guidelines for the design of new programs. In this report, solar thermal monitoring systems are classified into three levels. For each level, the report discusses the kinds of information obtained by monitoring, the effort needed to support the monitoring program, the hardware required, and the costs involved. Ultimately, all monitoring programs share one common requirement: the collection of accurate data that characterize some aspect or aspects of the system under study. This report addresses most of the issues involved with monitoring solar thermal systems. It does not address such topics as design fundamentals of thermal systems or the relative merits of the many different technologies employed for collection of solar energy.

  18. Modeling the solar thermal receiver for the CSPonD Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Anne)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective was to create an accurate steady state thermal model of a molten salt receiver prototype with a horizontal divider plate in the molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power on Demand (CSPonD). The purpose of the ...

  19. PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTORź V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading to a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.

  20. Waverly Light and Power- Residential Solar Thermal Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waverly Light and Power (WL&P) offers rebates for solar hot water heating systems to its residential customers. All purchases must be pre-approved through WL&P's solar water heater...