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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Estimation of Thermal Resistance from Room Temperature Electrical Resistance Measurements for Different LHC Beam Screen Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note the thermal resistance between the LHC beam screen and cold bore is estimated from room temperature electrical resistance measurements. The results indicate that the beam screen without supports should have a comparable, if not better, thermal performance than the one with the existing spring supports. This prediction from electrical resistance measurements is confirmed by recent preliminary thermal measurements.

Jenninger, B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Measurement of Thermal Diffusity and Flow Resistance for TCAP Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SRS uses the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) to separate isotopes of hydrogen. The frequency of thermal cycles is a limit of the productivity of the process and that frequency is largely determined by the thermal diffusivity of the absorbent material. For a given tube diameter, a larger thermal diffusivity decreases the time required for each cycle. In 1998, the Engineering Development Laboratory measured thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity for three TCAP materials in helium.

STEIMKE, JOHN

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Soil Thermal Resistivity and Thermal Stability Measuring Instrument: Volume 5: Abridged Manual for Use of the Statistical Weather Analysis Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is, in turn, a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties. For design purposes, these parameters should be trea...

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a very hot summer equivalent to a Guangzhou summer, the reduction of heat coming into rooms is very important with respect to thermal comfort and energy efficiency. The objective of this study is to investigate the evaporation cooling effect on a rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results of the hot-climate wind tunnel experiment. The calculated equivalent thermal resistance and synthesis exterior surface heat transfer coefficient were in fairly good agreement with that in the design standard for energy efficiency of residential buildings in the hot summer and warm winter zone, while the average velocity in hot-climate wind tunnel equals the summer average outdoor velocity in Guangzhou.

Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

thermal_resistance_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "The NBS Line-Heat-Source Guarded Hot Plate for Thick Materials",FJ Powell and BG Rennex, Proceedings ASHRAE/DOE Conference - II, Atlanta ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

AC resistance measuring instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

Hof, P.J.

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

Morgan, Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, William R. (Maynardville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Experimental and numerical study of the effective thermal conductivity of silica nanocomposites with thermal boundary resistance  

SciTech Connect

The thermal interface resistance at the macro scale is mainly described by the physical gap between two interfaces and constriction resistance due to this gap. The small gaps between the two material faces makes up the majority of thermal interface resistance at the macro scale. So, most of the studies have been focused on characterizing effect of surface geometry and material properties to thermal interface resistance. This resistance is more widely known as thermal contact resistance, represented with Rc. There are various models to predict thermal contact resistance at macro scale. These models predict thermal resistance Rc for given two materials by utilizing their bulk thermomechanical properties. Although, Rc represents thermal resistance accurately for macro size contacts between two metals, it is not suitable to describe interface resistance of particles in modern TIMs, aka particulate composites. The particles inside recently available TIMs are micron size and with effort to further increase surface area this particle size is approaching nano scale. At this small scale, Rc does not accurately predict thermal interface, as it is very difficult to characterize the surface topography. The thermal discontinuity at perfectly bonded interface of two dissimilar materials is termed as thermal boundary resistance (Rb) or Kapitza resistance. The macroscopic assumptions that thermal discontinuity only exists due to gaps and surface geometry leads to substantial error in determining interface thermal properties at micron and nano scale. The phenomenon of thermal boundary resistance is an inherent material property and arises due to fundamental mechanism of thermal transport. For metal-matrix particulate composites, Rb plays more important role than Rc. The free flowing nature of the polymer would eliminate most of the gaps between the two materials at their interface. This means almost all of the thermal resistance at particle/matrix interface would occur due to Rb. The current study presents experimental study of thermal boundary resistance for silica nano particles embedded inside epoxy resin. The bulk conductivity of the sample is measured and Rc is back calculated using Hasselman-Johnson s (H-J) equation. The numerical validation of the equation is also presented, including extrapolation study to predict effective conductivity of the nanocomposite TIM.

Kothari, Rushabh M [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of the thermal resistance of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier for tropical and humid conditions: Experimental study from field measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the experimental evaluation of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier (MRRB), installed according to the state of the art, on a dedicated test cell. An existing experimental device was completed with a specific system for the regulation of the airflow rate in the upper air layer included in a typical roof from Reunion Island. Several experimental sequences were conducted to determine the thermal resistance of the roof according to several parameters and following a specific method. The mean method, well known in international standards (ISO 9869 - 1994) for the determination of the thermal resistance using dynamic data, was used. The method was implemented in a building simulation code in order to allow the determination of the thermal indicator automatically. Experimental results are proposed according to different seasonal periods and for different values of the airflow rate in the upper air layer.

Frédéric Miranville; Ali Hamada Fakra; Stéphane Guichard; Harry Boyer; Jean Philippe Praene; Dimitri Bigot

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of the thermal resistance of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier for tropical and humid conditions: Experimental study from field measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the experimental evaluation of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier (MRRB), installed according to the state of the art, on a dedicated test cell. An existing experimental device was completed with a specific system for the regulation of the airflow rate in the upper air layer included in a typical roof from Reunion Island. Several experimental sequences were conducted to determine the thermal resistance of the roof according to several parameters and following a specific method. The mean method, well known in international standards (ISO 9869 - 1994) for the determination of the thermal resistance using dynamic data, was used. The method was implemented in a building simulation code in order to allow the determination of the thermal indicator automatically. Experimental results are proposed according to different seasonal periods and for different values of the airflow rate in the upper air layer

Miranville, Frédéric; Guichard, Stéphane; Boyer, Harry; Praene, Jean Philippe; Bigot, Dimitri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

3 omega method for specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a 3 omega method for simultaneously measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of a rod- or filament-like specimen using a way similar to a four-probe resistance measurement. The specimen in this method needs to be electrically conductive and with a temperature-dependent resistance, for acting both as a heater to create a temperature fluctuation and as a sensor to measure its thermal response. With this method we have successfully measured the specific heat and thermal conductivity of platinum wire specimens at cryogenic temperatures, and measured those thermal quantities of tiny carbon nanotube bundles some of which are only 10^-9 g in mass.

L. Lu; W. Yi; D. L. Zhang

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermal conductivity Measurements of Kaolite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was performed to determine the thermal conductivity of Kaolite 1600, which primarily consists of Portland cement and vermiculite. The material was made by Thermal Ceramics for refractory applications. Its combination of light weight, low density, low cost, and noncombustibility made it an attractive alternative to the materials currently used in ES-2 container for radioactive materials. Mechanical properties and energy absorption tests of the Kaolite have been conducted at the Y-12 complex. Heat transfer is also an important factor for the application of the material. The Kaolite samples are porous and trap moisture after extended storage. Thermal conductivity changes as a function of moisture content below 100 C. Thermal conductivity of the Kaolite at high temperatures (up to 700 C) are not available in the literature. There are no standard thermal conductivity values for Kaolite because each sample is somewhat different. Therefore, it is necessary to measure thermal conductivity of each type of Kaolite. Thermal conductivity measurements will help the modeling and calculation of temperatures of the ES-2 containers. This report focuses on the thermal conductivity testing effort at ORNL.

Wang, H

2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during pulse excimer laser interaction with materials Title Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...

17

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested ...

18

Low thermal resistance power module assembly - Energy Innovation ...  

A power module assembly (400) with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate (410 ...

19

Low thermal resistance power module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power module assembly with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate with passageways or openings for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface to an upper surface. A circuit substrate is provided and positioned on the spreader plate to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate includes a bonding layer configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening in the plate. The assembly includes power modules mounted on the circuit substrate on a surface opposite the bonding layer. The power modules are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

Hassani, Vahab (Denver, CO); Vlahinos, Andreas (Castle Rock, CO); Bharathan, Desikan (Arvada, CO)

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Low thermal resistance power module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power module assembly (400) with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate (410) with passageways or openings (414) for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface (411) to an upper surface (412). A circuit substrate (420) is provided and positioned on the spreader plate (410) to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate (420) includes a bonding layer (422) configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer (422) may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface (412) of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening (414) in the plate. The assembly includes power modules (430) mounted on the circuit substrate (420) on a surface opposite the bonding layer (422). The power modules (430) are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

Hassani, Vahab (Denver, CO); Vlahinos, Andreas (Castle Rock, CO); Bharathan, Desikan (Arvada, CO)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Influence of surface roughness and waviness upon thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with the phenomenon of thermal resistance between contacting solids. Attention is directed towards contiguous solids possessing both surface roughness and waviness. When two such surfaces are brought together ...

Yovanovich, M. Michael

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen: Surface Temperatures Title Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen: Surface...

23

Measured values of coal mine stopping resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As coal mines become larger, the number of stoppings in the ventilation system increases. Each stopping represents a potential leakage path which must be adequately represented in the ventilation model. Stopping resistance can be calculated using two methods, the USBM method, used to determine a resistance for a single stopping, and the MVS technique, in which an average resistance is calculated for multiple stoppings. Through MVS data collected from ventilation surveys of different subsurface coal mines, average resistances for stoppings were determined for stopping in poor, average, good, and excellent conditions. The calculated average stoppings resistance were determined for concrete block and Kennedy stopping. Using the average stopping resistance, measured and calculated using the MVS method, provides a ventilation modeling tool which can be used to construct more accurate and useful ventilation models. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Oswald, N.; Prosser, B.; Ruckman, R. [Mine Ventilation Services, Fresno, CA (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4 P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.2X O.sub.24, .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-2X Y.sub.2X P.sub.6 O.sub.24 and .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-X Y.sub.X P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.X O.sub.24 wherein .phi. is either Strontium or Barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures.

Limaye, Santosh Y. (1440 Sandpiper Cir. #38, Salt Lake City, UT 84117)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub 2X}O{sub 24}, {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}2X}Y{sub 2X}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} and {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}X}Y{sub X}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub X}O{sub 24} wherein {phi} is either strontium or barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures. 7 figs.

Limaye, S.Y.

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

Kennedy, Charles R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

29

Improving Glass Walls Thermal Resistance In Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar radiation through an air conditioned building depends on what is called the building envelope. Building envelope consists of the surfaces that separate the inside from the building outdoors. Area, direction, and specifications of glass walls; as one of envelope surfaces; has an important impact on solar radiation. Design and construction of glass walls have significant effects on building comfort and energy consumption. This paper describes methods of improving glass walls thermal resistance in air conditioned buildings. Effect of glass wall radiation temperature on the indoor temperature distribution of building rooms is also investigated. Heat gain through various types of glass is discussed. Optimization and testing of these types are carried out theoretically and experimentally as well. A series of experiments on different types of glass with special strips is performed.

Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Alajmi, R.; Al-Ansary. A; Abuzaid, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

32

An Empirical Model of UO2 Thermal Conductivity Based on Laser Flash Measurements of Thermal Diffusivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity of irradiated fuel materials, which can be derived from measured thermal diffusivity (TD), is a key consideration in thermal performance and design of a fuel rod. However, without interpretation, the measured TD data cannot be used directly to calculate fuel temperatures during irradiation. This report provides such interpretation and presents an empirical model for the degradation of UO2 thermal conductivity with burn-up.

1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Thermoelectric Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... which allow solid-state conversion of thermal to electrical energy, have a ... and exhaust system, which can run either an electric motor or accessories ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Facebook icon Twitter icon Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project...

35

Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Powder Insulation at Cryogenic Temperatures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A device to measure bulk effective thermal conductivity of powder insulation at cryogenic temperatures has been designed and tested. The design consists of two… (more)

Barrios, Matthew Nicklas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Direct Measurement of EGR Cooler Deposit Thermal Properties for Improved Understanding of Cooler Fouling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has become a significant issue for compliance with NOX emissions standards. This paper reports results of a study of fundamental aspects of EGR cooler fouling. An apparatus and procedure were developed to allow surrogate EGR cooler tubes to be exposed to diesel engine exhaust under controlled conditions. The resulting fouled tubes were removed and analyzed. Volatile and non-volatile deposit mass was measured for each tube. Thermal diffusivity of the deposited soot cake was measured by milling a window into the tube and using the Xenon flash lamp method. The heat capacity of the deposit was measured at temperatures up to 430 C and was slightly higher than graphite, presumably due to the presence of hydrocarbons. These measurements were combined to allow calculation of the deposit thermal conductivity, which was determined to be 0.041 W/mK, only ~1.5 times that of air and much lower than the 304 stainless steel tube (14.7 W/mK). The main determinant of the deposit thermal conductivity is density, which was measured to be just 2% that of the density of the primary soot particles (or 98% porous). The deposit layer thermal resistance was calculated and compared with estimates of the thermal resistance calculated from gas temperature data during the experiment. The deposit properties were also used to further analyze the temperature data collected during the experiment.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world's most powerful neutron source, the $1.4 billion Spallation Neutron Source At 1.4MW, SNS produces. SNS will feature 24 beamlines for physics, chemistry, biology, materials research. www.sns.gov #12 · Coproduction of epithermal, thermal and cold neutrons #12;SNS Instrument Beam Lines 1st experimentproposed 2nd

Danon, Yaron

38

Electrical, Frequency and Thermal Measurement and Modelling of Supercapacitor Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical, Frequency and Thermal Measurement and Modelling of Supercapacitor Performance Yasser--This paper presents an evaluation of commercial supercapacitors performance (ESR, C, self-discharge, Pmax, Emax, coulumbic efficiency, etc), under different conditions. Characterization of supercapacitor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

Microelectronic Thermal Anemometer for the Measurement of Surface Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the development and first prototype results of a microelectronic thermal anemometer without moving parts, for the measurement of velocity and direction of surface wind. The central part of the instrument is an integrated-...

B. W. Van Oudheusden; J. H. Huijsing

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Measurement and quantification of aggregate thermal coefficient of expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete affects thermal related distresses in pavements. Factors affecting expansion of concrete and aggregates along with existing models are reviewed. A test method to measure the coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregates is proposed. Existing methods used to analyze oxide contents are evaluated. A relation between the oxide content of various elements in aggregates and the CTE of aggregate is presented. Results obtained from the proposed method are presented. A model is also presented for the CTE of concrete based on aggregate properties.

Chande, Gautam U

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Standard Test Method for Thermal Oxidative Resistance of Carbon Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the apparatus and procedure for the determination of the weight loss of carbon fibers, exposed to ambient hot air, as a means of characterizing their oxidative resistance. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to inch-pound units which are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific hazard information, see Section 8.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Soil Thermal Properties Manual for Underground Power Transmission: Soil Thermal Property Measurements, Soil Thermal Stability, and the Use of Corrective Thermal Backfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal properties of soil used to bury underground transmission cables -- often only crudely estimated in the past -- can have a large impact on the capacity of a transmission system. This guide provides comprehensive information on soil thermal property measurement, surveying, interpretation, and improvement.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

Sarin, V.K.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal Transport Measurement of Silicon-Germanium Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal properties of one dimensional nanostructures are of interest for thermoelectric energy conversion. Thermoelectric efficiency is related to non dimensional thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT=S^2 o T/k, where S ,o , k and T are Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and the absolute temperature respectively. These physical properties are interdependent. Therefore, making materials with high ZT is a very challenging task. However, nanoscale materials can overcome some of these limitations. When the size of nanomaterials is comparable to wavelength and mean free path of energy carriers, especially phonons, size effect contributes to the thermal conductivity reduction without bringing about major changes in the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient. Therefore, the figure of merit ZT can be manipulated. For example, the thermal conductivities of several silicon nanowires were more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of bulk silicon values due to the enhanced boundary scattering. Among the nanoscale semiconductor materials, Silicon-Germanium(SiGe) alloy nanowire is a promising candidate for thermoelectric materials The thermal conductivities of SiGe core-shell nanowires with core diameters of 96nm, 129nm and 177nm were measured using a batch fabricated micro device in a temperature range of 40K-450K. SiGe nanowires used in the experiment were synthesized via the Vapour-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth method. The thermal conductivity data was compared with thermal conductivity of Si and Ge nanowires. The data was compared with SiGe alloy thin film, bulk SiGe, Si/SixGe1-x superlattice nanowire, Si/Si0.7Ge0.3 superlattice thin film and also with the thermal conductivity of Si0.5Ge0.5 calculated using the Einstein model. The thermal conductivities of these SiGe alloy nanowires observed in this work are ~20 times lower than Si nanowires, ~10 times lower than Ge nanowires, ~3-4 times lower than Si/SixGe1-x superlattice thin film, Si/SixGe1-x superlattice nanowire and about 3 time lower than bulk SiGe alloy. The low values of thermal conductivity are majorly due to the effect of alloy scattering, due to increased boundary scattering as a result of nanoscale diameters, and the interface diffuse scattering by core-shell effect. The influence of core-shell effect, alloy scattering and boundary scattering effect in reducing the thermal conductivity of these nanowires opens up opportunities for tuning thermoelectric properties which can pave way to thermoelectric materials with high figures of merit in the future.

Gwak, Yunki

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, pro- duct or process disclosed, nor represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. F Available from National Technical Information Service

50

Effective thermal boundary resistance from thermal decoupling of magnons and phonons in SrRuO3 thin films  

SciTech Connect

We use the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) to measure the local temperature and heat flow dynamics in ferromagnetic SrRuO3 thin films. After heating by a pump pulse, the film temperature decays exponentially, indicating that the heat flow out of the film is limited by the film/substrate interface. We show that this behavior is consistent with an effective boundary resistance resulting from disequilibrium between the spin and phonon temperatures in the film.

Langner, M.C.; Kantner, C.L.S.; Chu, Y.H.; Martin, L.M.; Yu, P.; Ramesh, R.; Orenstein, J.

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Effect of Prongs in the Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence with Fine-Wire Resistance Transducers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the fine-wire resistance temperature transducer was analyzed including the effects of (i) conducive heat transfer between wire and the supporting prong and (ii) a thermal boundary layer, which can form around the prongs especially ...

V. P. Singh; F. Eaton; R. Rubio

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Measurement of Thermal Dependencies of PBG Fiber Properties  

SciTech Connect

Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) represent a class of optical fibers which have a wide spectrum of applications in the telecom and sensing industries. Currently, the Advanced Accelerator Research Department at SLAC is developing photonic bandgap particle accelerators, which are photonic crystal structures with a central defect used to accelerate electrons and achieve high longitudinal electric fields. Extremely compact and less costly than the traditional accelerators, these structures can support higher accelerating gradients and will open a new era in high energy physics as well as other fields of science. Based on direct laser acceleration in dielectric materials, the so called photonic band gap accelerators will benefit from mature laser and semiconductor industries. One of the key elements to direct laser acceleration in hollow core PCFs, is maintaining thermal and structural stability. Previous simulations demonstrate that accelerating modes are sensitive to the geometry of the defect region and the variations in the effective index. Unlike the telecom modes (for which over 95% of the energy propagates in the hollow core) most of the power of these modes is located in the glass at the periphery of the central hole which has a higher thermal constant than air ({gamma}{sub SiO{sub 2}} = 1.19 x 10{sup -6} 1/K, {gamma}{sub air} = -9 x 10{sup -7} 1/K with {gamma} = dn/dT). To fully control laser driven acceleration, we need to evaluate the thermal and structural consequences of such modes on the PCFs. We are conducting series of interferometric tests to quantify the dependencies of the HC-633-02 (NKT Photonics) propagation constant (k{sub z}) on temperature, vibration amplitude, stress and electric field strength. In this paper we will present the theoretical principles characterizing the thermal behavior of a PCF, the measurements realized for the fundamental telecom mode (TE{sub 00}), and the experimental demonstration of TM-like mode propagation in the HC-633-02 fiber.

Laouar, Rachik

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effective thermal boundary resistance from thermal decoupling of magnons and phonons in SrRuO3 thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicates that in SRO thermal energy is stored predominantlybecause the fraction of thermal energy stored in the con?nedC. On this time-scale, thermal energy stored in the phonons

Langner, M.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Thirty Stage Annular Centrifugal Contactor Thermal Profile Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thirty stage 5 cm annular centrifugal contactor cascade has been assembled and tested to obtain thermal profiles during both ambient and heated input conditions of operation. Thermocouples were installed on every stage as well as feed inputs and Real-time data was taken during experiments lasting from two to eight hours at total flow rates of 0.5 to 1.4 liters per minute. Ambient temperature profile results show that only a small amount of heat is generated by the mechanical energy of the contactors. Steady state temperature profiles mimic the ambient temperature of the lab but are higher toward the middle of the cascade. Heated inlet solutions gave temperature profiles with smaller temperature gradients, more driven by the temperature of the inlet solutions than ambient lab temperature. Temperature effects of solution mixing, even at rotor speeds of 4000 rpm, were not measurable.

David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hyper-resistivity and electron thermal conductivity due to destroyed magnetic surfaces in axisymmetric plasma equilibria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to model the effects of small-scale current-driven magnetic fluctuations in a mean-field theoretical description of a large-scale plasma magnetic field B(x,t), a space and time dependent hyper-resistivity {Lambda}(x,t) can be incorporated into the Ohm's law for the parallel electric field E Dot-Operator B. Using Boozer coordinates, a theoretical method is presented that allows for a determination of the hyper-resistivity {Lambda}({psi}) functional dependence on the toroidal magnetic flux {psi} for arbitrary experimental steady-state Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric plasma equilibria, if values are given for the parallel plasma resistivity {eta}({psi}) and the local distribution of any auxiliary plasma current. Heat transport in regions of plasma magnetic surfaces destroyed by resistive tearing modes can then be modeled by an electron thermal conductivity k{sub e}({psi})=({epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}/e{sup 2}){Lambda}({psi}), where e and m{sub e} are the electron charge and mass, respectively, while {epsilon}{sub 0} is the permittivity of free space. An important result obtained for axisymmetric plasma equilibria is that the {psi}{psi}-component of the metric tensor of Boozer coordinates is given by the relation g{sup {psi}{psi}}({psi}){identical_to}{nabla}{psi} Dot-Operator {nabla}{psi}=[{mu}{sub 0}G({psi})][{mu}{sub 0}I({psi})]/{iota}({psi}), with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space, G({psi}) the poloidal current outside a magnetic surface, I({psi}) the toroidal current inside a magnetic surface, and {iota}({psi}) the rotational transform.

Weening, R. H. [Department of Radiologic Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University, 901 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107-5233 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Method to Correct the Thermal Dome Effect of Pyranometers in Selected Historical Solar Irradiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In using pyranometers to measure solar irradiance, it is important to know the magnitudes and the consequences of the thermal effect, which is introduced by the glass domes of the instruments. Historically, the thermal dome effect was not ...

Qiang Ji

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

In-Situ Mass, Temperature, and Resistance Measurements during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a simple household microwave, several materials properties (resistance, mass, and ... Numeric Simulation of the Cooling Process of the Iron Ore Sinter.

58

Spatially localized measurement of thermal conductivity using a hybrid photothermal technique  

SciTech Connect

A photothermal technique capable of measuring thermal conductivity with micrometer lateral resolution is presented. This technique involves measuring separately the thermal diffusivity, D, and thermal effusivity, e, to extract the thermal conductivity, k=(e2/D)1/2. To generalize this approach, sensitivity analysis was conducted for materials having a range of thermal conductivities. Experimental validation was sought using two substrate materials, SiO2 and CaF2, both coated with thin titanium films. The measured conductivities compare favorably with literature values.

David H Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Zilong Hua; Rory Kennedy; Heng Ban

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Remote Sensing Measurements of Tropospheric Ozone by Ground-Based Thermal Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing measurements of the troposphere were obtained by a new technique in which spectra of the downward thermal radiation from tropospheric ozone were measured with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The measurements were ...

W. F. J. Evans; E. Puckrin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Splice Resistance Measurements in 2G YBCO Coated Conductor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the electrical splice resistance of second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductor. The purpose of the experimental investigation is to study the splice resistance of 2G YBCO coated conductor as a function of: a) operating temperature, b) magnetic field strength (B-field), and c) magnetic field orientation ( ). Understanding the splice resistance with its corresponding variation as a function of surface preparation and operating conditions is essential to the practical implementation of electric utility devices; e.g., motors, generators, transformers, cables, and fault-current limiters, etc. Preliminary test results indicate that the 2G YBCO splice resistance shows a weak temperature dependence and a significantly stronger dependence upon magnetic field strength and magnetic field orientation. Surface preparation conditions are also briefly discussed. Index Terms coated conductor, splice, critical current, YBCO

Rey, Christopher M [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Developing Test Procedures for Measuring Stored Thermal Energy in Firefighter Protective Clothing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research studied stored thermal energy in fire fighter's turnout systems. It developed a novel laboratory apparatus and test protocols for measuring the contribution of… (more)

Eni, Egbe Uchechi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Measurement of thermal noise in multilayer coatings with optimized layer thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

Villar, Akira E.; Black, Eric D.; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M.; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 264-33, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbaune (France); Waves Group, University of Sannio at Benevento, Benevento, Italy, INFN and LSC (Italy)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Interim procedure to measure the thermal performance of window systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the report is to review the current sources of information on U-values and to describe the state of thermal test methods used for windows in order to provide the Bonneville Power Administration with some general guidelines in the application of thermal test data for use in the Model Conservation Standards (MCS) by the Northwest Power Planning Council. At present, considerable controversy exists in the window industry regarding the thermal testing of windows, therefore no consensus-based standards are available.

McCabe, M.E.; Goss, W.P.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Resistivity measurements were made prior to, and after an injection test at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. The objectives of the resistivity measurements were to determine if measureable changes could be observed and whether they could be used to infer the direction of fluid flow. Most of the apparent resistivity changes observed after the injection phase of Test 5 are smaller than the estimated standard deviation of the measurements. However, the contour map of the changes suggest an anomalous trend to the

66

Structure and resistivity of bismuth nanobelts in situ synthesized on silicon wafer through an ethanol-thermal method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bismuth nanobelts in situ grown on a silicon wafer were synthesized through an ethanol-thermal method without any capping agent. The structure of the bismuth belt-silicon composite nanostructure was characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscope. The nanobelt is a multilayered structure 100-800 nm in width and over 50 {mu}m in length. One layer has a thickness of about 50 nm. A unique sword-like nanostructure is observed as the initial structure of the nanobelts. From these observations, a possible growth mechanism of the nanobelt is proposed. Current-voltage property measurements indicate that the resistivity of the nanobelts is slightly larger than that of the bulk bismuth material. - Graphical Abstract: TEM images, EDS, and electron diffraction pattern of bismuth nanobelts. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bismuth nanobelts in situ grown on silicon wafer were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Special bismuth-silicon nanostructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential application in sensitive magnetic sensor and other electronic devices.

Gao Zheng; Qin Haiming; Yan Tao [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Bio-Micro/Nano Functional Materials Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Hong, E-mail: hongliu@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Bio-Micro/Nano Functional Materials Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Jiyang [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Bio-Micro/Nano Functional Materials Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

MEASUREMENTS OF SPECIFIC ELECTRICAL CONTACT RESISTANCE BETWEEN SIC AND LEAD-LITHIUM EUTECTIC ALLOY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angeles, CA, 90095-1597, USA, morley@fusion.ucla.edu Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been proposed as a possible resistance of disks of high purity CVD SiC were measured with liquid lead-lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy melts at the SiC/LLE interface was not significant. The contact resistance during initial exposure did not behave

Abdou, Mohamed

68

Apparatus for measuring resistance change only in a cell analyzer and method for calibrating it  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to resistance only monitoring and calibration in an electrical cell analyzer. Sample and sheath fluid flows of different salinities are utilized, the sample flow being diameter modulated to produce a selected pattern which is compared to the resistance measured across the flows.

Hoffman, Robert A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electrical resistance measurements of highly inhibited SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of oxidation damage at 900'C of highly inhibited, SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates on shear modulus, mass loss, and electrical resistance are studied. The approach taken enabled the interpretation of the shear modulus and electrical resistance values to the mass loss. In-situ electrical resistance measurements are taken at 900'C and shear modulus measurements are obtained at room temperature prior to and following oxidation. Initial oxidation damage is incurred preferentially along both transverse and longitudinal fiber bundles as well as creating some matrix cracks. Mass loss results revealed that the oxidation reaction is diffusion controlled at this temperature. The shear modulus decreased whereas the electrical resistance increased with increasing exposure time. Electrical resistance calculations based on the experimental results showed that the electrical resistance is a matrix dominated property. The analytical simulations used in conjunction with experimental data provided the relationships between shear modulus, electrical resistance, and mass loss. Examples are given which show the correlation of mass loss to both the electrical resistance and the shear modulus. Analytical predictions from the electrical resistance simulations are shown to predict the shear modulus for different oxidation times within 5% of experimental values.

Parker, Paul Albert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Measurement of electrical properties of electrode materials for the bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single gap (gas gap 2 mm) bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) modules of various sizes from 10 cm \\times 10 cm to 1 m \\times 1 m have been fabricated, characterized and optimized for efficiency and time resolution. Thin layers of different grades of silicone compound are applied to the inner electrode surfaces to make them smooth and also to reduce the surface resistivity. In the silicone coated RPCs an efficiency > 90% and time resolution \\sim 2 ns (FWHM) have been obtained for both the streamer and the avalanche mode of operation. Before fabrication of detectors the electrical properties such as bulk resistivity and surface resistivity of the electrode materials are measured carefully. Effectiveness of different silicone coating in modifying the surface resistivity was evaluated by an instrument developed for monitoring the I-V curve of a high resistive surface. The results indicate definite correlation of the detector efficiency for the atmospheric muons and the RPC noise rates with the surface resistiv...

Meghna, K K; Biswas, S; Bhattacharya, S; Bose, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Das, G; Marick, C; Saha, S; Viyogi, Y P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Rapid-Circulation Evaporation Chamber for Measuring Bulk Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relatively simple method is described for determining evaporation of short vegetation at any moment of time. The method is based on the measurement of bulk stomatal resistance of the crop with an evaporation chamber. Once this quantity is known,...

W. Kohsiek

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method for controlling directional drilling in response to horns detected by electromagnetic energy propagation resistivity measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For use in conjunction with an earth borehole drilling apparatus that includes: a drilling rig; a drill string operating from said drilling rig for drilling an earth borehole, said drill string including a bottom hole arrangement comprising a drill bit, a downhole resistivity measuring subsystem for measuring downhole formation resistivity near said bit by propagating electromagnetic energy into earth formations near said bit, receiving electromagnetic energy that has propagated through the formations and producing measurement signals that depend on the received signals; a method is described for directing the drilling of a well bore with respect to a geological bed boundary in said earth formations, comprising the steps of: producing from said measurement signals a recording of downhole formation resistivity as a function of borehole depth, determining the presence of a horn in said resistivity recording; and implementing a change in the drilling direction of said drill bit in response to said determination of the presence of a horn.

Luling, M.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

Bane, K L F; Tu, J J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Critical Evaluation of Current Skin Thermal Property Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burn treatment is an area of major importance in medicine, however, there is not currently an analytic method to determine the depth and magnitude of burns. Complications, such as a relative lack of knowledge of the specific thermal properties of skin and the relation between heat transfer and biological processes, have prevented a comprehensive model to explain the field of bioheat transfer. Research was conducted to estimate the relevant thermal and material properties in the field of bioheat transfer. Subsequently, an experiment was proposed, and a mathematical model was developed for the experiment, to allow for detection of burns through the use of heat transfer analysis. Burned skin and healthy skin differ in that there is no blood flow and thus no directionality to the heat transfer in burned skin. Thus, the experiment was designed to determine if there was a directionality was present in the heat transfer in the skin. Using the estimated skin properties, calculations were done to determine the viability of the proposed experiment. The experiment was refined to account for the findings and modified to more accurately detect burns in human skin. 1

Anand Mani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of a nanostructure thermal property measurement platform compatible with a transmission electron microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the electrical and thermal transport properties of one-dimensional nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes and nanowires) typically are obtained without detailed knowledge of the specimen's atomicscale structure ...

Harris, C. Thomas (Charles Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effective thermal conductivity measurements relevant to deep borehole nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to measure the effective thermal conductivity of a number of materials (particle beds, and fluids) proposed for use in and around canisters for disposal of high level nuclear waste in deep ...

Shaikh, Samina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

MEASUREMENTS IN EIGHT "RADON-RESISTANT " NEW HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have logged continuous radon, differential air pressures and other characteristics for eight houses built with radon-resistant features by Habitat for Humanity of Dane County. Pressures logged in the bases of the passive stacks were predominantly below basement air pressure, varying with time, while pressures in the sealed sump pits were above basement air pressure. Wind speed, wind direction and outdoor temperature affected the depressurization in the stack bases. With the stacks closed, the pressures in their bases increased to about 2 Pascals above basement air, and indoor radon increased by factors of 1.3 to 8 among the houses. In some houses, when appliance fans withdrawing air from the house envelope were operated, they pulled the basement air pressure below the pressure in the base of the stack, and bursts of indoor radon resulted. Basement radon averaged 1, 1.3, 2.6, 2.8, 3.8, 4.0, 4.0, and 12 pCi/L in winter in the eight houses. The latter house, which had poor sealing of basement floor-wall joints, was mitigated to 0.5 pCiIL with a 14-watt fan.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A17: Heat Capacity and Thermal Expansion Measurements of Solar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main tasks for getting reliable cp and enthalpy data of solar salts is therefore to find the right measurement parameters and crucible material/salt ...

80

Uncertainty analysis routine for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) biofouling measurement device and data reduction procedure. [HTCOEF code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofouling and corrosion of heat exchanger surfaces in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems may be controlling factors in the potential success of the OTEC concept. Very little is known about the nature and behavior of marine fouling films at sites potentially suitable for OTEC power plants. To facilitate the acquisition of needed data, a biofouling measurement device developed by Professor J. G. Fetkovich and his associates at Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) has been mass produced for use by several organizations in experiments at a variety of ocean sites. The CMU device is designed to detect small changes in thermal resistance associated with the formation of marine microfouling films. An account of the work performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop a computerized uncertainty analysis for estimating experimental uncertainties of results obtained with the CMU biofouling measurement device and data reduction scheme is presented. The analysis program was written as a subroutine to the CMU data reduction code and provides an alternative to the CMU procedure for estimating experimental errors. The PNL code was used to analyze sample data sets taken at Keahole Point, Hawaii; St. Croix, the Virgin Islands; and at a site in the Gulf of Mexico. The uncertainties of the experimental results were found to vary considerably with the conditions under which the data were taken. For example, uncertainties of fouling factors (where fouling factor is defined as the thermal resistance of the biofouling layer) estimated from data taken on a submerged buoy at Keahole Point, Hawaii were found to be consistently within 0.00006 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu, while corresponding values for data taken on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico ranged up to 0.0010 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

Bird, S.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A field measurement system for the study of thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal screen. A platinum RTD measured air sors usedin theAir Temperature platinum RTD IVlEASURENIENT ACCURACY,Surface Temperature platinum RTD M: 06 m N/A N/A -+ 0 5°C

Benton, C.; Bauman, Fred; Fountain, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

83

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffusion approximation to the equation of transfer (Boltzmann transport equation) is usually applied to media where scattering dominates the interactions. Diffusion approximation helps in significant savings in terms of code complexity and computational time. However, this approximation often has significant error. Error due to the inherent nature of a physics model is called model error. Information about the model error associated with the diffusion approximation is clearly desirable. An indirect measure of model error is a quantity that is related in some way to the error but not equal to the error. In general, indirect measures of error are expected to be less costly than direct measures. Perhaps the most well-known indirect measure of the diffusion model error is the variable-Eddington tensor. This tensor provides a great deal of information about the angular dependence of the angular intensity solution, but it is not always simple to interpret. We define a new indirect measure of the diffusion model error called the diffusion model error source (DME source). When this DME source is added to the diffusion equation, the transport solution for the angular-integrated intensity is obtained. In contrast to the variable-Eddington tensor, our DME source is a scalar that is conceptually easy to interpret. In addition to defining the DME source analytically, we show how to generate this source numerically relative to the Sn radiative transfer equations with linear-discontinuous spatial discretization. This numerical source is computationally tested and shown to reproduce the Sn solution for a number of problems. Our radiative transfer model solves a coupled, time dependent, multi-frequency, 1-D slab equation and material heat transfer equation. We then use diffusion approximation to solve the same problem. The difference due to this approximation can be modelled by a “diffusion source”. The diffusion source is defined as an amount of inhomogeneous source that, when added to a diffusion calculation, gives a solution for the angle-integrated intensity that is equal to the transport solution.

Kumar, Akansha

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Comparison of Proliferation Resistance Measures of Misuse Scenarios Using a Markov Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Misuse of declared nuclear facilities is one of the important proliferation threats. The robustness of a facility against these threats is characterized by a number of proliferation resistance (PR) measures. This paper evaluates and compares PR measures for several misuse scenarios using a Markov model approach to implement the pathway analysis methodology being developed by the PR&PP (Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection) Expert Group. Different misue strategies can be adopted by a proliferator and each strategy is expected to have different impacts on the proliferator's success. Selected as the probabilistic measure to represent proliferation resistance, the probabilities of the proliferator's success of misusing a hypothetical ESFR (Example Sodium Fast Reactor) facility system are calculated using the Markov model based on the pathways constructed for individual misuse scenarios. Insights from a comparison of strategies that are likely to be adopted by the proliferator are discussed in this paper.

Yue,M.; Cheng, L.-Y.; Bari, R.

2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Methods of operation of apparatus measuring formation resistivity from within a cased well having one measurement and two compensation steps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of operation of an apparatus having at least two pairs of voltage measurement electrodes vertically disposed in a cased well to measure the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. During stationary measurements with the apparatus at a fixed vertical depth within the cased well, the invention herein discloses methods of operation which include a measurement step and subsequent first and second compensation steps respectively resulting in improved accuracy of measurement. First and second order errors of measurement are identified, and the measurement step and two compensation steps provide methods to substantially eliminate their influence on the results. A multiple frequency apparatus adapted to movement within the well is described which simultaneously provide the measurement and two compensation steps.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally ...

Mirfayzi, S R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Autonomous Measurements of Sea Surface Temperature Using In Situ Thermal Infrared Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ and autonomous measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) have been performed with a thermal infrared radiometer mounted on a fixed oil rig. The accuracy limit was established at ±0.3 K for these SST measurements in order to meet the ...

Raquel Niclòs; Vicente Caselles; César Coll; Enric Valor; Eva Rubio

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

MEASUREMENT OF THE HUMIDITY OF SOILS BY DIFFUSION OF A BEAM OF THERMAL NEUTRONS  

SciTech Connect

From earlier results on the measurement of soil humidity an apparatus was constructed and calibrated for the measurement of the humidity of soils by diffusion of a beam of thermal neutrons. The construction and calibration of this apparatus are described in detail. (J.S.R.)

Wack, B.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT RESISTIVITY AND THERMAL CONDUCTION ON PLASMOID INSTABILITIES IN CURRENT SHEETS IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we investigate, by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the impact of temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conduction on the development of plasmoid instabilities in reconnecting current sheets in the solar corona. We find that the plasma temperature in the current-sheet region increases with time and it becomes greater than that in the inflow region. As secondary magnetic islands appear, the highest temperature is not always found at the reconnection X-points, but also inside the secondary islands. One of the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction is to decrease the temperature of the reconnecting X-points and transfer the heat into the O-points, the plasmoids, where it gets trapped. In the cases with temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, {eta} {approx} T {sup -3/2}, the decrease in plasma temperature at the X-points leads to (1) an increase in the magnetic diffusivity until the characteristic time for magnetic diffusion becomes comparable to that of thermal conduction, (2) an increase in the reconnection rate, and (3) more efficient conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy and kinetic energy of bulk motions. These results provide further explanation of the rapid release of magnetic energy into heat and kinetic energy seen during flares and coronal mass ejections. In this work, we demonstrate that the consideration of anisotropic thermal conduction and Spitzer-type, temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, as in the real solar corona, are crucially important for explaining the occurrence of fast reconnection during solar eruptions.

Ni Lei; Roussev, Ilia I.; Lin Jun [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, CAS, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011, Yunnan (China); Ziegler, Udo, E-mail: leini@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: iroussev@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: uziegler@aip.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Simultaneous measurement of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of unconsolidated materials by the transient hot wire method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new design for the transient hot wire method that can obtain the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of unconsolidated materials. In this method

Greg C. Glatzmaier; W. Fred Ramirez

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

resistance measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... uncertainties caused by transportation and the ... ? standard resistors influencing transport behaviour and ... NBS Ohm Past-Present-Future, RF Dziuba ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Estimation of in-situ thermal conductivities from temperature gradient measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been developed to study the effect of variable thermal conductivity of the formations, and the wellbore characteristics, on the fluid temperature behavior inside the wellbore during injection or production and after shut-in. During the injection or production period the wellbore fluid temperature is controlled mainly by the fluid flow rate and the heat lost from the fluid to the formation. During the shut-in period, the fluid temperature is strongly affected by differences in the formation thermal conductivities. Based on the results of the present analysis, two methods for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity were derived. First, the line source concept is extended to estimate values of the formation thermal conductivities utilizing the fluid temperature record during the transient period of injection or production and shut-in. The second method is applied when a well is under thermal equilibrium conditions. Values of the formation thermal conductivities can also be estimated by using a continuous temperature gradient log and by measuring the thermal conductivity of the formation at a few selected wellbore locations.

Hoang, V.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

An Attempt to Estimate the Thermal Resistance of the Upper Ocean to Climatic Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to estimate the thermal inertia of the upper ocean, relevant to climatic change. This is done by assuming that the annual variation in sea surface temperature (SST) can, to a first-order approximation, be described by a simple ...

H. M. Van Den Dool; J. D. Horel

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The concepts and theory behind the use of heat-sensitive tracers to study the thermal evolution of geothermal reservoirs was developed in the late 1980's under the Hot Dry Rock Project. Those studies described-conceptually and mathematically-the application of reactive tracers to tracking thermal fronts and to reservoir sizing. Later mathematical treatments focused on application of a single reactive tracer test to recover the temperature profile of a single streamtube. Previous tracer work has mainly focused on identifying conservative tracers. In these studies, chemicals that degraded at reservoir temperatures were discarded. Benzoic acids and dicarboxylic acids, which were found by Adams to degrade, may be useful as reactive tracers. Organic esters and amide tracers that undergo hydrolysis have been investigated and their use as reactive tracers appears feasible over a temperature range of 100ºC to 275ºC. However their reaction rates are pH dependent and sorption reactions have not been evaluated. While reactive tracer parameters have been measured in the lab, reactive tracers have not been extensively tested in the field. Thus, while reactive tracers appear to be a promising means of monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir, the concept has yet to be tested at the scale necessary for successful implementation, and tools for analyzing results of such tracer tests under the non-ideal conditions of an actual geothermal system have yet to be developed.

96

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes. 3 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Measurements of Electron Thermal Transport due to Electron Temperature Gradient Modes in a Basic Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production and identification of electron temperature gradient modes have already been reported [X. Wei, V. Sokolov, and A. K. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010)]. Now a measurement of electron thermal conductivity via a unique high frequency triple probe yielded a value of {chi}{sub perpendiculare} ranging between 2 and 10 m{sup 2}/s, which is of the order of a several gyrobohm diffusion coefficient. This experimental result appears to agree with a value of nonlocal thermal conductivity obtained from a rough theoretical estimation and not inconsistent with gyrokinetic simulation results for tokamaks. The first experimental scaling of the thermal conductivity versus the amplitude of the electron temperature gradient fluctuation is also obtained. It is approximately linear, indicating a strong turbulence signature.

Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally the total neutron cross-section is derived using FEA in an inverse iteration form.

S. R. Mirfayzi

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

100

Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature. 5 figs.

Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature.

Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Ericson, M. Nance (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Method and apparatus for remote tube crevice detection by current and voltage probe resistance measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the extent of contact between an electrically conducting tube and an electrically conductive tubesheet surrounding the tube, based upon the electrical resistance of the tube and tubesheet. A constant current source is applied to the interior of the electrically conducting tube by probes and a voltmeter is connected between other probes to measure the voltage at the point of current injection, which is inversely proportional to the amount of contact between the tube and tubesheet. Namely, the higher the voltage measured by the voltmeter, the less contact between the tube and tubesheet. 4 figs.

Kikta, T.J.; Mitchell, R.D.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

Characterization of the Thermal Structure inside an Urban Canyon: Field Measurements and Validation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of measurement campaigns are analyzed to investigate the thermal structure in an urban canyon and to validate a simplified model simulating the air and surface temperatures from surface energy budgets. Starting from measurements at ...

Lorenzo Giovannini; Dino Zardi; Massimiliano de Franceschi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method and apparatus for measuring properties of particle beams using thermo-resistive material properties  

SciTech Connect

A beam position detector for measuring the properties of a charged particle beam, including the beam's position, size, shape, and intensity. One or more absorbers are constructed of thermo-resistive material and positioned to intercept and absorb a portion of the incoming beam power, thereby causing local heating of each absorber. The local temperature increase distribution across the absorber, or the distribution between different absorbers, will depend on the intensity, size, and position of the beam. The absorbers are constructed of a material having a strong dependence of electrical resistivity on temperature. The beam position detector has no moving parts in the vicinity of the beam and is especially suited to beam areas having high ionizing radiation dose rates or poor beam quality, including beams dispersed in the transverse direction and in their time radio frequency structure.

Degtiarenko, Pavel V. (Williamsburg, VA); Dotson, Danny Wayne (Gloucester, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurement of neutron capture on $^{48}$Ca at thermal and thermonuclear energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Karlsruhe pulsed 3.75\\,MV Van de Graaff accelerator the thermonuclear $^{48}$Ca(n,$\\gamma$)$^{49}$Ca(8.72\\,min) cross section was measured by the fast cyclic activation technique via the 3084.5\\,keV $\\gamma$-ray line of the $^{49}$Ca-decay. Samples of CaCO$_3$ enriched in $^{48}$Ca by 77.87\\,\\% were irradiated between two gold foils which served as capture standards. The capture cross-section was measured at the neutron energies 25, 151, 176, and 218\\,keV, respectively. Additionally, the thermal capture cross-section was measured at the reactor BR1 in Mol, Belgium, via the prompt and decay $\\gamma$-ray lines using the same target material. The $^{48}$Ca(n,$\\gamma$)$^{49}$Ca cross-section in the thermonuclear and thermal energy range has been calculated using the direct-capture model combined with folding potentials. The potential strengths are adjusted to the scattering length and the binding energies of the final states in $^{49}$Ca. The small coherent elastic cross section of $^{48}$Ca+n is explained through the nuclear Ramsauer effect. Spectroscopic factors of $^{49}$Ca have been extracted from the thermal capture cross-section with better accuracy than from a recent (d,p) experiment. Within the uncertainties both results are in agreement. The non-resonant thermal and thermonuclear experimental data for this reaction can be reproduced using the direct-capture model. A possible interference with a resonant contribution is discussed. The neutron spectroscopic factors of $^{49}$Ca determined from shell-model calculations are compared with the values extracted from the experimental cross sections for $^{48}$Ca(d,p)$^{49}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca(n,$\\gamma$)$^{49}$Ca.

H. Beer; C. Coceva; P. V. Sedyshev; Yu. P. Popov; H. Herndl; R. Hofinger; P. Mohr; H. Oberhummer

1996-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electronic measurement apparatus movable in a cased borehole and compensating for casing resistance differences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of operation are described for an apparatus having at least two pairs of voltage measurement electrodes vertically disposed in a cased well to measure the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. During stationary measurements with the apparatus at a fixed vertical depth within the cased well, the invention herein discloses methods of operation which include a measurement step and subsequent first and second compensation steps respectively resulting in improved accuracy of measurement. The invention also discloses multiple frequency methods of operation resulting in improved accuracy of measurement while the apparatus is simultaneously moved vertically in the cased well. The multiple frequency methods of operation disclose a first A.C. current having a first frequency that is conducted from the casing into formation and a second A.C. current having a second frequency that is conducted along the casing. The multiple frequency methods of operation simultaneously provide the measurement step and two compensation steps necessary to acquire accurate results while the apparatus is moved vertically in the cased well. 6 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermal performance of clean horizontal radiant barriers under winter conditions: Laboratory measurements and mathematical modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several field experiments have been performed on attic radiant barriers under winter conditions; however, most of them have been confined to the fairly mild climates of Florida, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. Only one field experiment in a very cold climate (Canada) has been performed. In addition, no previous laboratory experiments under winter conditions have been performed on an attic both with and without a radiant barrier. This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements of the thermal performance of clean horizontal radiant barriers in a simulated residential attic module under nighttime or low solar gain daytime winter conditions. Comparing tests under the same conditions with and without a radiant barrier shows that the addition of a clean horizontal radiant barrier to insulation at the R-22 to R-25 level decreases the ceiling heat flow by 6 to 8%. The experimental results were found to be in very good agreement with predictions made with a mathematical model for the thermal performance of attics.

Wilkes, K.E.; Childs, P.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal performance of clean horizontal radiant barriers under winter conditions: Laboratory measurements and mathematical modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several field experiments have been performed on attic radiant barriers under winter conditions; however, most of them have been confined to the fairly mild climates of Florida, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. Only one field experiment in a very cold climate (Canada) has been performed. In addition, no previous laboratory experiments under winter conditions have been performed on an attic both with and without a radiant barrier. This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements of the thermal performance of clean horizontal radiant barriers in a simulated residential attic module under nighttime or low solar gain daytime winter conditions. Comparing tests under the same conditions with and without a radiant barrier shows that the addition of a clean horizontal radiant barrier to insulation at the R-22 to R-25 level decreases the ceiling heat flow by 6 to 8%. The experimental results were found to be in very good agreement with predictions made with a mathematical model for the thermal performance of attics.

Wilkes, K.E.; Childs, P.W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE  

SciTech Connect

Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Hentati, A. [International School in Nuclear Engineering, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA); Momii, Steven Thomas (Seattle, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA); Momii, Steven Thomas (Seattle, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Measurement of effective thermal conductivity of wheat as a function of moisture content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grain drying and storage are one of the main activities of agricultural industry. Increasing energy costs have stressed the importance of calculation of heat and mass transfer in a grain bulk in order to be able to optimize drying facilities. Another limitation during drying is the preservation of grain structure and its nutritional values, Muehlbauer and Christ have shown that damage to the grain structure and grain nutritional value is dependent upon grain temperature and drying time. Therefore, proper conditions during drying and storage of cereal grains require the knowledge of the thermophysical properties of the grains. The effective thermal conductivity of two varieties of Triticum durum wheat and a wheat product, bulgur, is determined at different moisture contents and at ambient temperature by the transient lime heat source method. The moisture contents of the samples ranged from 9.17 to 38.65% wet basis and the bulk densities ranged from 675 to 827 kg/m{sup 3}. Under those conditions, the measured effective thermal conductivities ranged from 0.159 to 0.201 W/m.K. The effective thermal conductivity is found to be linearly increasing with moisture content. The results are also in good agreement with literature values.

Tavman, S. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Food Engineering Dept.] [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Food Engineering Dept.; Tavman, I.H. [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Mechanical Engineering Dept.] [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Theory for the Retrievals of Virtual Temperature from Remote Measurements of Horizontal Winds and Thermal Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a theory for the estimation of virtual temperature from remote measurements of (i) emitted thermal radiation by microwave and infrared radiometers and (ii) horizontal winds by Doppler radars (or lidars). The problem of ...

Tzvi Gal-Chen

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Composites for Applications in Electronics Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal resistance of nanocomposite layers formed by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) dispersed in epoxy resins has been measured under conditions similar to the ones used to dissipate heat in microelettronic devices. Thevariation of thermal ... Keywords: Carbon Nanotubes, Thermal Management, Epoxy Resin, Nanocomposite, TIM, Thermal Interface Materials

Francesco Toschi; Emanuela Tamburri; Valeria Guglielmotti; Maria Letizia Terranova; Andrea Reale; Aldo Di Carlo; Daniele Passeri; Marco Rossi; Carlo Falessi; Annamaria Fiorello; Roberta Buttiglione

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 A at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T= 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360 Degree-Sign .

Kuechler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Induced-polarization measurements at Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An induced polarization survey was conducted at Roosevelt Hot Springs, using the dipole-dipole array. The survey consisted of two profile lines, one across the southern end of the system (2200N) and another across the northern portion (5950N). A total of 15 line-km of profiles was run, with 100 m and 300 m dipoles out to n spacings of 4 to 6. Apparent resistivity amplitude and phase data were gathered with a phase-sensitive receiver at frequencies between 32 Hz and 1/256 Hz. The data are presented in the form of apparent resistivity of phase pseudosections. Induced polarization effects in geothermal environments can result from clays and pyrite which are associated with hydrothermal alteration. Laboratory measurements on altered material show some induced polarization effects at frequencies below 1 Hz which are thought to be due to pyrite. A higher frequency polarization (> 1 Hz) is attributed to the effects of clays. The primary purpose of this survey was to investigate the feasibility of mapping clay alteration zones, and separating them from other conductive features, by making use of their polarization characteristics. The field data show some small, low frequency phase anomalies which may be the result of pyrite deposition. The higher frequencies show considerable phase effects, which can be the result of clays, but the effects of electromagnetic coupling have not, as yet, been assessed.

Chu, J.J.; Sill, W.R.; Ward, S.H.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

High-resolution thermal expansion measurements under helium-gas pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the realization of a capacitive dilatometer, designed for high-resolution measurements of length changes of a material for temperatures 1.4 K Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To T Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 300 K and hydrostatic pressure P Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 250 MPa. Helium ({sup 4}He) is used as a pressure-transmitting medium, ensuring hydrostatic-pressure conditions. Special emphasis has been given to guarantee, to a good approximation, constant-pressure conditions during temperature sweeps. The performance of the dilatometer is demonstrated by measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion at pressures P Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) and 104 MPa on a single crystal of azurite, Cu{sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, a quasi-one-dimensional spin S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The results indicate a strong effect of pressure on the magnetic interactions in this system.

Manna, Rudra Sekhar; Wolf, Bernd; Souza, Mariano de; Lang, Michael [Physics Institute, Goethe University Frankfurt(M), SFB/TR49, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ground truth measurements plan for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) have developed a diverse group of algorithms for processing and analyzing the data that will be collected by the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) after launch late in 1999. Each of these algorithms must be verified by comparison to independent surface and atmospheric measurements. SRTC has selected 13 sites in the continental U.S. for ground truth data collections. These sites include a high altitude cold water target (Crater Lake), cooling lakes and towers in the warm, humid southeastern US, Department of Energy (DOE) climate research sites, the NASA Stennis satellite Validation and Verification (V and V) target array, waste sites at the Savannah River Site, mining sites in the Four Corners area and dry lake beds in the southwestern US. SRTC has established mutually beneficial relationships with the organizations that manage these sites to make use of their operating and research data and to install additional instrumentation needed for MTI algorithm V and V.

Garrett, A.J.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

STEP—A Temperature Profiler for Measuring the Oceanic Thermal Boundary Layer at the Ocean–Air Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast measuring system has been designed and built to determine the oceanic thermal microstructure at the ocean–air interface. The system consists of a profiler sonde, which amends through the uppermost few meters of the ocean with a time of ...

Theodor C. Mammen; Nikolaus von Bosse

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Shocked H2O ice: Thermal emission measurements and the criteria for phase changes during impact events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shocked H2O ice: Thermal emission measurements and the criteria for phase changes during impact/s will initiate phase changes on icy surfaces. Thus, shock-induced melting and vaporization of ice is a widespread from shocked H2O ice and derive peak and post-shock temperatures. Under shock pressures between 8

Stewart, Sarah T.

129

A Note on Alternatively Direct Measurement of the Transfer Resistance over Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boundary layer transfer resistance is an important parameter in micrometeorology. The most common approach to determining it uses a wind function that is extremely sensitive to the specified roughness length and can suffer large uncertainties,...

Zhilin Zhu; Xiaomin Sun; Renhua Zhang; Hongbo Su; Xinzai Tang; Xuhui Lee

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Measurement of single and double glazing thermal performance under realistic conditions using the mobile window thermal test (MoWiTT) facility  

SciTech Connect

The thermal performance of single glazing, clear double glazing, and double glazing with a low-emissivity coating was measured in both south-facing and north-facing orientations under realistic field conditions using the new MoWiTT field test facility. The time-dependent net heat flow through each fenestration was found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard simplified heat transfer model, provided that an angle-dependent shading coefficient is used and diffuse solar gain is included in the calculation. Summer-condition average U-values were derived for each glazing type and were found to agree with the expected values for both types of double glazing. The measured U-value for single glazing was lower than predicted.

Klems, J.; Keller, H.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal-fluid and electrochemical modeling and performance study of a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell : analysis on SOEC resistances, size, and inlet flow conditions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory researchers are analyzing the electrochemical and thermal-fluid behavior of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for high temperature steam electrolysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The major challenges facing commercialization of steam electrolysis technology are related to efficiency, cost, and durability of the SOECs. The goal of this effort is to guide the design and optimization of performance for high temperature electrolysis (HTE) systems. An SOEC module developed by FLUENT Inc. as part of their general CFD code was used for the SOEC analysis by INL. ANL has developed an independent SOEC model that combines the governing electrochemical mechanisms based on first principals to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the operation of SOECs. The ANL model was embedded into the commercial STAR-CD CFD software, and is being used for the analysis of SOECs by ANL. The FY06 analysis performed by ANL and reported here covered the influence of electrochemical properties, SOEC component resistances and their contributing factors, SOEC size and inlet flow conditions, and SOEC flow configurations on the efficiency and expected durability of these systems. Some of the important findings from the ANL analysis are: (1) Increasing the inlet mass flux while going to larger cells can be a compromise to overcome increasing thermal and current density gradients while increasing the cell size. This approach could be beneficial for the economics of the SOECs; (2) The presence of excess hydrogen at the SOEC inlet to avoid Ni degradation can result in a sizeable decrease in the process efficiency; (3) A parallel-flow geometry for SOEC operation (if such a thing be achieved without sealing problems) yields smaller temperature gradients and current density gradients across the cell, which is favorable for the durability of the cells; (4) Contact resistances can significantly influence the total cell resistance and cell temperatures over a large range of operating potentials. Thus it is important to identify and avoid SOEC stack conditions leading to such high resistances due to poor contacts.

Yildiz, B.; Smith, J.; Sofu, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

Examination of Compatibility of Potentially Cavitation-Resistant Modifications of Type 316LN Stainless Steel with Mercury in a Thermal Convection Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 316L stainless steel thermal convection loop (TCL) containing a variety of stainless steel coupons circulated mercury for 2000 h. The TCL conditions included a maximum temperature of 307 C, a maximum temperature gradient of 90 C, and a Hg velocity of about 1.4 m/min. In addition to mill-annealed/surface-ground 316LN coupons serving as the baseline material, other coupons included 316LN that was 50% cold-worked, 316LN that was given a proprietary surface hardening treatment termed ''kolsterizing,'' and Nitronic 60. The purpose of this test was to examine Hg compatibility with these modest variations of annealed 31 6LN stainless steel that are considered potential improvements over annealed 31 6LN for cavitation-erosion resistance in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target containment system. The results indicated negligible weight change for each coupon type, no significant indication of attack or surface roughening, and generally no interaction with Hg.

Pawel, SJ

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pre-resistance-welding resistance check  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

Destefan, Dennis E. (Broomfield, CO); Stompro, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Pre-resistance-welding resistance check  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

Destefan, D.E.; Stompro, D.A.

1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Thermal imaging measurement of lateral diffusivity and non-invasive material defect detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining lateral thermal diffusivity of a material sample using a heat pulse; a sample oriented within an orthogonal coordinate system; an infrared camera; and a computer that has a digital frame grabber, and data acquisition and processing software. The mathematical model used within the data processing software is capable of determining the lateral thermal diffusivity of a sample of finite boundaries. The system and method may also be used as a nondestructive method for detecting and locating cracks within the material sample.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL); Deemer, Chris (Downers Grove, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Silica and boron-containing ultraphosphate laser glass with low concentration quenching and improved thermal shock resistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Neodymium-doped phosphate glasses having a refractive index, nd>1.520; an Abbe number, Vd, <60; a density <3.0 g/cm.sup.3, a thermal expansion coefficient, .alpha., .ltoreq.110.times.10.sup.-7 .degree.C..sup.-1 ; a Young's Modulus, E, <70.times.10.sup.3 N/mm.sup.2 ; a Poisson's Ratio, .nu., <0.28; a thermal conductivity, K, >0.5 W/m.multidot.K, a thermal FOM=(1-.nu.).multidot.K/.alpha.E>0.7, consisting essentially of, in mol. %: P.sub.2 O.sub.5 : 40-70% SiO.sub.2 : 0-20% B.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 5-20% Sum SiO.sub.2 +B.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 5-35% Sum Li.sub.2 O+Na.sub.2 O+K.sub.2 O: 5-20% Sum La.sub.2 O.sub.3 +Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 3-10% Sum MgO+CaO+SrO+BaO+ZnO: 0-10% and preferably containing an amount of Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 effective for laser activity having an emission cross-section, .sigma., >3.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2 ; a fluorescence linewidth (.DELTA..lambda..sub.f1)<23.5 nm; a first e-folding time of the Nd.sup.3+ fluorescence at 0.5 wt. % Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 >375 .mu.sec, and a first e-folding time of the Nd.sup.3+ fluorescence at 10 wt. % >175 .mu.sec at 10 wt. %, have very low self-concentration quenching rates.

Cook, Lee M. (Duryea, PA); Stokowski, Stanley E. (Danville, CA)

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermal Interface Materials for Power Electronics Applications: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The thermal resistance of the thermal interface material layer greatly affects the maximum temperature of the power electronics.

Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Kelly, K.; Eesley, G.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effect of Solder Microstructure on Mechanical and Thermal Shock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical tests were designed to couple the corresponding microstructure with mechanical and thermal shock properties. For thermal shock resistance of ...

140

Heat transfer simulation and thermal measurements of microfabricated x-ray transparent heater stages  

SciTech Connect

A microfabricated amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based nanocalorimeter is proposed to be suitable for an x-ray transparent sample platform with low power heating and built-in temperature sensing. In this work, thermal characterization in both air and vacuum are analyzed experimentally and via simulation. Infrared microscopy and thermoreflectance microscopy are used for thermal imaging of the sample area in air. While a reasonably large isothermal area is found on the sample area, the temperature homogeneity of the entire sample area is low, limiting use of the device as a heater stage in air or other gases. A simulation model that includes conduction, as well as radiation and convection heat loss, is presented with radiation and convection parameters determined experimentally. Simulated temperature distributions show that the homogeneity can be improved by using a thicker thermal conduction layer or reducing the pressure of the gas in the environment but neither are good solutions for the proposed use. A new simple design that has improved temperature homogeneity and a larger isothermal area while maintaining a thin thermal conduction layer is proposed and fabricated. This new design enables applications in transmission x-ray microscopes and spectroscopy setups at atmospheric pressure.

Baldasseroni, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Queen, D. R.; Cooke, David W.; Hellman, F. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maize, K.; Shakouri, A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modified Fowler-Milne method for the spectroscopic determination of thermal plasma temperature without the measurement of continuum radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique based on the Fowler-Milne method for the spectroscopic determination of thermal plasma temperatures without measuring continuum radiation is presented. This technique avoids the influence of continuum radiation with the combined line and continuum emission coefficients to derive the plasma temperatures. The amount of continuum emission coefficient is estimated by using an expression related to the Biberman factors. Parameters that affect the accuracy of the proposed technique and errors in the measured plasma temperatures are analyzed. It is shown that, by using the Ar I 696.5 nm line with a bandwidth of 3.27 nm without taking into account the continuum radiation, the plasma temperature measured will be lower on the order of up to 1000-3000 K for temperatures from 20 000 to 24 000 K. The theoretically predicted temperature errors are in good agreement with the experimental results, indicating that the proposed technique is reliable for plasma temperature measurement.

Ma Shuiliang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gao Hongming; Wu Lin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Experimental Determination of the Effect of Reactor Radiation on the Thermal Conductivity of Uranium-Impregnated Graphite  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are described in which the change in thermal conductivity of U-impregnated graphite under neutron irradiation was measured. Thermal resistivities relative to the thermal resistivity of undamaged impregnated graphite are reorted as functions of exposure. From applications of the expermental results to the North American Aviation low-power research reactor the peak tem. of the core is determined for a given reactor power and time of operation.

Hetrick, D.L.; McCarty, W.K.; Steele, G.N.; Brown, M.S.; Clark, E.V.; Holmes, F.R.; Howard, D.F.; McElroy, W.N.; Shields, B.L.

1953-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of Low Thermal Expansion Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For heat resistant alloys it is useful to decrease the thermal expansion for improved adherance of low thermal expansion ceramic coatings like silicon nitride,.

144

Considerations and measurements of latent-heat-storage salts for secondary thermal battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given its potential benefits, the practicality of using a latent heat-storage material as the basis for a passive thermal management system is being assessed by Chloride Silent Power Ltd. (CSPL) with technical assistance from Beta Power, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Based on the experience gained in large-scale solar energy storage programs, fused salts were selected as the primary candidates for the heat-storage material. The initial phase of this assessment was directed to an EV battery being designed at CSPL for the ETX-II program. Specific tasks included the identification and characterization of potential fused salts, a determination of placement options for the salts within the battery, and an assessment of the ultimate benefit to the battery system. The results obtained to date for each of these tasks are presented in this paper.

Koenig, A.A.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Armijo, J.R.

1988-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Determination of thermal parameters of one-dimensional nanostructures through a thermal transient method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements bythe heat pulse method for thermal transport measurements ofG. Speci?c heat and thermal conductivity measurements on

Arriagada, A.; Yu, E. T.; Bandaru, P. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A BOLOMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR BROADBAND MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE RESISTANCE AND APPLICATION TO SINGLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an ohmic heater and a UBC made temperature controller (model 85-003) permits bath regulation stable to less by a Drude model over the majority of the frequency range. Variations between measurements have been observed Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 Two Fluid Model Interpretation

British Columbia, University of

148

High temperature thermal conductivity measurements of UO/sub 2/ by Direct Electrical Heating. Final report. [MANTRA-III  

SciTech Connect

High temperature properties of reactor type UO/sub 2/ pellets were measured using a Direct Electrical Heating (DEH) Facility. Modifications to the experimental apparatus have been made so that successful and reproducible DEH runs may be carried out while protecting the pellets from oxidation at high temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements on the UO/sub 2/ pellets have been made before and after runs to assure that sample oxidation has not occurred. A computer code has been developed that will model the experiment using equations that describe physical properties of the material. This code allows these equations to be checked by comparing the model results to collected data. The thermal conductivity equation for UO/sub 2/ proposed by Weilbacher has been used for this analysis. By adjusting the empirical parameters in Weilbacher's equation, experimental data can be matched by the code. From the several runs analyzed, the resulting thermal conductivity equation is lambda = 1/4.79 + 0.0247T/ + 1.06 x 10/sup -3/ exp(-1.62/kT/) - 4410. exp(-3.71/kT/) where lambda is in w/cm K, k is the Boltzman constant, and T is the temperature in Kelvin.

Bassett, B

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high quality reference measurements. Here we show an experimental approach ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

150

Characterization of Thermal Effects in Pyranometers: A Data Correction Algorithm for Improved Measurement of Surface Insolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyranometers are reliable, economical radiometers commonly used to measure solar irradiances at the surface in a long-term, monitoring mode. This paper presents a discussion of the response of these instruments to varying environmental conditions,...

Brett C. Bush; Francisco P. J. Valero; A. Sabrina Simpson; Lionel Bignone

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high-quality reference measurements. This paper discusses an experimental ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

THERMAL PROPERTIES OF FIBERBOARD OVERPACK MATERIALS IN THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 9975 shipping package incorporates a cane fiberboard overpack for thermal insulation and impact resistance. Thermal properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity) have been measured on cane fiberboard and a similar wood fiber-based product at several temperatures representing potential storage conditions. While the two products exhibit similar behavior, the measured specific heat capacity varies significantly from prior data. The current data are being developed as the basis to verify that this material remains acceptable over the extended storage time period.

VORMELKER, PHILLIP; DAUGHERTY, W. L.

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosols using Semi-Continuous Thermal-Optical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols are major components in air pollution as a result of energy consumption, thus measurement of them is important to waste management. Increasing interest has been drawn to the identification, measurement, analysis, and modeling of carbon aerosols in the past decade. This book chapter will provide a review of current state-of-art techniques to determine carbonaceous aerosols in relation to air pollution and waste management. The chapter will be composed of four parts. The introduction will discuss why carbon aerosols including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and total carbon (TC=EC+OC) are important to energy consumption, air pollution, waste management, and global climate change. Key definitions will be introduced. Relevant terminologies will be provided. The second part will be a review of the current state-of the art measurement techniques that are used to determine carbon aerosols. Both on-line and off-line methods will be described. Comparisons of different techniques that provide the same physical quantity will be provided based on recent literature findings. Differences among the physical parameters determined by various techniques will be discussed. The third part will focus on data analysis and products obtained from carbon aerosol measurements. In addition to EC, OC, and TC, primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are of interest to researchers to understand the source and sink of carbonaceous aerosols. Techniques used to determine POC and SOC, such as the EC tracer method and positive matrix factorization, will be described and their differences discussed. Examples will be provided showing field data comparison between the Sunset organic carbon and elemental carbon field analyzer and the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, both of which are widely used for on-line aerosol measurements. The last part will report new trends and summarize future research needs in carbon aerosol measurement. Emerging problems will be identified and research priorities will be recommended.

Yu, Xiao-Ying

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Thermal Device for Aircraft Measurement of the Solid Water Content of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constant temperature probe for the measurement of solid water content of clouds is described. The probe is operated at a temperature of approximately 25°C, and is designed to collect and melt ice particles that impact in an open half-cylinder, ...

W. D. King; D. E. Turvey

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the CSAMT technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (a) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (b) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the connate water of the production field; (c) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (d) mathematically comparing the maps from step (a) and step (c) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., James R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Research options for the development of sensors to measure the thermal state of solid steel bodies.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study reported here is to assist Battelle's Pcacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in planning a research and development program to develop temperature sensors for metal and ceramic industries. This study focuses on sensors to measure internal temperatures within bodies of hot steel. A series of literature surveys, interviews, field visits, and meetings with steel-industry organizations was conducted in seeking answers to questions posed by PNL. These questions, with responses, are summarized.

Gaspar, T.A.; Lownie, H.W. Jr.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A database for equations of state and resistivities measurements in the warm dense matter regime  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to provide experimental data on various expanded elements in the warm dense matter regime. The experiments were done on the experimental facility 'enceinte a plasma isochore' and are evaluated through a thorough comparison with ab initio calculations, average-atom codes, and chemical models. This comparison allows for the evaluation of the experimental temperatures that are not accessible to the measurements and permits the building of useful data tables gathering energy, pressure, conductivity, and temperatures. We summarize experiments performed on aluminum (0.1 and 0.3 g/cm{sup 3}), nickel (0.2 g/cm{sup 3}), titanium (0.1 g/cm{sup 3}), copper (0.3 and 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}), silver (0.43 g/cm{sup 3}), gold (0.5 g/cm{sup 3}), boron (0.094 g/cm{sup 3}), and silicon (0.21 g/cm{sup 3}) for temperatures ranging from 0.5 eV to 3-4 eV.

Clerouin, J.; Noiret, P.; Blottiau, P.; Recoules, V.; Siberchicot, B.; Renaudin, P.; Blancard, C.; Faussurier, G. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Holst, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Starrett, C. E. [Los Alamos National laboratory, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for {sup 239}Pu thermal neutron induced fission  

SciTech Connect

Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on {gamma}-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S. [CEA, DEN-Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble (France); CEA, DSM-Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Thermal conductivity and other properties of cementitious grouts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

Allan, M.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND OTHER PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

ALLAN,M.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Measuring the Optical Performance of Evacuated Receivers via an Outdoor Thermal Transient Test: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern parabolic trough solar collectors operated at high temperatures to provide the heat input to Rankine steam power cycles employ evacuated receiver tubes along the collector focal line. High performance is achieved via the use of a selective surface with a high absorptance for incoming short-wave solar radiation and a low emittance for outgoing long-wave infrared radiation, as well as the use of a hard vacuum to essentially eliminate convective and conductive heat losses. This paper describes a new method that determines receiver overall optical efficiency by exposing a fluid-filled, pre-cooled receiver to one sun outdoors and measuring the slope of the temperature curve at the point where the receiver temperature passes the glass envelope temperature (that is, the point at which there is no heat gain or loss from the absorber). This transient test method offers the potential advantages of simplicity, high accuracy, and the use of the actual solar spectrum.

Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Netter, J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Improved 3-omega measurement of thermal conductivity in liquid, gases, and powders using a metal-coated optical fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel 3?thermal conductivitymeasurement technique called metal-coated 3? is introduced for use with liquids

Scott N. Schiffres; Jonathan A. Malen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Measurement of plutonium and americium volatilities under thermal process conditions. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used the transpiration method to measure volatilities of Pu and Am from PuO{sub 2}(s) and PuO{sub 2}/2% AmO{sub 2}(s) in the presence of steam and oxygen at temperatures of 1230--1430 K. We find the volatile species to be PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) and AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) at vapor pressures on the order of 10{sup {minus}10} atm and 10 {sup {minus}12} atm respectively under measurement conditions. For the Pu volatilization reaction, PuO{sub 2}(s) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain a free energy of reaction of {Delta}G{sup O}{sub T} = 231.3--0.0109 T in kj/mol, and for the Am volatilization reaction, AmO{sub 2}(s.s. in PuO{sub 2}) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain AG{sup O}{sub T} = 223.9--0.0109 T in kj/mol. We apply these results to the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Incinerator to assess the amount of volatile Pu and Am produced in the secondary combustor chamber. Taking operating conditions of 550C combustor temperature, 40 kmols/h of total gas flow at 1 atm pressure, 0.1 atm 0{sub 2}(9), 0.05 atm H{sub 2}0(g), PuO{sub 2} (s) containing 200 ppm AmO{sub 2} in the bed, and 6000 h of operating time per year, gives volatilization rates of 7 {times} 10 {sup {minus}6}g Pu and 4 {times} 10 {sup {minus}9}g Am/y.

Krikorian, O.H.; Condit, R.H.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.; Magana, J.W.; Morris, W.F.; Adamson, M.G.

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Freeze resistant buoy system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A freeze resistant buoy system includes a tail-tube buoy having a thermally insulated section disposed predominantly above a waterline, and a thermo-siphon disposed predominantly below the waterline.

Hill, David E. (Knoxville, TN); Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenbaum, Elias (Knoxville, TN); Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reduced Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Silicon Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alpha1=k1/(density1*cp1); %Thermal diffusivity of PMMA B1=Simon R. Phillpot, “Nanoscale Thermal Transport”, Journal of9] E.T. Swartz, R.O. Pohl, “Thermal Boundary Resistance”,

Yuen, Taylor S.

169

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese group. The impetus for the extensive {sup 36}Cl and other neutron activation measurements was the recognized need to validate the neutron component of the dose in Hiroshima. Although this was suggested at the time of the DS86 Final Report, where it was stated that the calculated neutron doses for survivors could possibly be wrong, the paucity of neutron validation measurements available at that time prevented adequate resolution of this matter. It was not until additional measurements and data evaluations were made that it became clear that more work was required to better understand the discrepancies observed for thermal neutrons in Hiroshima. This resulted in a large number of additional neutron activation measurements in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by scientists in the US, Japan, and Germany. The results presented here for {sup 36}Cl, together with measurements made by other scientists and for other isotopes, now provide a much improved measurement basis for the validation of neutrons in Hiroshima.

Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Measurement of probe displacement to the thermal resolution limit in photonic force microscopy using a miniature quadrant photodetector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A photonic force microscope comprises of an optically trapped micro-probe and a position detection system to track the motion of the probe. Signal collection for motion detection is often carried out using the backscattered light off the probe-however, this mode has problems of low S/N due to the small backscattering cross sections of the micro-probes typically used. The position sensors often used in these cases are quadrant photodetectors. To ensure maximum sensitivity of such detectors, it would help if the detector size matched with the detection beam radius after the condenser lens (which for backscattered detection would be the trapping objective itself). To suit this condition, we have used a miniature displacement sensor whose dimensions makes it ideal to work with 1:1 images of micrometer-sized trapped probes in the backscattering detection mode. The detector is based on the quadrant photo-integrated chip in the optical pick-up head of a compact disc player. Using this detector, we measured absolute displacements of an optically trapped 1.1 {mu}m probe with a resolution of {approx}10 nm for a bandwidth of 10 Hz at 95% significance without any sample or laser stabilization. We characterized our optical trap for different sized probes by measuring the power spectrum for each probe to 1% accuracy, and found that for 1.1 {mu}m diameter probes, the noise in our position measurement matched the thermal resolution limit for averaging times up to 10 ms. We also achieved a linear response range of around 385 nm with cross talk between axes {approx_equal}4% for 1.1 {mu}m diameter probes. The detector has extremely high bandwidth (few MHz) and low optical power threshold-other factors that can lead to its widespread use in photonic force microscopy.

Pal, Sambit Bikas; Haldar, Arijit; Roy, Basudev; Banerjee, Ayan [Department of Physical Sciences, IISER-Kolkata, West Bengal 741252 (India)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity;

173

Structural Changes During Thermal Fatigue of Two Nickel-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

greatly affect the thermal endurance of these heat-resisting alloys. I?. ... factors govern- ing the thermal fatigue behavior of a number of commercial nickel-.

174

Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral for the {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er reaction by using a {sup 55}Mn monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal neutron cross section and the resonance integral of the reaction {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er were measured by the Cd-ratio method using a {sup 55}Mn monitor as single comparator. Analytical grade MnO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder samples with and without a cylindrical 1 mm Cd shield box were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field obtained from three {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources. The induced activities in the samples were measured with a 120.8% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector. The correction factors for gamma-ray attenuation (F{sub g}), thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), and resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ({alpha}) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross section for the (n,{gamma}) reaction in {sup 170}Er has been determined to be 8.00 {+-} 0.56 b, relative to that of the {sup 55}Mn monitor. However, some previously reported experimental results compared to the present result show a large discrepancy ranging from 8.3 to 86%. The present result is, in general, in good agreement with the recently measured values by 9%. According to the definition of Cd cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the resonance integral obtained is 44.5 {+-} 4.0 b, which is determined relative to the reference integral value of the {sup 55}Mn monitor by using cadmium ratios. The existing experimental data for the resonance integral are distributed between 18 and 43 b. The present resonance integral value agrees only with the measurement of 43 {+-} 5 b by Gillette [Thermal Cross Section and Resonance Integral Studies, ORNL-4155, 15 (1967)] within uncertainty limits.

Yuecel, Haluk [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK), Besevler Campus, 06100 Tandogan-Ankara (Turkey); Budak, M. Gueray; Karadag, Mustafa [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar-Ankara (Turkey)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

CA Dept of Consumer Affairs, BEARHFTI - Thermal Insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Density). Thermal Resistance. [01/T05] ASTM C335 Steady-State Heat Transfer Properties of Horizontal Pipe Insulation. [01 ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

A steady-state Bi-substrate technique for measurement of the thermal conductivity of ceramic coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of heat injection and removal, the heater power and cooling water flow rate are fixed and the system,11]. This paper presents an analysis of the method and a brief study of the issues affecting accuracy are generated by heating the lower substrate with an electric resistance heater, while heat is continuously

Cambridge, University of

177

Thermal performance measurements of sealed insulating glass units with low-E coatings using the MoWiTT (Mobile Window Thermal Test) field-test facility  

SciTech Connect

Using data obtained in a mobile field-test facility, measured performance of clear and low-emissivity double-glazing units is presented for south-facing and north-facing orientations. The changes in U-value and shading coefficient resulting from addition of the low-E coating are found to agree with theoretical expectations for the cold spring test conditions. Accurate nighttime U-values were derived from the data and found to agree with calculations. Expected correlation between U-value and wind speed was not observed in the data; a plausible experimental reason for this is advanced.

Klems, J.; Keller, H.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A High-Accuracy Multiwavelength Radiometer for In Situ Measurements in the Thermal Infrared. Part II: Behavior in Field Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performances of the new conveyable low-noise infrared radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground surface targets, or CLIMAT, are presented for in situ measurements. For this, quantitative analyses were carried out on measurements ...

Gérard Brogniez; Christophe Pietras; Michel Legrand; Philippe Dubuisson; Martial Haeffelin

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EVALUATION OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF INSTALLED-IN-PLACE POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION BY EXPERIMENT AND ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

In the thermal analysis of the 9977 package, it was found that calculated temperatures, determined using a typical thermal analysis code, did not match those measured in the experimental apparatus. The analysis indicated that the thermal resistance of the overpack in the experimental apparatus was less than that expected, based on manufacturer's reported value of thermal conductivity. To resolve this question, the thermal conductivity of the installed foam was evaluated from the experimental results, using a simplified analysis. This study confirmed that the thermal resistance of the experimental apparatus was lower than that which would result from the manufacturer's published values for thermal conductivity of the foam insulation. The test package was sectioned to obtain samples for measurement of material properties. In the course of the destructive examination a large uninsulated region was found at the bottom of the package, which accounted for the anomalous results. Subsequent measurement of thermal conductivity confirmed the manufacturer's published values. The study provides useful insight into the use of simplified, scoping calculations for evaluation of thermal performance of packages.

Smith, A; Bruce Hardy, B; Kurt Eberl, K; Nick Gupta, N

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Measurement of Three Critical Parameters as a Basis for a Simple Thermal Barrier Coating Life Prediction Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Critical Parameters Three Critical Parameters As A Basis for A Simple Thermal Barrier Coating Life Prediction Methodology University of Connecticut Eric Jordan and Maurice Gell SCIES Project 02- 01- SR 097 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/02, 36 Month Duration) $ 478,495 Total Contract Value ($ 478,495 DOE) Gas Turbine Need * Industrial Gas Turbine Performance & Durability Depend Strongly On Use Of Thermal Barrier Coatings * Aggressive Application of TBCs Limited By Lack of NDI And Lifing Methods University of Connecticut Gas Turbine Need Non-Destructive Assessment of Remaining Life Strongly Impacts Operating Cost * Reduce occurrence of unplanned shut down * Reduce wasteful precautionary part replacement

182

Sonic and resistivity measurements on Berea sandstone containing tetrahydrofuran hydrates: a possible analogue to natural-gas-hydrate deposits. [Tetrahydrofuran hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposits of natural gas hydrates exist in arctic sedimentary basins and in marine sediments on continental slopes and rises. However, the physical properties of such sediments are largely unknown. In this paper, we report laboratory sonic and resistivity measurements on Berea sandstone cores saturated with a stoichiometric mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water. We used THF as the guest species rather than methane or propane gas because THF can be mixed with water to form a solution containing proportions of the proper stoichiometric THF and water. Because neither methane nor propane is soluble in water, mixing the guest species with water sufficiently to form solid hydrate is difficult. Because THF solutions form hydrates readily at atmospheric pressure it is an excellent experimental analogue to natural gas hydrates. Hydrate formation increased the sonic P-wave velocities from a room temperature value of 2.5 km/s to 4.5 km/s at -5/sup 0/C when the pores were nearly filled with hydrates. Lowering the temperature below -5/sup 0/C did not appreciably change the velocity however. In contrast, the electrical resistivity increases nearly two orders of magnitude upon hydrate formation and continues to increase more slowly as the temperature is further decreased. In all cases the resistivities are nearly frequency independent to 30 kHz and the loss tangents are high, always greater than 5. The dielectric loss shows a linear decrease with frequency suggesting that ionic conduction through a brine phase dominates at all frequencies, even when the pores are nearly filled with hydrates. We find that the resistivities are strongly a function of the dissolved salt content of the pore water. Pore water salinity also influences the sonic velocity, but this effect is much smaller and only important near the hydrate formation temperature.

Pearson, C.; Murphy, J.; Halleck, P.; Hermes, R.; Mathews, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Structural stability vs. thermal performance: old dilemma, new solutions  

SciTech Connect

In many building envelopes, actual thermal performance falls quite a bit short of nominal design parameters given in standards. Very often only windows, doors, and a small part of the wall area meet standards requirements. In the other parts of the building envelope, unaccounted thermal bridges reduce the effective thermal resistance of the insulation material. Such unaccounted heat losses compromise the thermal performance of the whole building envelope. For the proper analysis of the thermal performance of most wall and roof details, measurements and three-dimensional thermal modeling are necessary. For wall thermal analysis the whole-wall R-value calculation method can be very useful. In ties method thermal properties of all wall details are incorporated as an area weighted average. For most wall systems, the part of the wall that is traditionally analyzed, is the clear wall, that is, the flat part of the wall that is uninterrupted by details. It comprises only 50 to 80% of the total area of the opaque wall. The remaining 20 to 50% of the wall area is not analyzed nor are its effects incorporated in the thermal performance calculations. For most of the wall technologies, traditionally estimated R-values are 20 to 30% higher than whole-wall R-values. Such considerable overestimation of wall thermal resistance leads to significant errors in building heating and cooling load estimations. In this paper several examples are presented of the use of the whole-wall R-value procedure for building envelope components. The advantages of the use of the whole wall R-value calculation procedure are also discussed. For several building envelope components, traditional clear-wall R-values are compared with the results of whole-wall thermal analysis to highlight significant limits on the use of the traditional methods and the advantages of advanced computer modeling.

Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A High-Accuracy Multiwavelength Radiometer for In Situ Measurements in the Thermal Infrared. Part I: Characterization of the Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new infrared radiometer (conveyable low-noise infrared radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground surface targets, or CLIMAT) is a highly sensitive field instrument designed to measure brightness temperatures or radiances in the ...

Michel Legrand; Christophe Pietras; Gérard Brogniez; Martial Haeffelin; Nader Khalil Abuhassan; Michaël Sicard

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition in High Temperature Hydrogenated Water Using the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) Technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior studies of Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 have shown the existence of a maximum in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high temperature water (e.g., at 360 C), when testing is conducted over a range of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations. It has also been shown that this maximum in SCC susceptibility tends to occur in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, suggesting that oxide phase stability may affect primary water SCC (PWSCC) resistance. Previous studies have estimated the Ni/NiO transition using thermodynamic calculations based on free energies of formation for NiO and H{sub 2}O. The present study reports experimental measurements of the Ni/NiO transition performed using a contact electric resistance (CER) instrument. The CER is capable of measuring the surface resistance of a metal to determine whether it is oxide-covered or oxide-free at a given condition. The transition aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentration corresponding to the Ni/NiO equilibrium was measured at 288, 316, 338 and 360 C using high purity Ni specimens. The results showed an appreciable deviation (i.e., 7 to 58 scc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O) between the measured Ni/NiO transition and the theoretical Ni/NiO transition previously calculated using free energy data from the Journal of Solution Chemistry. The CER-measured position of the Ni/NiO transition is in good agreement with the maxima in PWSCC susceptibility at 338 and 360 C. The measured Ni/NiO transition provides a reasonable basis for estimating the aqueous H{sub 2} level at which the maximum in SCC susceptibility is likely to be observed at temperatures lower than 338 to 360 C, at which SCC tests are time-consuming to perform. Limited SCC data are presented which are consistent with the observation that SCC susceptibility is maximized near the Ni/NiO transition at 288 C.

S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; M.A. Ando; N.F. Panayotou; C.D. Thompson

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U  

SciTech Connect

We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for {sup 99}Mo where the present results are about 4%-relative higher for neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Additionally, our results illustrate the importance of representing the incident energy dependence of fission product yields over the fast neutron energy range for high-accuracy work, for example the {sup 147}Nd from neutron reactions on plutonium. An upgrade to the ENDF library, for ENDF/B-VII.1, based on these and other data, is described in a companion paper to this work.

Selby, H.D., E-mail: hds@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

A method for the thermal characterization, visualization, and integrity evaluation of conducting material samples or complex structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is useful in thermal imaging of conducting materials, and is particularly useful in measuring thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conditions in composite anisotropic materials, in materials of irregular shape, and in materials for high-temperature applications. It also has utility in visualizing the integrity of complex structures such as a machine, power plant, or chemical plant. The method is for modeling a conducting material sample or structure (system) as an electrical network of resistances, for measuring electric resistance between selected leads attached to the surface of the system, and, using basic circuit theory, for translating measured resistances into temperatures or indications of integrity in corresponding regions of the system. 10 figs.

Ortiz, M.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

On the charging and thermal characterization of a micro/nano structured thermal ground plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As power densities in electronic devices have increased dramatically over the last decade, advanced thermal management solutions are required. A significant part of the thermal resistance budget is commonly taken up by the ...

de Bock, H. Peter J.

189

Pressure Measurements in a PBX 9501 Gauged Acceptor When Impacted by a Steel Plate that is Accelerated by a Thermally Cooked Off PBX 9501 Charge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measuring the violence of a thermal explosion of a cased explosive is important for evaluating safety issues of explosive devices in fires. A sympathetic initiation scenario was studied here where a 9.0 cm diameter by 2.5 cm thick disc of PBX 9501 donor charge encased in a 304 stainless steel assembly was heated on top and bottom flat surfaces until it thermally exploded. The initial heating rate at the metal/explosive interface was 5 C per minute until it reaches 170 C; then this temperature is held for 35 minutes to allow temperature equilibration to within a few degrees throughout the explosive. The heating resumed at a rate of 1 C per minute until the PBX 9501 donor thermally exploded. A PBX 9501 acceptor charge with carbon resistor and manganin foil pressure gauges inserted at various depths was placed at a 10 cm standoff distance from the donor charge's top steel cover plate. Piezoelectric arrival time pins were placed in front of the acceptor surface to measure the velocity and shape of the impacting plate. The stainless steel cover plate of the donor charge had a nominal velocity of 0.55 {+-} 0.04 mm/{micro}s upon impact and was non-symmetrically warped. The impact of the tilted curved plate induced a three-dimensional compression wave into the acceptor. The rise times of the pressure waves were nominally 1.5 {micro}s with the closest carbon resistor gauges giving peak pressure of 10 kb that decayed to 3 kb for a wave run distance of 2.4 cm.

Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Greenwood, D W; Tarver, C M

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Direct-Current Resistivity At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault

191

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Stillwater Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault

192

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. and McEuen, P. L. , “Thermal Transport Measurements ofTomanek, D. , “Unusually High Thermal Conductivity of Carbonand Lau, C. N. , “Superior thermal conductivity of single-

Goyal, Vivek Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Comparison of different experimental and analytical measures of the thermal annealing response of neutron-irradiated RPV steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal annealing response of several materials as indicated by Charpy transition temperature (TT) and upper-shelf energy (USE), crack initiation toughness, K{sub Jc}, predictive models, and automated-ball indentation (ABI) testing are compared. The materials investigated are representative reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels (several welds and a plate) that were irradiated for other tasks of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program and are relatively well characterized in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. They have been annealed at two temperatures, 343 and 454 C (650 and 850 F) for varying lengths of time. The correlation of the Charpy response and the fracture toughness, ABI, and the response predicted by the annealing model of Eason et al. for these conditions and materials appears to be reasonable. The USE after annealing at the temperature of 454 C appears to recover at a faster rate than the TT, and even over-recovers (i.e., the recovered USE exceeds that of the unirradiated material).

Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermal And Mechanical Analysis of High-power Light-emitting Diodes with Ceramic Packages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the thermal and mechanical analysis of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with ceramic packages. Transient thermal measurements and thermo-mechanical simulation were performed to study the thermal and mechanical characteristics of ceramic packages. Thermal resistance from the junction to the ambient was decreased from 76.1 oC/W to 45.3 oC/W by replacing plastic mould to ceramic mould for LED packages. Higher level of thermo-mechanical stresses in the chip were found for LEDs with ceramic packages despite of less mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion comparing with plastic packages. The results suggest that the thermal performance of LEDs can be improved by using ceramic packages, but the mounting process of the high power LEDs with ceramic packages is critically important and should be in charge of delaminating interface layers in the packages.

J. Hu; L. Yang; M. -W. Shin

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities  

SciTech Connect

Wall cavities are widely present in the construction of low rise homes since wood framing is the most common type of construction for residential buildings in the United States. The primary function of such wall construction is to provide a stable frame to which interior and exterior wall coverings can be attached and by which a roof can be supported. The existence of wall cavities increases the thermal resistance of the enclosure, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. Several design guides provide data for prediction of the thermal resistance of uninsulated wall cavities of varying internal geometries. However, U-value coefficients provided in these guides do not account for partially insulated cavities or for variations in aspect ratio. Whole building energy simulation tools, like DOE2 or Energy Plus, use simplified, 1-D characterization of building envelopes. For the most part, this characterization assumes a fixed thermal resistance over the range of temperatures experienced by the enclosure. In reality, the thermal resistance is dominated by convection and radiation and is a function of several parameters, including the temperatures and emissivities of the cavity surfaces and the aspect ratio of the cavity. This study describes detailed CFD modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities accounting for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. The resulting correlations can serve as input for DOE2 and Energy Plus modeling of older homes, where the walls are either uninsulated or partially insulated due to the settling of the insulating material. Parameters of the study are the ambient temperature outdoors, emissivity of the cavity surfaces, cavity aspect ratio, and height of the insulation level. The outcomes of this study provide: An understanding of the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities, which is an essential aspect of energy conservation in residential buildings. Accurate input for whole building simulations models like DOE2 and Energy Plus in various climate zones. Recommendations on retrofit measures.

Ridouane, E.H.; Bianchi, M. V. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

resistance thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Quantities. Resistance Thermometry. Rate our Services. ... NIST provides worksheets on which the participant records data. ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity of rocks from LASL geothermal test holes GT-1 and GT-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conductivities on a number of dry rocks have been measured in an air environment. These experimental values are probably about 10 percent lower than the in situ values. Initial attempts to prepare ''wet'' rock samples (rocks saturated with water) have so far resulted in only ''damp'' rocks. Considerable effort will be required to characterize the crack system in ''solid'' rocks and to predict the probable conductivity values for in situ conditions.

Sibbitt, W.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

200

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A statistical method for estimating wood thermal diffusivity and probe geometry using in situ heat response curves from sap flow measurements  

SciTech Connect

The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux through plants; it works by inferring the velocity of water through a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity, e.g., wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtain the correct transpiration flux density from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale; and consequently, to up-scale tree-level water fluxes to canopy and landscape scales. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework for estimating the wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing simutaneously from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of a heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the time traces of wood temperature following a heat pulse, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique, based on the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that repeated tests using the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable and accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it is shown to be affected by both moisture content and temperature. Empirical factors are often introduced to account for the influence of non-ideal probe geometry on the estimation of heat pulse velocity, and they are estimated in this study as well. The proposed methodology can be applied for the calibration of existing heat ratio sap flow systems at other sites. It is especially useful when an alternative transpiration calibration device, such as a lysimeter, is not available.

Chen, Xingyuan; Miller, Gretchen R.; Rubin, Yoram; Baldocchi, Dennis

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, D.M.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Definition: Resistivity Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Log Resistivity Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Resistivity Log Electrical resistivity logging is the measurement of potential (voltage) differences resulting from electrical current flow in the vicinity of a borehole in order to determine formation resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Resistivity logging is a method of well logging that works by characterizing the rock or sediment in a borehole by measuring its electrical resistivity. Resistivity is a fundamental material property which represents how strongly a material opposes the flow of electric current. In these logs, resistivity is measured using 4 electrical probes to eliminate the resistance of the contact leads. The log must run in holes containing electrically conductive mud or water. Resistivity logging is

205

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermal Cycling Effects on the Thermoelectric Properties of n-Type In, Ce based Skutterudite Compounds  

SciTech Connect

N-type In-filled CoSb3 are known skutterudite compounds that have shown promising thermoelectric (TE) properties resulting in high dimensionless figure of merit values at elevated temperatures. Their use in various waste heat recovery applications will require that they survive and operate after exposure to harsh thermal cycling environments. This research focused on uncovering the thermal cycling effects on thermoelectric properties of n-type In0.2Co4Sb12 and In0.2Ce0.15Co4Sb12 skutterudite compositions as well as quantifying their temperature-dependent structural properties (elastic modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio). It was observed that the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity increased only slightly in the double-filled In,Ce skutterudite materials upon thermal cycling. In the In-filled skutterudites the Seebeck coefficient remained approximately the same on thermal cycling, while electrical resistivity increased significantly after thermal cycling. Results also show that thermal conductivity marginally decreases in the case of In-filled skutterudites, whereas the reduction is more pronounced in In, Ce-based skutterudite compounds. The possible reason for this kind of reduction can be attributed to grain pinning effects due to formation of nano inclusions. High temperature structural property measurements (i.e., Young's modulus and shear modulus) are also reported and the results show that these structural properties decrease slowly as temperature increases and the compounds are structurally stable after numerous thermal cycles.

Biswas, Krishnendu; Subramanian, Mas A.; Good, Morris S.; Roberts, Kamandi C.; Hendricks, Terry J.

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Measurement and prediction of the resistivity of ash/sorbent mixtures produced by sulfur oxide control processes. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the development of (1) a modified procedure for obtaining consistent and reproducible laboratory resistivity values for mixtures of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent, and (2) an approach for predicting resistivity based on the chemical composition of the sample and the resistivities of the key compounds in the sample that are derived from the sorbent. Furnace and cold-side sorbent injection technologies for reducing the emission of sulfur oxides from electric generating plants firing medium- to high-sulfur coal are under development for retrofit applications. The particulate resulting from injecting this sorbent will be a mixture of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent. The presence of this sorbent causes the resistivity of the mixture to be significantly higher than that of the fly ash alone. Since higher resistivity dusts are more difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), accurate knowledge of the resistivity of the mixture is needed to determine if the ESP will operate within an acceptable efficiency range.

Young, R.P.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with homogeneous thermal properties, to invert cooling data.thermal simulations of DTPS testing showing modeled coolingand cooling. The match between measured and modeled thermal

Freifeld, B.M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fire resistant nuclear fuel cask  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to a fire resistant nuclear fuel cask employing reversibly thermally expansible bands between adjacent cooling fins such that normal outward flow of heat is not interfered with, but abnormal inward flow of heat is impeded or blocked.

Heckman, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Moss, Marvin (Albuquerque, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Resistivity analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to an example embodiment of the present invention a semiconductor die having a resistive electrical connection is analyzed. Heat is directed to the die as the die is undergoing a state-changing operation to cause a failure due to suspect circuitry. The die is monitored, and a circuit path that electrically changes in response to the heat is detected and used to detect that a particular portion therein of the circuit is resistive. In this manner, the detection and localization of a semiconductor die defect that includes a resistive portion of a circuit path is enhanced.

Bruce, Michael R. (Austin, TX); Bruce, Victoria J. (Austin, TX); Ring, Rosalinda M. (Austin, TX); Cole, Edward Jr. I. (Albuquerque, NM); Hawkins, Charles F. (Albuquerque, NM); Tangyungong, Paiboon (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wear Resistance of Spray Formed Supermartensitic Stainless Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... resistance measured according to ASTM G65 and results have shown that this material presents a wear resistance similar to the Cr-Co alloy Stellite 1016.

213

Long-term dipole-dipole resistivity monitoring at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dipole-dipole resistivity measurements for the combined purposes of reservoir delineation and reservoir monitoring were first made at Cerro Prieto in 1978 and have continued on approximately an annual basis since then. Two 20 km-long dipole-dipole lines with permanently emplaced electrodes at 1-km spacings were established over the field area. Resistivity remeasurements have been made on one line at 6- to 18-month intervals using a 25 kW generator capable of up to 80A output and a microprocessor-controlled signal-averaging receiver. This high-power, low-noise system provides highly accurate measurements even at large transmitter receiver separations. Standard error calculations for collected data indicate errors less than 5% for all points. Results from four years of monitoring (1979-1983) indicate a 5% average annual increase in apparent resistivity over the present production area, and larger decreases in apparent resistivity in the region to the east. The increase in resistivity in the production zone is most likely due to dilution of reservoir fluids with fresher water, as evidenced by a drop in chloride content of produced waters. The area of decreasing resistivity east of the reservoir is associated with a steeply dipping conductive body, a zone of higher thermal gradients and an increase in shale thickness in the section. Decreasing resistivity in this area may be caused by an influx of high temperature, saline water from depths of 3/sup +/ km through a sandy gap in the shales.

Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Sasaki, Y.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Resistivity Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Tomography Resistivity Tomography Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Resistivity Tomography Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Resistivity Log Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 60.986,098 centUSD 0.061 kUSD 6.098e-5 MUSD 6.098e-8 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 76.227,622 centUSD 0.0762 kUSD 7.622e-5 MUSD 7.622e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 106.7110,671 centUSD 0.107 kUSD 1.0671e-4 MUSD 1.0671e-7 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 1 days0.00274 years

216

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF STRUCTURAL AMORPHOUS METAL  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of a yttrium-containing amorphous metal, SAM1651. SAM1651 has a glass transition temperature of {approx}584 C, a recrystallization temperature of {approx}653 C, and a melting point of {approx}1121 C. The measured critical cooling rate for SAM1651 is {le} 80 K per second, respectively. The yttrium addition to SAM1651 enhances glass formation, as reported by Guo and Poon [2003]. The corrosion behavior of SAM1651 was compared with nickel-based Alloy 22 in electrochemical polarization measurements performed in several highly concentrated chloride solutions.

Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Differential Thermal Analysis of Nickel-Base Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential thermal analysis was performed on over 200 nickel-base superalloys that ... differential thermal analysis (DTA) to simply and accurately measure.

219

Thermophysical properties of selected wear-resistant alloys  

SciTech Connect

Thermophysical properties of 13 selected wear-resistant materials, including specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal expansion (instantaneous, mean, and linear) are provided. The Center for Information and Numerical Data Analysis and Synthesis (CINDAS) at Purdue University supplied properties data.

Farwick, D.G.; Johnson, R.N.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric furnaces, or electric thermal storage systems. Electric Furnaces With electric furnaces, heated air is delivered throughout the home through supply ducts and returned to the furnace through return ducts. Blowers (large fans) in electric furnaces move air over a group of three to seven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric furnaces, or electric thermal storage systems. Electric Furnaces With electric furnaces, heated air is delivered throughout the home through supply ducts and returned to the furnace through return ducts. Blowers (large fans) in electric furnaces move air over a group of three to seven

222

Polarization Resistance of La0.85Ca0.15MnO3 Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) Measured Using Patterned Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Patterned cathodes of calcium-doped lanthanum manganite (LCM) were fabricated on polycrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and photolithographic techniques. Samples were generated with a constant electrode/electrolyte contact area but different three phase boundary (TPB) lengths (lTPB's). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed in the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and temperature range of 10-3 atm to 1.00 atm and 600-800 C respectively. The area specific polarization resistance, Rp, was found to scale linearly with the inverse of lTPB, suggesting that the TPB is the active region for oxygen reduction. The resistivity decreased with increased temperature and pO2 and showed an activation energy of 1.17 +/- 0.03 eV.

Miara, Lincoln J.; Yoon, Kyung J.; Topping, Stephen; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nanoscale thermal transport and the thermal conductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption depends on temperature of the nanotube · Assume heat capacity is comparable to graphite · Cooling conductance · Pump probe apparatus · Transient absorption ­ Carbon nanotubes and thermal transport at hard optical absorption of nanoparticles and nanotubes in liquid suspensions. ­ Measure the thermal relaxation

Braun, Paul

225

Thermal shock modeling of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under active cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal shock resistance is one of the most important parameters in Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) since it determines their performance in various applications. In this paper, due to the fact that the material parameters of UHTCs are very sensitive ... Keywords: Active cooling, Target temperature, Thermal protection system, Thermal shock resistance, Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

Weiguo Li; Fan Yang; Daining Fang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

Thermal via placement in 3D ICs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As thermal problems become more evident, new physical design paradigms and tools are needed to alleviate them. Incorporating thermal vias into integrated circuits (ICs) is a promising way of mitigating thermal issues by lowering the thermal resistance of the chip itself. However, thermal vias take up valuable routing space, and therefore, algorithms are needed to minimize their usage while placing them in areas where they would make the greatest impact. With the developing technology of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs), thermal problems are expected to be more prominent, and thermal vias can have a larger impact on them than in traditional 2D ICs. In this paper, thermal vias are assigned to specific areas of a 3D IC and used to adjust their effective thermal conductivities. The thermal via placement method makes iterative adjustments to these thermal conductivities in order to achieve a desired maximum temperature objective. Finite element analysis (FEA) is used in formulating the method and in calculating temperatures quickly during each iteration. As a result, the method efficiently achieves its thermal objective while minimizing the thermal via utilization.

Brent Goplen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1974) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1974) Coso Geothermal Area (1974) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1974 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use heat flow studies for the first time at Coso to indicate the presence or absence of abnormal heat Notes Located 10 sites for heat flow boreholes using available seismic ground noise and electrical resistivity data; data collected from 9 of 10; thermal conductivity measurements were completed using both the needle probe technique and the divided bar apparatus with a cell arrangement. In the upper few hundred meters of the subsurface heat is being transferred by a conductive heat transfer mechanism with a value of ~ 15 µcal/cm2sec; the background heat flow is ~ 3.5 HFU.

230

In situ measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

Lord, D.E.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electrical Resistance of Graphitic and Graphitized Cathode ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrical resistance of graphitic and graphitized cathode materials before and after electrolysis was also measured at temperatures from 30°C to 965°C. An  ...

232

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation. 9 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermal conductivity of aqueous foam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity plays an important part in the response of aqueous foams used as geothermal drilling fluids. The thermal conductivity of these foams was measured at ambient conditions using the thermal conductivity probe technique. Foam densities studied were from 0.03 to 0.2 g/cm/sup 3/, corresponding to liquid volume fractions of the same magnitude. Microscopy of the foams indicated bubble sizes in the range 50 to 300 ..mu..m for nitrogen foams, and 30 to 150 ..mu..m for helium foams. Bubble shapes were observed to be polyhedral at low foam densities and spherical at the higher densities. The measured conductivity values ranged from 0.05 to 0.12 W/m-K for the foams studied. The predicted behavior in foam conductivity caused by a change in the conductivity of the discontinuous gas phase was observed using nitrogen or helium gas in the foams. Analysis of the probe response data required an interpretation using the full intergral solution to the heat conduction equation, since the thermal capacity of the foam was small relative to the thermal mass of the probe. The measurements of the thermal conductivity of the foams were influenced by experimental effects such as the probe input power, foam drainage, and the orientation of the probe and test cell. For nitrogen foams, the thermal conductivity vs liquid volume fraction was observed to fall between predictions based on the parallel ordering and Russell models for thermal conduction in heterogeneous materials.

Drotning, W.D.; Ortega, A.; Havey, P.E.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the International Journal of Compact Heat Exchangers, May 2003 #12;2 Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers Abstract The dominant thermal resistance for most compact heat exchangers occurs on the air side and thus a detailed understanding of air side heat

Thole, Karen A.

236

Real-time temperature measurement during a laser annealing process featuring a microthermocouple array: Exploiting nano and micro-metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the acquisition of a real-time in situ surface thermal profile over a silicon substrate exposed to a laser beam, featuring a sub-mm spatial resolution, simultaneously recorded in six different sample points. A thin-film microthermocouple ... Keywords: Laser annealing, Microfabrication, Real-time resistivity measurement, Thermoelectric materials, Thin films

A. Chiolerio; P. Pandolfi; G. Maccioni; A. Sacco; D. Perrone; G. Grange

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

238

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, W.B. III.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermal transient anemometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Toward zero-emission data centers through direct reuse of thermal energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have tested hot water data center cooling by directly reusing the generated thermal energy in neighborhood heating systems. First, we introduce high-performance liquid cooling devices with minimal thermal resistance in order to cool a computer system ...

T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; E. Ruetsche; B. Michel

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pitting Corrosion Resistance of Type 2507 Duplex Stainless Steel in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloy Development for Measurement While Drilling Tools ... Resistance of Type 2507 Duplex Stainless Steel in Synthetic Seawater and Hydraulic Fluids.

243

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES Lab VI - 1 The change of the internal energy of a system temperature by sweating to cool down. Running seems to be the conversion of chemical energy to thermal energy energy into thermal energy, you decide to make some measurements in the laboratory. To make

Minnesota, University of

244

PCM energy storage during defective thermal cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incomplete thermal cycling affects storage capacities of phase change materials (PCMs). Existing PCM measuring methods are presented with their drawbacks. A new device named “the… (more)

Koekenbier, S.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Measuring the Impact of Experimental Parameters upon the Estimated Thermal Conductivity of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation Subjected to an Accelerated Aging Protocol ? Two Year Results  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C 1303 standard test method have led to a broad ruggedness test. This test includes the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods up to five years for later comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. This paper will compare the results after two years of full-thickness aging.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Experimental Evidence for a Reduction in Electron Thermal Diffusion due to Trapped Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New high time resolution measurements of the electron thermal diffusion {chi}{sub e} throughout the sawtooth cycle of the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch have been made by utilizing the enhanced capabilities of the upgraded multipoint, multipulse Thomson scattering system. These measurements are compared to the {chi}{sub e} due to magnetic diffusion predicted by using information from a new high spectral resolution zero-{beta} nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation performed, for the first time, at the Lundquist number of high current Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas (S{approx_equal}4x10{sup 6}). Agreement between the measured and predicted values is found only if the reduction in thermal diffusion due to trapped particles is taken into account.

Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Schnack, D. D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Stephens, H. D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Thermal fatigue evaluation of solder alloys. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the relative thermal fatigue resistance of 29 solder alloys. A number of these alloys were found to be less susceptible to thermal fatigue cracking in encapsulated printed wiring board applications than the commonly used tin-lead eutectic (63Sn-37Pb). Three alloys, 95Sn-5Ag, 96.5Sn-3.5Ag, and 95Sn-5Sb offered the greatest resistance to thermal fatigue. The selection of the encapsulation materials was confirmed to be a significant factor in thermal fatigue of solder joints, regardless of the solder alloy used.

Jarboe, D.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Interstrand resistance of SSC magnets  

SciTech Connect

In situ interstrand resistance measurements were conducted on selected section of the inner coil of a full size (15 m) and a short (1 m) model SSC magnets. A model for evaluating single contacts resistance between two strands was developed. Using this model analyses of adjacent and non-adjacent strand contacts were performed. The interstrand resistance distribution throughout the coil was found to correlate with the quench location data as well as with the multipoles decay characteristics of the magnet. An anisotropic continuum based model for evaluation of cable eddy current losses was developed and results were compared with the experimental data.

Kovachev, V.T.; Neal, M.J.; Capone, D.W. II [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Carr, W.J. Jr.; Swenson, C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Thermal management of batteries using a Variable-Conductance Insulation (VCI) enclosure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proper thermal management is important for optimum performance and durability of most electric-vehicle batteries. For high-temperature cells such as sodium/sulphur, a very efficient and responsive thermal control system is essential. Heat must be removed during exothermic periods and retained when the batteries are not in use. Current thermal management approaches rely on passive insulation enclosures with active cooling loops that penetrate the enclosure. This paper presents the design, analysis, and testing of an enclosure with variable conductance insulation (VCI). VCI uses a hydride with an integral electric resistance heater to expel and retrieve a small amount of hydrogen gas into a vacuum space. By controlling the amount of hydrogen gas, the thermal conductance can be varied by more than 100:1, enabling the cooling loop (cold plate) to be mounted on the enclosure exterior. By not penetrating the battery enclosure, the cooling system is simpler and more reliable. Also, heat can be retained more effectively when desired. For high temperatures, radiation shields within the vacuum space are required. Ceramic spacers are used to maintain separation of the steel enclosure materials against atmospheric loading. Ceramic-to-ceramic thermal contact resistance within the spacer assembly minimizes thermal conductance. Two full-scale (0.8-m {times} 0.9-m {times} 0.3-m) prototypes were designed, built, and tested under high-temperature 200{degrees}-350{degrees}C battery conditions. With an internal temperature of 330{degrees}C (and 20{degrees}C ambient), the measured total-enclosure minimum heat loss was 80 watts (excluding wire pass-through losses). The maximum heat rejection was 4100 watts. The insulation can be switched from minimum to maximum conductance (hydrogen pressure from 2.0 {times} 10{sup -3} to 8 torr) in 3 minutes. Switching from maximum to minimum conductance was longer (16 minutes), but still satisfactory because of the large thermal mass of the battery.

Burch, S.D.; Parish, R.C.; Keyser, M.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 432 (1999) 403}409 Measurement of the thermal and fast neutron #ux in a research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction A new type of "bre detector was developed at Nagoya University recently [1}3] and tested of these two materials are rather similar, the quartz "bre is superior regarding the radiation level in which, development of such a detector is of clear importance, and the measurements reported in this paper contribute

Pázsit, Imre

254

Thermal fatigue behavior of US and Russian grades of beryllium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 KW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degrees}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stress in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S-300F-H, Sr-200, I-400, extruded high purity. HIP`d sperical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be(SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Guiniatouline, R.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (USSR); Kupriynov, I.B. [Russian Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (USSR)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

256

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Details Activities (65) Areas (34) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock type, mineral and clay content may be inferred. Stratigraphic/Structural: Determination of fracture zones, faults, depth to groundwater aquifers. Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water. Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature.[1] Cost Information

257

Wafer heating mechanisms in a molecular gas, inductively coupled plasma: in situ, real time wafer surface measurements and three-dimensional thermal modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report measurements and modeling of wafer heating mechanisms in an Ar/O{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The authors employed a commercially available on-wafer sensor system (PlasmaTemp developed by KLA-Tencor) consisting of an on-board electronics module housing battery power and data storage with 30 temperature sensors embedded onto the wafer at different radial positions. This system allows for real time, in situ wafer temperature measurements. Wafer heating mechanisms were investigated by combining temperature measurements from the PlasmaTemp sensor wafer with a three-dimensional heat transfer model of the wafer and a model of the ICP. Comparisons between pure Ar and Ar/O{sub 2} discharges demonstrated that two additional wafer heating mechanisms can be important in molecular gas plasmas compared to atomic gas discharges. The two mechanisms are heating from the gas phase and O-atom surface recombination. These mechanisms were shown to contribute as much as 60% to wafer heating under conditions of low bias power. This study demonstrated how the 'on-wafer' temperature sensor not only yields a temperature profile distribution across the wafer, but can be used to help determine plasma characteristics, such as ion flux profiles or plasma processing temperatures.

Titus, M. J.; Graves, D. B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electrical Resistivities of La55Al25Ni10Cu10 Bulk Metallic Glasses ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Electrical resistivity measurements in comparison with ... The in- situ electrical resistivity data recorded in the annealing process show the same ...

259

Thermal Analysis of Curaua Fiber Reinforced Polyester Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the drawbacks associated with the application of natural fibers, ... the effect of the curaua fiber on the thermal resistance of the composites. ... Characterization of High Carbon Equivalent Cast Iron Using Thermal Analysis Curves ... Nanosecond Electrical Discharges between Semiconducting Sulfide Mineral Particles ...

260

High thermal conductivity connector having high electrical isolation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection. The connection method involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically isolating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk. The connection provides durable coupling of a heat sink and a heat source.

Nieman, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Nicol, Thomas H. (St. Charles, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Original article: Lumped-parameter-based thermal analysis of a doubly radial forced-air-cooled direct-driven permanent magnet wind generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped-parameter-based thermal analysis of a direct-driven permanent magnet wind generator with double radial forced-air cooling is presented. In the proposed thermal model, the thermal conduction and convection as well as the heating of the cooling ... Keywords: Air cooling, Permanent magnet synchronous generator, Thermal analysis, Thermal resistance networks

Janne Nerg, Vesa Ruuskanen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effective passivation of the low resistivity silicon surface by a rapid thermal oxide/PECVD silicon nitride stack and its application to passivated rear and bifacial Si solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel stack passivation scheme, in which plasma silicon nitride (SiN) is stacked on top of a rapid thermal SiO{sub 2} (RTO) layer, is developed to attain a surface recombination velocity (S) approaching 10 cm/s at the 1.3 {Omega}-cm p-type (100) silicon surface. Such low S is achieved by the stack even when the RTO and SiN films individually yield considerably poorer surface passivation. Critical to achieving low S by the stack is the use of a short, moderate temperature anneal (in this study 730 C for 30 seconds) after film growth and deposition. This anneal is believed to enhance the release and delivery of atomic hydrogen from the SiN film to the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, thereby reducing the density of interface traps at the surface. Compatibility with this post-deposition anneal makes the stack passivation scheme attractive for cost-effective solar cell production since a similar anneal is required to fire screen-printed contacts. Application of the stack to passivated rear screen-printed solar cells has resulted in V{sub oc}`s of 641 mV and 633 mV on 0.65 {Omega}-cm and 1.3 {Omega}-cm FZ Si substrates, respectively. These V{sub oc} values are roughly 20 mV higher than for cells with untreated, highly recombinative back surfaces. The stack passivation has also been used to form fully screen-printed bifacial solar cells which exhibit rear-illuminated efficiency as high as 11.6% with a single layer AR coating.

Rohatgi, A.; Narasimha, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Univ. Center for Excellence in Photovoltaics Research and Education; Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Multispectral thermal imaging  

SciTech Connect

Many remote sensing applications rely on imaging spectrometry. Here the authors use imaging spectrometry for thermal and multispectral signatures measured from a satellite platform enhanced with a combination of accurate calibrations and on-board data for correcting atmospheric distortions. The approach is supported by physics-based end-to-end modeling and analysis, which permits a cost-effective balance between various hardware and software aspects. The goal is to develop and demonstrate advanced technologies and analysis tools toward meeting the needs of the customer; at the same time, the attributes of this system can address other applications in such areas as environmental change, agriculture, and volcanology.

Weber, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Smith, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group; Garrett, A.; Pendergast, M.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Corp., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Kay, R.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Monitoring Systems and Technology Center

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Magnetorotational supernovae with resistivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We numerically investigate the effects of electrical resistivity on the dynamics of core-collapse supernovae. Initially strong magnetic fields and rapid rotations are assumed together with high resistivities. We find that resistivity acts as a negative ... Keywords: core-collapse, electric resistivity, magnetohydrodynamics, supernovae

Hidetomo Sawai; Shoichi Yamada; Kei Kotake

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others.

Farmer, J

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Dynamic thermal modelling of a power integrated circuit with the application of structure functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents dynamic thermal analyses of a power integrated circuit with a cooling assembly. The investigations are based on the examination of the cumulative and differential structure functions obtained from the circuit cooling curves recorded ... Keywords: Contact thermal resistance, Heat transfer coefficient, Structure function, Thermal modelling and simulation

Marcin Janicki; Jedrzej Banaszczyk; Gilbert De Mey; Marek Kaminski; Bjorn Vermeersch; Andrzej Napieralski

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A New Thermal-Conscious System-Level Methodology for Energy-Efficient Processor Voltage Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Thermal-Conscious System-Level Methodology for Energy-Efficient Processor Voltage Selection a thermal-conscious system-level methodology to make energy-efficient voltage selection (VS) for nanometer), thermal resistance, are integrated and considered in our system models, and their impacts on energy

Wang, Yu

270

Thermal conductance and rectification of asymmetric tilt grain boundary in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the lattice thermal transport across the asymmetry tilt grain boundary between armchair and zigzag grains by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). We have observed significant temperature drop and ultralow temperature-dependent thermal boundary resistance. Importantly, we find an unexpected thermal rectification phenomenon, i.e, the thermal conductivity and Kapitza conductance is asymmetric with respect to the thermal transport direction. And the effect of thermal rectification could be amplified by increasing the difference of temperature imposed on two sides. Our results propose a new promising kind of thermal rectifier and phonon diodes from polycrystalline graphene without delicate manupulation of the atomic structures.

Cao, Hai-Yuan; Gong, Xin-Gao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Transient plane source measurements of the thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... conductivity of (2.1–2.2) W/(m K). While the HS bounds are fairly tight in Fig. ... Res 33:363–371 8. Xu Y, Chung DDL (2000) Effect of sand addition on ...

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

Upgrades in thermal protection for downhole instruments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurement of geophysical parameters in progressively deeper and hotter wells has prompted design changes that improve the performance of downhole instruments and their associated thermal protection systems. This report provides a brief description of the mechanical and thermal loads to which these instruments and systems are subjected. Each design change made to the passive thermal protection system is described along with its resulting improvement. An outline of work being done to scope an active thermal protection system and the preliminary qualitative results are also described. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Bennett, G.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

CPC thermal collector test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of test procedures has evolved at Argonne National Laboratory for establishing the performance of compound parabolic and related concentrating thermal collectors with large angular fields of view. The procedures range from separate thermal and optical tests, to overall performance tests. A calorimetric ratio technique has been developed to determine the heat output of a collector without knowledge of the heat transfer fluid's mass flow rate and heat capacity. Sepcial attention is paid to the problem of defining and measuring the incident solar flux with respect to which the collector efficiency is to be calculated.

Reed, K A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Property:ThermalInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:ThermalInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ThermalInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 93 subproperties: A Acoustic Logs Active Seismic Methods Active Sensors Aeromagnetic Survey Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Cuttings Analysis D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Density Log Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Drilling Methods E Earth Tidal Analysis Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion

277

Electric Resistance Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to...

278

Resistance after firing protected electric match  

SciTech Connect

An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

Montoya, Arsenio P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Basics: Electric Resistance Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance...

280

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Near-field heat transfer at the spent fuel test-climax: a comparison of measurements and calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granitic stock at the DOE Nevada Test Site is a test of the feasibility of storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel in a deep geologic environment. Eleven spent fuel elements, together with six thermally identical electrical resistance heaters and 20 peripheral guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below surface in a three-drift test array. This array was designed to simulate the near-field effects of thousands of canisters of nuclear waste and to evaluate the effects of heat alone, and heat plus ionizing radiation on the rock. Thermal calculations and measurements are conducted to determine thermal transport from the spent fuel and electrical resistance heaters. Calculations associated with the as-built Spent Fuel Test geometry and thermal source histories are presented and compared with thermocouple measurements made throughout the test array. Comparisons in space begin at the spent fuel canister and include the first few metres outside the test array. Comparisons in time begin at emplacement and progress through the first year of thermal loading in this multi-year test.

Patrick, W.C.; Montan, D.N.; Ballou, L.B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Characterization of Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Corrosion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms of TBC failure after sealing have not been adequately explored. ... Bi-layer TBCs, comprising an air plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia inner ...

284

Investigation on High Thermal Stability and Creep Resistant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

05%) and Ti (1.22%) and also high atomic sum of Al+TifNb and atomic ra ... Age hardening study on Alloys 11, 13 and 15 was conducted with 950”C/lh/WC solu-.

285

Novel Molten Metal Corrosion Resistance Thermal Sprayed Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis of ...

286

Development of a Low Thermal Expansion, Crack Growth Resistant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

significant commercial usage in industries as diverse as gas turbine engine static ... Manufacturing and fabricating simplicity, and compatibility of heat treatments ...

287

Improved Thermal Shock Resistance of Shaped Alumina-Chromia ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Pb Free Piezoelectric Ceramics - Barium ... Thermographic Characterization of Tensile Behavior in Railway Bogie Materials.

288

Intergranular Thermal Residual Strain in Rolled and Texture-free ? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the intergranular thermal residual strains are determined from ... rolled and texture-free ?-uranium measured by neutron diffraction during cooling.

289

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermophysical Properties In our Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, we use a variety of instruments to measure the thermophysical properties of heat transfer fluids and storage...

290

Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds  

SciTech Connect

The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A. [NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Definition: British thermal unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal unit thermal unit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png British thermal unit The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit; often used as a unit of measure for the energy content of fuels.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule. The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg). It is still used

292

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

294

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INL’s Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

295

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

296

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

297

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effect of heat treatment temperature on binder thermal conductivities  

SciTech Connect

The effect of heat treatment on the thermal conductivities of a pitch and a polyfurfuryl alcohol binder residue was investigated. Graphites specially prepared with these two binders were used for the experiments. Measured thermal conductivities were treated in terms of a two-component system, and the binder thermal conductivities were calculated. Both binder residues showed increased thermal conductivity with increased heat treatment temperature. (auth)

Wagner, P.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Thermal transport of the single-crystal rare-earth nickel borocarbides RNi2B2C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quaternary intermetallic rare-earth nickel borocarbides RNi2B2C are a family of compounds that show magnetic behavior, superconducting behavior, and/or both. Thermal transport measurements reveal both electron and phonon scattering mechanisms, and can provide information on the interplay of these two long-range phenomena. In general the thermal conductivity kappa is dominated by electrons, and the high temperature thermal conductivity is approximately linear in temperature and anomalous. For R=Tm, Ho, and Dy the low-temperature thermal conductivity exhibits a marked loss of scattering at the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature T-N. Magnon heat conduction is suggested for R=Tm. The kappa data for R=Ho lends evidence for gapless superconductivity in this material above T-N. Unlike the case for the non-magnetic superconductors in the family, R=Y and Lu, a phonon peak in the thermal conductivity below T-c is not observed down to T=1.4 K for the magnetic superconductors. Single-crystal quality seems to have a strong effect on kappa. The electron-phonon interaction appears to weaken as one progresses from R=Lu to R=Gd. The resistivity data shows the loss of scattering at T-N for R=Dy, Tb, and Gd; and the thermoelectric power for all three of these materials exhibits an enhancement below T-N.

Hennings, BD; Naugle, Donald G.; Canfield, PC.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

302

DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wenner Array) Wenner Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

303

DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

304

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA); Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

307

Phase-coherence and symmetry in four-terminal magnetotransport measurements on InN nanowires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Universal conductance fluctuations in n-type doped InN nanowires are investigated at temperatures down to 0.35 K. The nanowires were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The effect of the contact resistance is eliminated by performing the measurements in a four-terminal configuration. We find that the decrease in the conductance fluctuation amplitude with temperature is due to small energy transfer phase-breaking processes and thermal broadening. In contrast to measurements in a two-terminal configuration, the symmetry of the conductance under magnetic field reversal is lost.

Frielinghaus, R.; Estevez Hernandez, S.; Calarco, R.; Schaepers, Th. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Proliferation resistance: issues, initiatives and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vision of a nuclear renaissance has highlighted the issue of proliferation resistance. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance. The GenIV International Forum (GIF) and others have devoted attention and resources to proliferation resistance. However, the hope of finding a way to make the peaceful uses of nuclear energy resistant to proliferation has reappeared again and again in the history of nuclear power with little practical consequence. The concept of proliferation resistance has usually focused on intrinsic (technological) as opposed to extrinsic (institutional) factors. However, if there are benefits that may yet be realized from reactors and other facilities designed to minimize proliferation risks, it is their coupling with effective safeguards and other nonproliferation measures that likely will be critical. Proliferation resistance has also traditionally been applied only to state threats. Although there are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, technology can play a limited role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating many non-state threats. These and other issues are not academic. They affect efforts to evaluate proliferation resistance, including the methodology developed by GIF's Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group as well as the proliferation resistance initiatives that are being pursued or may be developed in the future. This paper will offer a new framework for thinking about proliferation resistance issues, including the ways the output of the methodology could be developed to inform the decisions that states, the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) and others will have to make in order to fully realize the promise of a nuclear renaissance.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY ANALYSIS OF GASES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for the quantitative analysis of a gaseous mixture at subatmospheric pressure by measurement of its thermal conductivity. A heated wire forms one leg of a bridge circuit, while the gas under test is passed about the wire at a constant rate. The bridge unbalance will be a measure of the change in composition of the gas, if compensation is made for the effect due to gas pressure change. The apparatus provides a voltage varying with fluctuations of pressure in series with the indicating device placed across the bridge, to counterbalance the voltage change caused by fluctuations in the pressure of the gaseous mixture.

Clark, W.J.

1949-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Guiniatouline, R.N. [Efremov Institute, (Russia); Kupriynov, I.B. [Russian Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russia)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Thermal Stability of Li-Ion Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal stability of Li-ion cells with intercalating carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes was measured as a function of state of charge and temperature for two advanced cell chemistries. Cells of the 18650 design with Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} cathodes (commercial SONY cells) and Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathodes were measured for thermal reactivity in the open circuit cell condition. Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) was used to measure cell thermal runaway as a function of state of charge (SOC). Microcalorimetry was used to measure the time dependence of heat generating side reactions also as a function of SOC. Components of cells were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the thermal reactivity of the individual electrodes to determine the temperature regimes and conditions of the major thermal reactions. Thermal decomposition of the SEI layer at the anodes was identified as the initiating source for thermal runaway. The cells with Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} cathodes showed greater sensitivity to SOC and higher accelerating heating rates than seen for the cells with Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}cathodes. Lower temperature reactions starting as low as 40 C were also observed that were SOC dependent but not accelerating. These reactions were also measured in the microcalorimeter and observed to decay over time with a power-law dependence and are believed to result in irreversible capacity loss in the cells.

ROTH,EMANUEL P.

1999-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

In-situ biofouling of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico Center for Energy and Environmental Research equipped a LCU facility in 1100 m of water near Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico to measure in situ biofouling of simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion evaporator tubes. The system consisted of two 5052 aluminum alloy and two titanium tubes, through which a continuous flow of ocean water was maintained. The tubes were cleaned three times and the fouling resistance was measured, showing only slight differences between the tubes with respect to heat transfer loss resulting from biofouling. In all units, the average fouling rate after cleaning was greater than before cleaning, and only after the first cleaning did the aluminum units show greater fouling rates than did the titanium. The titanium units showed a progressive increase in the fouling rates with each cleaning. The subsequent average fouling rates for all units after eight months were between 4 and 4.6 x 0.000010 sq m-k/W-day.

Sasscer, D.S. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez); Morgan, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

High temperature, low expansion, corrosion resistant ceramic and gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to ZrO.sub.2 -MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 ceramic materials having improved thermal stability and corrosion resistant properties. The utilization of these ceramic materials as heat exchangers for gas turbine engines is also disclosed.

Rauch, Sr., Harry W. (Lionville, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Improvement of the Stress Corrosion Resistance of Alloy 718 in the PWR Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs associated with replacement of high-strength, nickel- base in-core components has led to efforts to improve corrosion resistance by various thermal, chemical and mechanical means. This report describes efforts designed to optimize the SCC resistance of alloy 718 in the PWR environment.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

Coupled power and thermal simulation with active cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Power is rapidly becoming the primary design constraint for systems ranging from server computers to handhelds. In this paper we study microarchitecture-level coupled power and thermal simulation considering dynamic and leakage power models with temperature and voltage scaling. We develop an accurate temperature-dependent leakage power model and efficient temperature calculation, and show that leakage energy can be different by up to 10X for temperatures between 35 o C and 110 o C. Given the growing significance of leakage power and its sensitive dependence on temperature, no power simulation without considering dynamic temperature calculation is accurate. Furthermore, we discuss the thermal runaway induced by the interdependence between leakage power and temperature, and show that in the near future thermal runaway could be a severe problem. We also study the microarchitecture level coupled power and thermal management by novel active cooling techniques that reduce packaging thermal resistance. We show that the active cooling technique that reduces thermal resistance from 0.8 o C/W to 0.05 o C/W can increase system maximum clock by up to 2.44X under the same thermal constraints. 1

Weiping Liao; Lei He

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

320

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Abstract Self potential and electrical resistivity surveys have been completed at the Blue Mountain geothermal area to search for the source of thermal fluids discovered during drilling for mineral exploration, and to help characterize the geothermal resource. Two large SP anomalies are associated with the artesian thermal area and the area of highest temperature observed in drill holes. Two similar anomalies were mapped 1 to 3 km to the south

322

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

Schobert, H.H.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there are increasing evidence for a thermal emission component that accompanies the overall non-thermal spectra of the prompt emission phase in GRBs. Both the temperature and flux of the thermal emission show a well defined temporal behavior, a broken power law in time. The temperature is nearly constant during the first few seconds, afterwards it decays with power law index alpha ~0.7. The thermal flux also decays at late times as a power law with index beta ~2.1. This behavior is very ubiquitous, and was observed in a sample currently containing 32 BATSE bursts. These results are naturally explained by considering emission from the photosphere. The photosphere of a relativistically expanding plasma wind strongly depends on the angle to the line of sight, theta. As a result, thermal emission can be seen after tens of seconds. By introducing probability density function P(r,theta) of a thermal photon to escape the plasma at radius r and angle theta, the late time behavior of the flux can be reproduced analytically. During the propagation below the photosphere, thermal photons lose energy as a result of the slight misalignment of the scattering electrons velocity vectors, which leads to photon comoving energy decay epsilon'(r)~r^{-2/3}. This in turn can explain the decay of the temperature observed at late times. Finally, I show that understanding the thermal emission is essential in understanding the high energy, non-thermal spectra. Moreover, thermal emission can be used to directly measure the Lorentz factor of the flow and the initial jet radius.

Asaf Pe'er

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

326

Solar Thermal Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with â??Kalwallâ?? building panels. An added feature of the â??Kalwallâ? system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

A study on the electrical resistance of the frog sartorius muscle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Four different methods of measuring the resistance of a muscle fiber have been applied to the frog sartorins muscle. The methods, in which the resistance of the microelectrode entered the calculation of the effective resistance of the fiber, resulted in values which were 8 times higher than the resistance values obtained with methods independent of the electrode resistance. A simple cable model of a muscle fiber could not account for the discrepancy in the effective resistance found in these measurements; therefore, an enlarged cable model for a muscle fiber has been proposed, and its biological implications have been discussed. The effective resistance (measured with the two different groups of methods) decreased when the potassium concentration in the bath increased. Using the proposed enlarged cable model for the interpretation of these results, it is shown that not only the membrane resistance but also the myoplasmic resistance decreases with an increasing potassium concentration in the Ringer solution.

Otto Schanne; Hikoshi Kawata; Barbel Schafer

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method for transferring thermal energy and electrical current in thin-film electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved electrochemical generator is disclosed. The electrochemical generator includes a thin-film electrochemical cell which is maintained in a state of compression through use of an internal or an external pressure apparatus. A thermal conductor, which is connected to at least one of the positive or negative contacts of the cell, conducts current into and out of the cell and also conducts thermal energy between the cell and thermally conductive, electrically resistive material disposed on a vessel wall adjacent the conductor. The thermally conductive, electrically resistive material may include an anodized coating or a thin sheet of a plastic, mineral-based material or conductive polymer material. The thermal conductor is fabricated to include a resilient portion which expands and contracts to maintain mechanical contact between the cell and the thermally conductive material in the presence of relative movement between the cell and the wall structure. The electrochemical generator may be disposed in a hermetically sealed housing.

Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Ranger, Michel (Lachine, CA); Sudano, Anthony (Laval, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN); Turgeon, Thomas A. (Fridley, MN)

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Abstract The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource's connectivity, therefore making fracture characterization highly important. This study aims to develop methodologies to use resistivity measurements to infer fracture properties in geothermal fields. The resistivity distribution in the field can be estimated by measuring potential differences between various points and the data can then be used to infer fracture properties due to the contrast in resistivity between water and rock.

331

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams  

SciTech Connect

The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; /SLAC; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermal conduction and particle transport in strong MHD turbulence, with application to galaxy-cluster plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate field-line separation in strong MHD turbulence analytically and with direct numerical simulations. We find that in the static-magnetic-field approximation the thermal conductivity in galaxy clusters is reduced by a factor of about 5-10 relative to the Spitzer thermal conductivity of a non-magnetized plasma. We also estimate how the thermal conductivity would be affected by efficient turbulent resistivity.

Benjamin D. G. Chandran; Jason L. Maron

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Terrain effects in resistivity and magnetotelluric surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional finite element computer algorithm which can accommodate arbitrarily complex topography and subsurface structure, has been developed to model the resistivity response of the earth. The algorithm has undergone extensive evaluation and is believed to provide accurate results for realistic earth models. Testing included comparison to scale model measurements, analytically calculated solutions, and results calculated numerically by other independent means. Computer modeling experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to remove the effect of topography on resistivity data under conditions where such effects dominate the response. This can be done without resorting to lengthy and costly trial and error computer modeling. After correction, the data can be interpreted with confidence that the anomalies are due only to subsurface structure. The results of case studies on resistivity field data measured in high relief topography are discussed.

Holcombe, H.T.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

RF-THERMAL COMBINED SIMULATIONS OF A SUPERCONDUCTING HOM COAXIAL COUPLER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To benchmark a multi-physics code VORPAL developed by Tech-X, the High Order Mode (HOM) coaxial coupler design implemented in Jefferson Lab?s 12GeV upgrade cryomodules is analyzed by use of commercial codes, such as ANSYS, HFSS and Microwave Studio. Testing data from a Horizontal Test Bench (HTB) experiment on a dual-cavity prototype are also utilized in the verification of simulation results. The work includes two stages: first, the HOM feedthrough that has a high RRR niobium probe and sapphire insulator is analyzed for the RF-thermal response when there is travelling wave passing through; second, the HTB testing condition is simulated and results from simulation are compared to thermal measurements from HTB tests. The analyses are of coupled-field nature and involve highly nonlinear temperature dependent thermal conductivities and electric resistivities for the eight types of materials used in the design. Accuracy and efficiency are the main factors in evaluation of the performance of the codes.

Guangfeng Cheng, Haipeng Wang, David Smithe

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

"Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Examining the effects of mid ocean ridge topography on 3D marine magnetometric resistivity model responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods which measure seafloor resistivity are uniquely suited to studying hydrothermal circulation in the crust. The magnetometric resistivity (MMR) technique is a galvanic method which uses a bipole current source with ...

Lassner, Lisa A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

Guidotti, Ronald Armand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An evaluation of the thermal characteristics of a flat plate heat pipe spreader  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evaluation of the thermal characteristics of a flat plate heat pipe spreader was performed through an analytical, numerical, and experimental analysis. The physical system considered was comprised of a high heat flux heat source attached to the center of a flat plate heat pipe, mounted at the base of a plate-finned heat sink and cooled by forced convection. In the analysis, the theoretical maximum operating conditions for the heat pipe are predicted, and it is found that the specific heat pipe configuration would most likely fail based on capillary limitations of the wick structure for conditions typical of electronic cooling applications. The mass and heat transfer processes which contribute to the capillary limitation were considered in theory, and a novel technique which utilizes well-known conventional heat pipe relations for pressure loss was developed to estimate the point of heat pipe failure. In addition, a thermal resistance network was developed in an effort to predict the temperature drop across the heat pipe spreader. Through a separate approach, a numerical model was developed to solve the conjugate problem of heat transfer in the heat pipe/heat sink with turbulent forced convection. In this approach, the heat pipe was modeled as a solid material having a high effective conductivity. Finally, the system was tested experimentally, and the results were compared to the analytical and numerical results. It was found that the capillary limit model over-predicted the measured point of heat pipe failure by several orders of magnitude, and the resistance model under-represented the actual resistance by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition, a change in thermal resistance with power input was discovered during experimentation that was not predicted by the analysis. The numerical model was compared to the experimental results and a relation for the effective conductivity as a function of power input was determined. Complexities associated with the internal heat and mass transfer processes of the flat plate heat pipe spreader were thoroughly discussed and the discrepancies between the experimental and analytical results were examined.

Chesser, Jason Blake

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations ...

346

Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.4 Thermal Modeling . . . . . . . .63 Table 4.3: Thermal Hot Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Performance-Efficient Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . .

Co?kun, Ay?e K?v?lc?m

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes 18 USGS Schlumberger soundings and 6 Schlumberger soundings by Furgerson (1973) were plotted and automatically processed and interpreted References Jackson, D.B. ODonnell, J.E.; Gregory, D. I. (1 January 1977) Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric mapping in and around the Coso Range, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DC_Resistivity_Survey_(Schlumberger_Array)_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=591389

348

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Magnetotelluric measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ideas of flux quantization and Josephson tunneling are reviewed, and the operation of the dc SQUID as a magnetometer is described. The SQUID currently used for magnetotellurics has a sensitivity of 10/sup -14/ T Hz/sup -1/2/, a dynamic range at 10/sup 7/ in a 1 Hz bandwidth, a frequency response from 0 to 40 kHz, and a slewing rate of 5 x 10/sup -5/T s/sup -1/. Recent improvements in sensitivity are discussed: SQUIDS are rapidly approaching the limit imposed by the uncertainty principle. The essential ideas of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements are outlined, and it is shown how the remote reference method can lead to major reductions in bias errors compared to more conventional schemes. The field techniques of the Berkeley group are described. The practical application of MT requires that amplitude and phase spectra of apparent resistivities be transformed into a geologically useful distribution of subsurface resistivities. In many areas where MT is being applied today, the technique may not provide the information needed because stations are too few and widely spaced, or because we are unable to interpret data influenced by complex 3-D resistivity features. The results of two surveys, one detailed, the other regional, over the Klamath Basin, Oregon, are examined. The detailed survey is able to resolve small (1 km wide) structural features that are missed or add a component of spatial aliasing to the regional data. On the other hand, the regional survey avoids truncation effects that may occur when the survey undersamples an area.

Clarke, J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Corrosion resistant refractory ceramics for slagging gasifier environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle power systems are the most efficient and economical power generation systems with a relatively low environmental impact. The gasification process requires the optimal design of gasifiers with extremely corrosion resistant refractory lining. The majority of the refractory materials tested for gasifier lining applications cannot resist the action of slagging corrosive environment combined with high operation temperatures as high as 1600?C and possible thermal shocks and thermal expansion mismatch between the lining and the slag. Silicon carbide-based ceramics and some zirconia- and zircon-based ceramics manufactured by Ceramic Protection Corporation (CPC) have been tested in a simulated coal-fired slagging gasifier environment at a temperature of 1500?C. Crucible ceramic samples have been examined after exposure to the slag at high temperature. Microstructure studies of the ceramic zone contacted with the slag have been carried out. The highest performance, i.e. the absence of corrosion damage and thermal cracking after testing, was observed for silicon carbide-based ceramics ABSC formed by silicon carbide grains with an optimized particle size distribution bonded by the aluminosilicate crystalline-glassy matrix. Dense zirconia and alumina-zirconia and slightly porous zircon ceramics demonstrated comparatively lower performance due to their lower corrosion resistance and greater thermal cracking. ABSC ceramics can be manufactured as thick-walled large components and may be considered as a promising material for gasifier refractory applications. Similar ceramics, but with finer grain sizes, may also be recommended for thermocouple protection.

Medvedovski, E. (Ceramic Protection Corp., Calgary, Alberta, Canada); Chinn, Richard E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermomechanical behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.  

SciTech Connect

The effect of coating porosity and thickness on the resistance to damage of yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings in an oxidizing environment by thermal cycling was evaluated. Hardness and elastic modulus of an as-processed porous coating were lower than those of a dense coating and the porous coating failed after fewer thermal cycles. Similarly, specimen with a thicker coating failed after fewer thermal cycles than specimen with a thinner coating. The earlier failure of the porous coating is due to lower fracture toughness and enhanced oxidation of the coating/substrate interface, whereas, the earlier failure of the thick coating is due to higher thermal transient stresses that developed in the coating during thermal cycling. Generally, an increase in coating density led to initial increase in both hardness and elastic modulus with increasing thermal cycles. However, hardness and density gradually decreased as the number of thermal cycles increase because of microcracks formation and growth. Microscopic observations indicated that the formation of multiple microcracks and their subsequent growth and coalescence led to final coating failure.

Singh, J. P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Accurate Characteristic Impedance Measurement on Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The resistance R per unit length of a transmission line can be determined from the lines' measured characteristic impedance Z and propagation ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

NEHRP - Earthquake Resistant Design Research Needs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Library. Research Needs Reports Earthquake Resistant Design. Earthquake Resistant Design. 2011. Research Plan for the ...

356

Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Resistivity Log Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Lithologic and resistivity logs from wells drilled into areas of less than 20 ohm-m resistivity show clay mineralization resulting from hydrothermal alteration within the volcanic fill (Nordquist, 1987). Low resistivity in the vicinity of well 44-16, identified in wellbore geophysical logs and two dimensional MT modeling is restricted to the thermal-fluid reservoirs in the early rhyolite and Bishop Tuff (Nordquist, 1987; Suemnicht, 1987). The MT data suggest that the resistivity structure near Mammoth Mountain is

357

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A dipole-dipole resistivity survey of the area was carried out with estimated penetration up to 700 meters and no indication of low values of resistivity were found associated with the thermal anomaly. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=510539

358

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials… (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Pressure dependence of the c-axis resistivity of graphite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The c-axis resistivity of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite has been measured from 2 to 300 K under hydrostatic pressures of up to 40 kbar. A resistivity peak near 40 K, typical for this type of graphite at ambient pressure, rapidly diminishes with increasing pressure but does not shift its position with respect to temperature. This observation suggests that the origin of the resistivity peak is not in a strong electron-phonon interaction but is associated with a particular structural matrix of these artificially produced graphites. A model is proposed, based on tunneling between microcrystallites, which accounts for the peculiar temperature and pressure dependence of the resistivity.

Uher, C.; Hockey, R.L.; Ben-Jacob, E.

1987-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Definition: Thermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Thermal energy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal energy The kinetic energy associated with the random motions of the molecules of a material or object; often used interchangeably with the terms heat and heat energy. Measured in joules, calories, or Btu.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Thermal energy is the part of the total potential energy and kinetic energy of an object or sample of matter that results in the system temperature. It is represented by the variable Q, and can be measured in Joules. This quantity may be difficult to determine or even meaningless unless the system has attained its temperature only through warming (heating), and not been subjected to work input or output, or any other

364

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Properties of Thermal Glueballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the 0++ glueball at finite temperature using SU(3) quenched lattice QCD. We find a significant thermal effects near T_c. We perform the \\chi^2 fit analyses adopting two Ansaetze for the spectral function, i.e., the conventional narrow-peak Ansatz and an advanced Breit-Wigner Ansatz. The latter is an extension of the former, taking account of the appearance of the thermal width at T>0. We also perform the MEM analysis. These analyses indicate that the thermal effect on the glueball is a significant thermal-width broadening \\Gamma(T_c) \\sim 300 MeV together with a modest reduction in the peak center \\Delta\\omega_0(T_c) \\sim 100 MeV.

Noriyoshi Ishii; Hideo Suganuma

2003-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Thermal Modeling and Device Noise Properties of Three-Dimensional-SOI Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal test structures and ring oscillators (ROs) are fabricated in 0.18-mum three-dimensional (3-D)-SOI technology. Measurements and electrothermal simulations show that thermal and parasitic effects due to 3-D packaging ...

Chen, Tze Wee

371

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

372

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Heat transfer through porous multiphase systems measurement, modelling and applications in printing of coated papers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work examines the thermal transfer through porous media by means of measurement of the effective thermal conductivity and modelling of the structural parameters. While… (more)

Gerstner, Philip

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gabel and Andresen, HVAC Secondary Toolkil. Atlanta: ASHRAE,P_02 Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Designdesign and operation of the HVAC thermal distribution system

Franconi, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

377

PROBLEM 13.94 KNOWN: Diameter, temperature and emissivity of boiler tube. Thermal conductivity and emissivity of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROBLEM 13.94 KNOWN: Diameter, temperature and emissivity of boiler tube. Thermal conductivity of 0.5 mm), Td = 773 K nd the ash provides a significant resistance to heat transfer.a COMMENTS: Boiler

Rothstein, Jonathan

378

Theoretical investigation of the impact of grain boundaries and fission gases on UO2 thermal conductivity  

SciTech Connect

Thermal conductivity is one of the most important metrics of nuclear fuel performance. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of microstructure features on thermal conductivity, especially since the microstructure evolves with burn-up or time in the reactor. For example, UO{sub 2} fuels are polycrystalline and for high-burnup fuels the outer parts of the pellet experience grain sub-division leading to a very fine grain structure. This is known to impact important physical properties such as thermal conductivity as fission gas release. In a previous study, we calculated the effect of different types of {Sigma}5 grain boundaries on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity and predicted the corresponding Kapitza resistances, i.e. the resistance of the grain boundary in relation to the bulk thermal resistance. There have been reports of pseudoanisotropic effects for the thermal conductivity in cubic polycrystalline materials, as obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, which means that the conductivity appears to be a function of the crystallographic direction of the temperature gradient. However, materials with cubic symmetry should have isotropic thermal conductivity. For this reason it is necessary to determine the cause of this apparent anisotropy and in this report we investigate this effect in context of our earlier simulations of UO{sub 2} Kapitza resistances. Another source of thermal resistance comes from fission products and fission gases. Xe is the main fission gas and when generated in sufficient quantity it dissolves from the lattice and forms gas bubbles inside the crystalline structure. We have performed studies of how Xe atoms dissolved in the UO{sub 2} matrix or precipitated as bubbles impact thermal conductivity, both in bulk UO{sub 2} and in the presence of grain boundaries.

Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optics, mask and resist implications on contact CDU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mask and condenser roughness plays important in contact CDU. Resist blur drives both dose requirements and mask specs. Correlation methods can be used to measure mask contributions to CDU.

Naulleau, Patrick

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

On the focusing of thermal images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new thermographic image database, suitable for the analysis of automatic focusing measures. This database contains the images of 10 scenes, each of which is represented once for each of 96 different focus positions. Using this ... Keywords: Database, Focus, Image quality, Thermal image

Marcos Faundez-Zanuy; Ji?í Mekyska; Virginia Espinosa-Duró

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers  

SciTech Connect

The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Thermal conductivity modeling of building façade materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental research has been conducted to assess the thermo-physical properties of three building materials in both dry and moist state: beech wood, autoclaved aerated concrete and brick. The objectives of the paper envisage the measurement of the ... Keywords: building materials, contact temperature, determining method, finite element, numerical modeling, thermal conductivity

Monica Chereches; Nelu-Cristian Chereches; Catalin Popovici

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Photoacoustic Thermal Characterization of a Natural Biofoam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... thermal properties that permit its use as an effective insulation material. ... Evolution of Crystallographic Texture of Cold Roll Bonding and Annealing Ti-Al- Nb Multilayer Sheets ... Thermodynamic Measurement of CaO-P2O5-SiO2 System.

384

Development of plastic heat exchangers for ocean thermal energy conversion. Final report, August 1976--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials and processes have been selected and design information obtained for plastic ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers as the result of a program comprising five types of laboratory experiments. Tests to evaluate the chemical resistance of seven commercially available thermoplastics to sea water and several possible working fluids were conducted with emphasis placed on compatibility with ammonia. Environmental rupture tests involving exposure of stressed specimens to sea water or liquid ammonia indicated that the high density polyethylene (HDPE) is the best suited candidate and produced an extrapolated 100,000 hour failure stress of 1060 psi for HDPE. Long term durability tests of extruded HDPE plate-tube panel confirmed that plastic heat transfer surface is mechanically reliable in an OTEC environment. Thermal conductivity measurements of acetylene black filled HDPE indicated that conductivity may be increased by 50% with a 35% by weight filler loading. The permeability coefficient measured for liquid ammonia through HDPE was higher than previous estimates. Test showed that the rate can be significantly reduced by sulfonation of HDPE. A review of biofouling mechanisms revealed that the permeable nature of the plastic heat exchanger surface may be used to control primary biofouling form formation by allowing incorporation of non-toxic organic repellents into the plastic. A preliminary design and fabrication development program suggests that construction of an ammonia condenser test unit is feasible using currently available materials and manufacturing techniques.

Hart, G.K.; Lee, C.O.; Latour, S.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Current measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods are provided for a system for measurement of a current in a conductor such that the conductor current may be momentarily directed to a current measurement element in order to maintain proper current without significantly increasing an amount of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element or adding resistance to assist in current measurement. The apparatus and methods described herein are useful in superconducting circuits where it is necessary to monitor current carried by the superconducting elements while minimizing the effects of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element.

Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel comes in many forms; oxide fuel is the most commonly used in current reactor systems while metal fuel is a promising fuel type for future reactors due to neutronic performance and increased thermal conductivity. As a key heat transfer parameter, thermal conductivity describes the heat transport properties of a material based upon the density, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity. A material’s ability to transport thermal energy through its structure is a measurable property known as thermal diffusivity; the units for thermal diffusivity are given in area per unit time (e.g., m2/s). Current measurement methods for thermal diffusivity include LASER (or light) Flash Analysis and the hot-wire method. This study examines an approach that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA), and it induces a radial transient across a packed sample of microspheres then monitors the temperature profile using an array of thermocouples located at different distances from the source of the thermal transient. From the thermocouple data and an accurate time log, the thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated. Results indicate that DU microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer. At 500°C, the thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was 0.431 ± 13% W/m-K compared to approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal. Characterization of the developed apparatus revealed a method that may be useful for measuring the thermal diffusivity of powders and liquids.

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermal Management ofUniversity of California, Riverside Acknowledgments First, I

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Triple-material stress-strain resistivity gage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triple material piezoresistive gage provides multi-component elastic stress or strain measurements. Thin foils of three piezoresistive materials, e.g., ytterbium, manganin, and constantan, are configured in a nested serpentine rectilinear grind or other grind arrangement and embedded in a medium, preferably normal to the direction of shock wave propagation. The output of the gage is a resistivity change history for each material of gage. Each resistivity change is independent of the others so that three diagonal components of the elastic stress or strain tensor can be calculated form the resistivity measurements. 4 figs.

Stout, R.B.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Triple-material stress-strain resistivity gage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triple material piezoresistive gage provides multi-component elastic stress measurements is disclosed. Thin foils of three piezoresistive materials, e.g. ytterbium, manganin, and constantan, are configured in a nested serpentine rectilinear grid or other grid arrangement and embedded in a medium, preferably normal to the direction of shock wave propagation. The output of the gage is a resistivity change history for each material of the gage. Each resistivity change is independent of the others so that three diagonal components of the elastic stress or strain tensor can be calculated from the resistivity measurements. 4 figs.

Stout, R.B.

1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Triple-material stress-strain resistivity gage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triple material piezoresistive gage provides multi-component elastic stress or measurements. Thin foils of three piezoresistive materials, e.g. ytterbium, manganin, and constantan, are configured in a nested serpentine rectilinear grid or other grid arrangement and embedded in a medium, preferably normal to the direction of shock wave propagation. The output of the gage is a resistivity change history for each material of the gage. Each resistivity change is independent of the others so that three diagonal components of the elastic stress or strain tensor can be calculated from the resistivity measurements.

Stout, Ray B. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Improvement of Contact Resistance with Molecular Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

Basic characteristics of ClusterBoron (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}) implantation were investigated for improving contact resistance in DRAM devices. Generally, {sup 49}BF{sub 2} has been widely used for contact implant application in DRAM manufacturing because of its higher productivity compared to monomer boron ({sup 11}B). However, because of limited activation in a low thermal budget ({approx}800 deg. C) anneal, the sheet resistance was saturated for doses over 5x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Although many investigations have been reported, such as {sup 30}BF implant mixed implant with monomer boron etc., no practical solution has been found for dramatic improvement of contact resistance in a productive manner. B{sub 18}H{sub 22} was developed to overcome the productivity limitations encountered in low energy, high dose boron implantation and the limited activation of {sup 49}BF{sub 2} due to co-implanted fluorine. In this study, basic characterization of the B{sub 18}H{sub 22} contact implant was performed through sheet resistance, SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) and XTEM (cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy). The B{sub 18}H{sub 22} implants showed lower sheet resistance than conventional {sup 49}BF{sub 2} for 5x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} on bare wafer tests. Through XTEM study, we found the activation behavior of both B{sub 18}H{sub 22} and {sup 49}BF{sub 2} were directly related with the amorphous layer thickness and residual defects from low thermal budget anneal. PMOS contact resistance in the sub-70 nm device by B{sub 18}H{sub 22} implantation showed considerable improvement (about 30%), showing B{sub 18}H{sub 22} could replace the BF{sub 2} for contact implant in contact resistance implant.

Lee, Kyung Won [Axcelis Technologies Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Sungkyunkwan University., 300 Cheoncheon, Jangan, Suwon, Kyoungki-do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Ku; Oh, Jae Geun; Ju, Min Ae; Jeon, Seung Joon; Ku, Ja Chun; Park, Sung Ki [Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami, Bubal, Ichon, Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Tae Hoon; Kim, Steve; Ra, Geum Joo; Harris, Mark A.; Reece, Ronald N. [Axcelis Technologies Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Yoon, Dae Ho [Sungkyunkwan University., 300 Cheoncheon, Jangan, Suwon, Kyoungki-do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Solar-thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermal characterization of Li-ion cells using calorimetric techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal stability of Li-ion cells with intercalating carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes was measured as a function of state of charge and temperature for two advanced cell chemistries. Cells of the 18650 design with Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} cathodes (commercial Sony cells) and Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathodes were measured for thermal reactivity. Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) was used to measure cell thermal runaway as a function of state of charge (SOC), microcalorimetry was used to measure the time dependence of thermal output, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the thermal reactivity of the individual components. Thermal decomposition of the anode solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer occurred at low temperatures and contributes to the initiation of thermal runaway. Low temperature reactions from 40 C--70 C were observed during the ARC runs that were SOC dependent. These reactions measured in the microcalorimeter decayed over time with power-law dependence and were highly sensitive to SOC and temperature. ARC runs of aged and cycled cells showed complete absence of these low-temperature reactions but showed abrupt exothermic spikes between 105--135 C. These results suggest that during aging the anode SEI layer is decomposing from a metastable state to a stable composition that is breaking down at elevated temperatures.

ROTH,EMANUEL P.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams  

SciTech Connect

The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

THERMAL PHASES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS: ESTIMATING THERMAL INERTIA FROM ECCENTRICITY, OBLIQUITY, AND DIURNAL FORCING  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like the modern Earth) and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. Orbital eccentricity and seasonal changes in albedo cause variations in the global-mean absorbed flux. The responses of the two climates to these global seasons indicate that the temperate planet has 3 Multiplication-Sign the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The obliquity seasons in the temperate simulation are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-equatorial heat transport have qualitatively different effects on obliquity seasons, insofar as heat transport tends to reduce seasonal amplitude without inducing a phase lag. For an Earth-like planet, however, this effect is masked by the mixing of signals from low thermal inertia regions (sea ice and land) with that from high thermal inertia regions (oceans), which also produces a damped response with small phase lag. We then simulate thermal light curves as they would appear to a high-contrast imaging mission (TPF-I/Darwin). In order of importance to the present simulations, which use modern-Earth orbital parameters, the three drivers of thermal phase variations are (1) obliquity seasons, (2) diurnal cycle, and (3) global seasons. Obliquity seasons are the dominant source of phase variations for most viewing angles. A pole-on observer would measure peak-to-trough amplitudes of 13% and 47% for the temperate and snowball climates, respectively. Diurnal heating is important for equatorial observers ({approx}5% phase variations), because the obliquity effects cancel to first order from that vantage. Finally, we compare the prospects of optical versus thermal direct imaging missions for constraining the climate on exoplanets and conclude that while zero- and one-dimensional models are best served by thermal measurements, second-order models accounting for seasons and planetary thermal inertia would require both optical and thermal observations.

Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Voigt, Aiko [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 53, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: n-cowan@nortwestern.edu [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fuzzy Categorization of Weather Conditions for Thermal Mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal mapping is a technique that uses a vehicle-mounted infrared radiometer to measure the variation of road surface temperature (RST). Conventionally, the technique is conducted under three qualitatively categorized weather conditions: ...

J. Shao

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cause of super-thermal electron heating during magnetotail reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We present a candidate mechanism for the energization of super-thermal electrons during magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail. By analyzing in-situ measurements of electron distribution functions we characterize ...

Egedal-Pedersen, Jan

405

Raman Spectroscopy of High Thermal Conductivity AlN Ceramics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity of AlN ceramics was measured by laser flash method. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize oxygen related defects of AlN ... Transport in Co-Based Materials for Fuel Cells and Oxygen Separation Membranes.

406

MoWiTT: The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow schematic MoWiTT: The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility In the MoWiTT facility, efficient window-and-frame systems are measured to understand the flow of energy through...

407

Aero-Thermal Performance Testing of Silicon Carbide Flexible TPS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and gas-phase measurements including infrared pyrometry, cold-wall heat flux, total pressure, and ... A Review of Metallic Systems Used in Offshore, Sour Environments: The Effect of ... High-temperature Foam-reinforced Thermal Insulation.

408

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures have been obtained to depths up to 133 m in 22 boreholes with measurements being made at least four times in each borehole. Geothermal gradients ranged from 240C/km to 450 0C/km. References Combs, J. (1 December 1976) Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=511217"

409

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Tuning the Electrical Resistivity in Hot-Deformed Nd-Fe-B Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study it was found by four-point measurements that hot-compacted magnets have a comparable electrical resistivity as sintered magnets. With higher ...

414

Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect

A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

Hirayama, Chikara (Murrysville, PA); Wagner, George R. (Murrysville, PA)

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

Resistance after firing protected electric match. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

Montoya, A.P.

1980-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal noise of a mirror is one of the limiting noise sources in the high precision measurement such as gravitational-wave detection, and the modeling of thermal noise has been developed and refined over a decade. In this paper, we present a derivation of coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The result agrees to a previous result with an infinite-size mirror in the limit of large thickness, and also agrees to an independent result based on the mode expansion with a thin-mirror approximation. Our study will play an important role not only to accurately estimate the thermal-noise level of gravitational-wave detectors but also to help analyzing thermal noise in quantum-measurement experiments with lighter mirrors.

Kentaro Somiya; Kazuhiro Yamamoto

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

419

Heat-Resistant Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Nominal compositions of selected heat-resistant nickel alloys...max 0.15 max Cu Gas turbines, rocket engines, nuclear applications N07750 Inconel X-750 15.5 73.0 � � 1.0 2.5 0.7 7.0 0.04 0.25 max Cu Gas turbine components, pressure vessels,

420

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Experimental and analytical systems studies of a combined thermal-photovoltaic residential solar system. Technical status report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical progress reported included testing of the corrosion resistance of a turbine flow meter and parametric studies using computerized simulation of a combined thermal-photovoltaic concentrating collector, thermal storage tank, absorption air conditioner with auxiliary heater, and a load. Also, work on a test facility, including data processing equipment and a cooling load simulator, is reported. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Improved tunnel resistance of silvered-polymer mirrors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the research performed at the Solar Energy Research Institute during fiscal year (FY) 1991 to develop ways to prevent delamination failure (known as tunneling) of silvered-polymer reflector materials. Several promising approaches have been identified and demonstrated that substantially reduce such failures. These approaches include (1) use of Tedlar edge tape rather than the manufacturer-recommended ECP-244 tape, (2) thermal treatment of laminated reflector/substrate constructions, and (3) application of silver to the polymer film through an alternative deposition process. Approaches 1 and 2 offer readily available engineering solutions to the delamination problem. Approaches 2 and 3 provide tunnel resistance over the entire surface of the reflector material, including the edges. Tedlar (a polyvinyl fluoride from DuPont) tape is an opaque white tape available in different widths from 3M Company. The base material has demonstrated outstanding outdoor durability. Thermal treatment of ECP-305 laminated to substrate materials has demonstrated outstanding resistance to tunneling. Alternative silver deposition techniques such as sputtering (rather than thermal evaporation) offer increased resistance to tunneling. 15 refs., 10 figs.

Jorgensen, G.; Schissel, P.; Kennedy, C.; Shinton, Y.; Powell, D.; Siebarth, J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal contact conductance is highly important in a wide variety of applications, from the cooling of electronic chips to the thermal management of spacecraft. The demand for increased efficiency means that components need to withstand higher temperatures and heat transfer rates. Many situations call for contact heat transfer through nominally cylindrical interfaces, yet relatively few studies of contact conductance through cylindrical interfaces have been undertaken. This study presents a review of the experimental and theoretical investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of composite cylinders, presenting data available in open literature in comparison with relevant correlations. The present investigation presents a study of the thermal contact conductance of cylindrical interfaces. The experimental investigation of sixteen different material combinations offers an opportunity to develop predictive correlations of the contact conductance, in conjunction with an analysis of the interface pressure as a function of the thermal state of the individual cylindrical shells. Experimental results of the present study are compared with previously published conductance data and conductance models.

Ayers, George Harold

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Phase Transformation Hysteresis in a Plutonium Alloy System: Modeling the Resistivity during the Transformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have induced, measured, and modeled the {delta}-{alpha}' martensitic transformation in a Pu-Ga alloy by a resistivity technique on a 2.8-mm diameter disk sample. Our measurements of the resistance by a 4-probe technique were consistent with the expected resistance obtained from a finite element analysis of the 4-point measurement of resistivity in our round disk configuration. Analysis by finite element methods of the postulated configuration of {alpha}' particles within model {delta} grains suggests that a considerable anisotropy in the resistivity may be obtained depending on the arrangement of the {alpha}' lens shaped particles within the grains. The resistivity of these grains departs from the series resistance model and can lead to significant errors in the predicted amount of the {alpha}' phase present in the microstructure. An underestimation of the amount of {alpha}' in the sample by 15%, or more, appears to be possible.

Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Johnson, D L; Mayhall, D J; Schwartz, A J

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

429

Thermal Analysis of a SHIELD Electromigration Test Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steady state and transient thermal behavior of an electromigration test structure was analyzed. The test structure was a Sandia SHIELD (Self-stressing HIgh fregquency rELiability Device) electromigration test device manufactured by an outside vendor. This device has a high frequency oscillator circuit, a buffer circuit to isolate and drive the metal line to the tested (DUT), the DUT to be electromigrated itself, a metal resistance thermometry monitor, and a heater elment to temperature accelerate the electromigration effect.

Benson, David A.; Bowman, Duane J.; Mitchell, Robert T.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

THE THERMAL SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH TOMOGRAPHY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect directly measures the thermal pressure of free electrons integrated along the line of sight and thus contains valuable information on the thermal history of the universe. However, the redshift information is entangled in the projection along the line of sight. This projection effect severely degrades the power of the tSZ effect to reconstruct the thermal history. We investigate the tSZ tomography technique to recover this otherwise lost redshift information by cross-correlating the tSZ effect with galaxies of known redshifts, or alternatively with matter distribution reconstructed from weak-lensing tomography. We investigate in detail the three-dimensional distribution of the gas thermal pressure and its relation with the matter distribution, through our adiabatic hydrodynamic simulation and the one with additional gastrophysics including radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. (1) We find a strong correlation between the gas pressure and matter distribution, with a typical cross-correlation coefficient r {approx}> 0.7 at k {approx}tight correlation will enable robust cross-correlation measurement between SZ surveys such as Planck, ACT, and SPT and lensing surveys such as DES and LSST, at {approx}>20{sigma}-100{sigma} level. (2) We propose a tomography technique to convert the measured cross-correlation into the contribution from gas in each redshift bin to the tSZ power spectrum. Uncertainties in gastrophysics may affect the reconstruction at {approx}2% level, due to the {approx}1% impact of gastrophysics on r found in our simulations. However, we find that the same gastrophysics affects the tSZ power spectrum at {approx}40% level, so it is robust to infer the gastrophysics from the reconstructed redshift-resolved contribution.

Shao Jiawei; Zhang Pengjie; Lin Weipeng; Jing Yipeng, E-mail: jwshao@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Structural controls, alteration, permeability and thermal regime of Dixie Valley from new-generation MT/galvanic array profiling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State-of-the-art MT array measurements in contiguous bipole deployments across the Dixie Valley thermal area have been integrated with regional MT transect data and other evidence to address several basic geothermal goals. These include 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), infer ultimate heat and fluid sources for the thermal area; and 4), from a generic technique standpoint, investigate the capability of well-sampled electrical data for resolving subsurface structure. Three dense lines cross the Senator Fumaroles area, the Cottonwood Creek and main producing area, and the low-permeability region through the section 10-15 area, and have stand-alone MT soundings appended at one or both ends for local background control. Regularized 2-D inversion implies that shallow pediment basement rocks extend for a considerable distance (1-2 km) southeastward from the topographic scarp of the Stillwater Range under all three dense profiles, but especially for the Senator Fumaroles line. This result is similar to gravity interpretations in the area, but with the intrinsic depth resolution possible from EM wave propagation. Low resistivity zones flank the interpreted main offsetting fault especially toward the north end of the field which may be due to alteration from geothermal fluid outflow and upflow. The appended MT soundings help to substantiate a deep, subvertical conductor intersecting the base of Dixie Valley from the middle crust, which appears to be a hydrothermal conduit feeding from deep crustal magmatic underplating. This may supply at least part of the high temperature fluids and explain enhanced He-3 levels in those fluids.

Philip E. Wannamaker

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

THERMAL INSULATION MATERIALS TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 01/W01 CAN/CGSB-51.2-M88 Thermal Insulation, Calcium Silicate, for Piping, Machinery and Boilers _____ ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NVLAP Thermal Insulation Materials LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for thermal insulation materials. The final report for Round 31 was released in February 2010. Proficiency testing is on hold ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphene’s thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

Subrina, Samia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arens E. , and Wang D. 2004. "Thermal sensation and comfortin transient non-uniform thermal environments", European7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments – Determination of

Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

Ghosh, Suchismita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal resistance measured" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Standard 55-2004: Thermal environmental conditionsA behavioural approach to thermal comfort assessment inBerger, X. , 1998. Human thermal comfort at Nimes in summer

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Holographic Thermal Helicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal helicity, defined in arXiv:1211.3850, of a conformal field theory with anomalies in the context of AdS$_{2n+1}$/CFT$_{2n}$. To do so, we consider large charged rotating AdS black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant using fluid/gravity expansion. We compute the anomaly-induced current and stress tensor of the dual CFT in leading order of the fluid/gravity derivative expansion and show their agreement with the field theoretical replacement rule for the thermal helicity. Such replacement rule is reflected in the bulk by new replacement rules obeyed by the Hall currents around the black hole.

Tatsuo Azeyanagi; R. Loganayagam; Gim Seng Ng; Maria J. Rodriguez

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

446

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Low-rise, wood-framed homes are the most common type of residential structures in the United States. Wood wall construction supports roofs efficiently and provides a stable frame for attaching interior and exterior wall coverings. Wall cavities are prevalent and increase thermal resistance, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. This paper describes detailed computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities and accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. Parameters are ambient outdoor temperature, cavity surface emissivity, cavity aspect ratio, and insulation height. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities is essential for conserving energy in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of new and older homes with uninsulated or partially insulated walls.

Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Integrated EM & Thermal Simulations with Upgraded VORPAL Software  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear physics accelerators are powered by microwaves which must travel in waveguides between room-temperature sources and the cryogenic accelerator structures. The ohmic heat load from the microwaves is affected by the temperature-dependent surface resistance and in turn affects the cryogenic thermal conduction problem. Integrated EM & thermal analysis of this difficult non-linear problem is now possible with the VORPAL finite-difference time-domain simulation tool. We highlight thermal benchmarking work with a complex HOM feed-through geometry, done in collaboration with researchers at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, and discuss upcoming design studies with this emerging tool. This work is part of an effort to generalize the VORPAL framework to include generalized PDE capabilities, for wider multi-physics capabilities in the accelerator, vacuum electronics, plasma processing and fusion R&D fields, and we will also discuss user interface and algorithmic upgrades which facilitate this emerging multiphysics capability.

D.N. Smithe, D. Karipides, P. Stoltz, G. Cheng, H. Wang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

453

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.