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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electric Motor Thermal Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape030bennion2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Electric Motor Thermal Management Electric Motor Thermal Management...

3

Electric Motor Thermal Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Peer Evaluation Meeting ape030bennion2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Motor Thermal Management Electric Motor Thermal Management Vehicle Technologies...

4

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.3.1 Electrical transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.5 Controlling electrical conductivity and opticalthe variation of electrical and thermal con- ductivity and

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Improving the Thermal Output Availability of Reciprocating Engine Cogeneration Systems by Mechanical Vapor Compression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOW?PRESSURE I WASTE STEAM r ... IMPROVING THE THERMAL OUTPUT AVAILABILITY OF RECIPROCATING ENGINE COGENERATION SYSTEMS BY MECHANICAL VAPOR COMPRESSION F.E. Becker and F.A. DiBella Tecogen, Inc., a Subsidiary of Thermo El~ctron Corporation...-user with electric power and process heat that is totally in the form of high-pressure steam. Current recipro cating engine systems can now provide only low pressure steam or hot water from the engine jacket, and this often is not needed or not the most appro...

Becker, F. E.; DiBella, F. A.; Lamphere, F.

12

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoporous Thermal-to-Electrical Energy Conversion System (of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion AArticles: 1. “ Thermal to electrical energy conversion” , Yu

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Supplementary sensors may be necessary for some special solar systems (e. g. solar systems with several storagesQuality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH- Input/Output-Procedure Peter Paerisch/Output-Controllers for in situ and automatic function control of solar thermal systems that were developed within the research

14

Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant challenge for solar thermal energy generation issolar thermal, cogeneration of electrical and thermal energy,for efficient energy production. Solar thermal plants, such

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

Faussurier, G., E-mail: gerald.faussurier@cea.fr; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature...

18

The Status of Solar Thermal Electric Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric technology was evaluated as a future source of power for United States utilities. The technology status was developed using an ... configuration was selected for each of the major solar col...

Richard J. Holl; Edgar A. DeMeo

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach and feasibility study of a low-cost solar thermal electricity generation technology, suitable for distributed: Solar Thermal Collectors, Solar Thermal Electricity, Stirling Engine 1. INTRODUCTION In this paper, we

Sanders, Seth

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

30

Output feedback control for robust tracking of position trajectories for DC electric motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A generalized PI-like output feedback dynamic control scheme with additional integral compensation of the output error is proposed for robust tracking tasks of position reference trajectories for direct current electric motors with speed reduction gear head, using measurements of angular displacement only. The integral compensation is used to improve the robustness property of the controller, in regards to parametric uncertainty and variable load torque, and avoid the application of asymptotic estimation methods of the state vector. A family of Taylor polynomials approximates the perturbation signals, in order to reduce the control design complexity. These signals are compensated by the integral control action directly. Experimental and simulation results describe the effective performance of the control scheme proposed in this paper as an alternative solution to the efficient angular position control problem of direct current electric motors.

Francisco Beltran-Carbajal; Antonio Favela-Contreras; Antonio Valderrabano-Gonzalez; Julio Cesar Rosas-Caro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Solar thermal electric power information user study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar thermal electric power are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from five solar thermal electric power groups of respondents are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

36

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

37

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

38

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

39

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

40

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

42

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

43

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

44

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

45

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

46

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

47

Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

Alger, T.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Continuous measurement of cardiac output with the electrical velocimetry method in patients under spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we aimed to continuously measure cardiac output (CO) with the electrical velocimetry (EV) method and characterize the hemodynamic profile of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective c...

Yanhong Liu; May C. M. Pian-Smith…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 548 Solar Thermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-548) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional

50

Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensors into a solar system with buffer storage tank and direct discharging. Figure 1 shows the sensorsQuality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal of standard solar thermal systems usually don't recognise failures affecting the solar yield, because

51

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A solar tracker and concentrator was designed and assembled for the purpose of cogeneration of thermal power and electrical power using thermoelectric technology. A BiTe… (more)

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermal bubble behaviour in liquid nitrogen under electric fields.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes thermally induced bubble behaviour changes in liquid nitrogen (LN2) under electric fields. Cryogenic liquids such as LN2 have been used not only… (more)

Wang, Ping

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

55

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

56

Thermal Management of Power Electronics and Electric Motors for Electric-Drive Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation is an overview of the power electronics and electric motor thermal management and reliability activities at NREL. The focus is on activities funded by the Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program.

Narumanchi, S.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity

58

Independent Manipulation of Electric and Thermal Fields with Bilayer Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the employment of transformation and metamaterial for manipulation of various physical fields, which requires complicated configuration and usually limits in single field. Here, for the first time, we propose and experimentally demonstrated bilayer structure to achieve simultaneously independent manipulation of multi-physics field (dc electric fields and thermal) by directly solving the dc electric/ thermal field equations. This structure is composed of two layers: the outer layer is made of isotropic and homogeneous material, while the inner layer is fan-shape layer. Since it is not based on TO, it can be readily experimentally fabricated with naturally occurring materials. Experimentally, we has designed, fabricated and characterized two structures simultaneously behaving as dc electric cloak/ thermal concentrator and dc electric concentrator/ thermal cloak, respectively. The simulation results agree well with the experiment ones, thus confirming the feasib...

Lan, Chuwen; Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

62

Medium-term planning for thermal electricity production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, we present a mid-term planning model for thermal power generation which is based on multistage stochastic optimization and involves stochastic electricity spot prices, a mixture of fuels with stochastic prices, the effect of CO Keywords: Electricity production, Modeling commodity spot prices, Multistage stochastic programming, Tree generation

Raimund M. Kovacevic; Florentina Paraschiv

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withhour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not all constraintslifetime ( a) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal... the start of the station has to be decided several hours before delivering output. At the earlier time there is still uncertainty about the future demand, possible failures of power stations and predictions for wind-output. We represent the uncertainty...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Thermal, Electrical and Mechanical Response to a Quench in Nb3Sn Superconducting Coils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

53129 4A-a07 Thermal, Electrical and Mechanical Response tofocuses on thermal, electrical and mechanical conditions inevaluated by the thermo-electrical model is transferred to a

Ferracin, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

67

Electrical Power Grid Delivery Dynamic Analysis: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

Diana K. Grauer; Michael E. Reed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal Agitation of Electricity in Conductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Statistical fluctuation of electric charge exists in all conductors, producing random variation of potential between the ends of the conductor. The effect of these fluctuations has been measured by a vacuum tube amplifier and thermocouple, and can be expressed by the formula IŻ2=(2kT?)?0?R(?)|Y(?)|2d?. I is the observed current in the thermocouple, k is Boltzmann's gas constant, T is the absolute temperature of the conductor, R(?) is the real component of impedance of the conductor, Y(?) is the transfer impedance of the amplifier, and ?2?=f represents frequency. The value of Boltzmann's constant obtained from the measurements lie near the accepted value of this constant. The technical aspects of the disturbance are discussed. In an amplifier having a range of 5000 cycles and the input resistance R the power equivalent of the effect is VŻ2R=0.8×10-16 watt, with corresponding power for other ranges of frequency. The least contribution of tube noise is equivalent to that of a resistance Rc=1.5×105ip?, where ip is the space current in milliamperes and ? is the effective amplification of the tube.

J. B. Johnson

1928-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Solar thermal power plants for the Spanish electricity market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar thermal power plants are at present the cheapest technology for solar electricity production. At good sites Levelised Electricity Costs (LEC) of 11 Ct/kWh have been achieved in commercially operated power plants. Economy of scale and further technical improvements will reduce the LEC for future projects. On the 27th of March 2004 in Spain the existing feed-in-law has been modified in order to support the erection of solar thermal power plants and thus make use of the huge solar potential of Spain. A payment of approx. 21 Ct/kWh, guaranteed for the first 25 years of operation, makes the erection and operation of solar thermal power plants very profitable for possible investors on the Spanish peninsula. This paper will present the present situation in Spain and the planned power plant projects. For one specific project the set-up is presented in more detail.

M. Eck; F. Rueda; S. Kronshage; C. Schillings; F. Trieb; E. Zarza

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal characterization of submicron polyacrylonitrile fibers based on optical heating and electrical thermal sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the thermal diffusivity of single submicron ({approx}800 nm) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers is characterized using the recently developed optical heating and electrical thermal sensing technique. In the experiment, a thin Au film (approximately in the nanometer range) is coated on the surface of nonconductive PAN fibers. A periodically modulated laser beam is used to irradiate suspended individual fibers to achieve noncontact periodical heating. The periodical temperature response of the sample is monitored by measuring the electrical resistance variation of the thin Au coating. The experimental results for three different synthesized PAN fibers with varying Au coating thickness are presented and discussed.

Hou Jinbo; Wang Xinwei; Zhang Lijun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, N104 Walter Scott Engineering Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0656 (United States)

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electrical and Thermal Experimental Characterization and Modeling of Carbon Nanotube/Epoxy Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work investigates the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) inclusions on the electrical and thermal conductivity of a thermoset epoxy resin. The characterization of electrical and thermal conductivity of CNT/epoxy composites is presented...

Gardea, Frank

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

73

Stirling Engines for Low-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stirling Engines for Low-Temperature Solar-Thermal- Electric Power Generation Artin Der Minassians-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation by Artin Der Minassians Karshenasi (Amirkabir University-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation Copyright c 2007 by Artin Der Minassians #12;1 Abstract Stirling

Sanders, Seth

74

Tunable Electrical and Thermal Transport in Ice-Templated MultiLayer Graphene Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to electrical energy storage,1­3 thermal energy storage,4­13 and composite materials.14­21 Ice applications in thermal and electrical energy storage. Phase change thermal storage seeks to reduce building offsets in energy supply and demand.6 Thermal energy storage is also an appealing way to cool power

Maruyama, Shigeo

75

Coupled Thermal and Electrical Analysis of Obstructed RTGs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) with an unsymmetrically obstructed heat rejection path can have significant axial and circumferential variations in the temperatures, currents, and voltages of its thermoelectric couple network. The present paper describes a methodology for analyzing the thermal and electrical performance of such an RTG, and the development of a computer code for implementing that emthodology. The code derives coupled solutions of the RTG's thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical equations. It accounts for the Peltier effect, Ohmic heating, and the Thomson effect, and treats the electrical power produced in each couple as an effective heat sink. It satisfies the condition that all parallel couples produce the same voltage, and that all series-connected couple groups produce the same current. Finally, the paper illustrates the use of the code by applying it to the detailed analysis of the RTGs for the CRAF and Cassini missions. In each of these, there are two adjacent RTGs which are obstructed by each other and by the nearby spacecraft. The results of the analysis will be used by the spacecraft designers in selecting the location, orientation, and spacing of the two RTGs. There are two copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred; Noravian, Heros; Or, Chuen T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demandsources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

DeForest, Nicholas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Topology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits/DC converter; electric drives; electric vehicles; fuel cell; hybrid electric vehicles; power electronics, motor

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

79

Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid Fe alloys at high P and T, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid Fe alloys at high P and T, and heat flux to crystallize (1, 4). Existing estimates of thermal conductivity (kel) and electrical resistivity (el) of Earth of electrical resistivity to temperature, its invariability along and across the Fe liquidus, and adherence

Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

80

Impact of a 1,000-foot thermal mixing zone on the steam electric power industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal discharge requirements for power plants using once-through cooling systems are based on state water quality standards for temperatures that must be met outside of designated mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones to no more than 1,000 feet from the discharge point. Data were collected from 79 steam electric plants. Of the plants currently using once-through cooling systems, 74% could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone. Of this total, 68% would retrofit cooling towers, and 6% would retrofit diffusers. The estimated nationwide capital cost for retrofitting plants that could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone is $21.4 billion. Conversion of a plant from once-through cooling to cooling towers or addition of diffusers would result in a lower energy output from that plant. For the affected plants, the total estimated replacement cost would be $370 to $590 million per year. Some power companies would have to construct new generating capacity to meet the increased energy demand. The estimated nationwide cost of this additional capacity would be $1.2 to $4.8 billion. In addition to the direct costs associated with compliance with a 1,000-foot mixing zone limit, other secondary environmental impacts would also occur. Generation of the additional power needed would increase carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 8.3 million tons per year. In addition, conversion from once-through cooling systems to cooling towers at affected plants would result in increased evaporation of about 2.7 million gallons of water per minute nationwide.

Veil, J.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

83

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceanpower plants, distributed solar thermal energy, geo/ocean-power plants [59]. Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

Andrepont, J. S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Second law analysis of a liquid cooled battery thermal management system for hybrid and electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As hybrid and electric vehicles continue to evolve there is a need for better battery thermal management systems (BTMS), which maintain uniformity of operating temperature… (more)

Ramotar, Lokendra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Work on optimizing electrical and thermal transport properties of n-type skutterudites via a multiple-element-void-filling approach is presented.

89

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the ceramic wafers have a high thermal conductivity,easily altered ceramic blocks all had a thermal conductivityCeramics. Available Online: http://www.dynacer.com/thermal_

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 2.2.2. Solar Thermal Versus Photovoltaic ..…………..…………doi:10.1038/nmat2090. 17. Solar Thermal Technology on anFigure 2.5: An eSolar solar thermal system in Burbank,

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

92

Electrical Conductivity, Near-Infrared Absorption, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopic Studies of Percolation of Microemulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Conductivity, Near-Infrared Absorption, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopic Studies studied below and above the percolation thresholds by electrical conductivity, near-infrared absorption. In this work the structure of microemulsions was investigated by using the near-IR absorption and thermal lens

Reid, Scott A.

93

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Direct thermal to electrical energy conversion using very low bandgap TPV cells in a gas-fired furnace system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, electricity generation using very low bandgap InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells whose bandgap is 0.53 eV was investigated in a gas-fired furnace system where thermal radiation was emitted from a metal alloy emitter. The electric output of the InGaAsSb TPV cells was characterized under various operating conditions. The cell short circuit density was measured to be 3.01 A/cm2 at an emitter temperature of 1197 °C. At this emitter temperature, an electric power density of 0.65 W/cm2 was produced by the TPV cells. Experimental results show that direct thermal to electrical energy conversion was achieved in a gas-fired heating furnace system. Such a system could be employed to form a micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) process where exhaust heat is utilized for home heating needs. The TPV integrated energy system provides an effective means for primary energy savings.

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electrical-Thermal Co-analysis for Power Delivery Networks in 3D System Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical-Thermal Co-analysis for Power Delivery Networks in 3D System Integration Jianyong Xie1 Rubin3 1 School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 2 IBM Package Design, Development, and Electrical Services Group, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 12601 3 IBM T

Swaminathan, Madhavan

97

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1.1. Low Grade Heat (LGH) isvoltage (V) as a function of the LGH temperature (T): (a) Ptresults of the output voltage as a function of the LGH

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thermoelectric module, and the water cooling tubes. Tothermoelectric module, combined with the thermal power transferred by the water cooling

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NREL Works to Increase Electric Vehicle Efficiency Through Enhanced Thermal Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at NREL are providing new insight into how heating and cooling systems affect the distance that electric vehicles can travel on a single charge. Electric vehicle range can be reduced by as much as 68% per charge because of climate-control demands. NREL engineers are investigating opportunities to change this dynamic and increase driving range by improving vehicle thermal management. NREL experts are collaborating with automotive industry partners to investigate promising thermal management technologies and strategies, including zone-based cabin temperature controls, advanced heating and air conditioning controls, seat-based climate controls, vehicle thermal preconditioning, and thermal load reduction technologies.

Not Available

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricity, for electricity and for particular products, results show environmental impacts split up by generation type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for efficient energy production. Solar thermal plants, suchenergy production. It would require a substantial amount of land usage to install enough solar

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of thermoelectric (TE) materials has improved tremendously over the past decade. The intrinsic thermal and electrical properties of state-of-the-art TE materials demonstrate that the potential ...

James R. Salvador; Jung Y. Cho; Zuxin Ye…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Novel Latent Heat Storage Devices for Thermal Management of Electric Vehicle Battery Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major aspect for safe and efficient operation of battery electric vehicles (BEV) is the thermal management of their battery systems. As temperature uniformity and level highly ... performance and the lifetime, ...

Ch. Huber; A. Jossen; R. Kuhn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Heat transfer and thermal management of electric vehicle batteries with phase change materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines a passive thermal management system for electric vehicle batteries, consisting of encapsulated phase change material ( ... process to absorb the heat generated by a battery. A new configuratio...

M. Y. Ramandi; I. Dincer; G. F. Naterer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Quantum-coupled single-electron thermal to electric conversion scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal to electric energy conversion with thermophotovoltaics relies on radiation emitted by a hot body, which limits the power per unit area to that of a blackbody. Microgap thermophotovoltaics take advantage of evanescent ...

Wu, D. M.

106

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

107

Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Power Grid Delivery: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

Diana K. Grauer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) mahines, Sterling engines,Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system or Sterling Engine (SE)an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system generates electricity

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity, such as steam engines or gas turbines. Typicalsystems, a sterling engine or steam turbine is typicallysuch as a steam turbine or sterling engine connected to an

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and permeability of saturated soils at various porosities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Ottawa Sand . 4. Thermal Conductivity Data Analysis 5. Thermal Conductivity of Reference Materials 6. DC Resistivity Data with Plate Electrode System for Kaolinite at Porosity of 49% PAGE 48 52 54 66 71 AC Resistivity Data for Kaolinite... THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY, AND PERMEABILITY OF SATURATED SOILS AT VARIOUS POROSITIES A Thesis by JAMES KEITH ENDERBY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Enderby, James Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Ge/Si Quantum Dot Superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Good carrier mobility and electric con- ductivity are important for thermoelectric materials where-Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA Recently proposed thermoelectric applications of quantum dot superlattices made of different material systems depend crucially on the values of the electrical and thermal

112

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhaust (CO 2 ) Grid electricity Cogen Heat Natural gas Airutility grid, 2) re-use of thermal energy “waste heat” forGrid electricity Exhaust (CO 2 ) Recycled Reformate Natural gas Air Water H2 Purifier Source: Weinert, 2005 Cogen Heat

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Low electrical potential anode modified with Fe/ferric oxide and its application in marine benthic microbial fuel cell with higher voltage and power output  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Low voltage and power output limit the widespread application of marine benthic microbial fuel cell (BMFCs). To increase the cell power, a Fe/Ferric oxide modified anode fabricating by electrolytic deposition is reported here. The novel anode has a lower surface contact angle and higher wettability, which favors the adhesion of bacteria. It is firstly demonstrated that the electrical potential of the modified anode is about ?775 mV, much lower than that of the plain graphite (about ?450 mV). Open circuit potential of BMFC with the modified anode is about 1050 ± 50 mV, while the potential for the plain cells is only 700 ± 50 mV. In comparison with the plain graphite, the modified anode presents a 393-fold exchange current density and a higher kinetic activity. The output power reaches 7.4 × 10?2 mW cm?2, 17.4-fold higher than that of the plain graphite. A composite mechanism of both chemical and microbial enhancement of the modified anode is proposed to explain its excellent electrochemical performance. The modified anode has potential for high-power output cell and novel voltage-booster design to make the BMFC utilization feasibility.

Yubin Fu; Qian Xu; Xuerong Zai; Yuanyuan Liu; Zhikai Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

- Electricity Purchases, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total...

115

Output Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every discrete-event simulation experiment with random input generates random sample paths as output. Each path usually consists of a sequence of dependent observations that serve as the raw material for estim...

George S. Fishman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Multi-scale electrical and thermal properties of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a potential new component to be incorporated into existing aerospace structural composites for multi-functional (mechanical, electrical, thermal, etc.) property enhancement and tailoring. ...

Yamamoto, Namiko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

High electric field effects on the thermal generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have studied the electric field dependence of the electron-hole thermal generation process in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. A model was developed which takes into account the Poole-Frenkel effect and the thermally assisted tunneling. In order to explain the experimental results it was necessary to consider a strong electron-lattice interaction describing the carrier tunneling mechanism. Deep defects relaxation is also discussed.

Ilie, A.; Equer, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analysis of combined cooling, heating, and power systems under a compromised electric–thermal load strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Following the electric load (FE) and following the thermal load (FT) strategies both have advantages and disadvantages for combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) systems. In this paper, the performance of different strategies is evaluated under operation cost (OC), carbon dioxide emission (CDE) and exergy efficiency (EE). Analysis of different loads in one hour is conducted under the assumption that the additional electricity is not allowed to be sold back to the grid. The results show that FE produces less OC, less CDE, and FT produces higher EE when the electric load is larger. However, FE produces less OC, less CDE and higher EE when the thermal load is larger. Based on a hybrid electric–thermal load (HET) strategy, compromised electric–thermal (CET) strategies are innovatively proposed using the efficacy coefficient method. Additional, the CCHP system of a hotel in Tianjin is analyzed for all of the strategies. The results for an entire year indicate the first CET strategy is the optimal one when dealing with OC, CDE and EE. And the second CET is the optimal one when dealing with OC and EE. Moreover, the laws are strictly correct for different buildings in qualitative terms.

Gang Han; Shijun You; Tianzhen Ye; Peng Sun; Huan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Connecticut -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic -- W W -- -- -- W New Jersey -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New York -- W W -- -- -- W Pennsylvania -- -- -- -- -- -- -- East North Central W W W 4.10 4.01 W W

120

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

122

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Conventional) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors...

123

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 (From Chapter 2.) Supply (Million Megawatthours) Generation Year Electric Utilities IPP (Non-CHP) IPP (CHP) Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Total Imports Total...

124

Thermal and electrical properties of porphyrin derivatives and their relevance for molecule interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thermal and electrical properties for two porphyrin derivatives. They determine their sublimation enthalpy in physics and chemistry.1 They are of interest because of their numerous potential applications from of the molecules at 650 K. II. MOLECULAR SUBLIMATION ENTHALPIES In order to determine the sublimation properties

125

Experimental investigation of battery thermal management system for electric vehicle based on paraffin/copper foam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To enhance the heat transfer of phase change material in battery thermal management system for electric vehicle, a battery thermal management system by using paraffin/copper foam was designed and experimentally investigated in this paper. The thermal performances of the system such as temperature reduction and distribution are discussed in detail. The results showed that the local temperature difference in both a single cell and battery module were increased with the increase of discharge current, and obvious fluctuations of local temperature difference can be observed when the electric vehicle is in road operating state. When the battery is discharging at constant current, the maximum temperature and local temperature difference of the battery module with paraffin/copper foam was lower than 45 °C and 5 °C, respectively. After the battery thermal management system was assembled in electric vehicle, the maximum temperature and local temperature difference in road operating state was lower than 40 °C and 3 °C, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that paraffin/copper foam coupled battery thermal management presented an excellent cooling performance.

Zhonghao Rao; Yutao Huo; Xinjian Liu; Guoqing Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Feature extraction and classification for detecting the thermal faults in electrical installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposed an effort to investigate the suitability of input features and classifier for identifying thermal faults within electrical installations. The features are extracted from the thermal images of electrical equipment and classified using a multilayered perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network and support vector machine (SVM). In the experiments, the classification performances from various input features are evaluated. The commonly used classification performance indices, including sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under curve (AUC), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and F-score are employed to identify the most suitable input feature as well as the best configuration of classifiers. The experimental results demonstrate that the combination of features set Tmax, Tdelta and \\{DTbg\\} produce the best input feature for thermal fault detection. In addition, the implementation of SVM using radial basis kernel function (RBF) produces slightly better performance than the MLP artificial neural network.

Mohd Shawal Jadin; Soib Taib; Kamarul Hawari Ghazali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

128

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

129

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

130

Spin-dependent thermal and electrical transport in a spin-valve system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the framework of Bu{close_quotes}ttiker{close_quote}s gauge invariant and charge conservation dc transport theory, the spin-dependent thermal and electrical transport in a ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet tunnel junction is investigated at finite bias voltage and finite temperature. It is observed that the relative orientations of magnetizations in the two ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes as well as temperature have remarkable effects on the differential conductance, thermopower, Peltier effect, and thermal conductivity. At low temperature the quantum resonant tunneling is predominant, leading to the deviation of classical transport theory, while the transport of electrons are crucially governed by thermal processes at high temperature. The so-called spin-valve phenomenon is clearly uncovered for both the differential conductance and the thermal conductivity at low temperature. The Wiedemann-Franz law is examined, and the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy is also discussed. Our findings are expected to be measured in the near future.

Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Su, Gang; Gao, Song

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of the Effects of Thermal Management on Battery Life in Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Tugce Yuksel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Effects of Thermal Management on Battery Life in Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles a simulation model that aims to evaluate the effect of thermal management on battery life. The model consists of two sub- models: a thermal model and a battery degradation model. The temperature rise in the battery

Michalek, Jeremy J.

132

Spin-dependent thermal and electrical transport in a spin-valve system Zheng-Chuan Wang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spin-dependent thermal and electrical transport in a spin-valve system Zheng-Chuan Wang,1 Gang Su,1 governed by thermal processes at high temperature. The so-called spin-valve phenomenon is clearly uncovered, the quantum size effect on the thermal conduc- tance and the Peltier coefficient,2 the diffusive thermopower

Gao, Song

133

Qualitative thermal characterization and cooling of lithium batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with the cooling of batteries. The first step was the thermal characterization of a single cell of the module, which consists in the detection of the thermal field by means of thermographic tests during electric charging and discharging. The purpose was to identify possible critical hot points and to evaluate the cooling demand during the normal operation of an electric car. After that, a study on the optimal configuration to obtain the flattening of the temperature profile and to avoid hot points was executed. An experimental plant for cooling capacity evaluation of the batteries, using air as cooling fluid, was realized in our laboratory in ENEA Casaccia. The plant is designed to allow testing at different flow rate and temperatures of the cooling air, useful for the assessment of operative thermal limits in different working conditions. Another experimental facility was built to evaluate the thermal behaviour changes with water as cooling fluid. Experimental tests were carried out on the LiFePO4 batteries, under different electric working conditions using the two loops. In the future, different type of batteries will be tested and the influence of various parameters on the heat transfer will be assessed for possible optimal operative solutions.

A Mariani; F D'Annibale; G Boccardi; G P Celata; C Menale; R Bubbico; F Vellucci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced battery thermal management for electrical-drive vehicles using reciprocating cooling flow and spatial-resolution, lumped-capacitance thermal model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The thermal management of traction battery systems for electrical-drive vehicles directly affects vehicle dynamic performance, long-term durability and cost of the battery systems. The… (more)

Mahamud, Rajib

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2002 1,838,901 5,757,283 943,531 28,963 8,568,678 2003 1,824,030 3,906,220 1,156,796 33,909 6,920,954 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399 1,295,857 33,139 5,065,031 2010 1,541,554 2,946,452 1,404,137 37,068 5,929,211 2011 1,529,434 2,206,981 1,372,306 34,400 5,143,121

136

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

137

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

138

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2002 141,714 43,935 1,711 116,952 29,601 328 24,761 14,334 1,383 2003 121,567 45,752 1,484 97,831 28,062 378 23,736 17,691 1,105 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627 21,751 17,607 309 2005 101,137 47,414 530 77,457 29,532 374 23,680 17,882 156 2006 140,964 48,216 674 110,277 29,799 456 30,688 18,416 217

139

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

140

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

142

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 18.64 W W 21.43 21.12 18.47 W Connecticut W 21.91 W 23.87 NM W 21.93 Maine W W W -- NM W W Massachusetts 17.17 19.76 -13% 17.45 NM 17.16 19.66 New Hampshire 23.23 W W 23.23 19.90 -- W Rhode Island -- W W -- NM -- W Vermont 24.11 NM NM 24.11 NM -- -- Middle Atlantic W 20.15 W 21.01 19.21 W 20.66 New Jersey 19.77 18.36 7.7% -- NM 19.77 20.28 New York W 19.66 W 21.01 20.00 W 19.36 Pennsylvania 21.84 22.19 -1.6% -- NM 21.84 22.19

143

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) 3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Description 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Utility Operating Revenues 219,609 230,151 238,759 265,652 275,501 270,964 ......Electric Utility 200,360 206,268 213,012 234,909 246,736 240,864 ......Other Utility 19,250 23,883 25,747 30,743 28,765 30,100 Utility Operating Expenses 189,062 201,057 206,960 236,786 245,589 241,198 ......Electric Utility 171,604 179,044 183,121 207,830 218,445 213,076 ............Operation 116,660 125,436 131,560 150,645 158,893 153,885 ..................Production 90,715 98,305 103,871 120,586 127,494 121,700 ........................Cost of Fuel 24,149 26,871 28,544 36,106 37,945 39,548

144

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

145

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

146

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

147

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

148

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

149

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

150

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

151

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

152

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

153

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

154

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

155

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

156

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

157

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

158

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.69 4.94 -25% 4.73 5.70 3.68 4.93 Connecticut 3.88 4.97 -22% 6.45 NM 3.87 4.96 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 3.55 4.88 -27% 4.47 5.75 3.53 4.87 New Hampshire W W W 5.54 6.01 W W Rhode Island 3.86 5.01 -23% -- -- 3.86 5.01 Vermont 4.06 5.22 -22% 4.06 5.22 -- -- Middle Atlantic 3.52 5.14 -32% 3.86 5.32 3.46 5.11 New Jersey 3.52 5.11 -31% -- -- 3.52 5.11 New York 3.85 5.45 -29% 3.86 5.32 3.84 5.50

159

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

160

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.59 3.68 -2.4% 4.07 3.55 3.34 3.74 Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.07 3.55 15% 4.07 3.55 -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic 2.50 2.68 -6.7% -- 2.92 2.50 2.63 New Jersey 4.05 4.18 -3.1% -- -- 4.05 4.18 New York 3.12 3.27 -4.6% -- 3.88 3.12 3.27 Pennsylvania 2.43 2.55 -4.7% -- 2.91 2.43 2.45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 Net Generation and Consumption of Fuels for January through December Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Fuel Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Net Generation (Thousand Megawatthours) Coal 1,514,043 1,733,430 -12.7% 1,146,480 1,301,107 354,076 416,783 883 1,049 12,603 14,490 Petroleum Liquids 13,403 16,086 -16.7% 9,892 11,688 2,757 3,655 191 86 563 657 Petroleum Coke 9,787 14,096 -30.6% 5,664 9,428 1,758 3,431 6 3 2,359 1,234 Natural Gas 1,225,894 1,013,689 20.9% 504,958 414,843 627,833 511,447 6,603 5,487 86,500 81,911

162

Effect of simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cell blended with organic salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents the influence of simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment on the performance of organic solar cell blended with organic salt. The organic solar cells were composed of indium tin oxide as anode, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene]: (6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester: tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate blend as organic active layer and aluminium as cathode. The devices underwent a simultaneous fixed-voltage electrical and thermal treatment at different temperatures of 25, 50 and 75 °C. It was found that photovoltaic performance improved with the thermal treatment temperature. Accumulation of more organic salt ions in the active layer leads to broadening of p-n doped regions and hence higher built-in electric field across thin intrinsic layer. The simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment has been shown to be able to reduce the electrical treatment voltage.

Sabri, Nasehah Syamin; Yap, Chi Chin; Yahaya, Muhammad [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thermal–electrical analogy for simulations of superconducting fault current limiters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In spite of the recent advances achieved with superconducting fault current limiters (SCFCL’s), modeling and simulation of such devices are still important issues. There are different approaches for modeling SCFCL’s, whereas computational simulations provide a better understanding of the behavior of SCFCL devices. In addition, results of hard experimental access may be achieved by means of computational simulation. The aim of this paper is to present a simple computational model to predict both the electrical and thermal behaviors of SCFCL devices. The main contribution of the present work is the use of a thermal–electrical analogy to solve the heat transfer equations inside SCFCL sub-components, which enables one to handle with relative easy the strong and nonlinear coupling between thermal and electrical phenomena. The limitation and quenching behavior of a resistive SCFCL assembly was investigated for overcurrents up to 67 kArms (Vo = 1 kVrms). Simulation results were compared to overcurrent experimental tests. A good agreement between simulations and tests has been found in the present work. Moreover, the results of the developed model were also compared with finite element results reported in the literature.

W.T.B. de Sousa; A. Polasek; R. Dias; C.F.T. Matt; R. de Andrade Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of distributed building thermal energy storage in conjunction with wind and solar electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage is often seen as necessary for the electric utility systems with large amounts of solar or wind power generation to compensate for the inability to schedule these facilities to match power demand. This study looks at the potential to use building thermal energy storage as a load shifting technology rather than traditional electric energy storage. Analyses are conducted using hourly electric load, temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation data for a 5-state central U.S. region in conjunction with simple computer simulations and economic models to evaluate the economic benefit of distributed building thermal energy storage (TES). The value of the TES is investigated as wind and solar power generation penetration increases. In addition, building side and smart grid enabled utility side storage management strategies are explored and compared. For a relative point of comparison, batteries are simulated and compared to TES. It is found that cooling TES value remains approximately constant as wind penetration increases, but generally decreases with increasing solar penetration. It is also clearly shown that the storage management strategy is vitally important to the economic value of TES; utility side operating methods perform with at least 75% greater value as compared to building side management strategies. In addition, TES compares fairly well against batteries, obtaining nearly 90% of the battery value in the base case; this result is significant considering TES can only impact building thermal loads, whereas batteries can impact any electrical load. Surprisingly, the value of energy storage does not increase substantially with increased wind and solar penetration and in some cases it decreases. This result is true for both TES and batteries and suggests that the tie between load shifting energy storage and renewable electric power generation may not be nearly as strong as typically thought.

Byron W. Jones; Robert Powell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

166

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

167

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 732 0.87 10.5 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.80 7.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 700 0.88 10.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

168

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) 4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) Operation Maintenance Year Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale 2002 9.00 2.59 3.71 3.26 5.04 2.67 2.62 2.38 2003 9.12 2.74 3.47 3.50 5.23 2.72 2.32 2.26 2004 8.97 3.13 3.83 4.27 5.38 2.96 2.76 2.14 2005 8.26 3.21 3.95 3.69 5.27 2.98 2.73 1.89 2006 9.03 3.57 3.76 3.51 5.69 3.19 2.70 2.16 2007 9.54 3.63 5.44 3.26 5.79 3.37 3.87 2.42 2008 9.89 3.72 5.78 3.77 6.20 3.59 3.89 2.72 2009 10.00 4.23 4.88 3.05 6.34 3.96 3.50 2.58 2010 10.50 4.04 5.33 2.79 6.80 3.99 3.81 2.73

169

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

170

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

171

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by Census Divison, 2012 and 2011 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Census Division December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 December 2012 December 2011 Coal (Thousand Tons) New England 1,030 1,389 -25.9% W W W W Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% W W W W East North Central 36,139 37,262 -3.0% 27,069 27,316 9,070 9,946 West North Central 30,554 28,544 7.0% 30,554 28,544 0 0 South Atlantic 38,859 36,920 5.3% 35,527 33,163 3,331 3,757 East South Central 19,657 17,185 14.4% 19,657 17,185 0 0 West South Central 28,807 22,910 25.7% 17,047 15,125 11,760 7,785

172

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2002 1,265,179,869 1,104,496,607 990,237,631 N/A 105,551,904 3,465,466,011 166,184,296 3,631,650,307 2003 1,275,823,910 1,198,727,601 1,012,373,247 6,809,728 N/A 3,493,734,486 168,294,526 3,662,029,012 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 N/A 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 N/A 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 N/A 3,669,918,840 146,926,612 3,816,845,452

173

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Period Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Coal Total End of Year Stocks 2002 70,704 66,593 4,417 141,714 2003 57,716 59,884 3,967 121,567 2004 49,022 53,618 4,029 106,669 2005 52,923 44,377 3,836 101,137 2006 67,760 68,408 4,797 140,964 2007 63,964 82,692 4,565 151,221 2008 65,818 91,214 4,556 161,589 2009 91,922 92,448 5,097 189,467 2010 81,108 86,915 6,894 174,917 2011 82,056 85,151 5,179 172,387 2012 86,437 93,833 4,846 185,116 2010, End of Month Stocks January 86,354 86,893 4,845 178,091 February 82,469 83,721 4,836 171,026 March 86,698 86,014 5,030 177,742 April 92,621 89,545 7,095 189,260 May 93,069 91,514 7,085 191,669

174

Maximum wind energy contribution in autonomous electrical grids based on thermal power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greek islands cover their continuously increasing electricity demand on the basis of small autonomous thermal power stations. This electrification solution is related with increased operational cost and power insufficiency, especially during summer. On the other hand, the stochastic behaviour of the wind and the important fluctuations of daily and seasonal electricity load in almost all Greek islands pose a substantial penetration limit for the exploitation of the high wind potential of the area. In this context, the present study is concentrated on developing an integrated methodology which can estimate the maximum wind energy contribution to the existing autonomous electrical grids, using the appropriate stochastic analysis. For this purpose one takes into account the electrical demand probability density profile of every island under investigation as well as the operational characteristics of the corresponding thermal power stations. Special attention is paid in order to protect the existing internal combustion engines from unsafe operation below their technical minima as well as to preserve the local system active power reserve and the corresponding dynamic stability. In order to increase the reliability of the results obtained, one may use extensive information for several years. Finally, the proposed study is integrated with an appropriate parametrical analysis, investigating the impact of the main parameters variation on the expected maximum wind energy contribution.

J.K. Kaldellis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

176

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

177

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

178

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 75,711 2,677 0.63 17.68 4.98 126.0 1,680,518 1,634,734 3.68 3.78 72.3 1.53 2003 89,618 3,165 0.74 20.94 5.51 124.0 1,486,088 1,439,513 5.59 5.77 81.6 1.74 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10 92.0 1,542,746 1,499,933 6.15 6.33 82.9 1.87 2005 102,450 3,632 1.29 36.31 5.16 87.9 1,835,221 1,780,721 8.32 8.57 83.4 2.38

179

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

180

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

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181

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,514,670 52,838 6,286 229,639 206 507,380 242,302 3,089 -7,434 480 2,549,457 2003 1,500,281 62,774 7,156 186,967 243 458,829 249,622 3,421 -7,532 519 2,462,281 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 3,692 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 4,945 -5,383 643 2,474,846 2006 1,471,421 31,269 9,634 282,088 30 425,341 261,864 6,588 -5,281 700 2,483,656

182

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Summer Peak Load (Megawatts) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 468,092 5,051 96,769 154,339 161,687 50,246 66,548 130,465 767,762 Projected 2013 45,668 59,969 469,857 5,109 96,192 155,553 159,032 53,971 67,998 133,523 777,015 Projected 2014 46,338 60,654 475,005 5,249 96,879 158,717 159,457 54,703 69,289 132,731 784,017 Projected 2015 47,053 61,428 484,637 5,360 97,565 162,216 164,150 55,346 71,423 134,183 798,724

183

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2002 884,287 0.94 1.25 25.52 120,851 1.64 3.34 20.77 5,607,737 3.56 1.86 2003 986,026 0.97 1.28 26.00 185,567 1.53 4.33 26.78 5,500,704 5.39 2.28 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42 186,655 1.66 4.29 26.56 5,734,054 5.96 2.48 2005 1,021,437 0.98 1.54 31.20 194,733 1.61 6.44 39.65 6,181,717 8.21 3.25

184

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

185

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 37,951 55,164 430,396 101,251 54,296 53,267 -- -- 28,825 -- -- 154,459 38,298 55,833 117,032 696,376 2003 40,387 53,936 422,253 98,487 53,566 53,617 -- -- 28,775 -- -- 148,380 39,428 59,282 120,894 696,752 2004 42,243 51,580 419,349 95,300 52,049 50,499 -- -- 29,094 -- -- 153,024 39,383 58,531 121,205 692,908

186

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

187

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2002 423,128 1.47 10.1 391,785 0.36 6.2 65,555 0.93 13.3 2003 467,286 1.50 10.0 432,513 0.38 6.4 79,869 1.03 14.4 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677 1.02 14.0 2006 489,550 1.59 10.5 504,947 0.35 6.1 75,742 0.95 14.4 2007 467,817 1.62 10.3 505,155 0.34 6.0 71,930 0.90 14.0

188

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

189

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

190

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

191

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 . Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewables Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total (All Sectors) 2002 633 1,147 1,649 40 66 1,426 682 38 28 2003 629 1,166 1,693 40 66 1,425 741 38 27 2004 625 1,143 1,670 46 66 1,425 749 39 28 2005 619 1,133 1,664 44 66 1,422 781 39 29 2006 616 1,148 1,659 46 66 1,421 843 39 29 2007 606 1,163 1,659 46 66 1,424 929 39 25 2008 598 1,170 1,655 43 66 1,423 1,076 39 29 2009 593 1,168 1,652 43 66 1,427 1,219 39 28 2010 580 1,169 1,657 48 66 1,432 1,355 39 32

192

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 211,116 286,199 2,301,321 567,897 273,907 279,264 -- -- 150,058 -- -- 835,319 194,876 280,269 666,696 3,745,601 2003 219,021 288,791 2,255,233 545,109 276,600 267,068 -- -- 153,918 -- -- 826,964 185,574 283,868 664,754 3,711,667 2004 220,335 292,725 2,313,180 553,236 283,646 274,760 -- -- 152,975 -- -- 856,734 191,829 289,146 682,053 3,797,439 2005 226,544 303,607 2,385,461 -- -- -- -- -- 216,633 -- 1,005,226 962,054 201,548 299,225 685,624 3,900,461

193

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

194

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 / 2003 42,001 45,980 360,748 84,844 46,159 39,974 -- -- 23,090 -- -- 137,541 29,140 44,719 94,554 588,002 2003 / 2004 36,229 47,850 357,026 86,332 45,625 39,955 -- -- 24,042 -- -- 133,244 27,828 41,988 100,337 583,430 2004 / 2005 41,449 47,859 371,011 91,800 45,565 40,618 -- -- 24,446 -- -- 139,486 29,096 44,010 101,002 605,331

195

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

196

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

197

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids 8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 413 639 -35.4% 52 120 267 374 49 55 45 90 Connecticut 112 166 -32.6% 4 5 104 155 0.05 0 4 5 Maine 84 178 -52.8% 0.17 1 65 89 2 3 16 85 Massachusetts 174 197 -11.2% 15 40 98 128 37 28 25 NM New Hampshire 22 78 -72.1% 20 57 0.12 1 2 20 0.17 0.10 Rhode Island 18 14 31.0% 11 10 0.12 1 7 2 0 0 Vermont 3 8 -58.1% 2 6 0 0 1 2 0 0

198

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Biomass 8. Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,229 7,138 1.3% 570 515 4,428 4,544 125 94 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 3,212 3,788 -15.2% 0 0 1,581 1,714 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,724 1,140 51.2% 0 0 1,157 1,137 1 3 566 0 New Hampshire 1,173 1,025 14.4% 347 291 795 734 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 101 127 -21.1% 0 0 101 127 0 0 0 0

199

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy 2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 36,116 34,283 5.3% 0 0 36,116 34,283 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 17,078 15,928 7.2% 0 0 17,078 15,928 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 5,860 5,085 15.2% 0 0 5,860 5,085 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 8,189 8,363 -2.1% 0 0 8,189 8,363 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 4,989 4,907 1.7% 0 0 4,989 4,907 0 0 0 0

200

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Net Generation from Coal 7. Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,103 6,848 -40.1% 1,268 2,208 2,793 4,592 0 0 42 47 Connecticut 653 526 24.2% 0 0 653 526 0 0 0 0 Maine 45 55 -18.0% 0 0 30 38 0 0 15 18 Massachusetts 2,137 4,059 -47.4% 0 0 2,110 4,029 0 0 27 30 New Hampshire 1,268 2,208 -42.6% 1,268 2,208 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Dollars) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,418 7,546 6,137 6,441 3,292 3,504 38 45 16,885 17,536 Connecticut 2,213 2,339 1,901 2,038 452 486 19 19 4,584 4,882 Maine 657 674 467 494 242 268 0 0 1,366 1,436 Massachusetts 3,029 3,003 2,453 2,547 2,127 2,270 17 22 7,627 7,842 New Hampshire 713 736 598 629 231 238 0 0 1,543 1,602 Rhode Island 450 449 432 453 99 103 2 4 982 1,008 Vermont 356 346 285 281 142 139 0 0 784 766

202

Electrical-Thermal-Structural Coupled Finite Element Model of High Temperature Superconductor for Resistive Type Fault Current Limiters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multi-physics finite element model of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) will be presented in this article. The electrical-thermal model is mainly based on Maxwell’s equation and basic heat transfer equa...

J. Sheng; Y. Chen; B. Lin; L. Ying; Z. Jin…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Transient modeling and validation of lithium ion battery pack with air cooled thermal management system for electric vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A transient numerical model of a lithium ion battery (LiB) pack with air cooled thermal management system is developed and validated for electric vehicle applications. In the battery model, the open circuit volta...

G. Y. Cho; J. W. Choi; J. H. Park; S. W. Cha

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Natural Gas-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Electric Utilities 206,774 78,346 37.9 74,835 23,624 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 170,654 42,509 24.9 40,788 12,216

205

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

206

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Period Average Btu per Pound Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Gallon Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Cubic Foot 2002 10,168 0.94 8.7 147,903 1.64 0.2 1,025 2003 10,137 0.97 9.0 147,086 1.53 0.1 1,030 2004 10,074 0.97 9.0 147,286 1.66 0.2 1,027 2005 10,107 0.98 9.0 146,481 1.61 0.2 1,028 2006 10,063 0.97 9.0 143,883 2.31 0.2 1,027 2007 10,028 0.96 8.8 144,546 2.10 0.1 1,027 2008 9,947 0.97 9.0 142,205 2.21 0.3 1,027 2009 9,902 1.01 8.9 141,321 2.14 0.2 1,025 2010 9,842 1.16 8.8 140,598 2.14 0.2 1,022

207

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

208

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

209

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

210

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity 2013 U.S. Total 513 15,144 179 12,604 334 2,540 Coal 4 1,482 28 4,465 -24 -2,983 Petroleum 21 45 41 1,401 -20 -1,356 Natural Gas 87 6,818 55 2,950 32 3,868 Other Gases -- -- 1 4 -1 -4 Nuclear -- -- 4 3,576 -4 -3,576 Hydroelectric Conventional 17 385 36 185 -19 201 Wind 25 2,225 -- -- 25 2,225 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic 277 3,460 1 1 276 3,459 Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels 10 489 -- -- 10 489 Geothermal 5 50 1 11 4 39

211

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,141 N/A N/A 8,300 N/A N/A N/A 13,089 18,189 N/A 2003 10,834 0 532 8,645 4,435 7,227 1,211 13,175 21,890 67,949 2004 13,739 0 569 8,528 4,377 6,978 884 13,563 19,518 68,154 2005 16,764 0 535 8,741 4,308 7,092 701 13,566 21,486 73,195 2006 24,238 0 493 8,404 4,771 7,259 774 13,406 24,390 83,736 2007 30,089 6 595 8,486 5,177 7,061 839 13,498 19,109 84,860 2008 48,464 60 787 8,750 6,057 6,975 1,040 13,643 23,451 109,226

212

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,354 N/A N/A 38,665 N/A N/A N/A 14,491 264,329 N/A 2003 11,187 2 532 37,529 5,077 8,306 2,428 14,424 275,806 355,293 2004 14,144 6 569 38,117 5,128 8,151 2,141 14,811 268,417 351,485 2005 17,811 16 535 38,856 5,142 8,330 1,948 14,692 270,321 357,651 2006 26,589 15 493 38,762 5,677 8,478 1,944 14,568 289,246 385,772 2007 34,450 16 596 39,014 6,158 8,304 2,063 14,637 247,510 352,747

213

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 Census Division and State Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroleum Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change New England 1,030 1,389 -26% 2,483 2,680 -7.3% 0 0 -- Connecticut W W W 1,300 954 36% 0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 675 W 837 990 -15% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 51 49 3.0% 0 0 -- Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% 5,496 6,591 -17% W W W New Jersey 926 871 6.3% 1,084 1,113 -2.6% 0 0 --

214

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

215

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 / 2013 36,409 45,545 386,359 4,925 74,430 122,566 149,359 35,079 46,909 101,706 616,927 Projected 2013 / 2014 43,384 46,008 399,149 5,385 75,320 132,229 145,657 40,558 51,435 107,341 647,317 Projected 2014 / 2015 44,060 46,090 403,883 5,500 76,252 134,742 146,130 41,259 53,742 109,418 657,192 Projected 2015 / 2016 44,596 46,184 408,927 5,563 77,058 137,338 147,201 41,767 55,346 110,814 665,866

216

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 469,273 4,967 96,769 156,319 158,041 53,177 66,548 130,465 768,943 Projected 2013 42,532 59,969 447,171 5,022 91,644 144,378 152,949 53,177 65,901 129,278 744,851 Projected 2014 43,142 60,654 448,912 5,161 92,331 144,497 152,843 54,080 67,592 128,200 748,499 Projected 2015 43,812 61,428 457,865 5,270 93,017 147,568 157,287 54,722 69,679 129,553 762,336

217

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

218

The resource of biomethane, produced via biological, thermal and electrical routes, as a transport biofuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomethane is an energy vector suitable for renewable transport fuel which may derive energy through three different methodologies: thermal gasification; biological anaerobic digestion; and conversion of electricity to hydrogen (via electrolysis) and on to methane as described by the Sabatier Equation. Thermal gasification to produce methane (based on “hard” feed stock) tends to require significant scale, of the order of 400 MW. Biological anaerobic digestion (based on “soft” feed stock) is typically of scale less than 1 MW. Systems based on the Sabatier Equation convert hydrogen to methane exothermically and sequester carbon. The resource is assessed at 19% of energy in transport in Ireland. Adopting the approach of the EU Renewable Energy Directive (for example double credit for biofuels from residues and lignocellulosic feed stock) biomethane can supply 40% renewable energy supply in transport (RES-T). The resource is sufficient to supply 30% of the private transport fleet with indigenous sustainable gaseous biofuel.

Jerry D. Murphy; James Browne; Eoin Allen; Cathal Gallagher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

220

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Theory of interparticle correlations in dense, high-temperature plasmas. V. Electric and thermal conductivities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of the quantum-statistical formulation of electronic transport, we calculate the electric and thermal conductivities of plasmas in a wide range of densities and temperatures where it is essential to take into account the varied degrees of electron degeneracy and local-field corrections describing the strong Coulomb-coupling effects. The physical implications of the results are investigated through comparison with other theories and experiments. For utility in the practical applications, we derive the analytic formulas parametrizing the computed results accurately for the generalized Coulomb logarithms appearing in those conductivities.

Setsuo Ichimaru and Shigenori Tanaka

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Performance analysis of an integrated CHP system with thermal and Electric Energy Storage for residential application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is the evaluation of the profitability of micro-CHP systems for residential application. An integrated CHP system composed of a prime mover, an Electric Energy Storage system, a thermal storage system and an auxiliary boiler has been considered. The study has been carried out taking into account a particular electrochemical storage system which requires also thermal energy, during its operation, for a better exploitation of the residual heat discharged by the prime mover. The prime mover could be a conventional Internal Combustion Engine or also an innovative system, such as fuel cell or organic Rankine cycle. An investigation of this integrated CHP system has been carried out, by means of an in-house developed calculation code, performing a thermo-economic analysis. This paper provides useful results, in order to define the optimum sizing of components of the integrated CHP system under investigation; the developed code allows also to evaluate the profitability and the primary energy saving with respect to the separate production of electricity and heat.

M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale; F. Melino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy from the Oceans: A Small Land Based Ocean Thermal Energy Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a small land based closed cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Plant which is being designed ... aquaculture facility and to produce a net electric power output of up to 300 kW. In...

Dr. F. A. Johnson

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen and Electricity: Public-Private Partnershipand electricity demands. • Foster Public-Private Partnershipand electricity demands. • Foster Public-Private Partnership

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Development of a thermal and electrical energy management in residential building micro-grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global warming and pressing concern about CO2 emission along with increasing fuel and oil cost have brought about great challenges for energy companies and homeowners. In this regard a potential candidate solution is widely used for Distributed Energy Resources which are capable of providing high quality low-cost heat and power to off-grid or remote facilities. To appropriately manage thermal and electrical energy a Smart Energy Management System (SEMS) with hierarchical control scheme has been presented. The developed SEMS model results in mixed integer non-linear programming optimization problem with the objective function of minimizing the operation cost as well as considering emissions. Moreover the optimization problem has been solved for deterministic and stochastic scheduling algorithms. The novelty of this work is basically reliant on using data mining approach to reduce forecasting error. Several case studies have been carried out to evaluate the performance of proposed data mining method on both energy cost and expected cost.

B. Vahidi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Thermal and Electrical Analysis of MARS Rover RTG, and Performance Comparison of Alternative Design Options.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the thermal, thermoelectric and electrical analysis of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the MARS Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The work described was part of an RTG design study conducted by Fairchild Space Company for the U.S. Department of Energy, in support of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's MRSR Project.; A companion paper presented at this conference described a reference mission scenario, al illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, its power system requirements and environmental constraints, a design approach enabling RTG operation in the Martian atmosphere, and the design and the structural and mass analysis of a conservative baseline RTG employing safety-qualified heat source modules and reliability-proven thermoelectric converter elements.; The present paper presents a detailed description of the baseline RTG's thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analysis. It examines the effect of different operating conditions (beginning versus end of mission, water-cooled versus radiation-cooled, summer day versus winter night) on the RTG's performance. Finally, the paper describes and analyzes a number of alternative RTG designs, to determine the effect of different power levels (250W versus 125W), different thermoelectric element designs (standard versus short unicouples versus multicouples) and different thermoelectric figures of merit (0.00058K(superscript -1) to 0.000140K (superscript -1) on the RTG's specific power.; The results presented show the RTG performance achievable with current technology, and the performance improvements that would be achievable with various technology developments. It provides a basis for selecting the optimum strategy for meeting the Mars Rover design goals with minimal programmatic risk and cost.; There is a duplicate copy and also a duplicate copy in the ESD files.

Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Skrabek, Emanuel A

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

A computational analysis of the evaporator/artery of an alkali metal thermal to electric conversion (AMTEC) PX series cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while minimizing mass. Current technology, such as Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's) are reliable, but do not supply the power conversion efficiencies desired for future space missions. That leads to Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric...-series cells to generate electricity for the deep space vehicle. The higher efficiency of AMTEC compared to other conversion technologies, such as Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's), results in less energy source material being launched...

Pyrtle, Frank

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Multiple-Filled Skutterudites: High Thermoelectric Figure of Merit through Separately Optimizing Electrical and Thermal Transports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Skutterudites CoSb{sub 3} with multiple cofillers Ba, La, and Yb were synthesized and very high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 1.7 at 850 K was realized. X-ray diffraction of the densified multiple-filled bulk samples reveals all samples are phase pure. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirm that multiple guest fillers occupy the nanoscale-cages in the skutterudites. The fillers are further shown to be uniformly distributed and the Co-Sb skutterudite framework is virtually unperturbed from atomic scale to a few micrometers. Our results firmly show that high power factors can be realized by adjusting the total filling fraction of fillers with different charge states to reach the optimum carrier density, at the same time, lattice thermal conductivity can also be significantly reduced, to values near the glass limit of these materials, through combining filler species of different rattling frequencies to achieve broad-frequency phonon scattering. Therefore, partially filled skutterudites with multiple fillers of different chemical nature render unique structural characteristics for optimizing electrical and thermal transports in a relatively independent way, leading to continually enhanced ZT values from single- to double-, and finally to multiple-filled skutterudites. The idea of combining multiple fillers with different charge states and rattling frequencies for performance optimization is also expected to be valid for other caged TE compounds.

Zhang, Weiqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jihui [General Motors Corporation; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Shi, Xun [General Motors Corporation-R& D; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Modeling of passive thermal management for electric vehicle battery packs with PCM between cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A passive thermal management system is examined for an electric vehicle battery pack. Phase change material (PCM) is infused in foam layers separating the lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells. Known operating conditions lead to selecting a suitable PCM for the application, n-octadecane wax. Suitable porous foam for infusion is decided on through experimentation. Finite volume based simulations are conducted to study the thermal behavior of a 4 cell sub-module. The effect of different discharge rates are compared for this sub-module, with and without the PCM's presence. The results show that the maximum temperature in the system is decreased up to 7.3 K by replacing dry foam with PCM-soaked “wet foam”. The addition of PCM also makes the temperature distribution more uniform across the cells. The modeling results give indication of the quantity of PCM required, show the influence of the transient melt behavior under dynamic operating conditions, and examine design constraints associated with this approach.

N. Javani; I. Dincer; G.F. Naterer; G.L. Rohrauer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Outdoor testing of advanced optical materials for solar thermal electric applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of low-cost, durable advanced optical materials is an important element in making solar energy viable for electricity production. It is important to determine the expected lifetime of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions. The demonstration of the optical durability of such materials in outdoor environments is critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal electric technologies. For many years optical performance data have been collected and analyzed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for candidate reflector materials subjected to simulated outdoor exposure conditions. Much of this testing is accelerated in order to predict service durability. Some outdoor testing has occurred but not in a systematic manner. To date, simulated/accelerated testing has been limited correlation with actual outdoor exposure testing. Such a correlation is desirable to provide confidence in lifetime predictions based upon accelerated weathering methods. To obtain outdoor exposure data for realistic environments and to establish a data base for correlating simulated/accelerated outdoor exposure data with actual outdoor exposure data, the development of an expanded outdoor testing program has recently been initiated by NREL. Several outdoor test sites will be selected based on the solar climate, potential for solar energy utilization by industry, and cost of installation. Test results are site dependent because exposure conditions vary with geographical location. The importance of this program to optical materials development is outlined, and the process used to determine and establish the outdoor test sites is described. Candidate material identification and selection is also discussed. 10 refs.

Wendelin, T.J.; Jorgensen, G.; Goggin, R.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electrical, optical, and thermal properties of Sn-doped phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, effect of Sn on the electrical, optical, and thermal properties of Ge2Sb2Te5 is studied. Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1.55Sb2Te5Sn0.45, and Ge1.1Sb2Te5Sn0.9...alloys are prepared by melt quenching technique and ...

Gurinder Singh; Aman Kaura; Monika Mukul; S. K. Tripathi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electrical contact structures for solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved electrical output connection means is provided for a high temperature solid oxide electrolyte type fuel cell generator. The electrical connection of the fuel cell electrodes to the electrical output bus, which is brought through the generator housing to be connected to an electrical load line maintains a highly uniform temperature distribution. The electrical connection means includes an electrode bus which is spaced parallel to the output bus with a plurality of symmetrically spaced transversely extending conductors extending between the electrode bus and the output bus, with thermal insulation means provided about the transverse conductors between the spaced apart buses. Single or plural stages of the insulated transversely extending conductors can be provided within the high temperatures regions of the fuel cell generator to provide highly homogeneous temperature distribution over the contacting surfaces.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Journal of Asian Electric Vehicles, Volume 8, Number 1, June 2010 Simplified Thermal Model of PM Motors in Hybrid Vehicle Applications Taking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to develop a complete and representative model of the heat processes in the electric motors. In this paper in Ansoft ePhysics soft- ware. Keywords hybrid electric vehicle, surface permanent magnet synchronous motors needs to be thor- oughly understood. The optimal design of electrical motors with solid thermal

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

235

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

re-use of thermal energy “waste heat” for building heating/and thermal energy “waste heat,” as well as purifiedare used to capture waste heat for productive purposes. Use

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Output power characteristics of the neutral xenon long laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasers which oscillate within inhomogeneously broadened gain media exhibit spectral hole burning and concomitant reduction in output power compared with equivalent homogeneously-broadened laser gain media. By increasing the cavity length, it may be possible to demonstrate at least a partial transition from an inhomogeneous laser cavity mode spectrum to a homogeneous spectrum. There are a number of high gain laser lines which are inhomogeneously-broadened transitions in electric discharges of neutral xenon. In neutral xenon lasers, as in the cases of many other gas lasers, the inhomogeneous spectral broadening mechanism arises from Doppler shifts, {Delta}{nu}{sub D}, of individual atoms in thermal motion within the electric discharge comprising the laser gain medium. Optical transitions corresponding to these noble gas atoms have natural linewidths, {Delta}{nu}{sub n}{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub D}. Simulations of the output power characteristics of the xenon laser were carried out as a function of laser cavity parameters, including the cavity length, L. These calculations showed that when the intracavity mode spacing frequency, c/2L{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub n}, the inhomogeneously broadened xenon mode spectrum converted to a homogeneously broadened oscillation spectrum with an increase in output power. These simulations are compared with experimental results obtained for the long laser oscillation characteristics of the (5d[5/2]{degree}{sub 2}{r_arrow}6p[3/2]{sub 1}) transition corresponding to the strong, high-gain 3.508 {mu} line in xenon.

Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

238

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Prediction of thermal behaviors of an air-cooled lithium-ion battery system for hybrid electric vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal management has been one of the major issues in developing a lithium-ion (Li-ion) hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) battery system since the Li-ion battery is vulnerable to excessive heat load under abnormal or severe operational conditions. In this work, in order to design a suitable thermal management system, a simple modeling methodology describing thermal behavior of an air-cooled Li-ion battery system was proposed from vehicle components designer's point of view. A proposed mathematical model was constructed based on the battery's electrical and mechanical properties. Also, validation test results for the Li-ion battery system were presented. A pulse current duty and an adjusted US06 current cycle for a two-mode HEV system were used to validate the accuracy of the model prediction. Results showed that the present model can give good estimations for simulating convective heat transfer cooling during battery operation. The developed thermal model is useful in structuring the flow system and determining the appropriate cooling capacity for a specified design prerequisite of the battery system.

Yong Seok Choi; Dal Mo Kang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Investigation of the effects of LIFT printing with a KrF-excimer laser on thermally sensitive electrically conductive adhesives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser induced forward transfer is an emerging material deposition technology. We investigated the feasibility of this technique for printing thermally sensitive, electrically conductive adhesives with and without using an intermediate dynamic release layer. A 248 nm KrF-excimer laser was used to print the epoxy-based conductive adhesives containing silver flakes down to 75 ?m dot size. The process is particularly relevant for realizing electrical connections to surface mount devices in the microelectronics industry. Characterization of the printed materials was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, four-point electrical measurements, die-shear testing and temperature shock testing, to establish that the properties of the adhesive were not affected by direct or indirect laser irradiation. The lack of degradation by the laser onto the adhesives confirms the potential of this technique for interconnection applications.

S M Perinchery; E C P Smits; A Sridhar; P Albert; J van den Brand; R Mandamparambil; I Yakimets; H F M Schoo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Lab Trials of an Electricity Transmission Line Voltage Sensor Based on Thermally Poled Silica Fibre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Voltage sensing using helically coiled lengths of thermally poled twin-hole silica optical fibre is presented. Lab accuracy test results showing good linearity and signal to noise...

Michie, Andrew M; Hambley, Philip; Bassett, Ian M; Haywood, John H; Henry, Peter; Ingram, John

242

Design of battery pack and internal combustion engine thermal models for hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis focuses on the design of computational models, capable of simulating the thermal behaviour of a battery pack and internal combustion engine equipping… (more)

Catacchio, Gabriele

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of NREL's Thermal Stress and Reliability Project work from October 2007 to March 2009 with an emphasis on activity during 2008/2009.

O'Keefe, M. P.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Chiller Start/Stop Optimization for a Campus-wide Chilled Water System with a Thermal Storage Tank Under a Four-Period Electricity Rate Schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of a 1.4-million-gallon chilled water thermal storage tank greatly increases the operational flexibility of a campuswide chilled water system under a four-part electricity rate structure. While significant operational savings can...

Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.; Contreras, O.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric PCM Assisted Thermal Heating System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Delphi Automotive at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric PCM assisted...

246

Predicting Battery Pack Thermal and Electrical Performance in a Vehicle Using Realistic Drive Cycle Power Profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat generated during battery charge and discharge cycles is a major ... issue, particularly since the performance of a battery depends on its operating temperature. As a consequence, robust thermal managemen...

Allen Curran; Scott Peck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

248

Dependence of thermal destabilization of electric-arc plasma in an air flow on discharge conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of the conditions of electric-arc burning in an air flow on the ... processes in the development of instability in an arc-discharge column is shown.

V. N. Borisyuk; S. V. Goncharik…

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermal performance of oil spray cooling system for in-wheel motor in electric vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cooling of the motor in an in-wheel system is critical to its performance and durability. In the present study, the shape of the channel in the hollow shaft for the oil spray cooling of a high-capacity 35 kW in-wheel motor was optimized, and the thermal performance of the motor was evaluated by numerical analysis and experiments. The thermal flow was analyzed by evaluating the thermal performance of two conventional cooling models of in-wheel motors under conditions of continuous rating base speed. For conventional model #1, in which the cooling oil is stagnant in the lower end of the motor, the maximum temperature of the coil was 221.7 °C. For conventional model #2, in which the cooling oil circulates through the exit and entrance of the housing and jig, the maximum temperature of the coil was 155.4 °C. Both models thus proved to be unsuitable for in-wheel motors because the motor control specifications limit the maximum temperature to 150 °C. We designed and manufactured an enhanced model for in-wheel motors, which we equipped with an optimized channel for the oil spray cooling mode, and evaluated its thermal performance under continuous rating conditions. The maximum temperatures of the coil at the base and maximum speeds, which were set as the design points, were below the motor temperature limit, being 138.1 and 137.8 °C, respectively.

Dong Hyun Lim; Sung Chul Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The USDOE Forrestal Lighting Retrofit: Analysis of Electricity and Thermal Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,705 or 76% of the total monetary savings. The measured energy savings performed within 90% of the estimated savings. Quite surprisingly, the thermal savings which were not included in initial estimates by the USDOE accounted for $102,824 or 24...

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NUMERICAL MODELLING OF THERMAL-ELECTRICAL PHENOMENA IN SPARK PLASMA SINTERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should allow their cost-effective introduction in aero-engines, in which these low density materials have. The comparison is carried out for two different materials (conductive and non conductive): TiAl and 32OAl in the conducting materials. As a consequence, the electrical potential and the temperature are strongly dependent

Boyer, Edmond

252

Electrical and thermal properties of neutron-transmutation-doped Ge at 20 mK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on hot-electron effects in neutron-transmutation-doped Ge (NTD Ge) near 20 mK. Both static and dynamic electrical properties were measured and compared with a model including both variable-range-hopping conduction and hot-electron effects.

Ning Wang; F. C. Wellstood; B. Sadoulet; E. E. Haller; J. Beeman

1990-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

HeatProbe: A Thermal-based Power Meter for Accounting Disaggregated Electricity Usage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on promoting energy consumption awareness [2, 3, 4]. Since utility bills aggregate electricity usage, it is diffi- cult to determine disaggregated energy consumption. If individuals can be made aware}@citi.sinica.edu.tw ABSTRACT To promote energy-saving behavior, disaggregating elec- tricity usage is critical for increasing

Ouhyoung, Ming

254

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

255

Spectroscopy peculiarities of thermal plasma of electric arc discharge between electrodes with Zn admixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Plasma of the free burning electric arc between Ag–SnO2–ZnO composite electrodes as well as brass electrodes were investigated. The plasma temperature distributions were obtained by Boltzmann plot method involving Cu I, Ag I or Zn I spectral line emissions. The electron density distributions were obtained from the width and from absolute intensity of spectral lines. The laser absorption spectroscopy was used for measurement of copper atom concentration in plasma. Plasma equilibrium composition was calculated using two independent groups of experimental values (temperature and copper atom concentration, temperature and electron density). It was found that plasma of the free burning electric arc between brass electrodes is in local thermodynamical equilibrium. The experimental verification of the spectroscopic data of Zn I spectral lines was carried out.

R.V. Semenyshyn; A.N. Veklich; I.L. Babich; V.F. Boretskij

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dynamic simulation of the thermal and electrical behavior of a thermionic converter coupled to a solar concentrator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical simulation for the dynamic thermal and electrical behavior of a thermionic converter coupled to a solar concentrator, is presented. The thermionic device is a Cesium-filled thermionic diode operating in the ignited mode. The emitter of the device is made of polycrystalline Rhenium and the collector of the device of Molybdenum. The solar concentrator is a parabolic dish. The designed emitter and collector temperatures are 1,850 K and 928 K, respectively. However, due to changes in ambient conditions, the collector efficiency varies and so does the system efficiency. This fact makes it necessary to evaluate the design of the system not just for one hour with constant conditions but also for a whole operating day. The paper presents plots for the emitter and collector thermionic device temperatures and power and voltage for a constant resistance load as a function of time.

Perez, G. [CUAP-UAP, Puebla (Mexico). Centro de Investigaciones en Dispositivos Semiconductores; Estrada, C.A.; Cervantes, J.G. [UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Solar Energy Research Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Impacts of high penetration level of fully electric vehicles charging loads on the thermal ageing of power transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper develops a methodology to determine the impacts of high penetration level of fully electric vehicles (FEVs) charging loads on the thermal ageing of power distribution transformers. The method proposed in this paper is stochastically formulated by modelling the transformer life consumption due to \\{FEVs\\} charging loads as a function of ambient temperature, start time of \\{FEVs\\} charging, initial state-of-charge and charging modes. \\{FEVs\\} loads are modelled using the results from an analytical solution that predicts a cluster of \\{FEVs\\} chargers. A UK generic LV distribution network model and real load demand data are used to simulate FEVs’ impacts on the thermal ageing of LV power distribution transformers. Results show that the ambient temperature, \\{FEVs\\} penetration level, and start time of charging are the main factors that affect the transformer life expectancy. It was concluded that the smart charging scenario generally shows the best outcome from the loss of life reduction perspective. Meanwhile, public charging which shifts a large percentage of charging load to commercial and industrial areas can significantly alleviate the residential transformer loading thus has little impact on the loss of life of transformers. The proposed method in this paper can be easily applied to the determination of the optimum charging time as a function of existing loads, and ambient temperature.

Kejun Qian; Chengke Zhou; Yue Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

1 000 000 "C/s thin film electrical heater: ln situ resistivity measurements of Al and Ti/Si thin films during ultra rapid thermal annealing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduce a new technique for rapidly heating (10' "C/s) thin films using an electrical thermal annealing- ently, most commercial RTA systems use radiation-heating techniques via tungsten-halogen lamps. These systems typi- cally have a maximum heating rate of 100-300 "C/s. We introduce an alternative methodfor

Allen, Leslie H.

259

Fluid flow in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera: implications from thermal data and deep electrical sounding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperatures of 100°C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800°C magma chamber at 6–8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Peclét-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower boundaries of the Bishop Tuff, and an upflow zone in the metasedimentary rocks. Vertical Darcy velocities range from 10 to 70 cm a?1. A 21-km-long geoelectrical profile across the caldera provides resistivity values to the order of 100 to >103 ?m down to a depth of 6 km, as well as variations of self-potential. Interpretation of the electrical data with respect to hydrothermal fluid movement confirms that there is no downflow beneath the resurgent dome. To explain the unexpectedly low temperatures in the resurgent dome, we challenge the common view that the caldera as a whole is a regime of high temperatures and the resurgent dome is a local cold anomaly. Instead, we suggest that the caldera was cooled to normal thermal conditions by vigorous hydrothermal activity in the past, and that a present-day hot water flow system is responsible for local hot anomalies, such as Hot Creek and the area of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant. The source of hot water has been associated with recent shallow intrusions into the West Moat. The focus of planning for future power plants should be to locate this present-day flow system instead of relying on heat from the old magma chamber.

Daniel F.C Pribnow; Claudia Schütze; Suzanne J Hurter; Christina Flechsig; John H Sass

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Electric Motor Thermal Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Technical and economical system comparison of photovoltaic and concentrating solar thermal power systems depending on annual global irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating solar thermal power and photovoltaics are two major technologies for converting sunlight to electricity. Variations of the annual solar irradiation depending on the site influence their annual efficiency, specific output and electricity generation cost. Detailed technical and economical analyses performed with computer simulations point out differences of solar thermal parabolic trough power plants, non-tracked and two-axis-tracked PV systems. Therefore, 61 sites in Europe and North Africa covering a global annual irradiation range from 923 to 2438 kW h/m2 a have been examined. Simulation results are usable irradiation by the systems, specific annual system output and levelled electricity cost. Cost assumptions are made for today's cost and expected cost in 10 years considering different progress ratios. This will lead to a cost reduction by 50% for PV systems and by 40% for solar thermal power plants. The simulation results show where are optimal regions for installing solar thermal trough and tracked PV systems in comparison to non-tracked PV. For low irradiation values the annual output of solar thermal systems is much lower than of PV systems. On the other hand, for high irradiations solar thermal systems provide the best-cost solution even when considering higher cost reduction factors for PV in the next decade. Electricity generation cost much below 10 Eurocents per kW h for solar thermal systems and about 12 Eurocents/kW h for PV can be expected in 10 years in North Africa.

Volker Quaschning

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Design of the Experimental Procedures for Analysis of Thermal and Electrical Properties of a Prismatic LiFeYPO4 Battery in a Modified Electric Car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric vehicle has become one of the alternatives for replacing the fossil-fuel vehicle due to the rapid decrease in the energy source and increase in the automobile utilization. Also, with the zero pipe-tail e...

Chayangkun Sanguanwatana…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermal control...

264

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A 10% increase in shaft work is directly attributable to modified thermal heat capacity Engineering HTF Specific heat yields modified power output. 27 127 227 327 427 527...

265

Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Morley, David W. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Relationship Among Efficiency and Output Power of Heat Energy Converters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationship among efficiency and output power of heat-electric energy converters as well as of any converters for transforming of heat energy into any other kind of energy is considered. It is shown, that the parameter efficiency does not determine univocally the output power of a converter. It is proposed to use another parameter for determination of working ability of heat energy converters. It is shown, that high output power can not be achieved by any kind of Stirling-type converters in spite of their high efficiency.

Alexander Luchinskiy

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility...

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management...

269

Electrical characteristics and thermal stability of HfO{sub 2} metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated on clean reconstructed GaSb surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HfO{sub 2}/GaSb interfaces fabricated by high-vacuum HfO{sub 2} deposition on clean reconstructed GaSb surfaces were examined to explore a thermally stable GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure with low interface-state density (D{sub it}). Interface Sb-O bonds were electrically and thermally unstable, and post-metallization annealing at temperatures higher than 200?°C was required to stabilize the HfO{sub 2}/GaSb interfaces. However, the annealing led to large D{sub it} in the upper-half band gap. We propose that the decomposition products that are associated with elemental Sb atoms act as interface states, since a clear correlation between the D{sub it} and the Sb coverage on the initial GaSb surfaces was observed.

Miyata, Noriyuki, E-mail: nori.miyata@aist.go.jp; Mori, Takahiro; Yasuda, Tetsuji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohtake, Akihiro [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ichikawa, Masakazu [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 054203 (2011) Electrical and thermal conductivity of liquid sodium from first-principles calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pipes in high-temperature solar-energy power plants, thanks to its large thermal conductivity, which Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, USA (Received 23 May 2011; published 4 August 2011) We report

Alfè, Dario

271

Exergy Analysis and Environmental Impact Assessment of Using Various Refrigerants for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Thermal Management Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal issues associated with EV and HEV battery packs and underhood electronics can significantly affect the performance and life cycle of the battery and the associated system. In order to keep the battery ope...

Halil S. Hamut; Ibrahim Dincer…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reduction of Ion Thermal Diffusivity Associated with the Transition of the Radial Electric Field in Neutral-Beam-Heated Plasmas in the Large Helical Device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent large helical device experiments revealed that the transition from ion root to electron root occurred for the first time in neutral-beam-heated discharges, where no nonthermal electrons exist. The measured values of the radial electric field were found to be in qualitative agreement with those estimated by neoclassical theory. A clear reduction of ion thermal diffusivity was observed after the mode transition from ion root to electron root as predicted by neoclassical theory when the neoclassical ion loss is more dominant than the anomalous ion loss.

K. Ida et al.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thermal calculation of combined transpiration-liquid cooling of discharge-chamber walls of an electric-arc heater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article presents a theoretical calculation of the temperature profiles and optimal thicknesses of porous and solid cooled walls, which provide a steady-state operation of an electric-arc heater with transpira...

G. L. Dobroedov; V. I. Krylovich

1970-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Design and Simulation of Air Cooled Battery Thermal Management System Using Thermoelectric for a Hybrid Electric Bus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic and electric parameters of HEVs and EVs such as acceleration, regenerative braking and battery charging/discharging depend on the battery system performance. Excessive or uneven temperature rise in a modu...

Vahid Esfahanian; Saber Ahmadi Renani…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric load thermal storage solar thermal storage chargingcombustion solar thermal CHP heat storage charging generateof solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of electrical storage,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2011 Resource Use: October 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Consistent with the retail sales numbers, generation output rose in Texas, as well as the Central and Mid-Atlantic regions and declined or remained

278

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: March 2012 Resource Use: March 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined across much of the country in March due to unseasonably warm temperatures. The two regions that observed small

279

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: February 2012 Resource Use: February 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in almost all regions in February due to unseasonably warm temperatures. Following the same pattern as January,

280

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: December 2011 Resource Use: December 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions, with the exception of the West and Texas, due to unseasonably warm temperatures in December. Fossil steam

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: November 2011 Resource Use: November 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined or remained relatively flat in all regions except for Texas and the Southeast. Both of these regions saw generation

282

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: January 2012 Resource Use: January 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions due to unseasonably warm temperatures in January. Fossil steam generation followed total generation

283

Semi-flexible bimetal-based thermal energy harvesters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new semi-flexible device able to turn thermal gradients into electricity by using a curved bimetal coupled to an electret-based converter. In fact, a two-step conversion is carried out: (i) a curved bimetal turns the thermal gradient into a mechanical oscillation that is then (ii) converted into electricity thanks to an electrostatic converter using electrets in Teflon®. The semi-flexible and low-cost design of these new energy converters pave the way to mass production over large areas of thermal energy harvesters. Raw output powers up to 13.46 ?W per device were reached on a hot source at 60?°C with forced convection. Then, a DC-to-DC flyback converter has been sized to turn the energy harvesters' raw output powers into a viable supply source for an electronic circuit (DC@3 V). At the end, 10 ?W of directly usable output power were reached with 3 devices, which is compatible with wireless sensor network powering applications.

S Boisseau; G Despesse; S Monfray; O Puscasu; T Skotnicki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: September 2011 Resource Use: September 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, is most pronounced in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the

285

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: August 2011 Resource Use: August 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation output by region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, predominants in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the Southeast and

286

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines to Electrical Machines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor

289

electrical, engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in groundbreaking community solar project PMC-based technology products enter the market Expanding our capacity: new learning educational gaming energy-efficient data storage and computing health informatics haptic education K-12 STEM electrical energy storage thermal energy storage and conversion energy production

Zhang, Junshan

290

Thermal-noise-limited transduction observed in mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous recordings of the spontaneous mechanical input fluctuations and the electrical output fluctuations in hair cells that serve as biological microphones show that the Brownian motion of the mechanoceptive organelle, the hair bundle, is often strongly correlated with the fluctuations of the transmembrane voltage. This correlation stems from transduction of the spontaneous input noise and shows that these cells can almost reach the sensitivity limit imposed by the thermal noise at their input.

Winfried Denk and Watt W. Webb

1989-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal Performance and...

293

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2013 Resource Use: October 2013 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By fuel type By generator type Region map map showing electricity regions In October 2013, net generation in the United States increased 1.0 percent compared to the previous year. This increase in electricity generation occurred mainly in the Mid-Atlantic, Central, and Southeast regions, along

294

Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation summarizes the information given during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

295

Electrical power converter method and system employing multiple output converters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C. (Wauwatosa, WI); Radosevich, Lawrence D. (Muskego, WI); Meyer, Andreas A. (Richmond Heights, OH); Gollhardt, Neil (Fox Point, WI); Kannenberg, Daniel G. (Waukesha, WI)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Electric motor with controllable speed and torque  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The proposed electric motor is characterized by controllable speed and torque ... shaft, at constant rotor speed. In this motor, the torque at the output shaft increases...

R. G. Khadeev

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gigawatthours largely because of the recent, rapid growth in photovoltaic capacity. Solar electricity output in June is a good indicator of the recent growth of the solar...

298

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Impact of high-oxygen thermal annealing on the structural, optical and electrical properties of ZnO discs made from 20-nm ZnO nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

20-nm nanoparticles of zinc oxide (ZnO) were used to make high-density ZnO discs by uniaxial pressing at 4 ton/cm2 pressure and sintering at 1200 °C for 1 hour. High-oxygen thermal annealing performed on the ZnO discs was found to have a profound impact especially enhanced grain growth even at a low annealing temperature of only 400 °C. Moreover we observed a unique secondary growth of ZnO nanoparticles and growth of multilayer grains that have not been reported elsewhere. The strong solid state reaction during annealing was probably attributed to the high surface area of the 20-nm ZnO nanoparticles that promoted strong surface reaction even at low annealing temperatures. The ZnO discs have been found to contain a very high concentration of structural defects (oxygen vacancies and zinc/oxygen interstitials) that was indicated by the dominant and broad visible photoluminescence (PL) emission in the green band with peaks at (519 - 533) nm and it was found that this visible emission was greatly increased after annealing treatment especially at 800 °C. Annealing treatment also was found to improved the grain crystallinity as illustrated by the lowering of intrinsic compressive stress based on the XRD lattice constant and full-wave half-maximum (FWHM) data. The electrical properties of the ZnO discs were also greatly influenced by the annealing treatment especially a big drop in the breakdown voltage from 362 V (as-grown sample) to 170 V (800 °C sample). The resistivity also experienced a dramatic drop from 267 k?.cm (as-grown sample) to 74.6 k?.cm (800 °C sample). High-oxygen thermal annealing can be employed as a new technique in controlling the breakdown voltage of ZnO discs made from ZnO nanoparticles with improved structural properties.

Rabab Khalid Sendi; Shahrom Mahmud

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Control of XeF laser output by pulse injecton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection locking is investigated as a means for control of optical pulse duration and polarization in a XeF laser. Intense short-pulse generation in the ultraviolet is achieved by injection of a low-level 1-ns optical pulse into a XeF oscillator. Control of laser output polarization by injection locking is demonstrated and studied as a function of injected signal level. Enhancement of XeF electric-discharge laser efficiency by injection pulse ''priming'' is observed.

Pacala, T.J.; Christensen, C.P.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 1 Electrical measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

position between coil windings. Circuit designed to have zero output at equilibrium. MTSC735, Spring 20081 MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 1 Electrical measurements Critical to all/reducing noise from measurements MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 2 Measurements Believe nothing

Plaisted, David A.

302

Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

Moreno, G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Beatriz L´opez-Wallea,1 and analytical calculations. Key words: Micro-actuators, Thermal modelling, Electrical analogy, Thermal network 1 and MicroMechatronic Systems Department (AS2M), 24 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besan¸con, France Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

Solar thermal organic rankine cycle for micro-generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) driven by solar thermal energy is developed for the decentralized production of electricity of up to 50 kW. Conventional Rankine Cycle uses water as the working fluid whereas ORC uses organic compound as the working fluid and it is particularly suitable for low temperature applications. The ORC and the solar collector will be sized according to the solar flux distribution in the Republic of Yemen for the required power output of 50 kW. This will be a micro power generation system that consists of two cycles the solar thermal cycle that harness solar energy and the power cycle which is the ORC that generates electricity. As for the solar thermal cycle heat transfer fluid (HTF) circulates the cycle while absorbing thermal energy from the sun through a parabolic trough collector and then storing it in a thermal storage to increase system efficiency and maintains system operation during low radiation. The heat is then transferred to the organic fluid in the ORC via a heat exchanger. The organic fluids to be used and analyzed in the ORC are hydrocarbons R600a and R290.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A study of the optimal operating conditions in the organic Rankine cycle using a turbo-expander for fluctuations of the available thermal energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The organic Rankine cycle is widely used to obtain electric power from renewable energy sources, such as solar energy, geothermal energy, and waste thermal energy. In a typical ORC, a turbo-expander or volumetric expander is applied to convert the thermal energy to mechanical energy. The turbo-expander is widely used for large-scale output power because it has merits when used with large mass flowrates; the scroll expander is used for small-scale output power. In \\{ORCs\\} that produce small-scale output power, the available thermal energy as a renewable heat source usually cannot be supplied continuously. For fluctuating levels of available thermal energy, positive displacement machine has difficulty in adjusting the mass flowrate. In order to regulate the mass flowrate for varying thermal energies, a small-scale radial-type turbine and supersonic nozzles were designed specifically for this study. \\{R245fa\\} was used as the working fluid, and the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid in the cycle were predicted on the basis of the designed turbine blade and nozzle shape even though the mass flowrates were varied. The output powers at the off-design operations were predicted for the full range of 30 kW according to the number of nozzles used.

Soo-Yong Cho; Chong-Hyun Cho; Kook-Young Ahn; Young Duk Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electric Currents Electric Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient of resistivity Electric Power: = = = Also, = . So, = = 2 = 2 Unit of Power(P): Watt (WChapter 18 Electric Currents #12;Electric Current: Flow of electric charge Current is flow of positive charge. In reality it's the electron moves in solids- Electron current. #12;Ohm's Law : Resistance

Yu, Jaehoon

309

Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photovoltaic panels (PV), solar thermal panels (ST), andphotovoltaic panels, solar thermal panels, and electricChiller, ST – solar thermal system, PV – photovoltaic. The

Cardoso, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic grid–adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

Venditti, David A.

311

Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric furnaces, or electric thermal storage systems. Electric Furnaces With electric furnaces, heated air is delivered throughout the home through supply ducts and returned to the furnace through return ducts. Blowers (large fans) in electric furnaces move air over a group of three to seven

312

Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric furnaces, or electric thermal storage systems. Electric Furnaces With electric furnaces, heated air is delivered throughout the home through supply ducts and returned to the furnace through return ducts. Blowers (large fans) in electric furnaces move air over a group of three to seven

313

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PV), solar thermal, stationary batteries, thermal storage,thermal storage, AC - absorption cooling, ST-solar thermal,solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) stationary electric storage (

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Well-to-Wheel Analyses for Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Electric Vehicles Using Various Thermal Power Generation Technologies in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compared BEV with the conventional gasoline car, diesel car, and hybrid electric car in terms of total energy use and... According to definition from U.S. EPA, mid-size car is pointed to th...

Wei Shen; Weijian Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electrical Characterization of an RF Glow Discharge at Room Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A non-thermal atmospheric-like plasma source able to operate at room temperature represents, by its physical nature, a considerable potential for biological applications, given its highly accurate action and extremely controllable penetration on the surface of biological tissue. As we start up a research line into this technology, we report the electrical characterization of a room pressure plasma discharge by means of a coupling network model. The discharge is produced by a 13.56MHz commercial generator. As it is impossible to measure directly its state variables (voltage and current intensity) due to the considerable perturbation created by introducing a low impedance at the system output, then an indirect estimation of such variables is achieved from experimental diagnostics at the input, so to validate the proposed electrical model.

Perez-Martinez, J. A.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, AP 890, Toluca (Mexico); Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Benitez-Read, J. S.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J. O. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, AP 890, Toluca (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Physics of Failure of Electrical Interconnects Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines...

317

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file every 6 days Output after 30 days in 6th file. The Starting Month = July Example: roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0120.nc.gz : July 3 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0122.nc.gz : July 6 and July 9 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0124.nc

Gangopadhyay, Avijit

318

Power output enhancement of a vibration-driven electret generator for wireless sensor applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a compact vibration-driven electret generator that excelled at a power output. It succeeded in the operation of wireless sensor modules only on electricity from electret generators. This electret generator can supply enough power to operate a wireless sensor module without an external power source. It was necessary for enabling this operation to enhance the power output of the electret generator. We enhanced the power output by decreasing the parasitic capacitance. To decrease the parasitic capacitance, we fabricated a collector substrate using concave electrodes. We decreased it from 25 to 17 pF. As a result, the power output from our generator was enhanced from 40 to 100 µW considerably at an acceleration of 0.15 g (1.47 m s?2) and a resonance frequency of 30 Hz.

Tatsuakira Masaki; Kenji Sakurai; Toru Yokoyama; Masayo Ikuta; Hiroshi Sameshima; Masashi Doi; Tomonori Seki; Masatoshi Oba

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Using input-output techniques to address economic and energy issues in Malaysia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities. Expand the basic activity: manufacturing into two activities: 1) high energy intensity 2) low energy intensity Assume they have equal share of output and their input structure is similar: Then assume? Assume electricity intensity: · high energy intensity 1.4 · low energy intensity 0.4 Now calculate

320

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

322

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electric Motor Improves Performance of Turbo and Compressor Charging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

What possibilities are available for avoiding turbo lag? Extremely fast and dynamic electric drives could, for example, be used ... Swiss company Sonceboz set to work. An electric motor with an output of 2 kW at ...

Dr.-Ing. Stephane Biwersi…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A calculation of the temperature of contact surfaces in a high-power discharge of electric current of commercial frequency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal processes occuring at the surface of disconnected electric contacts subjected to a high-power electric arc are considered.

I. L. Shleifman

1970-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Simulation of Advanced Powertrain Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Under this project, the Volvo complete vehicle model was modified to include engine and exhaust system thermal outputs and cooling system to enable WHR simulations from a system perspective.

326

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Gesture output: eyes-free output using a force feedback touch surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose using spatial gestures not only for input but also for output. Analogous to gesture input, the proposed gesture output moves the user's finger in a gesture, which the user then recognizes. We use our concept in a mobile scenario where a motion ... Keywords: eyes free, force feedback, gestures, touch

Anne Roudaut; Andreas Rau; Christoph Sterz; Max Plauth; Pedro Lopes; Patrick Baudisch

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5 V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used...

Eachempatti, Haritha

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E2.3 Bioenergy technology ­ balancing energy output with environmental benefitsbenefits John standards #12;Is it right to grow bioenergy? Or How much bioenergy production is right? #12;Historical bioenergy Farmers historically used 25% land for horse feed #12;Energy crops are `solar panels' Solar energy

Levi, Ran

330

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS Anshul Singh*, Arindam Basu, Keck-Voon Ling, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore *NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), NTU, Singapore $School of Computer Engineering, NTU, Singapore §School of ECE, Georgia

Mooney, Vincent

331

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of marine seismic airgun sources" Les Hatton CISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns Introduction Modelling Marine Life Impact Where next Overview #12 Normal speed surface movie of airgun firing Courtesy IO limited #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns

Hatton, Les

332

Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper first reviews the key hurdles to thermal energy storage. Next, case studies of three electric utility thermal storage marketing programs are reviewed. The results of these case studies. as well as advice and experiences from other...

McDonald, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Concrete as a thermal energy storage medium for thermocline solar energy storage systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rising energy costs and the adverse effect on the environment caused by the burning of fossil fuels have triggered extensive research into alternative sources of energy. Harnessing the abundance of solar energy has been one of the most attractive energy alternatives. However, the development of an efficient and economical solar energy storage system is of major concern. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), the cost per kilowatt hour electric from current technologies which utilize solar energy is high, estimated at approximately $0.15–$0.20/kW helectric, while the unit cost to store the thermal energy is approximately $30.00/kW hthermal. Based on traditional means of producing electricity (through burning fossil fuels), the unit cost of electricity is $0.05–$0.06/kW h. Clearly, current solar energy technologies cannot compete with traditional forms of electricity generation. In response, the DOE has established a goal of reducing the cost of solar generated electricity to $0.05–$0.07/kW helectric and achieving thermal storage costs below $15.00/kW hthermal. Reduction in the cost of the storage medium is one step in achieving the stated goal. In this research program economical concrete mixtures were developed that resisted temperatures up to 600 °C. This temperature level represents a 50% increase over the operating temperature of current systems, which is approximately 400 °C. However, long-term testing of concrete is required to validate its use. At this temperature, the unit cost of energy stored in concrete (the thermal energy storage medium) is estimated at $0.88–$1.00/kW hthermal. These concrete mixtures, used as a thermal energy storage medium, can potentially change solar electric power output allowing production through periods of low to no insolation at lower unit costs.

Emerson John; Micah Hale; Panneer Selvam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

High Temperature Oxidation Resistance and Surface Electrical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plates with oxidation resistant coatings. Candidate coatings must exhibit chemical and thermal-mechanical stability and high electrical conductivity during long-term...

335

A solar concentrating photovoltaic/thermal collector .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis discusses aspects of a novel solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal (PV/T) collector that has been designed to produce both electricity and hot water.… (more)

Coventry, Joseph S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Solar electric systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity from solar sources is the subject. The state-of-the-art of photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal electric systems is presented and also a broad range of solar energy activities throughout the Arab world is covered. Contents, abridged: Solar radiation fundamentals. Basic theory solar cells. Solar thermal power plants. Solar energy activities at the scientific research council in Iraq. Solar energy program at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Prospects of solar energy for Egypt. Non-conventional energy in Syria. Wind and solar energies in Sudan. Index.

Warfield, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Administrator Ready Reference Guide Customizing an Output Style  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may be in various sections of the instructions. Some things to look for: - line spacing Preview Utility (Tools, Preview Output Styles) or by simply opening the Output Style Editor (Bibliography, Edit button -- to the right of the output style drop- down). The Output Style Preview Utility

University of Technology, Sydney

338

Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

Liu Yingfan [Department of Mathematics, Nanjing University of Post and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: yingfanliu@hotmail.com; Zhang Qinghong [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI 49855 (United States)], E-mail: qzhang@nmu.edu

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 demonstration of a plug-in diesel-electric HUMVEE by thediesel max output (kW) continuous/Me- kW type efficiency electric

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermal performance evaluation of a solar air heater with and without thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This communication presents the experimental study and performance analysis of a solar air heater with and without phase change ... found that the output temperature in case with thermal energy storage (TES) is h...

V. V. Tyagi; A. K. Pandey; S. C. Kaushik…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effects of transcutaneous thermal and electrical stimulation of the teat on pituitary luteinizing hormone, prolactin and oxytocin secretion in ovariectomized, estrogen-treated beef cows following acute weaning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

days. In contrast to these results, Carruthers and Hafs (45) found suckling to result in an increased period of acyclicity (39. 7 vs 21. 2 days) but increasing milking frequency from two to four times daily in non-suckled dairy cows had... on the teat and tail approximately 5 min prior to each stimulation. An electrical device (Hunter, J. F. , Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A8M University, College Station, TX) was designed to deliver a continuous flow of current...

Cutshaw, Jonetta Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Thermal management optimization of an air-cooled Li-ion battery module using pin-fin heat sinks for hybrid electric vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Three dimensional transient thermal analysis of an air-cooled module that contains prismatic Li-ion cells next to a special kind of aluminum pin fin heat sink whose heights of pin fins increase linearly through the width of the channel in air flow direction was studied for thermal management of Lithium-ion battery pack. The effects of pin fins arrangements, discharge rates, inlet air flow velocities, and inlet air temperatures on the battery were investigated. The results showed that despite of heat sinks with uniform pin fin heights that increase the standard deviation of the temperature field, using this kind of pin fin heat sink compare to the heat sink without pin fins not only decreases the bulk temperature inside the battery, but also decreases the standard deviation of the temperature field inside the battery as well. Increasing the inlet air temperature leads to decreasing the standard deviation of the temperature field while increases the maximum temperature of the battery. Furthermore, increasing the inlet air velocity first increases the standard deviation of the temperature field till reaches to the maximum point, and after that decreases. Also, increasing the inlet air velocity leads to decrease in the maximum temperature of the battery.

Shahabeddin K. Mohammadian; Yuwen Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermal simulation of batteries for improving E-powertrain performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electrical energy is stored, for example, in battery systems with voltages of between 12 V ... a simulation tool, 3D-Electrical / 3D-Thermal Co-Simulation for improving electric powertrain performance.

Dipl.-Ing. Michael Clauss; Jakob Hennig; Dr. Carolus Grünig…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electricity cost saving comparison due to tariff change and ice thermal storage (ITS) usage based on a hybrid centrifugal-ITS system for buildings: A university district cooling perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the case study of a district cooling system of a university located in a South East Asia region (lat: 01°29?; long: 110°20?E) is presented. In general, the university has high peak ambient temperature of around 32–35 °C coupled with high humidity of about 85% during afternoon period. The total electricity charge for the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak Campus is very high amounting to more than $314,911 per month. In this paper, a few district cooling schemes are investigated to provide “what-if analysis” and in order to minimize the overall electricity charges. Few scenarios designed for the application of centrifugal with and without ice-thermal storage (ITS) systems on the buildings were investigated. It was found that, due to the local tariff status, marginally saving can be achieved in the range of 0.08–3.13% if a new tariff is adopted; and a total of further saving of 1.26–2.43% if ITS is operated. This marginally saving is mainly due to the local tariff conditions and lower local temperature range (?T) which are less favorable as compared with those reported in the literature elsewhere.

Mohammad Omar Abdullah; Lim Pai Yii; Ervina Junaidi; Ghazali Tambi; Mohd Asrul Mustapha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Output power characteristics and performance of TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element No. 24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of single cell TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) No. 24 is presented. Thermal power tests were conducted for over 3000 hours to investigate converter performance under normal and adverse operating conditions. Experiments conducted include low power testing, high power testing, air introduction to the interelectrode gap, collector temperature optimization, thermal modeling, and output power characteristic measurements. During testing, no unexpected degradation in converter performance was observed. The TFE has been removed from the test stand and returned to Scientific Industrial Association {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} for materials analysis and report. This research was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the Topaz International Program (TIP) by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Luchau, D.W.; Bruns, D.R. [Team Specialty Services, Inc., TOPAZ International Program, 901 University Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Izhvanov, O.; Androsov, V. [JV INERTEK, Scientific Industrial Association ``Luch``, 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya, Podolsk, (Russia) 142100

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Off-set stabilizer for comparator output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

Lunsford, James S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Potential solar thermal integration in Spanish combined cycle gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) are volumetric machines, which means that their net power output decreases at air temperatures above the design point. Such temperatures generally occur during periods of high solar irradiation. Many countries where these conditions occur, including Spain, have installed a significant number of \\{CCGTs\\} in recent years, with the subsequent yield losses in the summer. This implies enormous potential for solar hybridization, increasing production in peak hours and overall efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions. This paper analyzes the overall potential for solar thermal integration in 51 CCGTS (25,340 MW) in mainland Spain under different operating scenarios based on increasing yield, solar fraction and the hourly operational range adapted to the Spanish electricity market, considering actual meteorological conditions. A production model for integrating solar energy into combined cycles is proposed and described and the code in R is freely released so that the assessment can be replicated.

J. Antonanzas; E. Jimenez; J. Blanco; F. Antonanzas-Torres

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Application of computer voice input/output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advent of microprocessors and other large-scale integration (LSI) circuits is making voice input and output for computers and instruments practical; specialized LSI chips for speech processing are appearing on the market. Voice can be used to input data or to issue instrument commands; this allows the operator to engage in other tasks, move about, and to use standard data entry systems. Voice synthesizers can generate audible, easily understood instructions. Using voice characteristics, a control system can verify speaker identity for security purposes. Two simple voice-controlled systems have been designed at Los Alamos for nuclear safeguards applicaations. Each can easily be expanded as time allows. The first system is for instrument control that accepts voice commands and issues audible operator prompts. The second system is for access control. The speaker's voice is used to verify his identity and to actuate external devices.

Ford, W.; Shirk, D.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A comparative study of the electrical properties of Pd/ZnO Schottky contacts fabricated using electron beam deposition and resistive/thermal evaporation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic investigation to check the quality of Pd Schottky contacts deposited on ZnO has been performed on electron beam (e-beam) deposited and resistively/thermally evaporated samples using current-voltage, IV, and conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Room temperature IV measurements reveal the dominance of pure thermionic emission on the resistively evaporated contacts, while the e-beam deposited contacts show the dominance of generation recombination at low voltages, <0.30 V, and the dominance of pure thermionic emission at high voltages, greater than 0.30 V. The resistively evaporated contacts have very low reverse currents of the order of 10{sup -10} A at a reverse voltage of 1.0 V whereas the e-beam deposited contacts have reverse currents of the order of 10{sup -6} A at 1.0 V. Average ideality factors have been determined as (1.43 {+-} 0.01) and (1.66 {+-} 0.02) for the resistively evaporated contacts and e-beam deposited contacts, respectively. The IV barrier heights have been calculated as (0.721 {+-} 0.002) eV and (0.624 {+-} 0.005) eV for the resistively evaporated and e-beam deposited contacts, respectively. Conventional DLTS measurements reveal the presence of three prominent defects in both the resistive and e-beam contacts. Two extra peaks with energy levels of 0.60 and 0.81 eV below the conduction band minimum have been observed in the e-beam deposited contacts. These have been explained as contributing to the generation recombination current that dominates at low voltages and high leakage currents. Based on the reverse current at 1.0 V, the degree of rectification, the dominant current transport mechanism and the observed defects, we conclude that the resistive evaporation technique yields better quality Schottky contacts for use in solar cells and ultraviolet detectors compared to the e-beam deposition technique. The 0.60 eV has been identified as possibly related to the unoccupied level for the doubly charged oxygen vacancy, V{sub o}{sup 2+}.

Mtangi, W.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Coelho, S. M. M.; Legodi, M. J.; Nel, J. M.; Meyer, W. E.; Chawanda, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield, 0028 (South Africa)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

354

Coordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the generalizations of coordination of multiple linear dynamic systems to the cooperative output regulation problemCoordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems Ziyang Meng, Tao Yang, Dimos V. Dimarogonas, and Karl H. Johansson Abstract-- The coordinated output regulation problem

Dimarogonas, Dimos

355

Electrical insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....Material with very low conductivity, which surrounds active electrical devices. Common electrical insulation chemicals are fluorine-containing polymers.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Electrical Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...Material with very low conductivity which surrounds active electrical devices. Common electrical insulation chemicals are fluorine-containing polymers (Dissado LA...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Thermally-Activated Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermally-Activated Technologies Thermally-Activated Technologies Thermally-Activated Technologies November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Thermally-activated technologies include a diverse portfolio of equipment that transforms heat for useful purposes such as heating, cooling, humidity control, thermal storage, and shaft/electrical power. Thermally-activated technologies are essential for combined heat and power (CHP)-integrated systems that maximize energy savings and economic return. Thermally-activated technologies systems also enable customers to reduce seasonal peak electric demand and future electric and gas grids to operate with more level loads. Absorption Chillers Absorption cycles have been used for more than 150 years. Early equipment used a mixture of ammonia and water as an absorption working pair, with

358

Thermomechanical measurements on thermal microactuators.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the coupling of thermal and mechanical behaviors at small scales, a Campaign 6 project was created to investigate thermomechanical phenomena in microsystems. This report documents experimental measurements conducted under the auspices of this project. Since thermal and mechanical measurements for thermal microactuators were not available for a single microactuator design, a comprehensive suite of thermal and mechanical experimental data was taken and compiled for model validation purposes. Three thermal microactuator designs were selected and fabricated using the SUMMiT V{sup TM} process at Sandia National Laboratories. Thermal and mechanical measurements for the bent-beam polycrystalline silicon thermal microactuators are reported, including displacement, overall actuator electrical resistance, force, temperature profiles along microactuator legs in standard laboratory air pressures and reduced pressures down to 50 mTorr, resonant frequency, out-of-plane displacement, and dynamic displacement response to applied voltages.

Baker, Michael Sean; Epp, David S.; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Stochastic scenario-based model and investigating size of battery energy storage and thermal energy storage for micro-grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage systems (ESS) are designed to accumulate energy when production exceeds demand and to make it available at the user’s request. They can help match energy supply and demand, exploit the variable production of renewable energy sources (e.g. solar and wind), increase the overall efficiency of the energy system and reduce CO2 emissions. This paper presents a unit commitment formulation for micro-grid that includes a significant number of grid parallel PEM-Fuel Cell Power Plants (PEM-FCPPs) with ramping rate and minimum up and down time constraints. The aim of this problem is to determine the optimum size of energy storage devices like hydrogen, thermal energy and battery energy storages in order to schedule the committed units’ output power while satisfying practical constraints and electrical/thermal load demand over one day with 15 min time step. In order to best use of multiple PEM-FCPPs, hydrogen storage management is carried out. Also, since the electrical and heat load demand are not synchronized, it could be useful to store the extra heat of PEM-FCPPs in the peak electrical load in order to satisfy delayed heat demands. Due to uncertainty nature of electrical/thermal load, photovoltaic and wind turbine output power and market price, a two-stage scenario-based stochastic programming model, where the first stage prescribes the here-and-now variables and the second stage determines the optima value of wait-and-see variables under cost minimization. Quantitative results show the usefulness and viability of the suggested approach.

Sirus Mohammadi; Ali Mohammadi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal expansion of single-crystalline La0.83Sr0.17MnO3: The importance of temperature-induced strain for the electrical resistivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced strain for the electrical resistivity J. J. Neumeier Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University expansion, magnetization, and electrical-resistivity measurements of single crystalline La0.83Sr0.17MnO3 transitions is shown to influence the electrical resistivity. S0163-1829 99 01103-0 The electrical properties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Model-Free Learning-Based Online Management of Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-Free Learning-Based Online Management of Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Electric@elpl.snu.ac.kr Abstract--To improve the cycle efficiency and peak output power density of energy storage systems in electric vehicles (EVs), supercapacitors have been proposed as auxiliary energy storage elements

Pedram, Massoud

362

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermal History of the Earth with consideration of the Variable Thermal Conductivity of its Mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the data about electric conductivity...give no thermal resistance and the integral...the number of elementary cells in I cm3...of heat in an elementary volume v k cm3...inverse to the resistances:the thermal...the hydraulic resistance determining...charge,h-electric conductivity......

H. A. Lubimova

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity storage, photovoltaic panels, solar thermalof storage technology k theoretical peak solar conversionenergy storage, AC – Absorption Chiller, ST – solar thermal

Cardoso, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.01–0.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electricity Markets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

367

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of traditional emergency generator applications, these technologies are integrated in building energy systems to provide some portion of a facility’s electricity and thermal energy needs including space heating and air conditioning. In the event of a power.... These CHP systems provide electricity and utilize waste heat from the generation process in existing building thermal applications such as space heating, domestic water heating. Thermal energy can also be used in an absorption refrigeration cycle...

Jackson, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

An electric thermal storage marketing feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents a study undertaken to determine the market potential of a cooling storage rebate program in the Orange and Rockland service territory. The study was also designed to provide insight into which customer groups are the most likely candidates for cool storage. The information gained from this study is useful for both long term demand side planning and in focusing efforts cost effectively on future cool storage marketing programs.

Onofry, R. (Orange and Rockland Utilities (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal electric technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan Webinar Wednesday, Jan. 14 Sandian Presents on PV Failure Analysis at European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Design and Analysis...

372

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as Seebeck e?ect, Peltier e?ect and Thomson e?ect. Ameasure temperature over a wide temperature ranges. Peltiereffect Peltier e?ect was discovered by Jean-Charles Peltier

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electrical Engineer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in the Office of Electric Reliability. The Office of Electric Reliability helps protect and improve the reliability and security of the nation's bulk power system through...

374

Efficient Lithium-Ion Battery Pack Electro-Thermal Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A methodology to derive a computational efficient electro-thermal battery pack model is showed. It is taken ... up of three orders of magnitude for the thermal part. The electrical battery model is implemented an...

L. Kostetzer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

GAMS program used to estimate capacity output using a distance function with both good and bad output, variable returns to scale and weak disposability of the bad outputs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

." VIMS Marine resource Report N. 2007-6. August 2007. Author: John B. Walden NMFS/NEFSC 166 Water St(obs) weights ; POSITIVE Variable weight, lambda; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint for each output

376

24-26 September 2008, Rome, Italy Thermal Design of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity of most materials used to electrically insulate the devices enhances the thermal issues that could to estimate the overall thermal resistance by considering a combination of individual thermal resistances of layout parameters upon the thermal resistance of such devices. This contribution is aimed at supplying

Technische Universiteit Delft

377

Thermal stability of nano-structured selective emitters for thermophotovoltaic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fundamental challenge in solar-thermal-electrical energy conversion is the thermal stability of materials and devices at high operational temperatures. This study focuses on the thermal stability of tungsten selective ...

Lee, Heon Ju, 1977-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING A SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report LBL 8520. ) A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING Aenergy. A new type of solar thermal receiver based on thisThe success of the solar thermal electric power program

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 The objective is to develop the entire vehicle thermal management system for two electric drive vehicles (HEVs, PHEVs). Limited battery power and low engine efficiency at...

380

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Generating System (07-AFC-5) Project, Proposal to Construct a 400-m Megawatt Concentrated Solar Power Tower, Thermal-Electric Power Plant, San Bernardino County, California July 1,...

382

Energy storage for frequency regulation on the electric grid .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ancillary services such as frequency regulation are required for reliable operation of the electric grid. Currently, the same traditional thermal generators that supply bulk power… (more)

Leitermann, Olivia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

California PRC 25120, Definition for Thermal Powerplant | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for the purposes of this division. 'Thermal powerplant' does not include any wind, hydroelectric, or solar photovoltaic electrical generating facility." Effective September 19,...

384

Introductory Note Commentary: Electro-, loco-, and otromotor components of electric fish behaviour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an effector and that the electric organ discharge (EOD) is a form of motor output. Typically, one of the firstIntroductory Note Commentary: Electro-, loco-, and otromotor components of electric fish behaviour, when we discover the world of weakly electric fish, we learn that the electric organ also qualifies

Nelson, Mark E.

385

Constellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

average energy are selected more frequently than constellations with higher energy. However, the resultsConstellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs Chandana Nannapaneni signal constellation and the output is quantized by a uniform scalar quantizer. The goal is to jointly

Valenti, Matthew C.

386

ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADIOS ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TABLES ADIOS - ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE COMPUTER TABLE FOR CONTENTS Page I Module and Apple Card (Photograph) Figure 3 Complete Apple/ADIOS System (Photograph) Figure 4 Analog

Groppi, Christopher

387

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar thermal, stationary batteries, thermal storage, andThe model allows the EV batteries to transfer electricity toPV, and stationary batteries as options, e) an everything

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Most efficient quantum thermoelectric at finite power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machines are only Carnot efficient if they are reversible, but then their power output is vanishingly small. Here we ask, what is the maximum efficiency of an irreversible device with finite power output? We use a nonlinear scattering theory to answer this question for thermoelectric quantum systems; heat engines or refrigerators consisting of nanostructures or molecules that exhibit a Peltier effect. We find that quantum mechanics places an upper bound on both power output, and on the efficiency at any finite power. The upper bound on efficiency equals Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decays with increasing power output. It is intrinsically quantum (wavelength dependent), unlike Carnot efficiency. This maximum efficiency occurs when the system lets through all particles in a certain energy window, but none at other energies. A physical implementation of this is discussed, as is the suppression of efficiency by a phonon heat flow.

Robert S. Whitney

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cost and performance analysis of concentrating solar power systems with integrated latent thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrating TES (thermal energy storage) in a CSP (concentrating solar power) plant allows for continuous operation even during times when solar irradiation is not available, thus providing a reliable output to the grid. In the present study, the cost and performance models of an EPCM-TES (encapsulated phase change material thermal energy storage) system and HP-TES (latent thermal storage system with embedded heat pipes) are integrated with a CSP power tower system model utilizing Rankine and s-CO2 (supercritical carbon-dioxide) power conversion cycles, to investigate the dynamic TES-integrated plant performance. The influence of design parameters of the storage system on the performance of a 200 MWe capacity power tower CSP plant is studied to establish design envelopes that satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requirements, which include a round-trip annualized exergetic efficiency greater than 95%, storage cost less than $15/kWht and LCE (levelized cost of electricity) less than 6 ˘/kWh. From the design windows, optimum designs of the storage system based on minimum LCE, maximum exergetic efficiency, and maximum capacity factor are reported and compared with the results of two-tank molten salt storage system. Overall, the study presents the first effort to construct and analyze LTES (latent thermal energy storage) integrated CSP plant performance that can help assess the impact, cost and performance of LTES systems on power generation from molten salt power tower CSP plant.

K. Nithyanandam; R. Pitchumani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost benefits are still evident. Currently, there are many solar power plants that have been announced Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because, power output from a solar field. At the right cost, a storage system can improve overall economics

392

Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electrical hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

395

Solar electricity-a low power technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author examines the future potential of solar power with regard to its applications. He suggests that although the large size and small power output of solar cell electric systems are obstacles to high power usage, realistic low power applications can make a valuable contribution to world energy needs

L.B. Harris

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;I Basic ConceptsI. Basic Concepts Static electricity: charges at rest Electric charge Like charges repel Unlike charges attract Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;Electric ChargeElectric Charge Electron charge: -eElectron charge

Yoo, S. J. Ben

397

Sparse Convolved Gaussian Processes for Multi-output Regression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concentration of different heavy metal pollutants [5]. Modelling multiple output variables is a challenge as we methodology for synthetic data and real world applications on pollution prediction and a sensor network. 1

Rattray, Magnus

398

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2, and leader election. 1 Introduction We study computability in networks, referred to hereafter as distributed

399

Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that ... this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the...

Nada Atef Shebl; Bryony Dean Franklin; Nick Barber

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Grid adaptation for functional outputs of compressible flow simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An error correction and grid adaptive method is presented for improving the accuracy of functional outputs of compressible flow simulations. The procedure is based on an adjoint formulation in which the estimated error in ...

Venditti, David Anthony, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

402

APPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat pump from the grid during the two hours of electrical peak power · Design of a new heat exchangerAPPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft TITLE: Experimental assessment of a PCM to air heat This paper presents a heat exchanger prototype containing PCM material designed to provide a 1kW heating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

403

Electric machine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability..., power generation for offshore platforms, utility peak load 58 ESL-IE-92-04-10 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 power generation, emergency power, ship propulsion, and private...

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

405

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process Energy Conversion. At first, OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine power cables, to shore

406

A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 012139 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Dynamic characteristics of an orthogonal turbine and output-control systems for TPP with high-voltage frequency converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical description of a closed control system with allowance for pressure fluctuations in the head system, which makes it possible to analyze the regime stability of orthogonal generating sets at tidal electric power plants when operating in the complete range of heads, outputs, and rotational speeds, and to select parameters of the control system, is obtained for an orthogonal hydroturbine and a generator with a load regulator.

Berlin, V. V.; Murav'ev, O. A.; Golubev, A. V.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Solar electric power plant due to start up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In early April of this year, Solar One, a central receiver pilot plant designed to show that solar energy can be harnessed by utilities to produce electricity on a commercial scale, will begin producing power. ... With a rated maximum power output to the utility grid of 10.8 MW, Solar One is the world's largest solarpowered electrical generating facility. ...

RUDY M. BAUM

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Acknowledgments We thank Emily Zhang and Tim Giesbrecht for electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to attach additional solar panels and battery storage, the output load and capacity of the system can of Nyobok-Nkunzesi must travel to neighbouring towns which have access to electricity. Solar electricity has already proven to be a good source of power in the community through the installation of solar powered

Chau, Kenneth

410

The component interaction network approach for modeling of complex thermal systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A practical approach for the thermal modeling of complex thermal systems, called the component interaction network (CIN) is presented. Its stages are explained: description of the thermal system as a set of non-overlapping components and their interactions ... Keywords: Component interaction network, Electric furnace, Experimental validation, Heat transfer, Rapid thermal processing, Thermal modeling

K. El Khoury; G. Mouawad; G. El Hitti; M. Nemer

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

412

Steady-state analysis of a conceptual offshore wind turbine driven electricity and thermocline energy extraction plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A system for using offshore wind energy to generate electricity and simultaneously extract thermal energy is proposed. This concept is based on an offshore wind turbine driven hydraulic pump supplying deep seawater under high pressure to a land based plant consisting of a hydroelectric power generation unit and heat exchanger. A steady-state system model is developed using empirical formulae. The mathematical model comprises the fundamental system sub-models that are categorised as the rotor, hydraulic pump, pipeline, hydroelectric turbine and heat exchanger. A means for modelling the seawater temperature field across a two-dimensional bathymetry is also discussed. These mathematical models are integrated into a computational tool and a brief parametric static analysis is undertaken. The results illustrate the effect of pipeline diameter, rotational speed of the grid connected hydroelectric turbine, and the turbine distance from shore on the overall performance of the system. Through adequate parameter selection, the total rate of energy output for such a system, consisting of both electricity and thermal energy, is shown to increase by as much as 84%, when compared to a conventional wind turbine having an identical rotor diameter but which supplies only electrical energy.

Daniel Buhagiar; Tonio Sant

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Thermal Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

415

Electric machine for hybrid motor vehicle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine and an electric machine is disclosed. The electric machine has a stator, a permanent magnet rotor, an uncluttered rotor spaced from the permanent magnet rotor, and at least one secondary core assembly. The power system also has a gearing arrangement for coupling the internal combustion engine to wheels on the vehicle thereby providing a means for the electric machine to both power assist and brake in relation to the output of the internal combustion engine.

Hsu, John Sheungchun (Oak Ridge, TN)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interpreting and analyzing model output (A very cursory introduction) Here will talk briefly about using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output from your model. The model output is in netcdf format for the output. I use matlab to measure, plot, compute, etc.. Recall the the model output is stored in: /scratch shown at the top.) matlab I hope you have some experience with matlab. There are handy tutorials

Gerber, Edwin

417

Distinguishing Weak and Strong Disposability among Undesireable Outputs in DEA: The Example of the Environmental Efficiency of Chinese Coal-Fired Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in terajoules (TJ). 4.2 Undesirable Outputs Undesirable variable refers to emissions from the electricity generation process. Coal is a combustible mineral composed primarily of carbon and hydrocarbon, along with other assorted elements including nitrogen... of the sample power plants is 211.71GW. The total annual generation is 1117.59 TWh. Data, such as installed capacity, annual fuel consumption (coal and oil), number of employees, annual electricity generation, heat rates, and quality of fuel, were collected...

Yu, Hongliang; Pollitt, Michael G.

418

Engineering Electrical &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

419

Engineering Electrical &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

420

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL STORAGE APPLICATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES Roger 1. Knipp, PE. Dallas Power & Light Company Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage... since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either...

Knipp, R. L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

High-temperature quenching of electrical resistance in graphene interconnects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the chip interconnect design the materials with low electrical resistance and high thermal con- ductivity dependence of the resistance were explained by the thermal generation of the electron-hole pairs and carrier, increased total thermal boundary resistance of the chip layers, incorporation of the alternative dielectric

423

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

424

Forecast of Regional Power Output of Wind Turbines Hans Georg Beyer, Detlev Heinemann, Harald Mellinghoff, Kai Monnich, Hans-Peter Waldl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast of Regional Power Output of Wind Turbines Hans Georg Beyer, Detlev Heinemann, Harald of wind turbines connected to the public electricity grid will be intro- duced. Using this procedure and Northern Germany. At the moment, the installed capacity of wind turbines is in the order of magnitude

Heinemann, Detlev

425

Stirling converters for space dynamic power concepts with 2 to 130 W{sub e} output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three innovative Stirling converter concepts are described. Two concepts are based on Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission requirements, where two General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules provide the thermal input. The first concept (PFF2) considers a power system with two opposed Stirling converters; the second concept (PFF4) considers four opposed Stirling converters. For both concepts the Stirling converters are designed to vary their power production capability to compensate for the failure of one Stirling converter. While the net thermal efficiency of PFF4 is a few percentage points lower than PFF2, the total Stirling converter mass of PFF4 is half that for PFF2. The third concept (ITTI) is designed to supply 2 watts of power for weather stations on the Martian surface. The predicted thermal performance of the ITTI is low compared to PFF2 and PFF4, yet the ITTI concept offers significant advantages compared to currently available power systems at the 2-watt power level. All three concepts are based on long-life technology demonstrated by an 11-watt output Stirling generator that as of March 1995 has accumulated over 15,000 operating hours without maintenance.

Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

427

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

428

Formalization of computer input and output: the Hadley model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current digital evidence acquisition tools are effective, but are tested rather than formally proven correct. We assert that the forensics community will benefit in evidentiary ways and the scientific community will benefit in practical ways by moving beyond simple testing of systems to a formal model. To this end, we present a hierarchical model of peripheral input to and output from von Neumann computers, patterned after the Open Systems Interconnection model of networking. The Hadley model categorizes all components of peripheral input and output in terms of data flow; with constructive aspects concentrated in the data flow between primary memory and the computer sides of peripherals' interfaces. The constructive domain of Hadley is eventually expandable to all areas of the I/O hierarchy, allowing for a full view of peripheral input and output and enhancing the forensics community's capabilities to analyze, obtain, and give evidentiary force to data.

Matthew Gerber; John Leeson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 3 PV Array Generating Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 3 ­ PV Array Generating Electricity Prepared for the Oregon in Arrays: Solar Cells Generating Electricity Lesson Plan Content: In this lesson, students will learn about electricity. Objectives: Students will learn to use a tool called PV WATTS to calculate the output of PV

Oregon, University of

430

Combined photothermal and photoacoustic characterization of siliconepoxy composites and the existence of a particle thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiometric (PTR) detection were used to characterize thermal properties of silicon±epoxy composite materials applications. In this work, we study the thermal diusivity and electrical resistivity of silicon±epoxy compos materials the electrical and thermal transport properties have a spatial dependence, and thus

Mandelis, Andreas

431

27-301: Microstructure-Properties: I L8: Thermal Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ionically and covalently bonded materials exhibit very low conductivities (electrical and thermal of materials to their microstructure. · A practical example is used of optimization of thermal conductivity mechanisms in different types of materials. · Metals exhibit high electrical and thermal conductivity

Rollett, Anthony D.

432

BismuthCeramic Nanocomposites with Unusual Thermal Stability via High-Energy Ball Milling**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bismuth±Ceramic Nanocomposites with Unusual Thermal Stability via High-Energy Ball Milling, nanostructured bismuth±ceramic nanocomposites with unusual thermal stabil- ity. These materials contain a high. Important for electrical and thermoelectric applications, the ceramic phase is electrically and thermally

Braun, Paul

433

Electricity 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 EIA announces the proposal of Form EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report Released: August 15, 2011 Background On August 11, 2011, a Federal Register Notice was published soliciting comments for the new EIA-111 survey form. The EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report will replace the OE-781R, Monthly Electricity Imports and Exports Report. The OE-781R has been suspended and will be terminated upon the approval of the EIA-111. The OE-781R administered from July 2010 through May 2011, proved complex and confusing for the repondents. As a result, the EIA-111 was developed to more effectively and efficiently collect more accurate and meaningful data. The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires that each Federal agency obtains approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking to collect information from ten or more persons, or continuing a collection for which the OMB approval and the OMB control number are about to expire. The approval process, which is popularly known as the "OMB clearance process," is extensive. It requires two Federal Register notices and a detailed application ("supporting statement") to OMB. The first Federal Register Notice was published on August 11, 2011. EIA is prepared to address the comments submitted by each individual.

434

An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

Ubaidillah Zuhdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Handbook providing practical information to help regulators decide if they want to use output-based regulations and explains how to develop an output-based emission standard

436

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh* , Arindam Basu , Keck-Voon Ling* and Vincent J. Mooney III*$§ Email: anshul.singh@research.iiit.ac.in, {arindam.basu, ekvling}@ntu, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore * NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied

Mooney, Vincent

437

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

438

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zurich Laboratory ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: boelcskei@nari.ee.ethz.ch Abstract--Soft-input soft, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: studer@iis.ee.ethz.ch Helmut Bölcskei Communication Technology

439

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

440

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $600 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.01 per BTU output Provider Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per system, or $600. Eligible solar water heaters can be either passive or active systems. The proposed solar system must meet Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) specifications and be installed by a contractor certified to install solar water heating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

442

Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

443

Thermal power plant efficiency enhancement with Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In addition to greenhouse gas emissions, coastal thermal power plants would gain further opposition due to their heat rejection distressing the local ecosystem. Therefore, these plants need to enhance their thermal efficiency while reducing their environmental offense. In this study, a hybrid plant based on the principle of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion was coupled to a 740 MW coal-fired power plant project located at latitude 28°S where the surface to deepwater temperature difference would not suffice for regular OTEC plants. This paper presents the thermodynamical model to assess the overall efficiency gained by adopting an ammonia Rankine cycle plus a desalinating unit, heated by the power plant condenser discharge and refrigerated by cold deep seawater. The simulation allowed us to optimize a system that would finally enhance the plant power output by 25–37 MW, depending on the season, without added emissions while reducing dramatically the water temperature at discharge and also desalinating up to 5.8 million tons per year. The supplemental equipment was sized and the specific emissions reduction was estimated. We believe that this approach would improve the acceptability of thermal and nuclear power plant projects regardless of the plant location.

Rodrigo Soto; Julio Vergara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ELECTRIC RAILWAYS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...candidate. It is safe to say that the...education in the fundamental facts and methods...Steam-engine, boilers and dynamos...road in successful operation upon or-dinary...been in successful operation for several years...now in successful operation electric rail-ways...

W. D. Marks

1886-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

Electric Propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is clear. The long-t?me continuous operation is required for electric propulsion pri-marily...travel against a small voltage to the cold element. The cell thereby produces an...concentrate and focus the solar rays on a heater. Little, if any, decrease in specific...

W. E. Moeckel

1963-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

447

Alternative Strategies for Maximizing the Output of Multi-Junction Photovoltaic Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-junction photovoltaics provide a logical method of increasing the utilization of solar power for a given area. However, their current design and fabrication methods invoke numerous material and cost complexities that limit their potential, particularly for flat panel paradigms. In this paper, three general strategies based on the electrical isolation of the internal sub-layers are described. These strategies involve current or voltage matching the sub-layers by varying of fractional absorption and areal coverage of individual cells within each sub-layer, as well as modifying their combined output using power electronics. A simplified theoretical description of these strategies is provided for pairs of junction materials that allows a more streamlined description of the requirements.

Abrams, Ze'ev R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

449

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Water Research 39 (2005) 16751686 Electricity generation using membrane and salt bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Research 39 (2005) 1675­1686 Electricity generation using membrane and salt bridge microbial Hydrogen Energy (H2E) Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 212 Sackett Bld., University Park, PA, USA also examined power output in a MFC with a salt bridge instead of a membrane system. Power output

451

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Energy and environmental impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of the total steam electric generating capacity in the United States operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. No evidence exists that Section 316(a) variances have caused any widespread environmental problems. Conversion from once-through cooling to cooling towers would result in a loss of plant output of 14.7-23.7 billion kilowatt-hours. The cost to make up the lost energy is estimated at $12.8-$23.7 billion (in 1992 dollars). Conversion to cooling towers would increase emission of pollutants to the atmosphere and water loss through evaporation. The second report describes alternatives available to plants that currently operate under the variance and estimates the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Little justification has been found for removing the 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue to investigate the abstract concept of electric field. If you know the electric field at a point in space, you). With this simulation you can construct a complicated charge configuration and read out the resulting electric field

Minnesota, University of

453

Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Department Website: www.iit.edu/engineering/ece Electrical engineering is concerned with the generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy and with the transmitting and processing of information. Electrical engineers are involved in the analysis, design, and pro

Heller, Barbara

454

Clock-controlled generators with large period output sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clock-controlled generators are a kind of pseudo-random number generators (PRNG). Recently, some clock-controlled generators based on jumping Linear Finite State Machines (LFSMs) have been proposed, such as Pomaranch and MICKEY. The period and the linear complexity of their output sequences need to be large enough to provide security against linear attacks. In this paper, a new condition for the period to reach its maximal value is presented. The condition is better than the previous one. Further, some clock-controlled generators are considered, including a new generator which uses a Feedback with Carry Shift Register (FCSR) as the control register. How to maximise the period of their output sequences is investigated.

Zhiqiang Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acid batteries flow battery thermal n/a n/a xiv The Effectscapacity electrical flow battery thermal n/a n/a source:lead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, with

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

457

Nanoshell-mediated near-infrared thermal therapy of tumors under magnetic resonance guidance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...light into thermal energy. Nonetheless, pioneering...used for treatment planning, localization...the temperature distribution during the treatments...Echospeed, General Electric Medical Systems...Workstation, General Electric Medical Systems...sections to assess the distribution of tissue damage...

L. R. Hirsch; R. J. Stafford; J. A. Bankson; S. R. Sershen; B. Rivera; R. E. Price; J. D. Hazle; N. J. Halas; J. L. West

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Ethanol and E85 Reforming Assisted by a Non-thermal Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol and E85 Reforming Assisted by a Non-thermal Arc Discharge ... The input electric power is expressed in terms of the percentage of Qfuel·LHVfuel, and is noted as %LHV. ... for electricity prodn. ...

Guillaume Petitpas; José Gonzalez-Aguilar; Adeline Darmon; Laurent Fulcheri

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

459

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

460

Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Subtopic c. References: Subtopic c. References: 1. Thomas B. Johansson, Henry Kelly, Amulya K.N. Reddy, and Robert H. Williams, "Renewable Energy: Sources for Fuels and Electricity", Island Press, 1993 2. Patrick Takahashi and Andrew Trenka, "Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion", John Wiley & sons, 1996. *All references can be accessed at: http://archive.epri.com/oceanenergy/streamenergy.html#reports OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY 28. NATURAL DISASTER REDUCTION THROUGH TECHNOLOGY The U.S. electric power sector is a critical part of our society. Virtually all aspects of residential, industrial, and commercial activities depend on safe, reliable, and affordable electricity. Electricity is among the most infrastructure-intensive segments of the energy sector - the electricity grid includes a network of 5,000 power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced thermal interface Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On the Thermal Attack in Instruction Caches Joonho Kong, Johnsy K. John, Eui-Young Chung, ... Source: Chung, Eui-Young - School of Electrical and Electronics...

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational thermal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Management," Proc. Int'l Symp. High-Performance Computer... ... Source: Chung, Eui-Young - School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University; Hu, Jie -...

463

High Temperature InGaN Topping Cells for Hybrid Photovoltaic/Concentrating Solar Thermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid PV/CSP systems offer the potential of higher solar to grid efficiency, with the benefits of dispatchable electricity from thermal storage. Here we present an implementation...

Honsberg, Christiana; Gleckman, Philip; Doolittle, William A; Ponce, Fernando; Arena, Chantal; Vasileska, Dragica; Goodnick, Stephen M

464

Delaware Electric Cooperative - Green Energy Program Incentives |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delaware Electric Cooperative - Green Energy Program Incentives Delaware Electric Cooperative - Green Energy Program Incentives Delaware Electric Cooperative - Green Energy Program Incentives < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate PV: $7,500 for Class A, $10,000 for Class B or non-profits Solar Thermal (domestic water): $3,000 for residential, $7,500 for non-residential Solar Thermal (radiant space heating): $5,000 for residential, $7,500 for non-residential Wind: $2,500 Fuel Cells: $7,500 for residential, $10,000 for non-residential Geothermal Heat Pumps: $5,000 for residential, $10,000 for non-residential

465

Generating random thermal momenta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of random thermal particle momenta is a basic task in many problems, such as microscopic studies of equilibrium and transport properties of systems, or the conversion of a fluid to particles. In heavy-ion physics, the (in)efficiency of the algorithm matters particularly in hybrid hydrodynamics + hadronic transport calculations. With popular software packages, such as UrQMD 3.3p1 or THERMINATOR, it can still take ten hours to generate particles for a single Pb+Pb "event" at the LHC from fluid dynamics output. Below I describe reasonably efficient simple algorithms using the MPC package, which should help speed momentum generation up by at least one order of magnitude. It is likely that this wheel has been reinvented many times instead of reuse, so there may very well exist older and/or better algorithms that I am not aware of (MPC has been around only since 2000). The main goal here is to encourage practitioners to use available efficient routines, and offer a few practical solutions.

Denes Molnar

2012-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

466

Illinois Municipal Electric Agency- Electric Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Illinois Municipal Electric Agency (IMEA) offers rebates to member municipal utilities* (those who purchase wholesale electric service from IMEA) and retail customers for energy efficiency...

467

Resistance after firing protected electric match  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

Montoya, Arsenio P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

469

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EECS Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EECS Department The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at WSU offers undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. The EECS Department offers master of science degrees in computer science, electrical engineering

470

Liquid Metal as a Heat Transport Fluid for Thermal Solar Power Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to increase the thermal efficiency and produce process heat for hydrogen production, the operating temperature of the heat transfer fluid in thermal solar plants needs to increase. In addition reaching 900 °C would also increase the heat storage density and the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle by using a combined cycle for electricity production. The benefits of hydrogen (e.g., for fuel cells) and a more efficient thermodynamic cycle would allow a plant to have a higher energy output per square acre of land use, thereby increasing its economic competiveness. Today, solar thermal plants do not operate at these high temperatures due to the fact that conventional heat transport fluids begin to disintegrate around 600 °C [1,2]. For non-solar applications, low melting-temperature metals, such as wood's metal and lead- bismuth eutectic alloy, have been examined as heat-transport media, because of the large temperature ranges over which they remain liquid. Lead-bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE; 45% Pb, 55% Bi) melts at 125 °C and does not boil until 1670 °C, making it an ideal heat-transfer medium for application in thermal solar power [3]. The main obstacle to using LBE is finding structural materials that can withstand the harsh corrosion environments at high temperatures. In this work the key issues of materials exposed to liquid metal are described while initial data on carious steels tested in liquid metal are provided. While corrosion is a significant issue in this environment, mechanical failure of steels in liquid metal are discussed as well.

D. Frazer; E. Stergar; C. Cionea; P. Hosemann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time Electricity Pricing Beneficial to Solar PV in New York City?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The goal of this study is to evaluate the validity of the following statement: “the coincidence of high electric energy prices and peak solar electric photovoltaic (PV) output can improve the economics of PV installations, and can also facilitate the wider use of hourly pricing.” The study is focused on Con Edison electric service territory in New York City.

472

Electric Wheel Hub Motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wheel hub motors are an innovative drive concept for electric vehicles where the electric machine and, in some cases, the...

Dipl.-Ing. Michael Gröninger; Dipl.-Ing. Felix Horch…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fulcher, Clay W. G. (Sandia Park, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Energy storage for frequency regulation on the electric grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ancillary services such as frequency regulation are required for reliable operation of the electric grid. Currently, the same traditional thermal generators that supply bulk power also perform nearly all frequency regulation. ...

Leitermann, Olivia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Process Technology has placed a prototype of its patented, electrically heated, packed-bed air toxics oxidizer at a northern California chemical plant. This thermal oxidizer is capable of handling a wide range of chlorinated and non...

Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

476

Process characterization of Electrical Discharge Machining of highly doped silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) is an advanced machining process that removes material via thermal erosion through a plasma arc. The machining process is accomplished through the application of high frequency current ...

Crawford, Gregory Allan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherOffice of Solar Power Applications. Division of Ocean Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherpower from the temperature differential between warm surface and cold deep-ocean

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants...

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NCPART: management of ICEMDDN output for numerical control users  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NCPART is a procedure developed by the Numerical Control Department at Bendix Kansas City Division to handle the entry to and exit from ICEMDDN, and process all of the local files output by ICEMDDN. The NCPART procedure is menu driven, and provides automatic access to ICEMDDN and any files necessary to process information with ICEM for numerical Control users. Basically, the procedure handles all of the ICEMDDN operations that involve operating system commands, and frees the NC programmer to concentrate on his/her work as a programmer.

Rossini, B.F.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Waveguide submillimetre laser with a uniform output beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing non-Gaussian light beams with a uniform intensity profile is described. The method is based on the use of a combined waveguide quasi-optical resonator containing a generalised confocal resonator with an inhomogeneous mirror with absorbing inhomogeneities discretely located on its surface and a hollow dielectric waveguide whose size satisfies the conditions of self-imaging of a uniform field in it. The existence of quasi-homogeneous beams at the output of an optically pumped 0.1188-mm waveguide CH{sub 3}OH laser with a amplitude-stepped mirror is confirmed theoretically and experimentally. (lasers)

Volodenko, A V; Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Topkov, A N [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv (Ukraine)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the intermittent nature of output from wind turbines and solar panels is frequently discussed as a potential obstacle to larger scale application of these tech- nologies. Contributions of 10-20% of electrical energy from individual intermittent technologies create... , Cambridge CB3 9DE, UK, Tel: ++ 44 1223 335200, paul.twomey@econ.cam.ac.uk, karsten.neuhoff@econ.cam.ac.uk. 1 1 Introduction Renewable energy technologies are playing an increasingly important role in the portfolio mix of electricity generation. However...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

484

Thermal performance analysis of a direct-expansion solar-assisted heat pump water heater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct-expansion solar-assisted heat pump water heater (DX-SAHPWH) is described, which can supply hot water for domestic use during the whole year. The system mainly employs a bare flat-plate collector/evaporator with a surface area of 4.2 m2, an electrical rotary-type hermetic compressor, a hot water tank with the volume of 150 L and a thermostatic expansion valve. R-22 is used as working fluid in the system. A simulation model based on lumped and distributed parameter approach is developed to predict the thermal performance of the system. Given the structure parameters, meteorological parameters, time step and final water temperature, the numerical model can output operational parameters, such as heat capacity, system COP and collector efficiency. Comparisons between the simulation results and the experimental measurements show that the model is able to give satisfactory predictions. The effect of various parameters, including solar radiation, ambient temperature, wind speed and compressor speed, has been analyzed on the thermal performance of the system.

X.Q. Kong; D. Zhang; Y. Li; Q.M. Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety SLAC-I-730-0A11A-001-R003 23 March 2005 Document Title: Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Original Publication Date: 19 January 2005 Revised Publication Date: 23 March 2005 (updated 29 November 2010) Department: Electrical Safety Document Number: SLAC

Wechsler, Risa H.

486

Thermal Modeling and Effects of Electrode Configuration on Thermal Behaviour of a LiFePO4 Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Li-ion battery has great application prospects on electric vehicles ... etc. For the performance of Li-ion battery is closely related to its operating temperature, the battery thermal management technique is cons...

Cheng Ruan; Kun Diao; Huajie Chen; Yan Zhou…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Environmental, seasonal, and social modulations of basal activity in a weakly electric fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric organ discharge (EOD) of weakly electric fish encodes information about species, sex, behavioral, and physiological states throughout the lifetime. Its central command is crucial for sensory-motor coordination, and is therefore the target of plastic mechanisms that adapt fish to environmental and social challenges. The EOD waveform of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus is modulated by environmental factors and the neuroendocrine system. In this study we investigate the effects of water temperature and day–night cycle upon EOD rate in this species during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. During the non-breeding season, EOD rate is a linear function of water temperature and exhibits counterclockwise hysteresis. During breeding, a thermal resistance strategy prevents the decrease of EOD rate to cooling. A nocturnal increase of EOD basal rate independent of water temperature and locomotor activity was demonstrated in isolated non-breeding adults and in male–female dyads all year round. An additional increase of nocturnal EOD rate, probably acting as a social courtship signal, was found in breeding dyads. This additional increase of nocturnal EOD rate could not be fully explained by gonadal maturation and was modulated by social stimuli. This study provides novel data on the complex interactions between environment, reproductive cycle, social behavior, and electromotor output in an advantageous model of the vertebrate central nervous system.

Ana Silva; Rossana Perrone; Omar Macadar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Electrical Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by the Office of Health, Safety and Security and is available to all DOE components and their contractors. 2. Specific comments (recommendations, additions, deletions, and any pertinent data) to enhance this document should be sent to: Patrick Tran

489

Definition: Thermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Thermal energy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal energy The kinetic energy associated with the random motions of the molecules of a material or object; often used interchangeably with the terms heat and heat energy. Measured in joules, calories, or Btu.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Thermal energy is the part of the total potential energy and kinetic energy of an object or sample of matter that results in the system temperature. It is represented by the variable Q, and can be measured in Joules. This quantity may be difficult to determine or even meaningless unless the system has attained its temperature only through warming (heating), and not been subjected to work input or output, or any other

490

Electrical Power from the Wind - The First Attempts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-scale utilisation of electricity started with the construction of the first power plants. The world’s first power plants were built in New York with a power output of about 500 kW (in 1882) and in Berlin...

Erich Hau

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell H wastewater, while at the same time accomplishing biological wastewater treatment (removal of chemical oxygen of the wastewater. Power output was proportional to the hydraulic retention time over a range of 3-33 h

492

TRIPLE OUTPUT POWER SUPPLY Agilent MODEL E3630A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, manufacture, and intended use of the instrument. Agilent Technologies assumes no liability for the customer, the instrument chassis and cabinet must be connected to an electrical ground. The instrument must be connected to the ac power supply mains through a three-conductor power cable, with the third wire firmly connected

Ravikumar, B.

493

Cogenerating Photovoltaic and Thermal Solar Collector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell, 25% max ­ Steam power plant, 50% max · Data Centers in the U.S. ­ Demand increases as internet.2% of the nations electricity consumption · Load equivalent to 5 1000 MW power plants · Over 2.2 billion dollars applications #12;First Prototype Spring 2008 #12;#12;Experimental Results · Thermal power generated ­ 1.4 KW

Su, Xiao

494

Inflation uncertainty, growth uncertainty, oil prices, and output growth in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the transmission and response of inflation uncertainty and output uncertainty on inflation and output growth in the UK using a bi-variate EGARCH model. Results suggest that inflation uncertain...

Ramprasad Bhar; Girijasankar Mallik

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Techno-economic assessment of electric steelmaking through the year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a critical review of the outlook for electric steelmaking including an assessment of existing and potential electric arc furnace (EAF) capacity. Suggested areas of development to minimize energy consumption and optimize output are also featured. 20 figs.; 62 tabs.

Bosley, J. J.; Clark, J. P.; Dancy, T. E.; Fruehan, R. J.; McIntyre, E. H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

498

Quantum teleportation scheme by selecting one of multiple output ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scheme of quantum teleportation, where Bob has multiple (N) output ports and obtains the teleported state by simply selecting one of the N ports, is thoroughly studied. We consider both deterministic version and probabilistic version of the teleportation scheme aiming to teleport an unknown state of a qubit. Moreover, we consider two cases for each version: (i) the state employed for the teleportation is fixed to a maximally entangled state, and (ii) the state is also optimized as well as Alice's measurement. We analytically determine the optimal protocols for all the four cases, and show the corresponding optimal fidelity or optimal success probability. All these protocols can achieve the perfect teleportation in the asymptotic limit of $N\\to\\infty$. The entanglement properties of the teleportation scheme are also discussed.

Satoshi Ishizaka; Tohya Hiroshima

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

499

Video digitisation and thermal analysis of a PCB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermal analysis of a naturally-cooled printed-circuit-board (PCB) has been performed under prescribed conditions. A fast-action camera with image digitisation and pre-processing capabilities was employed to input the PCB image to a thermal-analysis template. Isotherms and isometric colour projections were predicted. This technique can solve thermal problems of electronic and electrical packages faster and more efficiently than other conventional methods.

H.E. George; R.F Babus'Haq; P.W. O'Callaghan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

List of Geothermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 1258 Geothermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-1000) CSV (rows 1001-1258) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 401 Certification (Vermont) Environmental Regulations Vermont Utility Industrial Biomass/Biogas Coal with CCS Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Small Hydroelectric Nuclear Yes APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat