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1

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

2

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Supplementary sensors may be necessary for some special solar systems (e. g. solar systems with several storagesQuality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH- Input/Output-Procedure Peter Paerisch/Output-Controllers for in situ and automatic function control of solar thermal systems that were developed within the research

4

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL STORAGE APPLICATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES Roger 1. Knipp, PE. Dallas Power & Light Company Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage... since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either...

Knipp, R. L.

5

Efficient Thermal Energy Distribution in Commercial Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy distribution. These include, but not limited to, 1) reducing thermal losses induced by air leakage through system components (i.e., duct, equipment), 2) decreasing thermal losses induced by heat conductionLBNL-41365 Efficient Thermal Energy Distribution in Commercial Buildings Final Report to California

6

Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the key hurdles to thermal energy storage. Next, case studies of three electric utility thermal storage marketing programs are reviewed. The results of these case studies. as well as advice and experiences from other...

McDonald, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

8

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

SciTech Connect

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $150,000 Program Info Funding Source Public Benefits Fund Start Date 03/15/2013 State Connecticut Program Type State Grant Program Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority '''''Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs. ''''' The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering grants and loans to non-residential entities for solar hot water installations. Only

10

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

11

Improving the Thermal Output Availability of Reciprocating Engine Cogeneration Systems by Mechanical Vapor Compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW?PRESSURE I WASTE STEAM r ... IMPROVING THE THERMAL OUTPUT AVAILABILITY OF RECIPROCATING ENGINE COGENERATION SYSTEMS BY MECHANICAL VAPOR COMPRESSION F.E. Becker and F.A. DiBella Tecogen, Inc., a Subsidiary of Thermo El~ctron Corporation...-user with electric power and process heat that is totally in the form of high-pressure steam. Current recipro cating engine systems can now provide only low pressure steam or hot water from the engine jacket, and this often is not needed or not the most appro...

Becker, F. E.; DiBella, F. A.; Lamphere, F.

12

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

13

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

14

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

15

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

16

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

17

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

18

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

19

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

30

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

31

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

36

Evaluation of thermal hazard for commercial 14500 lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial lithium-ion batteries ranged from different sizes, shapes, capacities, ... In this study, the worst scenarios on thermal runaway of four commercial batteries were conducted and compared. A customized-m...

Tsai-Ying Hsieh; Yih-Shing Duh

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensors into a solar system with buffer storage tank and direct discharging. Figure 1 shows the sensorsQuality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal of standard solar thermal systems usually don't recognise failures affecting the solar yield, because

38

Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

39

The thermal performance of fixed and variable selective transmitters in commercial architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A parametric model is developed for use in evaluating the relative thermal and lighting performance of a variety of existing and proposed types of commercial glazing materials. The glazing materials considered are divided ...

Bartovics, William A

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

42

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

ThermalEngineeringLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Convection Heat Transfer of Nanofluids in Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Commercial Electronic Cooling Systems N.A. Roberts and D.G. Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering in real systems · Benefits of nanofluids ­ reduced sedimentation and viscosity ­ reduced damageThermalEngineeringLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Convection Heat Transfer of Nanofluids

Walker, D. Greg

44

Catalog of thermal bridges in commercial and multi-family residential construction  

SciTech Connect

The catalog comprises a collection of 21 thermal bridges commonly encountered in commercial buildings, as well as alternative construction techniques which reduce the deleterious effects of these bridges. The thermal bridges presented here are conduction-dominated. Construction details which transfer heat mostly through convection or radiation are not addressed. The benefits of the alternate designs are expressed for each thermal bridge as (1) reductions in U-values and (2) reductions in moisture condensation. These reductions, in turn, are extrapolated at the whole building level in order to predict changes in the energy used for space heating and cooling and to estimate changes in the magnitude of the surface areas affected by moisture condensation. Finally, technical notes address the probable effects (thermal and moisture) of minor variations in the construction details presented in this catalog. The technical notes also give a more detailed prediction of the potential for moisture condensation due to thermal bridging.

Tuluca, A.N.; Evans, D.M.; Kumar, D.; Krarti, M. (Winter (Steven) Associates, Inc., New York, NY (USA)); Childs, K.; Courville, G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Vonier, T. (Vonier (Thomas) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Tye, R. (Holometrix, Inc., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

COMMERCIALIZING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMERCIALIZING TECHNOLOGIES & CREATING JOBS Our location in the SS&TP plays a vital role in our ability to leverage the deep domain expertise of Sandia. Our proximity to the Labs...

46

Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRC 7439-R3 Energy Edge Impact Evaluation Early Overview, Final Report. R. Diamond, J. Harris, M. Piette, O. deBuen, and B. Nordman. Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (1290). Commercial...

47

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

48

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

49

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Title Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3898e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Xu, Peng, Rongxin Yin, Carrie Brown, and DongEun Kim Date Published June 2009 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT, hot climates, market sectors, office buildings, pre-cooling, technologies, testbed tools and guides, thermal mass Abstract The potential for using building thermal mass for load shifting and peak energy demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Previous Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory research has demonstrated that the approach is very effective in cool and moderately warm climate conditions (California Climate Zones 2-4). However, this method had not been tested in hotter climate zones.This project studied the potential of pre-cooling the building early in the morning and increasing temperature setpoints during peak hours to reduce cooling-related demand in two typical office buildings in hotter California climates - one in Visalia (CEC Climate Zone 13) and the other in San Bernardino (CEC Climate Zone 10). The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling in hotter climates has similar potential to that seen previously in cool and moderate climates. All other factors being equal, results to date indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the possible demand shed of a given building. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling in typical office building under hot weather conditions is very limited. However, night pre-cooling is helpful for office buildings with an undersized HVAC system. Further work is required to duplicate the tests in other typical buildings and in other hot climate zones and prove that pre-cooling is truly effective.

50

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

51

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36E 36E Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California R. Yin, S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

52

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withhour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not all constraintslifetime ( a) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by utilizing thermal energy storage such as ice storage orThermal Storage Utilization. Journal of Solar Energy

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

55

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Metallurgy, thermal stability, and failure mode of the commercial Bi-Te-based thermoelectric modules.  

SciTech Connect

Bi-Te-based thermoelectric (TE) alloys are excellent candidates for power generation modules. We are interested in reliable TE modules for long-term use at or below 200 C. It is known that the metallurgical characteristics of TE materials and of interconnect components affect the performance of TE modules. Thus, we have conducted an extensive scientific investigation of several commercial TE modules to determine whether they meet our technical requirements. Our main focus is on the metallurgy and thermal stability of (Bi,Sb){sup 2}(Te,Se){sup 3} TE compounds and of other materials used in TE modules in the temperature range between 25 C and 200 C. Our study confirms the material suite used in the construction of TE modules. The module consists of three major components: AlN cover plates; electrical interconnects; and the TE legs, P-doped (Bi{sub 8}Sb{sub 32})(Te{sub 60}) and N-doped (Bi{sub 37}Sb{sub 3})(Te{sub 56}Se{sub 4}). The interconnect assembly contains Sn (Sb {approx} 1wt%) solder, sandwiched between Cu conductor with Ni diffusion barriers on the outside. Potential failure modes of the TE modules in this temperature range were discovered and analyzed. The results show that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloys used in the P and N legs are stable up to 200 C. However, whole TE modules are thermally unstable at temperatures above 160 C, lower than the nominal melting point of the solder suggested by the manufacture. Two failure modes were observed when they were heated above 160 C: solder melting and flowing out of the interconnect assembly; and solder reacting with the TE leg, causing dimensional swelling of the TE legs. The reaction of the solder with the TE leg occurs as the lack of a nickel diffusion barrier on the side of the TE leg where the displaced solder and/or the preexisting solder beads is directly contact the TE material. This study concludes that the present TE modules are not suitable for long-term use at temperatures above 160 C due to the reactivity between the Sn-solder and the (Bi,Sb){sup 2}(Te,Se){sup 3} TE alloys. In order to deploy a reliable TE power generator for use at or below 200 C, alternate interconnect materials must be used and/or a modified module fabrication technique must be developed.

Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Morales, Alfredo Martin

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 (From Chapter 2.) Supply (Million Megawatthours) Generation Year Electric Utilities IPP (Non-CHP) IPP (CHP) Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Total Imports Total...

58

Output Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every discrete-event simulation experiment with random input generates random sample paths as output. Each path usually consists of a sequence of dependent observations that serve as the raw material for estim...

George S. Fishman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Best Practice For the Location of Air and Thermal Boundaries in Small Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suspended t-bar ceilings are common in commercial buildings. Research has found that these ceilings are very leaky, and several problems arise from this. If the space above the ceiling is vented to outdoors, the entire building becomes leaky...

Cummings, J. B.; Withers, C. R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

SciTech Connect

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

63

Cooling Strategies Based on Indicators of Thermal Storage in Commercial Building Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific instance of this phenomenon, in which thermal storage by building mass over weekends exacerbates Monday cooling energy requirements. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large, office building prototype in El Paso, TX using...

Eto, J. H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 " Pennsylvania",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 "East North Central",112,197,127,309,331,-6.8 " Illinois",34,45,29,79,66,18.9 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

65

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",25,54,32,79,90,-12 " Pennsylvania",25,54,32,79,90,-12 "East North Central",115,183,117,298,301,-0.9 " Illinois",31,42,28,73,67,8.1 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

66

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

67

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic",62,58,56,10.9 " Pennsylvania",62,58,56,10.9 "East North Central",168,171,197,-14.7 " Illinois","w","w","w","w" " Indiana",75,76,75,0.5 " Michigan","w","w","w","w" " Ohio",25,15,19,27 " Wisconsin",5,5,3,59.1 "West North Central",66,75,97,-32.2

70

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 " Pennsylvania",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 "East North Central",87.62,97.3,87.11,93.56,95.13,-1.7 " Illinois",59.27,60.3,62.17,59.86,66.69,-10.2 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

71

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "Pennsylvania" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "East North Central" " Btu",11928,12228,11682,12112,11933,1.5

72

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

73

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

74

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

75

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

76

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 2003 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Historical Data 2003 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,870 775 168 -- 6,813 2004 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 14,114 1,494 215 3 15,826 2005 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19,244 1,565 337 -- 21,146 2006 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 30,689 2,553 376 -- 33,618 2007 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44,450 3,513 391 -- 48,354 2008 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740

77

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 9,580 399 2.10 50.44 2.59 28.4 503 91 5.38 29.73 0.02 7.5 2003 8,835 372 1.99 47.24 2.43 20.5 248 43 7.00 40.82 0.04 3.1 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20 26.9 2005 11,081 464 2.57 61.21 2.43 24.2 1,684 289 8.28 48.22 0.17 18.3 2006 12,207 518 2.63 61.95 2.51 27.5 798 137 13.50 78.70 0.17 15.5

78

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

79

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

80

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

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81

Equal-channel angular pressing of commercial aluminum alloys: Grain refinement, thermal stability and tensile properties  

SciTech Connect

Using equal-channel angular (ECA) pressing at room temperature, the grain sizes of six different commercial aluminum-based alloys (1100, 2024, 3004, 5083, 6061, and 7075) were reduced to within the submicrometer range. These grains were reasonably stable up to annealing temperatures of {approximately} 200 C and the submicrometer grains were retained in the 2024 and 7075 alloys to annealing temperatures of 300 C. Tensile testing after ECA pressing through a single pass, equivalent to the introduction of a strain of {approximately}1, showed there is a significant increase in the values of the 0.2 pct proof stress and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) for each alloy with a corresponding reduction in the elongations to failure. It is demonstrated that the magnitudes of these stresses scale with the square rot of the Mg content in each alloy. Similar values for the proof stresses and the UTS were attained at the same equivalent strains in samples subjected to cold rolling, but the elongations to failure were higher after ECA pressing to equivalent strains >1 because of the introduction of a very small grain size. Detailed results for the 1100 and 3004 alloys show good agreement with the standard Hall-Petch relationship.

Horita, Zenji; Fujinami, Takayoshi; Nemoto, Minoru; Langdon, T.G.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

83

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

84

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

85

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

86

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program 2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 15,284 24,803 10,242 -- 50,328 2003 12,914 24,758 10,031 551 48,254 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790 50,732 23,061 76 120,659 2012 54,516 58,894 25,023 92 138,525 Energy Efficiency - Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2002 5,300 5,389 2,768 -- 13,457 2003 5,909 4,911 2,671 94 13,585

87

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

88

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

89

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

90

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

91

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) 2007 2,202,222 262,159 9,106 2 2,473,489 2008 4,190,244 444,003 12,757 12 4,647,016 2009 8,712,297 876,419 22,675 10 9,611,401 2010 18,369,908 1,904,983 59,567 67 20,334,525 2011 33,453,548 3,682,159 154,659 7 37,290,373

92

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 (From Table 2.1.) Number of Ultimate Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

93

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

94

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

95

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

96

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

97

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

98

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

99

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

100

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

102

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

103

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

104

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

105

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

106

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

107

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

108

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

109

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

110

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

111

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

112

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

113

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

114

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

115

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids 8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 413 639 -35.4% 52 120 267 374 49 55 45 90 Connecticut 112 166 -32.6% 4 5 104 155 0.05 0 4 5 Maine 84 178 -52.8% 0.17 1 65 89 2 3 16 85 Massachusetts 174 197 -11.2% 15 40 98 128 37 28 25 NM New Hampshire 22 78 -72.1% 20 57 0.12 1 2 20 0.17 0.10 Rhode Island 18 14 31.0% 11 10 0.12 1 7 2 0 0 Vermont 3 8 -58.1% 2 6 0 0 1 2 0 0

116

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Biomass 8. Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,229 7,138 1.3% 570 515 4,428 4,544 125 94 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 3,212 3,788 -15.2% 0 0 1,581 1,714 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,724 1,140 51.2% 0 0 1,157 1,137 1 3 566 0 New Hampshire 1,173 1,025 14.4% 347 291 795 734 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 101 127 -21.1% 0 0 101 127 0 0 0 0

117

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy 2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 36,116 34,283 5.3% 0 0 36,116 34,283 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 17,078 15,928 7.2% 0 0 17,078 15,928 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 5,860 5,085 15.2% 0 0 5,860 5,085 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 8,189 8,363 -2.1% 0 0 8,189 8,363 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 4,989 4,907 1.7% 0 0 4,989 4,907 0 0 0 0

118

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Net Generation from Coal 7. Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,103 6,848 -40.1% 1,268 2,208 2,793 4,592 0 0 42 47 Connecticut 653 526 24.2% 0 0 653 526 0 0 0 0 Maine 45 55 -18.0% 0 0 30 38 0 0 15 18 Massachusetts 2,137 4,059 -47.4% 0 0 2,110 4,029 0 0 27 30 New Hampshire 1,268 2,208 -42.6% 1,268 2,208 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

119

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2002 1,265,179,869 1,104,496,607 990,237,631 N/A 105,551,904 3,465,466,011 166,184,296 3,631,650,307 2003 1,275,823,910 1,198,727,601 1,012,373,247 6,809,728 N/A 3,493,734,486 168,294,526 3,662,029,012 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 N/A 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 N/A 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 N/A 3,669,918,840 146,926,612 3,816,845,452

120

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 Net Generation and Consumption of Fuels for January through December Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Fuel Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Net Generation (Thousand Megawatthours) Coal 1,514,043 1,733,430 -12.7% 1,146,480 1,301,107 354,076 416,783 883 1,049 12,603 14,490 Petroleum Liquids 13,403 16,086 -16.7% 9,892 11,688 2,757 3,655 191 86 563 657 Petroleum Coke 9,787 14,096 -30.6% 5,664 9,428 1,758 3,431 6 3 2,359 1,234 Natural Gas 1,225,894 1,013,689 20.9% 504,958 414,843 627,833 511,447 6,603 5,487 86,500 81,911

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Dollars) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,418 7,546 6,137 6,441 3,292 3,504 38 45 16,885 17,536 Connecticut 2,213 2,339 1,901 2,038 452 486 19 19 4,584 4,882 Maine 657 674 467 494 242 268 0 0 1,366 1,436 Massachusetts 3,029 3,003 2,453 2,547 2,127 2,270 17 22 7,627 7,842 New Hampshire 713 736 598 629 231 238 0 0 1,543 1,602 Rhode Island 450 449 432 453 99 103 2 4 982 1,008 Vermont 356 346 285 281 142 139 0 0 784 766

122

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

123

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

124

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

125

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

126

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

127

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

128

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity 2013 U.S. Total 513 15,144 179 12,604 334 2,540 Coal 4 1,482 28 4,465 -24 -2,983 Petroleum 21 45 41 1,401 -20 -1,356 Natural Gas 87 6,818 55 2,950 32 3,868 Other Gases -- -- 1 4 -1 -4 Nuclear -- -- 4 3,576 -4 -3,576 Hydroelectric Conventional 17 385 36 185 -19 201 Wind 25 2,225 -- -- 25 2,225 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic 277 3,460 1 1 276 3,459 Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels 10 489 -- -- 10 489 Geothermal 5 50 1 11 4 39

129

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,141 N/A N/A 8,300 N/A N/A N/A 13,089 18,189 N/A 2003 10,834 0 532 8,645 4,435 7,227 1,211 13,175 21,890 67,949 2004 13,739 0 569 8,528 4,377 6,978 884 13,563 19,518 68,154 2005 16,764 0 535 8,741 4,308 7,092 701 13,566 21,486 73,195 2006 24,238 0 493 8,404 4,771 7,259 774 13,406 24,390 83,736 2007 30,089 6 595 8,486 5,177 7,061 839 13,498 19,109 84,860 2008 48,464 60 787 8,750 6,057 6,975 1,040 13,643 23,451 109,226

130

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,354 N/A N/A 38,665 N/A N/A N/A 14,491 264,329 N/A 2003 11,187 2 532 37,529 5,077 8,306 2,428 14,424 275,806 355,293 2004 14,144 6 569 38,117 5,128 8,151 2,141 14,811 268,417 351,485 2005 17,811 16 535 38,856 5,142 8,330 1,948 14,692 270,321 357,651 2006 26,589 15 493 38,762 5,677 8,478 1,944 14,568 289,246 385,772 2007 34,450 16 596 39,014 6,158 8,304 2,063 14,637 247,510 352,747

131

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

132

A rapid estimation and sensitivity analysis of parameters describing the behavior of commercial Li-ion batteries including thermal analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a methodology based on rigorous model fitting and sensitivity analysis is presented to determine the parameters describing the physicochemical behavior of commercial pouch Li-ion batteries of high-capacity (16Ah), utilized in electric vehicles. It is intended for a rapid estimation of the kinetic and transport parameters, state of charge and health of a Li-ion battery when chemical information is not available, or for a brand new system. A pseudo 2-D model comprised of different contributions reported in the literature is utilized to describe the mass, charge and thermal balances of the cell and porous electrodes; and adapted to the battery chemistry under study. The sensitivity analysis of key model parameters is conducted to determine confidence intervals, using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for non-linear models. Also individual multi-parametric sensitivity analysis is conducted to assess the impact of the model parameters on battery voltage. The battery is comprised of multiple cells in parallel containing carbon anodes and LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) cathodes with maximum and cut-off voltages of 4.2 and 2.7V, respectively. Mass and charge transfer limitations during the discharge/charge of the battery are discussed as a function of State of Charge (SOC). A thermal analysis is also conducted to estimate the temperature rise on the surface of the battery. This modeling methodology can be extended to the analysis of other chemistry types of Li-ion batteries, as well as the evaluation of other material phenomena including capacity fade.

Jorge Vazquez-Arenas; Leonardo E. Gimenez; Michael Fowler; Taeyoung Han; Shih-ken Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

SciTech Connect

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

PHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

know that solar energy is environ- mentally attractive--and that photovoltaic or PV systems have made's electrical output matches well with patterns of energy use in commercial buildings, promoting effective convey tax advantages, such as accelerated depreciation and a federal income tax credit. M ost people

Perez, Richard R.

136

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A 10% increase in shaft work is directly attributable to modified thermal heat capacity Engineering HTF Specific heat yields modified power output. 27 127 227 327 427 527...

137

Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Morley, David W. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of commercial warm air furnaces since 1994. Commercial warm air furnaces are self-contained oil-fired or gas-fired furnaces that are designed to supply heated air through ducts to spaces that require it. Commercial warm air furnaces are industrial equipment and have a maximum rated input capacity of 225,000 British thermal units (Btu) an hour or more. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a request for information regarding energy conservation standards for commercial warm air furnaces. 78 FR 25627 (May 2, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking webpage.

139

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

140

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Windows: $250 - Residential; $750 (Commercial) Insulation: up to $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Water Heater Blanket: $20 per unit Radiant/Thermal Barrier Material: $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Duct Repair/Replacement: $500

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Review of Thermally Activated Technologies, July 2004 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and waste-heat-fired applications of thermally-driven cooling systems, thermally-driven heat pumps, and thermally-driven bottoming cycles, primarily for use in commercial...

142

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Commercial Norms, Commercial Codes, and International Commercial Arbitration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article defends the incorporation of commercial norms into commercial codes, through provisions such as statute 1-205 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It finds significant reliance on trade usages in international ...

Drahozal, Christopher R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING RELIABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING microstructure, and bondline thermal resistance with the tradeoffs between material systems, manufacturability of devices to heat sinks using existing commercial thermal interface materials (TIMs). The present study

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Pennsylvania: Window Technology First of Its Kind for Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Opti Ultra Thermal Window series introduces new high-performing windows to the commercial building industry and unlocks the potential to save energy in more of America's commercial building space.

147

Comparison of Two Ventilation Systems in a Chinese Commercial Kitchen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A numerical simulation of an indoor thermal environment in a Chinese commercial kitchen has been carried out using indoor zero-equation turbulence model. Two different ventilation systems in a Chinese commercial kitchen have been simulated...

Wan, X.; Yu, L.; Hou, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

149

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

150

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

151

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

152

Technology Commercialization Fund - EERE Commercialization Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fund The Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) is designed to complement angel investment or early stage corporate product development. The fund totaled nearly 14.3 million in...

153

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

154

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

155

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

156

Limited Lawn & Limited Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited Lawn & Ornamental Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Review and Exams Limited for Commercial Landscape Maintenance Application: http://www.flaes.org/ pdf/lndspckt.pdf Limited Certification.floridatermitehelp.org or request by phone at 850-921-4177. Limited Lawn & Ornamental/Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance

Watson, Craig A.

157

Limited Lawn & Limited Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited Lawn & Ornamental Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Review and Exams Limited-921-4177. Limited Lawn & Ornamental/Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance: Ornamental and Turf Pest Control (SM 7&O/Structural only). See web locations below for applications. Limited Certification for Commercial Landscape

Jawitz, James W.

158

Output power characteristics of the neutral xenon long laser  

SciTech Connect

Lasers which oscillate within inhomogeneously broadened gain media exhibit spectral hole burning and concomitant reduction in output power compared with equivalent homogeneously-broadened laser gain media. By increasing the cavity length, it may be possible to demonstrate at least a partial transition from an inhomogeneous laser cavity mode spectrum to a homogeneous spectrum. There are a number of high gain laser lines which are inhomogeneously-broadened transitions in electric discharges of neutral xenon. In neutral xenon lasers, as in the cases of many other gas lasers, the inhomogeneous spectral broadening mechanism arises from Doppler shifts, {Delta}{nu}{sub D}, of individual atoms in thermal motion within the electric discharge comprising the laser gain medium. Optical transitions corresponding to these noble gas atoms have natural linewidths, {Delta}{nu}{sub n}{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub D}. Simulations of the output power characteristics of the xenon laser were carried out as a function of laser cavity parameters, including the cavity length, L. These calculations showed that when the intracavity mode spacing frequency, c/2L{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub n}, the inhomogeneously broadened xenon mode spectrum converted to a homogeneously broadened oscillation spectrum with an increase in output power. These simulations are compared with experimental results obtained for the long laser oscillation characteristics of the (5d[5/2]{degree}{sub 2}{r_arrow}6p[3/2]{sub 1}) transition corresponding to the strong, high-gain 3.508 {mu} line in xenon.

Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The OptiQ Ultra Thermal Window series introduces new high-performing windows to the commercial building industry and unlocks the potential to save energy in more of Americas commercial building space.

160

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

163

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anisotropic gridadaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

Venditti, David A.

164

Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

165

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

166

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

167

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file every 6 days Output after 30 days in 6th file. The Starting Month = July Example: roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0120.nc.gz : July 3 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0122.nc.gz : July 6 and July 9 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0124.nc

Gangopadhyay, Avijit

168

Characterization of the Thermal Transport Through a Temporally-Varying Ash Layer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ash deposits in commercial coal-fired boilers frequently pose serious maintenance challenges and decrease thermal efficiency. A better understanding of fundamental thermal transport properties in ash (more)

Cundick,Darron Palmer 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced solar thermal Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

..) - residential and commercial. (A. Athienitis) 2. Solar thermal systems for heating and cooling (DHW... and optimization tool. THEME 1 Integration THEME 2 Thermal THEME...

170

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides from a Commercial Building Initiative webinar outlining the Commercial Building Asset Rating Program on August 23, 2011.

171

Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic Microbes to Increase Feedstock Production Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of...

172

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

173

Renae Speck Commercialization Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manager Renae Speck, Ph.D is a Commercialization Manager in the Office of Technology Transfer in the Partnership Directorate at the United States Department of Energy's Oak...

174

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

175

Average Commercial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves...

176

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

177

Commercial Marketing Toolkit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial-Marketing-Toolkit Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors Technology...

178

Commercial fertilizers 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compendium of tables on consumption of commercial fertilizers in the USA in 1993, including types of different fertilizers and consumption of each.

Berry, J.T.; Montgomery, M.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

180

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal Simulation of Advanced Powertrain Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under this project, the Volvo complete vehicle model was modified to include engine and exhaust system thermal outputs and cooling system to enable WHR simulations from a system perspective.

182

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate Refrigeration/Cooking/Lighting: rebate will not exceed 75% of project cost Retrocommissioning: $20,000 Retrocommissioning: Building must have at least 40,000 sq ft of conditioned space Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heating: $150 - $300 or $20/kW Thermal Storage: $20 - $40/kW Condensers: $25/HP - $100/HP

183

Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon February 27, 2012 Portland State University Physics Seminar Robert D. "Skip" Rung President and Executive Director #12;2 Nanotechnology Commercialization on "green" nanotechnology and gap fund portfolio company examples #12;3 Goals of the National Nanotechnology

Moeck, Peter

184

Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing  

SciTech Connect

Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

Robert Stockwell, PhD

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

187

Gesture output: eyes-free output using a force feedback touch surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose using spatial gestures not only for input but also for output. Analogous to gesture input, the proposed gesture output moves the user's finger in a gesture, which the user then recognizes. We use our concept in a mobile scenario where a motion ... Keywords: eyes free, force feedback, gestures, touch

Anne Roudaut; Andreas Rau; Christoph Sterz; Max Plauth; Pedro Lopes; Patrick Baudisch

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of the total cost Program Info Expiration Date 9/30/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 with Electric Ballasts: $10 - $65 Hardwired CFL's: $40 - $80 Screw In CFL's: $3 - $12 Cold Cathode: $3 - $15 Ceramic Metal Halide Fixture: $30 - $50 LED's: $15 - $50 Induction: $80 - $400 High-output T5/T8: $50 - $180 Metal Halide/High Pressure Sodium: $80 - $400 Stairwell/Garage Fluorescent Fixture: $50 Occupancy Sensor/Timer: $30 - $60

189

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5 V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used...

Eachempatti, Haritha

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E2.3 Bioenergy technology ­ balancing energy output with environmental benefitsbenefits John standards #12;Is it right to grow bioenergy? Or How much bioenergy production is right? #12;Historical bioenergy Farmers historically used 25% land for horse feed #12;Energy crops are `solar panels' Solar energy

Levi, Ran

191

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS Anshul Singh*, Arindam Basu, Keck-Voon Ling, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore *NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), NTU, Singapore $School of Computer Engineering, NTU, Singapore §School of ECE, Georgia

Mooney, Vincent

192

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of marine seismic airgun sources" Les Hatton CISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns Introduction Modelling Marine Life Impact Where next Overview #12 Normal speed surface movie of airgun firing Courtesy IO limited #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns

Hatton, Les

193

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

194

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

195

Coal gasification 2006: roadmap to commercialization  

SciTech Connect

Surging oil and gas prices, combined with supply security and environmental concerns, are prompting power generators and industrial firms to further develop coal gasification technologies. Coal gasification, the process of breaking down coal into its constituent chemical components prior to combustion, will permit the US to more effectively utilize its enormous, low cost coal reserves. The process facilitates lower environmental impact power generation and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional generation techniques. The study is designed to inform the reader as to this rapidly evolving technology, its market penetration prospects and likely development. Contents include: Clear explanations of different coal gasification technologies; Emissions and efficiency comparisons with other fuels and technologies; Examples of US and global gasification projects - successes and failures; Commercial development and forecast data; Gasification projects by syngas output; Recommendations for greater market penetration and commercialization; Current and projected gasification technology market shares; and Recent developments including proposals for underground gasification process. 1 app.

NONE

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

3-D modelling of kerosene-fuelled HVOF thermal spray gun  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid-fuelled high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying systems are capable of generating more momentum output to powder particles in comparison with gas-fuelled systems. The use of low-cost fuel such as kerosene makes this technology particular attractive. High-quality coating requires thermal spraying systems delivering consistent performance as a result of the combustion during HVOF spraying. The combustion of kerosene is very complicated due to the variation of fuel composition and subsequently makes it extremely challenging for process control. This paper describes a 3-D simulation using mathematical models available in a commercial finite volume CFD code. The combustion and discrete particle models within the numerical code are applied to solve the combustion of kerosene and couple the motion of fuel droplets with the gas flow dynamics in a Lagrangian fashion. The effects of liquid fuel droplets on the thermodynamics of the combusting gas flow are examined thoroughly.

S. Kamnis; S. Gu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

198

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

SciTech Connect

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Administrator Ready Reference Guide Customizing an Output Style  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may be in various sections of the instructions. Some things to look for: - line spacing Preview Utility (Tools, Preview Output Styles) or by simply opening the Output Style Editor (Bibliography, Edit button -- to the right of the output style drop- down). The Output Style Preview Utility

University of Technology, Sydney

200

Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

Liu Yingfan [Department of Mathematics, Nanjing University of Post and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: yingfanliu@hotmail.com; Zhang Qinghong [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI 49855 (United States)], E-mail: qzhang@nmu.edu

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermal performance evaluation of a solar air heater with and without thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This communication presents the experimental study and performance analysis of a solar air heater with and without phase change ... found that the output temperature in case with thermal energy storage (TES) is h...

V. V. Tyagi; A. K. Pandey; S. C. Kaushik

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Commercial Space Activities at Goddard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, environmental verification, and engineering `Best Practices' requirements #12;Commercial Utilization's commercial practices and processes · Brief summary of procurement activities under the three Rapid Catalogs Quantity ­ Leverage commercial practices and processes when possible ­ NASA mission assurance

Waliser, Duane E.

204

Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 200,000 or 50% of the total job cost (including equipment, installation and tax), whichever is less. Thermal Energy Storage projects have a separate 200,000 cap. Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Split System AC/Heat Pumps (1.5 ton - 5 ton): $200 - $600/unit

205

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heaters: $5,000 Lighting: over $4,500 must be preapproved Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting (Hard-Wired Systems): $0.20/watt of demand reduction Lighting (Screw-In CFL/LED): $0.05/watt of demand reduction Motors: $20 - $3,000 Air Source Heat Pumps: $160 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $350 Water Heaters: $150 - $300; or $20/kw Thermal Storage: $20 - $40

206

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

207

Output power characteristics and performance of TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element No. 24  

SciTech Connect

A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of single cell TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) No. 24 is presented. Thermal power tests were conducted for over 3000 hours to investigate converter performance under normal and adverse operating conditions. Experiments conducted include low power testing, high power testing, air introduction to the interelectrode gap, collector temperature optimization, thermal modeling, and output power characteristic measurements. During testing, no unexpected degradation in converter performance was observed. The TFE has been removed from the test stand and returned to Scientific Industrial Association {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} for materials analysis and report. This research was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the Topaz International Program (TIP) by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Luchau, D.W.; Bruns, D.R. [Team Specialty Services, Inc., TOPAZ International Program, 901 University Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Izhvanov, O.; Androsov, V. [JV INERTEK, Scientific Industrial Association ``Luch``, 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya, Podolsk, (Russia) 142100

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

209

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate General: $100,000 per customer per year; may not exceed 50% of the total installed cost of measures New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Owner): $150,000 per year New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Design Team): $30,000 per year New Construction (Systems Approach): $50,000 per year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostats: $50/unit

210

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

211

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

212

Off-set stabilizer for comparator output  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

Lunsford, James S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pathways to commercial success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGIES (HFCIT) PROGRAM Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program August 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................................................................1-1

214

Application of computer voice input/output  

SciTech Connect

The advent of microprocessors and other large-scale integration (LSI) circuits is making voice input and output for computers and instruments practical; specialized LSI chips for speech processing are appearing on the market. Voice can be used to input data or to issue instrument commands; this allows the operator to engage in other tasks, move about, and to use standard data entry systems. Voice synthesizers can generate audible, easily understood instructions. Using voice characteristics, a control system can verify speaker identity for security purposes. Two simple voice-controlled systems have been designed at Los Alamos for nuclear safeguards applicaations. Each can easily be expanded as time allows. The first system is for instrument control that accepts voice commands and issues audible operator prompts. The second system is for access control. The speaker's voice is used to verify his identity and to actuate external devices.

Ford, W.; Shirk, D.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Boiler Commercial Boiler Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis What's Covered All Federal purchases of hot water or steam boilers (using either oil or gas) with a rated capacity (Btu/h) of 300,000-10,000,000 must meet or exceed FEMP-designated thermal efficiencies. FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Boilers Table 1 displays the FEMP-designated minimum efficiency requirements for

216

Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate The lesser of 25% of the total cost or $50,000 Program Info Funding Source RPS alternative compliance payments Start Date 11/1/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: $0.80/W (DC) for new systems; $0.50/W (DC) for additions to existing systems Solar Thermal: $0.12/rated or modeled kBtu/year for new systems with 15 or fewer collectors; $0.07/rated or modeled kBtu/year for new systems with

217

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heater: $75 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $1.50 - $3 /gallon, plus $50 Tri-State G&T incentive Resistive Heat: $8 /kW Electric Thermal Storage: $50 /unit or $12 /kW Air-Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150 /ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150 /ton Terminal Unit: $85 Motors: $8 - $13 /hp (CPL and Tri-State Combined Rebate) Provider Carbon Power and Light, Inc.

218

Coordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the generalizations of coordination of multiple linear dynamic systems to the cooperative output regulation problemCoordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems Ziyang Meng, Tao Yang, Dimos V. Dimarogonas, and Karl H. Johansson Abstract-- The coordinated output regulation problem

Dimarogonas, Dimos

219

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

220

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Proceedings: Commercial Refrigeration Research Workshop  

SciTech Connect

Improving refrigeration systems for commercial use can enhance both utility load factors and supermarket profits. This workshop has pinpointed research needs in commercial refrigeration and systems integration for a supermarket environment.

None

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

REPORT OF THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOCICAL LABORATORY GALVESTON, TEXAS FISCAL YEAR, GALVESTON, TEXAS Fiscal Year 1966 Milton J. Lindner, Director Robert E. Stevenson, Assistant Director Contribution No. 226, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory, Galveston, Texas Circular 268

223

Commercialization of Genetically Engineered Crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1993 research-article Commercialization of Genetically Engineered...patent protection of the processes and final products provide...world's food supply. Commercialization of genetically engineered...patent protection of the processes and final products provide...

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Commercial Building Profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Profiles Building Profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset includes simulation results from a national-scale study of the commercial buildings sector. Electric load profiles contain the hour-by-hour demand for electricity for each building. Summary tables describe individual buildings and their overall annual energy performance. The study developed detailed EnergyPlus models for 4,820 different samples in 2003 CBECS. Simulation output is available for all and organized by CBECS's identification number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and the stock if rebuilt using maximum efficiency technology (with typical weather). The following reports describe how the dataset was developed:

225

List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 548 Solar Thermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-548) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional

226

Commercial Building Funding Opportunity Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This webinar provide an overview of the Commercial Building Technology Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001084.

227

Commercialization of clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect

The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

Bharucha, N. [Dept. of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra (Australia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Commercial Feeding Stuffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'7, of the Texas Experiment Station. OBJECTS OF THE LAW. 1. quani or otl tho+ IrllcL. U bu yic 2, he co centa 4. place 5 The intent of the Feeding Stuff Law is to provide means by which every purchaser of feeding stuffs may know exactly what he...371-410-30m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. 127 March, 1910 Commercial Feeding Stuffs J. W. CARSON and G. S. FRAPS POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS AUSTIN, TEXAS: VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS. 1910...

Carson, J.W.; Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors  

SciTech Connect

The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Commercial Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap, detergent, or both and mechanical movement to clean clothes. Commercial clothes washers are used in commercial settings, multi-family housing, or laundromats. There are two classes of commercial clothes washers: front-loading and top-loading clothes washers. The current standard will save approximately 0.12 quads of energy and result in approximately $1.1 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2036. The standard will avoid about 6.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 1.3 million automobiles.

231

Sulphur Removal Characteristics from a Commercial NOx Storage/Reduction Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ability to effectively remove sulphur from sulphur-poisoned NOx storage/reduction (NSR) catalysts, while minimizing associated fuel penalties and thermal degradation, is important for commercial application (more)

Kisinger, Darren

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

savings. Water-using commercial kitchen equipment include pre-rinse spray valves, wash tanks and sinks, commercial dishwashers, food steamers, steam kettles, commercial ice...

233

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance More Documents & Publications North American Standard Level VI Inspection...

234

Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators  

SciTech Connect

The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.010.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

236

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(92) (92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this publication under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202-586-1617). The project was directed by Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202-586-1112) and Nancy L. Leach, Chief

237

Energy Efficient Commercial Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Technologies April 11th, 2012 Presented by: Warren Willits Energy Solutions Center (202) 824-7150 www.ESCenter.org Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2012 Jekyll Island, GA Todays Energy Efficient Technologies  Water Heating  Heating  Air Conditioning  Humidity Control  CHP / Cogeneration Atmospheric Direct Vent High Efficiency .7 EF Atmospheric water heaters now available 97 % efficient tank water heaters now available Traditional Tank Style Water Heating  Tankless Water Heaters  EF = .82 Standard Unit  EF = .97 Condensing  Solar Water Heaters  With H.E. gas back up systems Newer Water Heaters Water Heater Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Costs Electric Tank Water Heater Gas Water Heater

238

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

GAMS program used to estimate capacity output using a distance function with both good and bad output, variable returns to scale and weak disposability of the bad outputs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

." VIMS Marine resource Report N. 2007-6. August 2007. Author: John B. Walden NMFS/NEFSC 166 Water St(obs) weights ; POSITIVE Variable weight, lambda; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint for each output

240

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s',:ratumin year 2001 for rebate incentives program ofthe utility provides a rebate so that any system with aof only 3 years, and (6) rebates--a rebate of $100 for each

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of BuildingEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the ice storage system, during direct cooling, thethe building cooling load. In dynamic systems, ice is formedcooling/demand-limited storage / electric load management / full storage / ice

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load power, calculated based on motor nameplate electrical data.nameplate data is used to calculate the full-load power ofload factors based on the measured power (or current) data.

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC schedule must be input on the 'START' tab. This schedule is used to filterHVAC schedule must be input on the 'START' tab. This schedule is used to filterHVAC schedule must also be input on the 'START' tab. This schedule is used to filter

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle and supply air temperature controls. The tool can beSupply Air Temperature setpoint (if applicable) Economizer controlCOOL- CONTROL=CONSTANT. It is the supply air temperature out

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air-volume HVAC systems, static pressures across theIn VAY HVAC systems, the static pressures may likely changefor the Static Pressure Analysis Tool are: HVAC schedule

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Duct Thermal Performance Models for Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department) for his assistance in defining the duct surface heat transfer models described in the body of this report

248

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering developing test procedures, labels, and energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial pumps. Pumps exist in numerous applications, including agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. There are currently no federal standards or test procedures for commercial and industrial pumps. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document regarding commercial and industrial pumps. 78 FR 7304 (February 1, 2013).

249

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Home For BNL Inventors For Industry For Entrepreneurs Sponsored Research Search Technologies Patents Contacts TCP Director Connie Cleary Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima Upadhya Partnerships Mike Furey, Manager Ginny Coccorese Alison Schwarz Intellectual Property Legal Group (Legal Dept.) Dorene Price, Chief Intellectual Property Counsel Lars Husebo, Attorney Maria Pacella, Sr. Staff Specialist William Russell, Asst. Staff Specialist INNOVATION MEETS BUSINESS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. WE GRANT LICENSES for our intellectual property to existing and start up companies. WE SEEK FUNDING from experienced investors to develop our intellectual assets. Tech Commercialization News

250

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercialization Programs Commercialization Programs Through our commercialization programs, we help accelerate the transfer of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the marketplace. Clean Energy Alliance The Clean Energy Alliance is an alliance of the nation's top business incubators that provide business services to nascent clean energy entrepreneurs. NREL partners with these elite business incubators to help foster the growth of robust clean energy businesses and commercialize their technologies. Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development Formerly the Colorado Cleantech Initiative program, the Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED) is a joint effort between NREL, the State of Colorado, and affiliated stakeholders to provide

251

Commercial Weatherization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. Commercial buildings consume 19 percent of the energy used in the U.S.

252

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Quick Links Energy Innovation Portal Site Map Commercialization Home Page About Success Stories Legacy Initiatives Small...

253

Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

254

Covered Product Category: Commercial Ovens  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial ovens, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

255

The process of technology commercialization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis investigates, describes and understands the extensive process of technology commercialization. What stages there are, important aspects and implications. It is structured as (more)

Holmgren, Annie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

257

Constellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average energy are selected more frequently than constellations with higher energy. However, the resultsConstellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs Chandana Nannapaneni signal constellation and the output is quantized by a uniform scalar quantizer. The goal is to jointly

Valenti, Matthew C.

258

ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADIOS ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TABLES ADIOS - ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE COMPUTER TABLE FOR CONTENTS Page I Module and Apple Card (Photograph) Figure 3 Complete Apple/ADIOS System (Photograph) Figure 4 Analog

Groppi, Christopher

259

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

260

Most efficient quantum thermoelectric at finite power output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Machines are only Carnot efficient if they are reversible, but then their power output is vanishingly small. Here we ask, what is the maximum efficiency of an irreversible device with finite power output? We use a nonlinear scattering theory to answer this question for thermoelectric quantum systems; heat engines or refrigerators consisting of nanostructures or molecules that exhibit a Peltier effect. We find that quantum mechanics places an upper bound on both power output, and on the efficiency at any finite power. The upper bound on efficiency equals Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decays with increasing power output. It is intrinsically quantum (wavelength dependent), unlike Carnot efficiency. This maximum efficiency occurs when the system lets through all particles in a certain energy window, but none at other energies. A physical implementation of this is discussed, as is the suppression of efficiency by a phonon heat flow.

Robert S. Whitney

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal Instability of Olivine-Type LiMnP04 Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal stability of LiFePC^ and its charged counterpart, FeP04, have been instrumental in its commercialization as a lithium ion battery

Chen, Guoying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Thermal Conversion Factors | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Conversion Factors Thermal Conversion Factors Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

263

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate Step 1 Incentive Limits (contact utility to determine current incentive limits): Single-family residential systems that displace natural gas: $2,719 Single-family residential systems that displace electricity or propane: $1,834 Commercial and multifamily residential systems that displace natural gas: $500,000 Commercial and multifamily residential systems that displace electricity or propane: $250,000

264

COMMERCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMERCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY February 2013 Commercial Services (CS) provides a range high standards of sustainability across all its activities. This policy supports CS aim to become a `Sustainable, Efficient and Effective Organisation' that "....will carefully consider the impact of our

Haase, Markus

265

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost benefits are still evident. Currently, there are many solar power plants that have been announced Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because, power output from a solar field. At the right cost, a storage system can improve overall economics

267

Relationship Among Efficiency and Output Power of Heat Energy Converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationship among efficiency and output power of heat-electric energy converters as well as of any converters for transforming of heat energy into any other kind of energy is considered. It is shown, that the parameter efficiency does not determine univocally the output power of a converter. It is proposed to use another parameter for determination of working ability of heat energy converters. It is shown, that high output power can not be achieved by any kind of Stirling-type converters in spite of their high efficiency.

Alexander Luchinskiy

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) regulates the energy efficiency of small, large, and very large commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps. Commercial air conditioners and heat pumps are air-cooled, water-cooled, evaporatively-cooled, or water source unitary air conditioners or heat pumps that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps, and SPVUs, will save approximately 1.7 quads of energy and result in approximately $28.9 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. These standards will avoid about 90.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 31.1 million automobiles. The standard implemented in 2010 for very large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps will save approximately 0.43 quads of energy and result in approximately $4.3 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. The standard will avoid about 22.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 4.4 million automobiles.

269

Sparse Convolved Gaussian Processes for Multi-output Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the concentration of different heavy metal pollutants [5]. Modelling multiple output variables is a challenge as we methodology for synthetic data and real world applications on pollution prediction and a sensor network. 1

Rattray, Magnus

270

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2, and leader election. 1 Introduction We study computability in networks, referred to hereafter as distributed

271

Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that ... this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the...

Nada Atef Shebl; Bryony Dean Franklin; Nick Barber

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Grid adaptation for functional outputs of compressible flow simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An error correction and grid adaptive method is presented for improving the accuracy of functional outputs of compressible flow simulations. The procedure is based on an adjoint formulation in which the estimated error in ...

Venditti, David Anthony, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

274

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability..., power generation for offshore platforms, utility peak load 58 ESL-IE-92-04-10 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 power generation, emergency power, ship propulsion, and private...

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

275

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

276

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Energy Conservation Standard Commercial Clothes Washers Energy Conservation Standard Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering whether to revise its energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers. This current rulemaking will satisfy the requirement to publish the second final rule by January 1, 2015 as mandated by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates The DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document for commercial clothes washers. 77 FR 48108 (August 13, 2012). Public Meeting Information

277

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Promoting Energy Savings for Businesses S igned by President Bush on August 8, 2005, the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) lays the foundation for the new Federal tax incentives for consumers and businesses that pursue energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy. For updated information about the tax incentives, see www.energy.gov. This web- site also describes other EPACT provisions of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building owners and lessees who purchase and install energy-saving products in their businesses can qualify for a tax deduction under EPACT. Buildings must achieve a 50 percent reduction in

278

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Commercial and Industrial Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Pumps are used in agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. Currently there are no energy conservation standards for pumps. The Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct an analysis of the energy use, emissions, costs, and benefits associated with this equipment during the commercial and industrial pumps energy conservation standards rulemaking. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document. 78 FR 7304 (Feb. 1, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking page.

279

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Compressors Determination Commercial and Industrial Compressors Determination Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to determine that commercial and industrial compressors meet the criteria for covered equipment under Part A-1 of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a Proposed Coverage Determination concerning commercial and industrial compressors. 77 FR 76972 (Dec. 31, 2012). Public Meeting Information No public meeting is scheduled at this time. Submitting Public Comments The comment period is closed.

280

Commercial Combustion and CHP Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wood heat for individual homes (i.e., wood stoves and pellet stoves) is widely recognized and understood in the Northeast USA. Commercial-scale wood heat and CHP (combined heat and power), however, ... the region...

Daniel Ciolkosz; Jim Babcock

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Technology Commercialization: Opportunities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercialization of technology from university and national laboratory ... in the early 1970s to an active process in the 1990s, involving exclusive licensing ... development professional involved in the licen...

K. L. Crandell

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Speaker(s): Thomas Durkin Date: February 23, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Moira Howard-Jeweler This seminar presentation will be video-conferenced from our Washington, DC Projects office.) According to USGBC, LBNL, and CBECS data, commercial/institutional buildings use one quarter of all the energy consumed in the US. Depending on the geographic area of the country, heating can be as little as 30% (Houston), or as much as 68% (Minneapolis) of the building total. Mr. Durkin will share his experience in dramatically reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from completed projects shows 50 to 60%

283

Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only October 8, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the base model and other assumptions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement What is the deliverable fluid type? Water Steam What fuel is used? Gas Oil How many boilers will you purchase? unit(s) Performance Factors Existing What is the capacity of the existing boiler? MBtu/hr* What is the thermal efficiency of the existing boiler? % Et New What is the capacity of the new boiler?

284

Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Buying & Making Electricity Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate Single-Family Residential: $2,500 Multi-Family Residential: $5,000 Commercial: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2014 Expiration Date 12/31/2023 State Minnesota Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% Provider Minnesota Department of Commerce Beginning in 2014, the Department of Commerce will offer a Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate program. Rebates are 25% of installed costs, with a $2,500 maximum for residential systems, $5,000 maximum for multi-family residential systems, and $25,000 for commercial systems.

285

Optimization of micro-thermal actuator for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders were successfully used in commercial products to compensate the flying height (FH) loss and reduce the risk of head-disk contacts (Gupta et al. 2001; Wang et al. 2001; ...

Jin Liu; Jianhua Li; Junguo Xu; Shinobu Yoshida

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Thermal Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

288

Translation and commercialization of regenerative medicines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...issue 'Translation and commercialization of regenerative medicines...Prescott Translation and commercialization of regenerative medicines...accelerate the banking process and facilitate appropriate...Supplement Translation and commercialization of regenerative medicines...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Interpreting and analyzing model output (A very cursory introduction) Here will talk briefly about using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output from your model. The model output is in netcdf format for the output. I use matlab to measure, plot, compute, etc.. Recall the the model output is stored in: /scratch shown at the top.) matlab I hope you have some experience with matlab. There are handy tutorials

Gerber, Edwin

290

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

291

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

292

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

293

Commercial Algae Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Algae Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Commercial Algae Management Address: 320 Arbor Lane Place: Franklin, NC Zip: 28734 Year Founded: 2002 Phone Number:...

294

DOE Commercial Reference Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings DOE Commercial Reference Buildings DOE Commercial Reference Buildings refbldgseuitables1-47-0.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Information Agency's 2003...

295

Small Buildings Small Portfolio Commercial Upstream Incentive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Small Portfolio Commercial Upstream Incentive Project: Regional Roll-Out - 2014 BTO Peer Review Small Buildings Small Portfolio Commercial Upstream Incentive Project:...

296

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation...

297

Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume...

298

commercial buildings initiative | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Initiative The DOE Building Technologies Office works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the use of energy efficiency technologies in both...

299

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliance Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Email: carlisles@cvsa.org Phone: 301-830-6147 CVSA Levels of Inspections Level I Full inspection Level II Walk Around - Driver - Vehicle Level III Driver - Paperwork Level IV Special Project - Generally focus on one item CVSA Levels of Inspections Level V Vehicle Only Level VI Enhanced RAM Level VII Jurisdictional Mandated * 8 basic classes/year held in various states * Prerequisites: CVSA Level I and HAZMAT certified * Industry attends course * To date 135 classes/2268 attendees * Currently 702 certified Level VI

300

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Commercialization of sustainable energy technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercialization efforts to diffuse sustainable energy technologies (SETs11The \\{SETs\\} can be viewed as a portfolio of technologies, which are expected to use renewable energy resources as input to produce modern energy carriers. ) have so far remained as the biggest challenge in the field of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Limited success of diffusion through government driven pathways urges the need for market based approaches. This paper reviews the existing state of commercialization of \\{SETs\\} in the backdrop of the basic theory of technology diffusion. The different \\{SETs\\} in India are positioned in the technology diffusion map to reflect their slow state of commercialization. The dynamics of SET market is analysed to identify the issues, barriers and stakeholders in the process of SET commercialization. By upgrading the potential adopters to techno-entrepreneurs, the study presents the mechanisms for adopting a private sector driven business model approach for successful diffusion of SETs. This is expected to integrate the processes of market transformation and entrepreneurship development with innovative regulatory, marketing, financing, incentive and delivery mechanisms leading to SET commercialization.

P. Balachandra; Hippu Salk Kristle Nathan; B. Sudhakara Reddy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Stirling converters for space dynamic power concepts with 2 to 130 W{sub e} output  

SciTech Connect

Three innovative Stirling converter concepts are described. Two concepts are based on Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission requirements, where two General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules provide the thermal input. The first concept (PFF2) considers a power system with two opposed Stirling converters; the second concept (PFF4) considers four opposed Stirling converters. For both concepts the Stirling converters are designed to vary their power production capability to compensate for the failure of one Stirling converter. While the net thermal efficiency of PFF4 is a few percentage points lower than PFF2, the total Stirling converter mass of PFF4 is half that for PFF2. The third concept (ITTI) is designed to supply 2 watts of power for weather stations on the Martian surface. The predicted thermal performance of the ITTI is low compared to PFF2 and PFF4, yet the ITTI concept offers significant advantages compared to currently available power systems at the 2-watt power level. All three concepts are based on long-life technology demonstrated by an 11-watt output Stirling generator that as of March 1995 has accumulated over 15,000 operating hours without maintenance.

Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

304

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

305

Formalization of computer input and output: the Hadley model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current digital evidence acquisition tools are effective, but are tested rather than formally proven correct. We assert that the forensics community will benefit in evidentiary ways and the scientific community will benefit in practical ways by moving beyond simple testing of systems to a formal model. To this end, we present a hierarchical model of peripheral input to and output from von Neumann computers, patterned after the Open Systems Interconnection model of networking. The Hadley model categorizes all components of peripheral input and output in terms of data flow; with constructive aspects concentrated in the data flow between primary memory and the computer sides of peripherals' interfaces. The constructive domain of Hadley is eventually expandable to all areas of the I/O hierarchy, allowing for a full view of peripheral input and output and enhancing the forensics community's capabilities to analyze, obtain, and give evidentiary force to data.

Matthew Gerber; John Leeson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

308

Commercially Valuable Smart Grid Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 4, 2010 1 February 4, 2010 1 Commercially Valuable Smart Grid Data Commercially Valuable Smart Grid Data Question: What is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) approach for ensuring confidentiality of information that contains confidential and/or proprietary information that recipients are required to submit in carrying out their Metrics and Benefits Reporting Plan obligations? Answer: DOE does not anticipate requiring delivery of any "proprietary" information, i.e., confidential information developed at private expense outside the DOE grant. For data developed under a SGIG grant, DOE has the right to obtain and publish such data. However, certain "commercially valuable data" as set forth in more detail below, may be protected from publication.

309

Innovative technical advances in the application of regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect

Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers (RTOs) have been applied in industry for over twenty (20) years to reduce the emissions of Volatile Organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere from industrial process emissions. The Clean Air Act and its amendments have established a regulatory framework setting standards for allowable levels of VOC emissions. Several forces are driving the increasing use and acceptance of this technology: (1) High efficiency and increasing stringent standards require higher destruction efficiency; (2) Low operating cost and control of emission streams with less VOCs (therefore, less fuel value) causing higher use of natural gas for combustion; (3) Low NO{sub x}--the overlapping concern of NO{sub x} generation from the combustion process; (4) Low process upsets with improved productivity of industrial process require continuous integration of VOC abatement equipment; and (5) Reduced capital cost--capital cost criteria is $/ton of VOC abated. The latest development in RTO technology is the Single Can Oxidizer (SCO). This regenerative thermal oxidizer is the accumulation of developments in many subsystems of RTOs, combined with a dramatic new configuration. Several features of the system offer unique benefits to industrial end users: (1) Single can configuration gives reduced weight, material usage, and cost; (2) Rotary valve design gives smooth operation, and low pressure fluctuations; (3) Structured block heat recovery media reduces pressure drop, and lowers HP/operating cost; and (4) SMART system lowers NO{sub x} output/reduced operation cost. This paper will present a discussion of the features listed above. In addition, it will provide analytical documentation of test results for a full scale commercial unit.

Grzanka, R.; Truppi, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System April 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial enhanced geothermal system (EGS) project to supply electricity to the grid. Based in Churchill County, Nevada, Ormat Technologies' Desert Peak 2 EGS project has increased power output of its nearby operating geothermal field by nearly 38 percent - providing an additional 1.7 megawatts of power to the grid and validating this emerging clean energy technology. "Developing America's vast renewable energy resources sustainably is an

311

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plumbing Products Test Procedure Plumbing Products Test Procedure Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy has proposed to update its test procedures for showerheads, faucets, water closets, urinals,and commercial prerinse spray valves, collectively known as plumbing products. This activity is mandated by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 2007 (EPCA). Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a final rule regarding test procedures for showerheads, faucets, water closets, urinals, and commercial prerinse spray valves. 78 FR 62970 (October 23, 2013). Public Meeting Information

312

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet summarizing the Building Technologies Program's commercial building energy asset score program

313

Today in Energy - commercial consumption & efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends.

2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy from the Oceans: A Small Land Based Ocean Thermal Energy Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a small land based closed cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Plant which is being designed ... aquaculture facility and to produce a net electric power output of up to 300 kW. In...

Dr. F. A. Johnson

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies depending on utility Program Info Start Date Varies Expiration Date Varies State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on utility Provider Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company Certain municipal utilities in Massachusetts, in cooperation with

316

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: See program web site Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.06/kWh/yr saved CFL Bulbs: $1 - $5 CFL Fixtures: $22/fixture High Performance T8 Lighting Retrofit: $4-$20/fixture retrofit

317

Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Retrofit Lighting: $3 - $400 per unit New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50 per unit Provider Flathead Electric Cooperative Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program and a new

318

An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

Ubaidillah Zuhdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Handbook providing practical information to help regulators decide if they want to use output-based regulations and explains how to develop an output-based emission standard

320

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh* , Arindam Basu , Keck-Voon Ling* and Vincent J. Mooney III*$§ Email: anshul.singh@research.iiit.ac.in, {arindam.basu, ekvling}@ntu, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore * NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied

Mooney, Vincent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

322

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zurich Laboratory ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: boelcskei@nari.ee.ethz.ch Abstract--Soft-input soft, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: studer@iis.ee.ethz.ch Helmut Bölcskei Communication Technology

323

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

324

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

325

The NASA Food Commercial Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NASA Food Technology Commercial Space Center and How Your Company Can Participate space in a range of food development projects. For more information about NASA FTCSC or to arrange a presentation about the NASA FTCSC program, contact Dr. Anthony L. Pometto III Director NASA Food Technology

Lin, Zhiqun

326

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boilers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

327

Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including commercial fryers, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

328

Covered Product Category: Commercial Dishwashers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial dishwashers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

329

International Commercial Vehicle Technology Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cluster (CVC), the Fraunhofer Innovations Cluster for Digital Commercial Vehicle Technology (DNT Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster DNT/FUMI, Fraunhofer ITWM Opening of exhibition and come together WEDNESDAY, 12 innovation projects between the industry and the scientific fraternity. A network like the CVA works like

Steidl, Gabriele

330

REPORT OF THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY GALVESTON, TEXAS FISCAL YEAR, GALVESTON, TEXAS Fiscal Year 1967 Milton J. Lindner, Director Robert E. Stevenson, Assistant Director Contribution No. Z6l, Bureau of Connmercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory, Galveston, Texas Circular 295

331

Commercial Equipment Testing Enforcement Policies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In an exercise of its enforcement discretion, under specific conditions, DOE will not perform assessment testing, verification testing, or enforcement testing on units of certain types of commercial equipment if the manufacturer distributes in commerce an otherwise identical unit that does not have that feature.

332

Thermal power plant efficiency enhancement with Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In addition to greenhouse gas emissions, coastal thermal power plants would gain further opposition due to their heat rejection distressing the local ecosystem. Therefore, these plants need to enhance their thermal efficiency while reducing their environmental offense. In this study, a hybrid plant based on the principle of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion was coupled to a 740MW coal-fired power plant project located at latitude 28S where the surface to deepwater temperature difference would not suffice for regular OTEC plants. This paper presents the thermodynamical model to assess the overall efficiency gained by adopting an ammonia Rankine cycle plus a desalinating unit, heated by the power plant condenser discharge and refrigerated by cold deep seawater. The simulation allowed us to optimize a system that would finally enhance the plant power output by 2537MW, depending on the season, without added emissions while reducing dramatically the water temperature at discharge and also desalinating up to 5.8 million tons per year. The supplemental equipment was sized and the specific emissions reduction was estimated. We believe that this approach would improve the acceptability of thermal and nuclear power plant projects regardless of the plant location.

Rodrigo Soto; Julio Vergara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solar Thermal Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Incentive Program Thermal Incentive Program Solar Thermal Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: $4,000 per site/meter Non-residential: $25,000 per site/meter Incentive also capped at 80% of calculated existing thermal load Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge Start Date 12/10/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1.50 per kWh displaced annually, for displacement of up to 80% of calculated existing thermal load Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

334

A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier  

SciTech Connect

The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heatthe boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermal and electrostrictive expansion characteristics of MLC (Multilayer Ceramic) capacitors  

SciTech Connect

We have measured by strain gauge technique, in-plane thermal expansivity (coefficient of thermal expansion) as a function of temperature and electrostrictive expansion as a function of applied DC voltage for ceramic capacitors with X7R, NPO and N1500 dielectrics. Multilayer Ceramic (MLC) capacitor materials from two commercial suppliers were evaluated. Thermal expansivities of these materials were compared to polyimide-quartz boards and alumina ceramic substrates. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Chanchani, R.; Hall, C.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of a commercial photovoltaic concentrator module  

SciTech Connect

The ojective of this work was to develop the design and prototype of a commercial high-concentration photovoltaic (PV) module. The design is for a 282-sun point-focus concentrating module. Most of the components, subassemblies, and design features incorporate simplifications and ease of manufacturing. The Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) module is designed to incorporate high-efficiency, single-crystal silicon PV cells. The housing is made with aluminum laminated for voltage stand-off and simultaneously providing high thermal conductivity. The Fresnel lens injection molded by American Optical (AO) as singles. The cell assembly consists of a copper heat spreader, a photovoltaic cell soldered, a top and bottom contact, and a reflective secondary optical element (SOE). The cell assemblies passed all of the initial electrical characterization and high-potential tests. Under environmental cycling, the only bond that failed was the PV cell-to-heat spreader interface. The other components (top contact, bottom contact, SOE) passed all the environmental cycling tests. The cell assemblies were designed to be mounted onto the receiver section with a thermally conductive RTV. This geometry was subjected to environmental testing. There was no delamination of this bond nor was there electrical breakdown when the assemblies were subjected to the hi-pot test. A mock module was fabricated for environmental evaluation. This module was subjected to the humidity/freeze cycling to assess the performance of the lens mounting design. This module was also subjected to the rain test after the humidity/freeze cycling and checked for water leaks. The lens showed small displacement from its original position after the environmental cycling. One tablespoon of water did collect inside the module.

Saifee, S.T.; Hutchison, G. [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

340

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clothes Washers Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential clothes washers since 1988. Residential clothes washers use a water solution of soap and/or detergent and mechanical agitation or other movement to clean clothes. These include automatic, semi-automatic, and "other" clothes washers (known collectively as "clothes washer products"). This category does not include commercial clothes washers used in commercial settings, multifamily housing, or coin laundries. Standards put in place in 1994, 2004, and 2007 will save approximately 16.4 quads of energy and result in approximately $346.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2036. The standards will avoid about 870.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 170.6 million automobiles.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps. HID lamps are electric discharge lamps and include high-pressure sodium, mercury vapor, and metal halide lamps. HID lamps require an HID ballast to start and regulate electric current flow through the lamp. HID lamps are used in street and roadway lighting, area lighting such as for parking lots and plazas, industrial and commercial building interior lighting, security lighting for commercial, industrial, and residential spaces, and landscape lighting. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Energy Conservation Standard and Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Test Procedures.

342

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards for single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps as a separate equipment class since 2008. Before 2010, this equipment was regulated under the broader scope of commercial air conditioning and heating equipment. Single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps are commercial air conditioning and heating equipment with its main components arranged in a vertical fashion. They are mainly used in modular classrooms, modular office buildings, telecom shelters, and hotels, and are typically installed on the outside of an exterior wall or in a closet against an exterior wall but inside the building.

343

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

SciTech Connect

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Clock-controlled generators with large period output sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clock-controlled generators are a kind of pseudo-random number generators (PRNG). Recently, some clock-controlled generators based on jumping Linear Finite State Machines (LFSMs) have been proposed, such as Pomaranch and MICKEY. The period and the linear complexity of their output sequences need to be large enough to provide security against linear attacks. In this paper, a new condition for the period to reach its maximal value is presented. The condition is better than the previous one. Further, some clock-controlled generators are considered, including a new generator which uses a Feedback with Carry Shift Register (FCSR) as the control register. How to maximise the period of their output sequences is investigated.

Zhiqiang Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

346

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $10,000 per account, not to exceed 20% of cost Scroll Refrigeration Compressors: $500 Variable Speed/Frequency Drive Motor: $500 Variable Speed Compressed Air Motor: $500 Energy Audit: One in Five Years Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free General Lighting: $1 - $15/unit LED Lamps: $2/bulb

347

Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Rebates exceeding $5,000 require pre-approval by BED prior to purchase Buildings exceeding 10,000 square feet must consult BED regarding rebates prior to purchase Program Info State Vermont Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See Program Website HVAC Air Conditioners/Heat Pumps: $50 - $100/ton Integrated Dual Enthalpy Economizer Controls: $250/controlled unit Ventilation Fans: $35 - $60

348

Roseville Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Roseville Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 6/30/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Unitary AC/Heat Pump: $120/ton or $500/ton Package Terminal AC/Heat Pumps: $125/unit Variable Frequency Drive: $120/hp Variable Speed Motor: $75/hp Window Film: $4/sq ft Shade Tree: $30/tree Desktop Computer Network Controller: $10/computer Cold Cathode Lamps: $4/lamp Ceramic Metal Halide: $20/lamp

349

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives: amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1 year simple payback Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Retrofits and Engineering Studies: 50% of project cost Fluorescent Lighting: $10-$50 High Bay: $70 or $100 (retrofit) Metal Halide: $50 or $70 LED Exit Signs: $12 LED Traffic Signals: $50

350

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

351

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 (existing facilities); $250,000 (new construction) Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Traps: $2500 Programmable Thermostats: up to five units Boiler Reset Controls: up to two units Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount

352

Control of XeF laser output by pulse injecton  

SciTech Connect

Injection locking is investigated as a means for control of optical pulse duration and polarization in a XeF laser. Intense short-pulse generation in the ultraviolet is achieved by injection of a low-level 1-ns optical pulse into a XeF oscillator. Control of laser output polarization by injection locking is demonstrated and studied as a function of injected signal level. Enhancement of XeF electric-discharge laser efficiency by injection pulse ''priming'' is observed.

Pacala, T.J.; Christensen, C.P.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Dominion Virginia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dominion Virginia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Dominion Virginia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Dominion Virginia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Expiration Date March 31, 2013 State Virginia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Energy Audit/Incentives: Up to $4,000 Duct Testing/Sealing: $90/ton (20 tons or less) Duct Testing/Sealing: $75/ton (21 tons or more) Dominion Virginia Power provides a number of rebates to customers for the installation of energy efficient equipment and measures.

355

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or combined heat and power (CHP) in commercial buildings anda renewable energy source or CHP system at the commercialPV at (GW) microgrids adopted CHP and (GW) DG at microgrids

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Non -commercial License 1. INTENT/PURPOSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

licensee to commercialize the software or any derivative work of the software. 8. FEE/ROYALTY Licensee pays no royalty for non-commercial license Licensee and any third parties must enter a new agreement

Barthe, Loïc

357

Sol-gel process set for commercialization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sol-gel process set for commercialization ... Research on embedding chemical compounds in porous glass, carried out in Israel at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has reached the point of commercialization. ...

JAMES KRIEGER

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Commercial Cooler: Order (2013-CE-5343)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Commercial Cooler, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Commercial Cooler had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

359

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ice Machines Ice Machines Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines October 8, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis Vary capacity size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Ice Cube Machine Ice Making Head Self-Contained Remote Condensing Unit Ice Making Head Type of Condenser Air Cooled Water Cooled Air Cooled Ice Harvest Rate (lbs. ice per 24 hrs.) lbs. per 24 hrs. 500 lbs. per 24 hrs. Energy Consumption (per 100 lbs. of ice) kWh 5.5 kWh Quantity of ice machines to be purchased 1 Energy Cost $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh Annual Hours of Operation hrs. 3000 hrs. Calculate Reset OUTPUT SECTION Performance per Ice Cube Machine Your

360

Generating random thermal momenta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation of random thermal particle momenta is a basic task in many problems, such as microscopic studies of equilibrium and transport properties of systems, or the conversion of a fluid to particles. In heavy-ion physics, the (in)efficiency of the algorithm matters particularly in hybrid hydrodynamics + hadronic transport calculations. With popular software packages, such as UrQMD 3.3p1 or THERMINATOR, it can still take ten hours to generate particles for a single Pb+Pb "event" at the LHC from fluid dynamics output. Below I describe reasonably efficient simple algorithms using the MPC package, which should help speed momentum generation up by at least one order of magnitude. It is likely that this wheel has been reinvented many times instead of reuse, so there may very well exist older and/or better algorithms that I am not aware of (MPC has been around only since 2000). The main goal here is to encourage practitioners to use available efficient routines, and offer a few practical solutions.

Denes Molnar

2012-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE commercial building energy asset rating program information presented to stakeholders at the workshop held in Washington, DC, December 2011

362

Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

than 4 units) *Condominiums *Apartment complexes Commercial *Office buildings *Malls *Gas stations *Restaurants Industrial *Factories *Warehouses *Computer chip manufacturers...

363

ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies ITP Industrial Materials: Development and...

364

Commercial Cooking Equipment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooking Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCommercialCookingEquipment&oldid38063...

365

Technology Development and Commercialization | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Technology Fact Sheets Synthesizing Pharmaceuticals Using Containerless Processing Commercialization target set for larger, more precise photodetectors to aid science,...

366

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

367

Commercial Building Research and Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Research and Development Commercial Building Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows,

368

Uranium mononitride as a potential commercial LWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluated uranium mononitride (UN) as a potential replacement for 5% enriched UO{sub 2} fuel in Generation III and III+ commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Significant improvement in LWR performance depends on developing and implementing changes in the nuclear fuel used in these reactors. Compared to UO{sub 2}, UN offers several advantages such as higher uranium loading and better thermal conductivity. In this paper, the thermal safety margin of UN was evaluated at both normal and accident conditions using a readily available coupled CFD model developed for the US DOE CASL program. One of the prime technical challenges in utilization of UN as LWR fuel is the water compatibility because pure phase UN is not stable in water at 350 deg. C. The water corrosion resistance of UN and the corrosion mechanism were reviewed and mitigation methods were proposed. (authors)

Xu, P.; Yan, J.; Lahoda, E. J.; Ray, S. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, 5801 Bluff Rd, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Commercial Mobile Radio Service (WRI CMRS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Mobile Radio Service (WRI ­ CMRS) Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor · Improved safety of CMVs and their operation · Reductions in accidents · Increased productivity and mobility · CMRS ­ Commercial Mobile Radio Services · Includes telematics devices (such as electronic on

370

Solar Congeneration for Commercial Rooftops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Cogeneration for Commercial Rooftops Arun Gupta, PhD agupta@skyentechnologies.com ESL-KT-13-12-36 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Introduction What is Solar Cogeneration? ? Fun fact...: Typical photovoltaic (PV) solar panels waste roughly 85% of their energy as heat ? Q: Why not capture that heat and use it to heat water? What is Concentrating Solar? ? Using mirrors or lenses to concentrate sunlight ? Why? Less PV material, higher...

Gupta, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

SOLAR MODELLING OF COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Robert Amor, Michael Donn and Ian van der Werff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR MODELLING OF COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Robert Amor, Michael Donn and Ian van der Werff Energy of modelling the thermal response of buildings. There have been two major obstacles precluding these programs an additional obstacle in the lack of comprehensive weather data files (containing the information required

Amor, Robert

372

Operating Experience and Economic Assessment of Commercial and Industrial Cool Storage Systems - TVA Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage systems offer utilities a means to change the energy use patterns of both residential and commercial and industrial (C&I) customers by moving water-heating and space-conditioning loads from peak to offpeak periods. Benefits from...

Sieber, R. E.; Dahmus, A. B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

NCPART: management of ICEMDDN output for numerical control users  

SciTech Connect

NCPART is a procedure developed by the Numerical Control Department at Bendix Kansas City Division to handle the entry to and exit from ICEMDDN, and process all of the local files output by ICEMDDN. The NCPART procedure is menu driven, and provides automatic access to ICEMDDN and any files necessary to process information with ICEM for numerical Control users. Basically, the procedure handles all of the ICEMDDN operations that involve operating system commands, and frees the NC programmer to concentrate on his/her work as a programmer.

Rossini, B.F.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Waveguide submillimetre laser with a uniform output beam  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing non-Gaussian light beams with a uniform intensity profile is described. The method is based on the use of a combined waveguide quasi-optical resonator containing a generalised confocal resonator with an inhomogeneous mirror with absorbing inhomogeneities discretely located on its surface and a hollow dielectric waveguide whose size satisfies the conditions of self-imaging of a uniform field in it. The existence of quasi-homogeneous beams at the output of an optically pumped 0.1188-mm waveguide CH{sub 3}OH laser with a amplitude-stepped mirror is confirmed theoretically and experimentally. (lasers)

Volodenko, A V; Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Topkov, A N [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv (Ukraine)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Progress Energy Carolinas - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Program Energy Efficiency Program Progress Energy Carolinas - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: 75% of the incremental measure costs Technical Efficiency Studies: 50% of cost up to $10,000-$20,000 Design Incentive (New Construction): $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 1/1/2013 State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.08 per kW hour saved annually CFL Lamps (Retrofit Only): $1.50

376

Research and Commercialization Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Commercialization Grants Research and Commercialization Grants Research and Commercialization Grants < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Schools Institutional Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1999 State Montana Program Type Grant Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Board of Research and Commercialization Technology provides grants for renewable resource research and development projects, among other types, to

377

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

378

Commercial Reference Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings » Research Projects » Commercial Reference Buildings » Research Projects » Commercial Reference Buildings Commercial Reference Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories, developed commercial reference buildings, formerly known as commercial building benchmark models. These reference buildings play a critical role in the program's energy modeling software research by providing complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. There are 16 building types that represent approximately 70% of the commercial buildings in the U.S., according to the report published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory titled U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock. These

379

Consumers Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumers Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Consumers Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Consumers Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Other Construction Commercial Weatherization Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Prescriptive: $100,000 per facility Custom: 50% of project cost and $200,000 per facility (100% of the calculated incentive up to $100,000 and 50% of the calculated incentive above $100,000) Large Gas Customer Incentive Limit: $25,000 Customer Incentive Limit: $500,000

380

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

A miniature shock-activated thermal battery for munitions applications  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a small, fast-rise thermal battery for non-spinning munitions applications was examined by studying the response of conventional thermal cells to impact (mechanical) energy to simulate a setback environment. This is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated that shock activation could be used to produce power from a conventional thermal-battery cell. The results of tests with both single and multiple cells are presented, along with data for a 5-cell miniature (5-mm diameter) thermal battery. The issues needing to be resolved before such a device can become a commercial reality are also discussed.

Guidotti, R.A.; Kirby, D.L.; Reinhardt, F.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY...

384

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Two case studies for commercial vehicle...

385

Clean Energy Finance Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide to Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer...

386

Guide to Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12: Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer...

387

Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer An overview of Commercial PACE programs, featuring an explanation of...

388

Transforming Commercial Building Operations - 2013 BTO Peer Review...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations - 2013 BTO Peer Review Transforming Commercial Building Operations - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Project for...

389

Definition: Thermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Thermal energy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal energy The kinetic energy associated with the random motions of the molecules of a material or object; often used interchangeably with the terms heat and heat energy. Measured in joules, calories, or Btu.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Thermal energy is the part of the total potential energy and kinetic energy of an object or sample of matter that results in the system temperature. It is represented by the variable Q, and can be measured in Joules. This quantity may be difficult to determine or even meaningless unless the system has attained its temperature only through warming (heating), and not been subjected to work input or output, or any other

390

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential room air conditioners since 1987. Residential room air conditioners are mounted in windows or through walls and deliver conditioned air to enclosed spaces. Room air conditioners typically extract heat from the room and vent it outdoors. These products are offered in a broad range of sizes and configurations. They are used in homes, apartments, and commercial settings. The standard implemented in 1990 will save approximately 0.7 quads of energy and result in approximately $8 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1990-2019. The standard will avoid about 41.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 8.1 million automobiles.

391

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Showerheads Showerheads Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of showerheads since 1992. A showerhead is a perforated nozzle that distributes water over a large solid angle at point of use, generally overhead of the bather. They are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 6 quads of energy and result in approximately $120 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 329.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 64.5 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

392

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternate Rating Methods Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternate Rating Methods Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to revise and expand its existing regulations governing the use of alternative efficiency determination methods (AEDM) and alternate rating methods (ARM) for covered products as alternatives to testing for the purpose of certifying compliance. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a final rule revising its existing regulations governing the use of particular methods as alternatives to testing for commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration equipment. 78 FR 79579 (December 31, 2013).

393

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Closets (Flush Toilets) Water Closets (Flush Toilets) Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of water closets (flush toilets) since 1992. Water closets (flush toilets) dispose of human waste by using water to flush it through a drainpipe to another location. The current standard will result in approximately $132.2 billion in savings for products shipped from 2007-2026. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a final rule regarding test procedures for showerheads, faucets, water closets, urinals, and commercial prerinse spray valves. 78 FR 62970 (October 23, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking page.

394

commercial building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description Source EERE Date Released September 27th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated September 27th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords buildings commercial building DOE energy use Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon New construction (xlsx, 391.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Post-1980 construction (in or after 1980) (xlsx, 391.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Pre-1980 construction (xlsx, 367.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

395

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illuminated Exit Signs Illuminated Exit Signs Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of illuminated exit signs since 2005. Illuminated exit signs are used to indicate exit doors in schools, hospitals, libraries, government buildings, and commercial buildings of all kinds, including offices, restaurants, stores, auditoriums, stadiums, and movie theatres. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates There are no recent updates for this equipment. Standards for Illuminated Exit Signs The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for illuminated exit signs. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

396

SF6432-CS Commercial Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/31/13 7/31/13 Page 1 of 18 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CS (07/2013) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT BANKRUPTCY CANCELLATION OR TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE CHANGES COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS DEFINITIONS DISPUTES EXCUSABLE DELAYS EXPORT CONTROL ORDER OF PRECEDENCE PAYMENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PROGRAM

397

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faucets Faucets Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of faucets since 1992. This standard covers kitchen faucets and kitchen replacement aerators, lavatory faucets and lavatory replacement aerators, and metering faucets. These faucets are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 0.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $25.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 49.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 9.6 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

398

FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR THERMAL DISTRIBUTION STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

This report details development paths for advanced versions of ASHRAE Standard 152, Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Efficiency. During the course of conversations within the ASHRAE committee responsible for developing the standard (SPC152P), three areas of development for Standard 152 were proposed: (1) extend the scope of the standard to include thermal comfort variables; (2) extend the scope of the standard to include small commercial buildings; and (3) improve the existing standard with respect to accuracy and economy of effort. Research needs associated with each of the three options are identified.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

21 - Thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power (CSP) technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The option to supply electricity on demand is a key advantage of solar thermal power plants with integrated thermal storage. Diurnal storage systems providing thermal power in the multi-MW range for several hours are required here, the temperature range being between 250C and 700C. This chapter describes the state of the art in commercial storage systems used in solar thermal power generation. An overview of alternative and innovative storage concepts for this application area is given.

W.-D. Steinmann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ABSTRACT Establishing an Energy Efficiency Recommendation for Commercial Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To assist the federal government in meeting its energy reduction goals, President Clintons Executive Order 12902 established the Procurement Challenge, which directed all federal agencies to purchase equipment within the top 25 ~ percentile of efficiency. Under the direction of DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Procurement Challenges goal is to create efficiency recommendations for all energy-using products (e.g. commercial boilers, chillers, motors) that could substantially impact the governments energy reduction goals. When establishing efficiency recommendations, FEMP looks at standardized performance ratings for products sold in the U.S. marketplace. Currently, the commercial boiler industry uses combustion efficiency and, sometimes, thermal efficiency as metrics when specifying boiler performance. For many years, the industry has used both metrics interchangeably, causing confusion in the market place about boiler performance. This paper discusses the method used to establish FEMPs efficiency recommendation for commercial boilers in lieu of the various, and somewhat confusing, efficiency ratings currently available. The paper also discusses potential energy cost savings for federal agencies that improve the efficiency of boilers specified and purchased.

Michelle J. Ware

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Inflation uncertainty, growth uncertainty, oil prices, and output growth in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the transmission and response of inflation uncertainty and output uncertainty on inflation and output growth in the UK using a bi-variate EGARCH model. Results suggest that inflation uncertain...

Ramprasad Bhar; Girijasankar Mallik

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $2,000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: $300 per kW saved LED Exit Signs: $12 Occupancy Sensors: $20 - $40 Air Conditioning Systems: $20 - $40 per ton Air-Source Heat Pumps: $65 - $150 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $150 per ton Chillers: $3,000 - $4,000, depending on size Chilled Water Resets: $350 - $900, depending on type and size

404

Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Expiration Date Installation must be made within one year of the preliminary approval date State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 20-29 kW saved: $75/kW new; $150/kW retrofit 30-39 kW saved: $100/kW new; $200/kW retrofit 40-49 kW saved: $125/kW new; $250/kW retrofit 50 or more kW saved: $150/kW new; $300/kW retrofit Provider Conservation Section For existing and new commercial construction, Pedernales Electric Cooperative provides incentives for kW saved through efficient lighting.

405

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

406

Western Massachusetts Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Massachusetts Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Western Massachusetts Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates Western Massachusetts Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Pre-approval required for rebates greater than $5,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Small Business Program: up to 70% of cost, zero percent financing on remainder Custom: based on energy savings Retrofit Pay-for-Performance Incentive: $0.75/kWh or therm saved Lighting: Varies, see program web site Vending Machine Controls: $45 - $115 Variable Speed Drive (Retrofit): $2,550 - $10,500

407

NYSEG (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program NYSEG (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate No maximum per customer rebate; however, NYSEG/RG&E reserve the right to cap the rebate to any one customer. Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting, HVAC: Prescriptive incentives vary A/C or Heat Pump A/C or Heat Pump > 63 tons: $25/ton + $5/ton for each 0.1 EER above 9.7 Water Cooled Chillers: $6/ton or $15/ton + $2-$8/ton for each 0.01 kW/ton

408

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

409

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

410

Quantum teleportation scheme by selecting one of multiple output ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scheme of quantum teleportation, where Bob has multiple (N) output ports and obtains the teleported state by simply selecting one of the N ports, is thoroughly studied. We consider both deterministic version and probabilistic version of the teleportation scheme aiming to teleport an unknown state of a qubit. Moreover, we consider two cases for each version: (i) the state employed for the teleportation is fixed to a maximally entangled state, and (ii) the state is also optimized as well as Alice's measurement. We analytically determine the optimal protocols for all the four cases, and show the corresponding optimal fidelity or optimal success probability. All these protocols can achieve the perfect teleportation in the asymptotic limit of $N\\to\\infty$. The entanglement properties of the teleportation scheme are also discussed.

Satoshi Ishizaka; Tohya Hiroshima

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms Sairaj to the power output of a wind farm while factoring in the availability of the wind turbines in the farm availability model for the wind turbines, we propose a method to determine the wind-farm power output pdf

Liberzon, Daniel

412

Linear model-based estimation of blood pressure and cardiac output for Normal and Paranoid cases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Provisioning a generic simple linear mathematical model for Paranoid and Healthy cases leading to auxiliary investigation of the neuroleptic drugs effect imposed on cardiac output (CO) and blood pressure (BP). Multi-input single output system identification ... Keywords: Blood pressure, Cardiac output, Heart rate, MISO transfer function, Stroke volume, System identification

Mohamed Abdelkader Aboamer, Ahmad Taher Azar, Khaled Wahba, Abdallah S. Mohamed

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

414

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9 hour CHP heat solar thermal thermal storage Fig. 3. Lowis replaced by storage and solar thermal collection, but thesolar thermal absorption chiller electrical storage fixed

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling SoftwareCommercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software ETCommercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling

Jump, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assessment of Energy Impact of Window Technologies for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average commercial buildings site energy usage of 91 kBtu/commercial buildings, even though the average Energy Usage

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Commercial Building Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Activities Building Activities Commercial Building Activities The Building Technologies Office commercial buildings effort researches and deploys advanced technologies and systems to reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions to accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's key projects. 179d Tax Calculator The 179d Calculator can help determine whether improvements qualify for a Federal tax deduction, and allows owners and managers to estimate energy cost savings of efficiency improvements. Advanced Energy Design Guides These recommendations can help designers achieve between 30% and 50% energy savings in a new commercial building.

419

Sandia National Laboratories: commercializing algae biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commercializing algae biofuels The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University On July 25, 2013, in Biofuels, Energy, News, News...

420

Kenergy- Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kenergy offers commercial and industrial customers rebates for energy-efficient lighting and other energy efficient improvements. Customers can receive rebates of $350 per kilowatt of energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technology Commercialization and Business Innovation | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

commercialization and business innovation funding programs: SunShot Incubator Program Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIRSTTR)....

422

Piedmont Natural Gas- Commercial Equipment Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates to commercial customers for purchasing and installing high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters. Customers on the 202-Small General Service Standard...

423

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1995 - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

>Commercial Buildings Home > 1995 Characteristics Data 1995 Data Executive Summary Table of Contents Overview to Detailed Tables Detailed Tables 1995 national and Census region...

424

Enforcement Policy Statement: Commercial HVAC Equipment  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

policy statements regarding Departmental testing of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps subject to test procedures and energy conservation standards found at 10 C.F.R....

425

Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation Distributed Bio-Oil...

426

Sharyland Utilities- Commercial Standard Offer Program (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sharyland Utilities offers its Commercial Standard Offer Program to encourage business customers of all sizes to pursue energy efficiency measures in their facilities. Incentives are paid directly...

427

KIUC- Energy Wise Commercial Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kauai Island Utility Cooperative, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers incentives to its commercial customers for installing energy efficient equipment. The eligible replacements are identified...

428

Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial refrigerators and freezers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

429

Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy cost with an average commercial electric steam cooker life of 12 years. Future electricity price trends and a 3% discount rate are based on Federal guidelines (NISTIR...

430

Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial steam cookers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

431

Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

commercial kitchen equipment. In the Federal sector, these products are typically used in food service operations like cafeterias in GSA buildings, kitchens in penitentiaries, and...

432

Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies: Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction system...

433

Black Hills Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Black Hills Power provides rebates for its commercial customers who install energy efficient heat pumps, motors, variable frequency drives, lighting, and water heaters. Custom rebates for approved...

434

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

435

Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian Fuel Cell...

436

Lab grants Decision Sciences Corporation exclusive commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exclusive commercial license for muon tomography Muon tomography uses naturally occurring cosmic-ray muons to detect and identify concealed nuclear threat materials based on...

437

Top Resources | Commercial Buildings Resource Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commissioning can greatly improve the quality and energy efficiency of commercial refrigeration systems. This guide provides... How-To Guide Download Read more Download...

438

Commercial Building Demonstration and Deployment Overview - 2014...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Demonstration and Deployment Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Commercial Building Demonstration and Deployment Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presentation: Kristen Taddonio, U.S....

439

Commercial Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heaters Commercial Water Heaters Standardized DOE Testing Templates commercialwaterheater v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers...

440

Commercial Buildings Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

cover key market sectors: retail, food service, commercial real estate, hospitality, health care, higher education, and state and local building owners and managers. Learn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Vermont Gas- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Vermont Gas (VGS) offers two energy efficiency programs for commercial customers: the WorkPlace New Construction Program and the WorkPlace Equipment Replacement and Retrofit Program.

442

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

443

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Emitting Diode Lamps Light Emitting Diode Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for light emitting diode (LED) lamps.LED lamps are comprised of an LED source, such as LED packages or LED arrays; an LED driver; an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard base, and other optical, thermal, mechanical, and electrical components. These LED lamps are primarily used in residential applications as replacement lamps. The Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct an analysis of the energy, emissions, and costs associated with LEDs during any future energy conservation standard rulemakings. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Light-Emitting Diode Lamps Test Procedure.

444

Commercialization of New Carbon Fiber Materials Based on Sustainable Resources for Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and GrafTech International have collaborated to develop and demonstrate the performance of high temperature thermal insulation prototypes made from lignin-based carbon fibers. This project will potentially lead to the first commercial application of lignin-based carbon fibers (LBCF). The goal of the commercial application is to replace expensive, Chinese-sourced isotropic pitch carbon fibers with lower cost carbon fibers made from a domestically sourced, bio-derived (renewable) feedstock. LBCF can help recapture jobs that were previously exported to China while resolving a supply chain vulnerability and reducing the production cost for GrafTech s high temperature thermal insulation. The performance of the LBCF prototypes was measured and found to be comparable to that of the current commercial product. During production of the insulation prototypes, ORNL and GrafTech demonstrated lignin compounding/pelletization, fiber production, heat treatment, and compositing at scales far surpassing those previously demonstrated in LBCF R&D or production. A plan was developed for the commercialization of LBCF thermal insulation, with key milestones including qualification of multiple scalable lignin sources in 2013, tons-scale production and field testing by customers in 2014, and product launch as soon thereafter as production capabilities can be constructed and commissioned.

Eberle, Cliff [ORNL; Webb, Daniel C [ORNL; Albers, Tracy [GrafTech International; Chen, Chong [GrafTech International

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate None Program Info State Ohio Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Ohio Department of Taxation Ohio may provide a sales and use tax exemption for certain tangible personal property used in energy conversion, solid waste energy conversion, or thermal efficiency improvement facilities designed, constructed, or installed after December 31, 1974. Qualifying energy conversion facilities are those that are used for the

446

Thermally efficient compact fluorescent fixture systems  

SciTech Connect

Compact fluorescent lamps that can be inserted into conventional light fixtures are rapidly gaining acceptance as both a viable retrofit and new design approach to reducing lighting loads. Ideally, the compact fluorescent lamp should have the same light output as the incandescent lamp it replaces, but overheating inside typically small enclosed fixtures can reduce lumen output and hence lighting fixture efficiency by 15 to 20 percent. Fortunately, simple fixture modifications can erase this efficiency penalty, so that the full efficiency benefit of replacing incandescent lamps with fluorescent lamps can be realized. The paper describes such modifications and presents experimental data documenting the potential efficiency enhancement associated with thermal control systems. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Packer, M.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed photovoltaic generation and energy storageenergy management in buildings and microgrids with e.g. installed Photovoltaic (energy storage, TS thermal storage, FB Flow Battery, AC Absorption Chiller, ST solar thermal system, PV photovoltaic.

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

449

COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

S.O. Bader

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

Commercial Reference Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Commercial Reference Buildings Jump to: navigation, search DOE developed Commercial Reference Buildings which provide descriptions for whole building analysis using EnergyPlus. There are 16 building types and three categories that apply to all building types. The commercial reference buildings were developed across 16 reference locations. Contents 1 Building Types 2 Construction Categories 3 Climate Zones Used to Create Reference Buildings 4 References Building Types DOE developed 16 Commercial Reference Building Types[1] , which represent approximately 70% of the commercial buildings in the U.S. [2]. Whole

451

Small Commercial Refrigeration Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Commercial Refrigeration Incentive Small Commercial Refrigeration Incentive Small Commercial Refrigeration Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Incentives over $5,000 must be pre-approved Program Info Funding Source Efficiency Vermont Public Benefit Fund Expiration Date 06/30/2013 State Vermont Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Outside Air Economizers: $1,250 Evaporator Fan Motors: $20 - $100 Evaporator Fan Motor Controls: $550 Door/Frame Heater Controls: $50 per door Case Light Occupancy Controls: $40 LED Refrigerator and Freezer Case Light Fixtures: $6 - $15 per foot Energy Star Ice Machines: $50 - $75 Efficient Compressors: $200 Display Case Strip-Curtain and Continuous Covers: $6 per foot

452

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database Research & Development Codes & Standards Popular Commercial Links

453

Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy Program Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate '''General Incentive Limits''' Commercial Industrial Lighting Retrofit: $100,000 per program year Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency: $100,000 per program year Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Industrial Lighting Retrofit Lighting Retrofit: $500/kW of peak-demand reduction

454

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

455

Solar Thermal/PV | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal/PV Thermal/PV Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

456

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Output, efficiency, emissions improved with Cat's 3500 series B engine  

SciTech Connect

Like most technologies, engine developments tend to follow evolutionary paths. And it's a given that the longer an engine's been around and the more successful it's been, the more likely it is that any changes made would be incremental. On the surface, such is the case with the Caterpillar 3500 Series B diesel engine, recently introduced in Europe and the United States. Based on the well-proven 3500 engine first introduced in 1980 and upgraded with a Phase II program five years later, most of the changes appear incremental. But taken as a whole, they provide a level of performance and durability that Caterpillar anticipates will make this engine an even stronger contender in power generation and marine applications for years to come. It's not hard to see why. Output has been increased between 17% and 30% on some models; fuel consumption is improved by as much as 15%; and with the new aftertreatment system introduced with the engines, emissions as low as 1.3 g/kWh NO[sub x] are said to be achieveable. This paper outlines the design, specifications, and highlights of the improvements in performance of these new engines. 3 figs.

Brezonick, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

INVESTIGATION OF LASER SUPPORTED DETONATION WAVES AND THERMAL COUPLING USING 2.8um HF LASER IRRADIATED METAL TARGETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATION OF LASER SUPPORTED DETONATION WAVES AND THERMAL COUPLING USING 2.8um HF LASER of Hull, Hull, HU6 7RX, England. Abstract.- The formation and propagation of laser supported detonation was obtained in a of laser supported detonation waves and thermal o. 300 nsec. pulse (FHHM). The laser output

Boyer, Edmond

459

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. 3 figs.

Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fundamental Research Needs in Combined Water and Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are presented. DOI: 10.1115/1.3008043 Keywords: thermal and water management, PEM fuel cell, cold-start, PEMFC as well as a low cost has yet to be achieved. This is essential before fuel cells can be commercialized Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Under Normal and Cold-Start Conditions Satish G. Kandlikar1 e-mail: sgkeme

Kandlikar, Satish

463

Commercialization and Licensing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Success Stories Success Stories Commercialization and Licensing Economic Development Industrial Partnerships Sponsored Research Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Success Stories | Commercialization and Licensing Success Stories Commercialization and Licensing 1-10 of 14 Results Prev 12 Next DNP Green Technology, Inc. Exclusively Licenses Patents Invented at Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory March 09, 2010 - On March 9, 2010, UT-Battelle, LLC, UChicago Argonne, LLC, and DNP Green Technology, INC fully executed an exclusive license agreement for patents invented solely by Argonne National Laboratory and jointly by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). GE-Reuter Stokes to Market SNS-Designed Electronics

464

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion and Commercial Applications 1 Dr. Ted Johnson Director of Alternative Energy Programs Development Lockheed Martin

465

Novel AC and DC Non-Thermal Plasma Sources for Cold Surface Treatment of Polymer Films and Fabrics at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel types of non-thermal plasma sources at atmospheric pressure based on multi-pin DC (direct ... ofdischarges mentioned and output energy characteristics of new plasma sources as well as data on after-...

Yuri Akishev; Michail Grushin; Anatoly Napartovich

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

467

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

468

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

469

El Paso Electric Company - Small Business and Commercial Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business and Commercial Program Small Business and Commercial Program El Paso Electric Company - Small Business and Commercial Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Large Commercial Solutions: $240/peak kW demand reduction Small Commercial Solutions: $400/kW demand reduction Provider El Paso Electric Company El Paso Electric (EPE) offers several incentive programs targeting small business owners as well as larger commercial and industrial EPE customers.

470

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

471

Entergy New Orleans - Small Commercial and Industrial Solutions Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy New Orleans - Small Commercial and Industrial Solutions Entergy New Orleans - Small Commercial and Industrial Solutions Program Entergy New Orleans - Small Commercial and Industrial Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $50,000 or full cost of upgrade Program Info Funding Source New Orleans City Council State Louisiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Small Commercial Solutions Efficiency Improvements: $0.125 per kWh saved Large Commercial and Industrial Solutions Lighting Improvements: $0.10 per

472

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Commercial About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database

473

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Commercial Vehicle Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement

474

Commercial Readiness of eSolar Next Generation Heliostat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract eSolar has been designing small heliostats since the company's founding in 2007. One of the cornerstones of our approach to heliostat design is to deploy many factory-built small heliostats in high density fields. The fields are replicated and thus aggregated into solar plants supporting steam and molten salt electric power, integrated solar combined cycle (ISCC), and process heat applications, such as enhanced oil recovery and desalination. The small heliostat approach has been used in several pilot projects and was previously evolved into a commercially available product presented in 2011 at SolarPACES. In this paper we discuss the ground up redesign of our small heliostat hardware, with a focus of leveraging the proven approach into a higher reliability, globally applicable, more industrial, simple to source and most importantly total installed cost reduced solar collector product. During the redesign we discovered methods to simplify the design and confirmed that small, factory-built, affordable heliostats provide a compelling concentrated solar thermal technology. We discuss details on system optimization, concept selection and prototype development, including some results from design validation testing. Finally, we discuss how this new solar collector system (SCS5) performs and meets economic requirements. eSolar's SCS5 product will be commercially released early in 2014, and is currently available to quote for CSP projects.

P. Ricklin; M. Slack; D. Rogers; R. Huibregtse

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

477

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stricker, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995 “A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures” The report can be downloaded in its entirety, or in sections (all in PDF format): Full report (includes all detailed tables; 402 pages, 5.7 MB) Contents: At A Glance (4 pages, 315 KB) Chapters 1 through 5 (61 pages, 363 KB) 1. Overview 2. Major Characteristics of Commercial Buildings 3. End Uses, Energy Sources, and Energy Consumption 4. End-Use Equipment and Energy Conservation 5. Detailed Tables (introductory text) How to Read the Tables Categories of Data in the Tables

479

Definition: Commercial Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loans Loans Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Commercial Loans Commercial loans are the traditional debt finance (senior debt) where the source of repayment for creditors is the sponsoring company, backed by its entire balance sheet and not by the project's cash flows alone. For balance sheet owned projects, creditors sill analyze a project loan based on its own merits, but will also take into consideration the financial health of the sponsor's balance sheet and will estimate the net effect of the new project on the overall financial structure of the organization. The two most common examples of commercial loans are construction and mortgage loans.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Commercial Lender Related Terms Loans, Financing References

480

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 2 Table 2. Photocopiers in Commercial Buildings, 1999 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Photocopiers (thousand) Photocopiers per Million Square Feet Photocopiers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657 67,338 81,852 4,934 73 60 Principal Building Activity Education 327 8,651 8,927 433 50 48 Food Sales 174 994 980 41 42 42 Food Service 349 1,851 4,031 Q Q 26 Health Care 127 2,918 6,219 401 138 65 Inpatient 11 1,865 3,350 187 100 56 Outpatient 116 1,053 2,869 214 204 75 Lodging 153 4,521 2,356 78 17 33 Mercantile 667 10,398 11,384 526 51 46

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agreements for Commercializing Technology Agreements for Commercializing Technology NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a partner seeks highly-specialized or technical services to complete a project. An ACT agreement also authorizes participating contractor-operated DOE laboratories, such as NREL, to partner with businesses using more flexible terms that are aligned with industry practice. The agreement type used depends on the business, and the specific partnership selected is determined on a case-by-case basis. Benefits The benefits of Agreements for Commercializing Technology include: Intellectual Property Rights. ACT provides a more flexible framework for negotiation of intellectual property rights to facilitate moving technology from the laboratory to the marketplace as quickly as possible.

482

Commercial Building National Accounts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Building National Accounts Commercial Building National Accounts Jump to: navigation, search National Accounts is part of DOE's Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative (CBI), which was mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA enabled DOE to bring together parties from the private sector, DOE national labs, other federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations to advance research into low- and zero-net-energy buildings. CBI's goal is to develop market-ready, net zero-energy commercial buildings by 2025. A net zero-energy building makes as much energy as it uses over a year[1] [2]. As of 2009, estimates indicated that retail and office buildings consume 18 percent of the nation's total energy and half of nation's overall building energy (including homes, schools, and other structures). The program

483

Commercialization of germanium based nanocrystal memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the commercialization of germanium-based nanocrystal memories. Demand for smaller and faster electronics and embedded systems supports the development of high-density, low-power non-volatile electronic ...

Seow, Kian Chiew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Education Project  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this grant is to educate the public about carbon emissions and the energy-saving and job-related benefits of commercial building energy efficiency. investments in Illinois.

None

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

485

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

486

Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towers....................................................................... 9 Dish/Engine Systems, and dish/engine. Parabolic troughs are the most commercially available technology. Linear Fresnel and power Rankine steam cycles, similar to those used for coal and nuclear plants. Steam cycle power plants require

Laughlin, Robert B.

487

Commercial Solar Hot Water Financing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and Paradigm Partners are offering a solar hot water financing program in order to meet MassCEC's objective of growing the commercial solar hot water...

488

Piedmont Natural Gas- Commercial Equipment Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates to commercial customers for purchasing and installing high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters. Customers on the 102-Small General Service and 152...

489

New Construction Commercial Reference Buildings Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

490

Commercialization of Coal-to-Liquids Technology  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the current status of coal-to-liquids (CTL) commercialization efforts, including an analysis of efforts to develop and implement large-scale, commercial coal-to-liquids projects to create transportation fuels. Topics covered include: an overview of the history of coal usage and the current market for coal; a detailed description of what coal-to-liquids technology is; the history of coal-to-liquids development and commercial application; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coal-to-liquids; an analysis of the issues and challenges that are hindering the commercialization of coal-to-liquids technology; a review of available coal-to-liquids technology; a discussion of the economic drivers of coal-to-liquids project success; profiles of key coal-to-liquids developers; and profiles of key coal-to-liquids projects under development.

NONE

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

Commercial Cooler: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5343)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Commercial Cooler, Inc. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

492

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

493

Ashland Electric Utility- Commercial Conservation Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

City of Ashland Conservation District has no-interest loans to help commercial customers finance energy efficiency improvements in facilities. The loans can be used for lighting retrofits, water...

494

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 The files on this page contain commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. These U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reference buildings are complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis. You can also return to a summary of building types and climate zones and information about other building vintages. These files are updated regularly. There are two versions of these files on this page. Version 1.3_5.0 was updated September 27, 2010 and Version 1.4_7.2 was updated November 13, 2012. You can also view related resources: an archive of past reference buildings files

495

Memory system characterization of commercial workloads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial applications such as databases and Web servers constitute the largest and fastest-growing segment of the market for multiprocessor servers. Ongoing innovations in disk subsystems, along with the ever increasing gap between processor and memory ...

Luiz Andr Barroso; Kourosh Gharachorloo; Edouard Bugnion

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Avista Utilities (Gas)- Prescriptive Commercial Incentive Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers Natural Gas saving incentives to commercial customers on rate schedule 420 and 424. This program provides rebates for a variety of equipment and appliances including cooking...

497

Combining frequency and time domain approaches to systems with multiple spike train input and output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between neuronal spike trains. Prog Biophys Mol Biol Vapnikto systems with multiple spike train input and output D. R.Keywords Multiple spike trains Neural coding Maximum

Brillinger, D. R.; Lindsay, K. A.; Rosenberg, J. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

On using transputers to design the header and output processors for the PSi architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the complexity associatecl with general soft ware. From Upper Layer Needer Processor From Lower Leyei' Input Bus Concoction Processor Connection Processor 256 CP's Output Bus To Upper Layer Output Processor To Lower Layer Fig. 2. d. Block... yer From Lower Layer T2 T3 To Input Bus of CP's From Output Bus of CF's From Output Bus of Cfes Fig, 4. 1. e. Block diagram of Design I transputers has its own private memory. Tl acts as the header processor. Two of its serial links...

Manickam, Muralidhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

A CSP Timed Input-Output Relation and a Strategy for Mechanised Conformance Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we propose a timed input-output conformance relation (named CSPTIO) based on the process algebra CSP. In contrast to other relations, CSPTIO...

Gustavo Carvalho; Augusto Sampaio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

FORMALIZATION OF INPUT AND OUTPUT IN MODERN OPERATING SYSTEMS: THE HADLEY MODEL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We present the Hadley model, a formal descriptive model of input and output for modern computer operating systems. Our model is intentionally inspired by the (more)

Gerber, Matthew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z