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1

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Title Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Publication Type...

2

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion ...

3

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

4

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. The purpose of the study was to develop and screen a list of potential entry market applications for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Several initial screening criteria were used to identify promising ATES applications. These include the existence of an energy availability/usage mismatch, the existence of many similar applications or commercial sites, the ability to utilize proven technology, the type of location, market characteristics, the size of and access to capital investment, and the number of decision makers involved. The in-depth analysis identified several additional screening criteria to consider in the selection of an entry market application. This analysis revealed that the best initial applications for ATES are those where reliability is acceptable, and relatively high temperatures are allowable. Although chill storage was the primary focus of this study, applications that are good candidates for heat ATES were also of special interest. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Hattrup, M.P.; Weijo, R.O.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling...

8

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

9

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either constructing thermal storage or using it on a day-by-day basis. This presentation will discuss three technologies for thermal storage systems noting the particular advantages of each. Thermal storage technologies are selected by the temperature range of the storage media. This is not a design-oriented presentation, but an overview of what one utility sees taking place in the commercial and industrial refrigeration market place.

Knipp, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

Wray, Craig P.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

12

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

SciTech Connect

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $150,000 Program Info Funding Source Public Benefits Fund Start Date 03/15/2013 State Connecticut Program Type State Grant Program Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority '''''Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs. ''''' The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering grants and loans to non-residential entities for solar hot water installations. Only

15

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

16

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass inthe high thermal storage during the pre-cooling period. Forwith low thermal mass is limited, the pre-cooling period can

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

19

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

30

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

31

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

36

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

37

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

38

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

39

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

40

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

42

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an auxiliary heater supplies the consumers with warm water even in the case of failures. In order to assureQuality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal of standard solar thermal systems usually don't recognise failures affecting the solar yield, because

44

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 22.1- 22.12, Electric Power Research Institute Report,pp. 21.1-21.33, Electric Power Research Institute Report,Commercial Cool Storage," Electric Power Research Institute

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The thermal performance of fixed and variable selective transmitters in commercial architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A parametric model is developed for use in evaluating the relative thermal and lighting performance of a variety of existing and proposed types of commercial glazing materials. The glazing materials considered are divided ...

Bartovics, William A

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

47

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

48

THERMAL DeNOx: A COMMERCIAL SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC NOx REDUCTION PROCESS FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL DeNOx: A COMMERCIAL SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC NOx REDUCTION PROCESS FOR WASTE when high NOx reduction is required. To illustrate the cost effectiveness, investment and operating in cinerators. INTRODUCTION THERMAL DeNO", a selective noncatalytic NO" reduction process, was invented just

Columbia University

49

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: Pre-cooling; Demand response; Thermal mass; Auto-discharged cooling energy from building thermal mass. If theand Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Thermal analysis of Yucca Mountain commercial high-level waste packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal performance of commercial high-level waste packages was evaluated on a preliminary basis for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate for waste package component temperatures as a function of isolation time in tuff. Several recommendations are made concerning the additional information and modeling needed to evaluate the thermal performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system.

Altenhofen, M.K. [Altenhofen (M.K.), Richland, WA (United States); Eslinger, P.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Improving the Thermal Output Availability of Reciprocating Engine Cogeneration Systems by Mechanical Vapor Compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An innovative, alternative reciprocating engine cogeneration system is being developed that can provide the industrial and commercial end-user with electric power and process heat that is totally in the form of high-pressure steam. Current reciprocating engine systems can now provide only low-pressure steam or hot water from the engine jacket, and this often is not needed or not the most appropriate.

Becker, F. E.; DiBella, F. A.; Lamphere, F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Commercial and Industrial Thermal Loads: A Driving Force Behind Future DR Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) systems are installed to minimize overall energy costs at commercial and industrial facilities where heat can be effectively recovered from the power generation process to meet the site heat loads. The suitability of a given site for CHP is most critically dependent on the nature of the heat load at the site. To date, more attention has been paid to the technologies associated with power generation and recovering the heat output of the power generator and less to quantifying...

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Best Practice For the Location of Air and Thermal Boundaries in Small Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suspended t-bar ceilings are common in commercial buildings. Research has found that these ceilings are very leaky, and several problems arise from this. If the space above the ceiling is vented to outdoors, the entire building becomes leaky. Furthermore, if the insulation is located at the ceiling rather than the roof, then the ceiling space will be hot (summer), and if the ceiling space is also vented to outdoors, then the ceiling space will be hot and humid. The thermal and humidity conditions of the ceiling space have important implications for space conditioning loads, building ventilation rates, and indoor relative humidity. Conductive gains through ductwork add to loads, and various forms of uncontrolled air flow readily move air between the ceiling space and the occupied space. These factors should be considered during design and construction of commercial buildings. Best practice: locate the air and thermal boundaries of the building at the roof deck. This approach has many benefits.

Cummings, J. B.; Withers, C. R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Steam Generator Management Program: Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of a Recirculating Steam Generator Using Commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to demonstrate that a commercial computational fluid dynamics code can be set up to model the thermal-hydraulic physics that occur during the operation of a steam generator. Specific complexities in steam-generator thermal-hydraulic modeling include: phase change and two-phase fluid mechanics, hydrodynamic representation of the tube bundle, and thermal coupling between the primary and secondary sides. A commercial computational fluid dynamics code was used without any s...

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Diurnal cool thermal energy storage: Research programs, technological developments, and commercial status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the major federal and private research and development efforts in diurnal cool thermal energy storage for electric load management in buildings. Included are brief technical descriptions and research histories of the technologies and applications of cool thermal storage. The goals, accomplishments, and funding levels of major thermal storage research programs also are summarized. The report concludes with the results of recent field performance evaluations of cool thermal storage installations and a discussion of the current commercial status of thermal storage equipment, including utility participation programs. This report was sponsored by the Technology and Consumer Products (TCP) Division within the Office of Conservation of the US Department of Energy. This report is part of TCP's ongoing effort to examine and evaluate technology developments and research efforts in the areas of lighting, space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and other building energy conversion equipment. Information obtained through this effort is used as an input in developing the US research agenda in these areas.

Wise, M A

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

58

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

59

Dish/Stirling systems: Overview of an emerging commercial solar thermal electric technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dish/Stirling is a solar thermal electric technology which couples parabolic, point-focusing solar collectors and heat engines which employ the Stirling thermodynamic cycle. Since the late 1970s, the development of Dish/Stirling systems intended for commercial use has been in progress in Germany, Japan, and the US. In the next several years it is expected that one or more commercial systems will enter the market place. This paper provides a general overview of this emerging technology, including: a description of the fundamental principles of operation of Dish/Stirling systems; a presentation of the major components of the systems (concentrator, receiver, engine/alternator, and controls); an overview of the actual systems under development around the world, with a discussion of some of the technical issues and challenges facing the Dish/Stirling developers. A brief discussion is also presented of potential applications for small Dish/Stirling systems in northern Mexico.

Strachan, J.W.; Diver, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Estrada, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Spain)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Title Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3898e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Xu, Peng, Rongxin Yin, Carrie Brown, and DongEun Kim Date Published June 2009 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT, hot climates, market sectors, office buildings, pre-cooling, technologies, testbed tools and guides, thermal mass Abstract The potential for using building thermal mass for load shifting and peak energy demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Previous Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory research has demonstrated that the approach is very effective in cool and moderately warm climate conditions (California Climate Zones 2-4). However, this method had not been tested in hotter climate zones.This project studied the potential of pre-cooling the building early in the morning and increasing temperature setpoints during peak hours to reduce cooling-related demand in two typical office buildings in hotter California climates - one in Visalia (CEC Climate Zone 13) and the other in San Bernardino (CEC Climate Zone 10). The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling in hotter climates has similar potential to that seen previously in cool and moderate climates. All other factors being equal, results to date indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the possible demand shed of a given building. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling in typical office building under hot weather conditions is very limited. However, night pre-cooling is helpful for office buildings with an undersized HVAC system. Further work is required to duplicate the tests in other typical buildings and in other hot climate zones and prove that pre-cooling is truly effective.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

62

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Building thermal mass can be used to reduce the peak cooling load. For example, in summer, the building mass can be pre-cooled during non-peak hours in order to reduce the cooling load in the peak hours. As a result, the cooling load is shifted in time and the peak demand is reduced. The building mass can be cooled most effectively during unoccupied hours because it is possible to relax the comfort constraints. While the benefits of demand shift are certain, different thermal mass discharge strategies result in different cooling load reduction and savings. The goal of an optimized discharge strategy is to maximize the thermal mass discharge and minimize the possibility of rebounds before the shed period ends. A series of filed tests were carefully planned and conducted in two commercial buildings in Northern California to investigate the effects of various precooling and demand shed strategies. Field tests demonstrated the potential of cooling load reduction in peak hours and importance of discharge strategies to avoid rebounds. EnergyPlus simulation models were constructed and calibrated to investigate different kind of recovery strategies. The results indicate the value of pre-cooling in maximizing the electrical shed in the on-peak period. The results also indicate that the dynamics of the shed need to be managed in order to avoid discharging the thermal capacity of the building too quickly, resulting in high cooling load and electric demand before the end of the shed period. An exponential trajectory for the zone set-point during the discharge period yielded good results and is recommended for practical implementation.

Xu, Peng

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36E 36E Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California R. Yin, S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

64

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizing building thermal mass for cooling load shiftingUse of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for CommercialScenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for CommercialThe whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Family Lutjanidae), in Puerto Rico, 1969 to 1978 CommercialFamily Lutjanidae), in Puerto Rico, 1969 to 1978. CommercialFamily Lutjanidae), in Puerto Rico, 1969 to 1978. Commercial

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

69

The U.S. Department of Energy`s role in commercialization of solar thermal electric technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported the development of solar thermal electric (STE) technology since the early 1970s. From its inception, the program has held a long-term goal of nurturing STE technologies from the research and development (R&D) stage through technology development, ultimately leading to commercialization. Within the last few years, the focus of this work -has shifted from R&D to cost-shared cooperative projects with industry. These projects are targeted not just at component development, but at complete systems, marketing approaches, and commercialization plans. This changing emphasis has brought new industry into the program and is significantly accelerating solar thermal`s entry into the marketplace. Projects such as Solar Two in the power tower area, a number of dish/Stirling joint ventures in the modular power area, and operations and maintenance (O&M) cost reduction studies will be discussed as examples of this new focus.

Burch, G.D. [United States Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEThe Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Keywords: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass, hot

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Use of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and installed DG equipment (PV, solar thermal, natural gas5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal price run; and 6. aenergy sources such as PV or solar thermal. However, this

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A prototype data archive for the PIER 'thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings' project  

SciTech Connect

A prototype archive for a selection of building energy data on thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings was developed and pilot tested. While the pilot demonstrated the successful development of the data archive prototype, several questions remain about the usefulness of such an archive. Specifically, questions on the audience, frequency of use, maintenance, and updating of the archive would need to be addressed before this prototype is taken to the next level.

Diamond, Rick C.; Wray, Craig P.; Smith, Brian V.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Matson, Nance E.; Cox, Skylar A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Solar energy conversion systems engineering and economic analysis radiative energy input/thermal electric output computation. Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct energy flux analytical model, an analysis of the results, and a brief description of a non-steady state model of a thermal solar energy conversion system implemented on a code, SIRR2, as well as the coupling of CIRR2 which computes global solar flux on a collector and SIRR2 are presented. It is shown how the CIRR2 and, mainly, the SIRR2 codes may be used for a proper design of a solar collector system. (LEW)

Russo, G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperationalOCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:siTE IN PUERTO

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters, i.e. , the electricity tariff structure. Due toenergy loads, 2 electricity and natural gas tariff structureelectricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed ($/day) Sources: PG&E commercial tariffs,

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBPSA-USA Conference at MIT, Boston, MA. Demand ResponseDemand- Limiting Setpoint Trajectories in Commercial Buildings Using Short-Term Data Analysis, Proceedings of the 2006 IBPSA-USA

Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

80

A pilot study of the building integrated photovoltaic thermal (BIPVT) collector for commercial applications in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building integrated photovoltaic thermal solar collector (BIPVT) has been designed to produce both electricity and hot water and later integrated to building. The hot water is produced at the useful temperatures for the applications in Malaysia such ... Keywords: BIPVT collector, hot water heating system, thermal and electrical efficiency

A. Ibrahim; M. Y. Othman; M. H. Ruslan; S. Mat; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Sector, 2002 through 2011 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 1,205 1,720 700 -- 3,625 2003 855...

82

Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a high-contains also heat for absorption chillers, and therefore,storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar thermal

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Commercial potential for thermal & magnetic sensitive polymer in drug delivery applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and magnetically sensitive polymers are a new class of materials with unique properties suitable for applications in drug delivery. Specifically, these polymers can be combined with a drug reservoir to make a drug ...

Edward, Jonathan M. (Jonathan Mark)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Quantifying the economic and commercial potential of a high strength, low thermal coefficient super-alloy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by the importance of having a favourable sheathing material for superconducting wires, a high-strength, low thermal coefficient (CTE) super-alloy has been developed. Known as Incoloy 908, this super-alloy's material ...

Liew, Heng Lee Henry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 " Pennsylvania",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 "East North Central",112,197,127,309,331,-6.8 " Illinois",34,45,29,79,66,18.9 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

88

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",25,54,32,79,90,-12 " Pennsylvania",25,54,32,79,90,-12 "East North Central",115,183,117,298,301,-0.9 " Illinois",31,42,28,73,67,8.1 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

89

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

90

Cooling Strategies Based on Indicators of Thermal Storage in Commercial Building Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building thermal mass and multi-day regimes of hot weather are important, yet poorly understood, contributors to cooling energy requirements. This paper develops load-shifting sub-cooling and precooling equipment operating strategies to address a specific instance of this phenomenon, in which thermal storage by building mass over weekends exacerbates Monday cooling energy requirements. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large, office building prototype in El Paso, TX using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program. The economic value of the strategies is evaluated with direct reference to utility rate schedules and a crude measure of thermal storage is related to the energy impacts of the strategies. The indicators are based on core zone air temperatures, which are sampled a t night when HVAC systems are not in use. The suggestion is made that the results and proposed strategies could be adapted for use by computerized energy management systems to reduce building energy operating costs.

Eto, J. H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic",62,58,56,10.9 " Pennsylvania",62,58,56,10.9 "East North Central",168,171,197,-14.7 " Illinois","w","w","w","w" " Indiana",75,76,75,0.5 " Michigan","w","w","w","w" " Ohio",25,15,19,27 " Wisconsin",5,5,3,59.1 "West North Central",66,75,97,-32.2

92

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 " Pennsylvania",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 "East North Central",87.62,97.3,87.11,93.56,95.13,-1.7 " Illinois",59.27,60.3,62.17,59.86,66.69,-10.2 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

93

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "Pennsylvania" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "East North Central" " Btu",11928,12228,11682,12112,11933,1.5

94

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

95

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

SciTech Connect

The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

98

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

99

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

100

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 9,580 399 2.10 50.44 2.59 28.4 503 91 5.38 29.73 0.02 7.5 2003 8,835 372 1.99 47.24 2.43 20.5 248 43 7.00 40.82 0.04 3.1 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20 26.9 2005 11,081 464 2.57 61.21 2.43 24.2 1,684 289 8.28 48.22 0.17 18.3 2006 12,207 518 2.63 61.95 2.51 27.5 798 137 13.50 78.70 0.17 15.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

102

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 2003 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Historical Data 2003 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,870 775 168 -- 6,813 2004 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 14,114 1,494 215 3 15,826 2005 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19,244 1,565 337 -- 21,146 2006 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 30,689 2,553 376 -- 33,618 2007 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44,450 3,513 391 -- 48,354 2008 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740

103

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

104

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

105

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

108

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

109

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

110

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

111

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

112

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

113

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

114

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

115

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

116

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

117

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

118

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

119

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

120

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

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121

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

122

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

123

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program 2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 15,284 24,803 10,242 -- 50,328 2003 12,914 24,758 10,031 551 48,254 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790 50,732 23,061 76 120,659 2012 54,516 58,894 25,023 92 138,525 Energy Efficiency - Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2002 5,300 5,389 2,768 -- 13,457 2003 5,909 4,911 2,671 94 13,585

124

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

125

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

126

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

127

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

128

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) 2007 2,202,222 262,159 9,106 2 2,473,489 2008 4,190,244 444,003 12,757 12 4,647,016 2009 8,712,297 876,419 22,675 10 9,611,401 2010 18,369,908 1,904,983 59,567 67 20,334,525 2011 33,453,548 3,682,159 154,659 7 37,290,373

129

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 (From Table 2.1.) Number of Ultimate Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

130

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

131

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

132

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

133

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

134

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

135

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

136

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

137

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

138

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

139

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

140

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids 8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 413 639 -35.4% 52 120 267 374 49 55 45 90 Connecticut 112 166 -32.6% 4 5 104 155 0.05 0 4 5 Maine 84 178 -52.8% 0.17 1 65 89 2 3 16 85 Massachusetts 174 197 -11.2% 15 40 98 128 37 28 25 NM New Hampshire 22 78 -72.1% 20 57 0.12 1 2 20 0.17 0.10 Rhode Island 18 14 31.0% 11 10 0.12 1 7 2 0 0 Vermont 3 8 -58.1% 2 6 0 0 1 2 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Biomass 8. Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,229 7,138 1.3% 570 515 4,428 4,544 125 94 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 3,212 3,788 -15.2% 0 0 1,581 1,714 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,724 1,140 51.2% 0 0 1,157 1,137 1 3 566 0 New Hampshire 1,173 1,025 14.4% 347 291 795 734 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 101 127 -21.1% 0 0 101 127 0 0 0 0

142

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy 2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 36,116 34,283 5.3% 0 0 36,116 34,283 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 17,078 15,928 7.2% 0 0 17,078 15,928 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 5,860 5,085 15.2% 0 0 5,860 5,085 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 8,189 8,363 -2.1% 0 0 8,189 8,363 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 4,989 4,907 1.7% 0 0 4,989 4,907 0 0 0 0

143

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Net Generation from Coal 7. Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,103 6,848 -40.1% 1,268 2,208 2,793 4,592 0 0 42 47 Connecticut 653 526 24.2% 0 0 653 526 0 0 0 0 Maine 45 55 -18.0% 0 0 30 38 0 0 15 18 Massachusetts 2,137 4,059 -47.4% 0 0 2,110 4,029 0 0 27 30 New Hampshire 1,268 2,208 -42.6% 1,268 2,208 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

144

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2002 1,265,179,869 1,104,496,607 990,237,631 N/A 105,551,904 3,465,466,011 166,184,296 3,631,650,307 2003 1,275,823,910 1,198,727,601 1,012,373,247 6,809,728 N/A 3,493,734,486 168,294,526 3,662,029,012 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 N/A 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 N/A 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 N/A 3,669,918,840 146,926,612 3,816,845,452

145

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 Net Generation and Consumption of Fuels for January through December Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Fuel Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Net Generation (Thousand Megawatthours) Coal 1,514,043 1,733,430 -12.7% 1,146,480 1,301,107 354,076 416,783 883 1,049 12,603 14,490 Petroleum Liquids 13,403 16,086 -16.7% 9,892 11,688 2,757 3,655 191 86 563 657 Petroleum Coke 9,787 14,096 -30.6% 5,664 9,428 1,758 3,431 6 3 2,359 1,234 Natural Gas 1,225,894 1,013,689 20.9% 504,958 414,843 627,833 511,447 6,603 5,487 86,500 81,911

146

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Dollars) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,418 7,546 6,137 6,441 3,292 3,504 38 45 16,885 17,536 Connecticut 2,213 2,339 1,901 2,038 452 486 19 19 4,584 4,882 Maine 657 674 467 494 242 268 0 0 1,366 1,436 Massachusetts 3,029 3,003 2,453 2,547 2,127 2,270 17 22 7,627 7,842 New Hampshire 713 736 598 629 231 238 0 0 1,543 1,602 Rhode Island 450 449 432 453 99 103 2 4 982 1,008 Vermont 356 346 285 281 142 139 0 0 784 766

147

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

148

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

149

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

150

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

151

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

152

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

153

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity 2013 U.S. Total 513 15,144 179 12,604 334 2,540 Coal 4 1,482 28 4,465 -24 -2,983 Petroleum 21 45 41 1,401 -20 -1,356 Natural Gas 87 6,818 55 2,950 32 3,868 Other Gases -- -- 1 4 -1 -4 Nuclear -- -- 4 3,576 -4 -3,576 Hydroelectric Conventional 17 385 36 185 -19 201 Wind 25 2,225 -- -- 25 2,225 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic 277 3,460 1 1 276 3,459 Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels 10 489 -- -- 10 489 Geothermal 5 50 1 11 4 39

154

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,141 N/A N/A 8,300 N/A N/A N/A 13,089 18,189 N/A 2003 10,834 0 532 8,645 4,435 7,227 1,211 13,175 21,890 67,949 2004 13,739 0 569 8,528 4,377 6,978 884 13,563 19,518 68,154 2005 16,764 0 535 8,741 4,308 7,092 701 13,566 21,486 73,195 2006 24,238 0 493 8,404 4,771 7,259 774 13,406 24,390 83,736 2007 30,089 6 595 8,486 5,177 7,061 839 13,498 19,109 84,860 2008 48,464 60 787 8,750 6,057 6,975 1,040 13,643 23,451 109,226

155

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,354 N/A N/A 38,665 N/A N/A N/A 14,491 264,329 N/A 2003 11,187 2 532 37,529 5,077 8,306 2,428 14,424 275,806 355,293 2004 14,144 6 569 38,117 5,128 8,151 2,141 14,811 268,417 351,485 2005 17,811 16 535 38,856 5,142 8,330 1,948 14,692 270,321 357,651 2006 26,589 15 493 38,762 5,677 8,478 1,944 14,568 289,246 385,772 2007 34,450 16 596 39,014 6,158 8,304 2,063 14,637 247,510 352,747

156

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

158

Case Study on Thermal Energy Storage: Gemasolar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19.9-MW Gemasolar plant is the first commercial concentrating-solar thermal power plant to use a central receiver tower and a two-tank molten-salt thermal energy storage system. The initial plant operation has demonstrated the feasibility of the technology to operate under commercial conditions at utility scale and verified continuous 24-hour operation. The storage capacity makes the plant output dispatchable and improves the plants capacity factor and profitability. This white paper ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Market potential for solar thermal energy supply systems in the United States industrial and commercial sectors: 1990--2030. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report revises and extends previous work sponsored by the US DOE on the potential industrial market in the United States for solar thermal energy systems and presents a new analysis of the commercial sector market potential. Current and future industrial process heat demand and commercial water heating, space heating and space cooling end-use demands are estimated. The PC Industrial Model (PCIM) and the commercial modules of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM) used by the DOE`s Energy Information Administration (EIA) to support the recent National Energy Strategy (NES) analysis are used to forecast industrial and commercial end-use energy demand respectively. Energy demand is disaggregated by US Census region to account for geographic variation in solar insolation and regional variation in cost of alternative natural gas-fired energy sources. The industrial sector analysis also disaggregates demand by heat medium and temperature range to facilitate process end-use matching with appropriate solar thermal energy supply technologies. The commercial sector analysis disaggregates energy demand by three end uses: water heating, space heating, and space cooling. Generic conceptual designs are created for both industrial and commercial applications. Levelized energy costs (LEC) are calculated for industrial sector applications employing low temperature flat plate collectors for process water preheat; parabolic troughs for intermediate temperature process steam and direct heat industrial application; and parabolic dish technologies for high temperature, direct heat industrial applications. LEC are calculated for commercial sector applications employing parabolic trough technologies for low temperature water and space heating. Cost comparisons are made with natural gas-fired sources for both the industrial market and the commercial market assuming fuel price escalation consistent with NES reference case scenarios for industrial and commercial sector gas markets.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Mass, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 125 (building, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 125 (2003),

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An energy equivalency analysis of trade-offs between thermal efficiency and standby loss requirements for commercial gas service water heaters  

SciTech Connect

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Standing Standard Project Committee 90.1 has approved an addendum (90.lb) to ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989. The addendum specifies an increase in the minimum thermal efficiency requirement (from 77% to 78%), accompanied by an easing of the standby loss requirements, for commercial gas-fired service water heaters. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed an energy equivalency analysis to assess the impact of trade-offs between the improved thermal efficiency and the less stringent standby loss requirements. The analysis objective was to estimate whether the energy savings during firing would offset the increased energy losses during standby periods. The primary focus of this report is to summarize the major results of the analysis and provide a recommendation for minimum energy-efficiency commercial gas-fired service water heaters. Limitations to the availability of detailed performance and energy-use data for these commercial water heaters are also pointed out.

Somasundaram, S.; Jarnagin, R.E.; Keller, J.M.; Schliesing, J.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The effects of thermal processing on properties of fundamental food polymers in commercial Asian and experimental sorghum noodles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing variables of 100% sorghum noodles were evaluated. A dough was made, extruded to create noodles then dried. Structural, physical, and cooking characteristics of the experimental sorghum noodles, as well as thin spaghetti, commercial Asian rice, broad bean, tapioca, sweet potato and egg noodles were evaluated. In comparison to the commercial noodles, the experimental sorghum noodles had high dry matter loss, but similar water uptake and moisture. The dry matter loss of sorghum noodles was greatly affected by the heating stage before extrusion, with a lower dry matter loss resulting from a longer heating time. The internal structure of the noodles was evaluated with the ESEM. Starch noodles had a thick starchy continuous phase that was smooth and amorphous. The protein based noodles were held together by a gluten matrix, small endosperm pieces with intact starch granules were visible and suspended within the matrix. Noodles made from any grain or starch other than wheat must rely on starch gelatinization for their structure. The sorghum noodles produced in this experiment indicated that sorghum could be used to produce a non-wheat noodle. A sorghum noodle could be a new food product for those who are gluten-intolerant or an alternative food product for the semi-arid tropic regions where sorghum is a native grain.

Leach, Michelle R

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

test output enable Veto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to BIP/FSCC's RESET to (NIM) test output FSCC/COM (NIM) INPUT TRIGGER GLOBAL 0.08­19.5 usec adjustable

Berns, Hans-Gerd

164

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

166

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design...

167

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

168

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance preliminary design report. [150 MW commercial tower focus plant and 10 MW pilot plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the 10 MWe Pilot Plant and the 150 MWe Commercial Plant are given. The Commercial Plant consists of 15 integrated collector - receiver modules. Each module contains 1325 heliostats and an internally mounted steam-generating receiver on a steel tower with an aperture height of 90 M. The Pilot Plant consists of one full-scale collector - receiver module. The two-stage sensible heat storage system utilizes a heat transfer salt medium and a hydrocarbon oil storage medium. The electric power generation system uses a conventional steam turbine-generator. The Pilot Plant is one module of the Commercial Plant, providing for one-to-one scaling in the most critical areas. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

? Adjustable Output Voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LM25010 features all the functions needed to implement a low cost, efficient, buck regulator capable of supplying in excess of 1A load current. This high voltage regulator integrates an N-Channel Buck Switch, and is available in thermally enhanced LLP-10 and TSSOP-14EP packages. The constant on-time regulation scheme requires no loop compensation resulting in fast load transient response and simplified circuit implementation. The operating frequency remains constant with line and load variations due to the inverse relationship between the input voltage and the on-time. The valley current limit detection is set at 1.25A. Additional features include: VCC under-voltage lock-out, thermal shutdown, gate drive under-voltage lock-out, and maximum duty cycle limiter.

Lmq Is Aec-q Grade

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Multiple output timing and trigger generator  

SciTech Connect

In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

172

8.5. Adding New Outputs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have fixed values in the Output definition will not ... are a few example Output definitions, extracted from ... an example, illustrating the Energy output and ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coded output support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a coded output support vector machine (COSVM) by introducing the idea of information coding to solve multi-class classification problems for large-scale datasets. The COSVM is built based on the support vector regression (SVR) machine ... Keywords: coded output, multi-class classification, number system, parallel implementation, support vector machine (SVM)

Tao Ye; Xuefeng Zhu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of commercial warm air furnaces since 1994. Commercial warm air furnaces are self-contained oil-fired or gas-fired furnaces that are designed to supply heated air through ducts to spaces that require it. Commercial warm air furnaces are industrial equipment and have a maximum rated input capacity of 225,000 British thermal units (Btu) an hour or more. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a request for information regarding energy conservation standards for commercial warm air furnaces. 78 FR 25627 (May 2, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking webpage.

175

rifsimp_output.html - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whenever DiffConstraint or UnSolve entries are present in the output, some parts of the algorithm have been disabled by options, and the resulting cases must...

176

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Windows: $250 - Residential; $750 (Commercial) Insulation: up to $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Water Heater Blanket: $20 per unit Radiant/Thermal Barrier Material: $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Duct Repair/Replacement: $500

177

Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings: Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, and Technology Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy output is in the form of useful thermal energy. Where useful thermal energy results from power production,half the annual useful thermal energy output equals not less

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Louisville Gas & Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reset: 250 - 550 Thermal Storage: 100kW offset Energy Audit: Free Louisville Gas and Electric (LGE) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly...

179

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships manages and advances the commercialization of cutting-edge discoveries ...

180

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Brian Smith, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Skylar Cox Indoor Environment...

182

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

183

Overload protection circuit for output driver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

Stewart, Roger G. (Neshanic Station, NJ)

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Commercial Thermal Distribution Systems FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Center for Environmental Design Research (CEDR Offerman of IEESF, and Graham Carter of Ove Arup, Cliff Federspiel and Nora Watanabe (CEDR) for their contributions to the CEDR project on fan research. #12;LBNL-44320 Disclaimer This document was prepared

185

Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

funding. CEFIA will also take into consideration factors such as the amount of in-state job creation the project supports (either directly or indirectly, for example through use...

186

Optimal Filtering of AC Output Anemometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The output of pulsed and AC output anemometers suffer from discretization noise when such anemometers are sampled at fast rates (>1 Hz). This paper describes the construction of an optimal filter designed to reduce this noise. By comparing the ...

J. C. Barnard; L. L. Wendell; V. R. Morris

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Performance characteristics of a commercially available, point-focus, solar power system. [7. 5 kWe peak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a commercially available solar electric power system is described in terms of instantaneous electrical power output for a given insolation and electrical energy production per day. Receiver thermal loss coefficient and concentrator optical efficiency are measured and system performance is then given with steam cycle efficiency and electrical generator efficiency as parameters. System performance is limited by a relatively low optical efficiency of 44%. For peak insolation, this collector delivers 9.2 kw./sub th/ to the steam engine, representing 35% of the solar input.

Bohn, M.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

EERE: Commercialization & Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

marketplace. Commercialization Commercialization initiatives help bridge the gap between technology R&D and venture capital funding and marketing. Energy Innovation Portal...

189

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development ...

191

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development (R&D), and venture ...

192

Applications of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters can provide high-efficiency water heating and supplemental space cooling and dehumidification in commercial buildings throughout the United States. They are particularly attractive in hot, humid areas where cooling loads are high and the cooling season is long. Because commercial kitchens and laundry facilities have simultaneous water heating and cooling needs, they are excellent applications for heat pump water heaters. Typical heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) operate at an annual coefficient of performance (COP) of approximately 3.0 for water heating alone. Space conditioning benefits of about 0.67 Btu are delivered at no additional cost for each Btu of water heating output. In situations in which this cooling output is valued, the dual thermal outputs for heating and cooling make heat pump water heaters particularly attractive. The comfort value of added cooling in overheated facilities and the resulting increase in employee and customer satisfaction are frequently cited as additional benefits. This paper describes currently available heat pump water heating equipment and offers guidelines for successful applications in commercial facilities. The results of field test programs involving more than 100 units in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and other areas are incorporated. Initial conclusions are drawn from a reliability database, and interviews with utility applications specialists and manufacturers are discussed. Design tools are reviewed, including a new comprehensive computer simulation model. Emphasis is placed on identifying sound candidates for installations and on application and design considerations. A brief survey is provided of environmental implications of heat pump water heaters and new developments in heat pump water heater equipment.

Johnson, K. F.; Shedd, A. C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

194

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

195

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

197

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

198

Thermal characterization of Li-ion cells using calorimetric techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal stability of Li-ion cells with intercalating carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes was measured as a function of state of charge and temperature for two advanced cell chemistries. Cells of the 18650 design with Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} cathodes (commercial Sony cells) and Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathodes were measured for thermal reactivity. Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) was used to measure cell thermal runaway as a function of state of charge (SOC), microcalorimetry was used to measure the time dependence of thermal output, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the thermal reactivity of the individual components. Thermal decomposition of the anode solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer occurred at low temperatures and contributes to the initiation of thermal runaway. Low temperature reactions from 40 C--70 C were observed during the ARC runs that were SOC dependent. These reactions measured in the microcalorimeter decayed over time with power-law dependence and were highly sensitive to SOC and temperature. ARC runs of aged and cycled cells showed complete absence of these low-temperature reactions but showed abrupt exothermic spikes between 105--135 C. These results suggest that during aging the anode SEI layer is decomposing from a metastable state to a stable composition that is breaking down at elevated temperatures.

ROTH,EMANUEL P.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships |  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

200

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office  

Contacts. For more information about the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, or about other commercialization initiatives, please contact ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price Average Commercial Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

202

Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: solar kinetics T-600 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics T-600 solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector are presented for three output temperatures at five cities in the US. (WHK)

Harrison, T.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Light output simulation of LYSO single crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used the Geant4 simulation toolkit to estimate the light collection in a LYSO crystal by using cosmic muons and E=105 MeV electrons. The light output as a function of the crystal length is studied. Significant influence of the crystal wrapping in the reflective paper and optical grease coupling to the photodetectors on the light output is demonstrated.

Usubov, Zafar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Structural Changes During Thermal Fatigue of Two Nickel-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

greatly affect the thermal endurance of these heat-resisting alloys. I?. ... factors govern- ing the thermal fatigue behavior of a number of commercial nickel-.

205

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

206

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

207

Thermal Analysis of Refrigeration Systems Used for Vaccine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Thermal Analysis of Refrigeration Systems Used for Vaccine Storage ... Suitability of commercial refrigerators for vaccine storage not ...

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

208

High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems  

SciTech Connect

A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial fenestration framing systems, by investigating new technologies that would improve the thermal performance of aluminum frames, while maintaining their structural and life-cycle performance. The project targeted an improvement of over 30% (whole window performance) over conventional commercial framing technology by improving the performance of commercial framing systems.

Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

210

Dynamical Properties of Model Output Statistics Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical properties of forecasts corrected using model output statistics (MOS) schemes are explored, with emphasis on the respective role of model and initial condition uncertainties. Analytical and numerical investigations of low-order ...

S. Vannitsem; C. Nicolis

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below ...

Bing Xie; Jeffrey Chase; David Dillow; Oleg Drokin; Scott Klasky; Sarp Oral; Norbert Podhorszki

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ensemble Model Output Statistics for Wind Vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bivariate ensemble model output statistics (EMOS) technique for the postprocessing of ensemble forecasts of two-dimensional wind vectors is proposed, where the postprocessed probabilistic forecast takes the form of a bivariate normal probability ...

Nina Schuhen; Thordis L. Thorarinsdottir; Tilmann Gneiting

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Multimegawatt power sources for commercial space operations  

SciTech Connect

There is a great deal of interest in commercial operation in space today, but very little consideration of where the power to run such an operation is to come from. For any commercial operation in space, the power source, especially those involving kilowatts and megawatts of power, must be considered at the very onset of the venture. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is working this problem in conjunction with the development of Strategic Defense Initiative needs. The same type of up-front power development program needs to be considered in all discussions associated with commercial development in space. A system developed for a commercial operation in space will most likely be a hybrid system utilizing both electrical and thermal energy. Even if the commercial process consists totally of high power thermal energy usage, there will be a certain amount of electricity required for controls, mass transport, environmental control (if manned), and communications. The optimum system will thus require a great deal of planning and coordination with the development of the commercial process. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Dearien, J.A.; Martinell, J.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

215

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

216

Commercialization Info 080611  

sponsors of the research that led to the Invention; the inventors of the Licensed Patents; and their ... of funding for the development and commercialization:

217

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

218

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

219

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

220

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

Robert Stockwell, PhD

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

224

Potential for energy technologies in residential and commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The residential-commercial energy technology model was developed as a planning tool for policy analysis in the residential and commercial building sectors. The model and its procedures represent a detailed approach to estimating the future acceptance of energy-using technologies both in new construction and for retrofit into existing buildings. The model organizes into an analytical framework all relevant information and data on building energy technology, building markets, and government policy, and it allows for easy identification of the relative importance of key assumptions. The outputs include estimates of the degree of penetration of the various building energy technologies, the levels of energy use savings associated with them, and their costs - both private and government. The model was designed to estimate the annual energy savings associated with new technologies compared with continued use of conventional technology at 1975 levels. The amount of energy used under 1975 technology conditions is referred to as the reference case energy use. For analytical purposes the technologies were consolidated into ten groupings: electric and gas heat pumps; conservation categories I, II, and III; solar thermal (hot water, heating, and cooling); photovoltaics, and wind systems. These groupings clearly do not allow an assessment of the potential for individual technologies, but they do allow a reasonable comparison of their roles in the R/C sector. Assumptions were made regarding the technical and economic performances of the technologies over the period of the analysis. In addition, the study assessed the non-financial characteristics of the technologies - aesthetics, maintenance complexity, reliability, etc. - that will also influence their market acceptability.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

226

Analysis of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency and load-managed electric cooling and water heating technologies often provide a better rate of return for commercial building owners, with lower capital outlay and lower technical risk than cogeneration. Commercially available equipment typical of these electric technologies include high-efficiency chillers, thermal energy storage, heat recovery chillers, heat recovery heat pumps, and heat pump water heaters.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

228

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Commercial remodeling : using computer graphic imagery to evaluate building energy performance during conceptual redesign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is an investigation of the relationship between commercial remodeling and building thermal performance. A computer graphic semiotic is developed to display building thermal performance based on this relationship. ...

Williams, Kyle D

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Computers in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

has risen as well. The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 forecasts that commercial energy demand will grow at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, with the most rapid increases in...

232

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

233

OpenEI - Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are given by a location defined by the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) for which the weather data was collected. Commercial load data is sorted by the (TMY) site as a...

234

Commercial Grade Dedication RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the CGD activities for office of Environmental Management...

235

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

237

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ERC commercialization activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

Maru, H.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate Refrigeration/Cooking/Lighting: rebate will not exceed 75% of project cost Retrocommissioning: $20,000 Retrocommissioning: Building must have at least 40,000 sq ft of conditioned space Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heating: $150 - $300 or $20/kW Thermal Storage: $20 - $40/kW Condensers: $25/HP - $100/HP

242

System dynamics model of construction output in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates fluctuations of construction output, and growth of the output in Kenya. Fluctuation and growth of construction activity are matters of concern in (more)

Mbiti, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem. [10-MW Pilot Plant and 100-MW Commercial Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conception, design, and testing of the receiver subsystem proposed by the McDonnell Douglas/Rocketdyne Receiver team for the DOE 10-MW Pilot Plant and the 100-MW Commercial Plant are described. The receiver subsystem consists of the receiver unit, the tower on which the receiver unit is mounted above the collector field, and the supporting control and instrumentation equipment. The plans for implementation of the Pilot Plant are given including the anticipated schedule and production plan (procurement, installation, checkout, and maintenance). Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the Pilot Plant receiver subsystem are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of the total cost Program Info Expiration Date 9/30/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 with Electric Ballasts: $10 - $65 Hardwired CFL's: $40 - $80 Screw In CFL's: $3 - $12 Cold Cathode: $3 - $15 Ceramic Metal Halide Fixture: $30 - $50 LED's: $15 - $50 Induction: $80 - $400 High-output T5/T8: $50 - $180 Metal Halide/High Pressure Sodium: $80 - $400 Stairwell/Garage Fluorescent Fixture: $50 Occupancy Sensor/Timer: $30 - $60

246

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

247

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

SciTech Connect

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below the peak. This paper characterizes the data absorption behavior of a center-wide shared Lustre parallel file system on the Jaguar supercomputer. We use a statistical methodology to address the challenges of accurately measuring a shared machine under production load and to obtain the distribution of bandwidth across samples of compute nodes, storage targets, and time intervals. We observe and quantify limitations from competing traffic, contention on storage servers and I/O routers, concurrency limitations in the client compute node operating systems, and the impact of variance (stragglers) on coupled output such as striping. We then examine the implications of our results for application performance and the design of I/O middleware systems on shared supercomputers.

Xie, Bing [Duke University; Chase, Jeffrey [Duke University; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [Intel Corporation; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Degrande, Cline; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Cline Degrande; Claude Duhr; Benjamin Fuks; David Grellscheid; Olivier Mattelaer; Thomas Reiter

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Monitoring of Photovoltaic Plant Output and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems, including variability characteristics, is of increasing interest to utilities as they integrate more solar energy onto the electric grid. This study is part of a multi-year research series to investigate influencing factors that affect PV plant output, variability, and approaches to system management. It explores PV variability both from a grid perspective and through examination of project design aspects that can affect annual power production. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water...

252

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air...

253

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap,...

254

Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caldwell, 865-574-4180, caldwelljt@ornl.gov Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager Jennifer Caldwell is a Senior Commercialization Manager for the Partnerships...

255

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building...

256

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The portable electronics market is rapidly migrating towards more compact devices with multiple functionalities. Form factor, performance, cost and efficiency of these devices constitute the factors of merit of devices like cell phones, MP3 players and PDA's. With advancement in technology and more intelligent processors being used, there is a need for multiple high integrity voltage supplies for empowering the systems in portable electronic devices. Switched mode power supplies (SMPS's) are used to regulate the battery voltage. In an SMPS, maximum area is taken by the passive components such as the inductor and the capacitor. This work demonstrates a single inductor used in a buck converter with two output voltages from an input battery with voltage of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used for the single inductor dual output buck converter in this work. Results of schematic and post layout simulations performed in CADENCE prove the merits of this control method, such as nil cross regulation and excellent transient response.

Eachempatti, Haritha

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

260

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook, Volume II: Advanced Concepts in Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume I contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the steam power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Vol...

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

2013 completions of large solar thermal power plants mark ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Several large, new solar thermal power plants are expected to begin commercial operation by the end of 2013, more than doubling the solar thermal ...

264

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate General: $100,000 per customer per year; may not exceed 50% of the total installed cost of measures New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Owner): $150,000 per year New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Design Team): $30,000 per year New Construction (Systems Approach): $50,000 per year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostats: $50/unit

265

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

266

Pathways to commercial success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGIES (HFCIT) PROGRAM Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program August 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................................................................1-1

267

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program Austin Energy - Commercial Energy Management Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 200,000 or 50% of the total job cost (including equipment, installation and tax), whichever is less. Thermal Energy Storage projects have a separate 200,000 cap. Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Split System AC/Heat Pumps (1.5 ton - 5 ton): $200 - $600/unit

270

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heaters: $5,000 Lighting: over $4,500 must be preapproved Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting (Hard-Wired Systems): $0.20/watt of demand reduction Lighting (Screw-In CFL/LED): $0.05/watt of demand reduction Motors: $20 - $3,000 Air Source Heat Pumps: $160 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $350 Water Heaters: $150 - $300; or $20/kw Thermal Storage: $20 - $40

271

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

272

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

Quick Links. Energy Innovation Portal; Site Map Commercialization Home Page. About. Success Stories; Legacy Initiatives

273

Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State...

274

Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial...

275

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential...

276

Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Heating & Cooling...

277

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

278

Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Program Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential...

279

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local...

280

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Appliances &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Third-party entrepreneurs help spur commercialization of wind energy  

SciTech Connect

Several utilities have already signed third-party contracts to buy the output of wind farms, the largest commitments being in California and Hawaii. Third-party entrepreneurs, such as Windfarms, Ltd., San Francisco, finance, build, and operate facilities and sell the electric power output to a utility under a long-term contract. As a financial bridge between utilities and new technology, their primary role is to raise capital. A spokesman for Windfarms considers the federal income tax credit for business investment and a DOE demonstration plant as essential for commercialization to succeed, but both are threatened by the administration. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

283

Energy conserving automatic light output system  

SciTech Connect

An energy conserving lighting system is provided wherein a plurality of fluorescent lamps are powered by a poorly regulated voltage source power supply which provides a decreasing supply voltage with increasing arc current so as to generally match the volt-ampere characteristics of the lamps. A transistor ballast and control circuit connected in the arc current path controls the arc current, and hence the light output, in accordance with the total ambient light, i.e., the light produced by the lamps together with whatever further light is produced by other sources such as daylight. In another embodiment, a transistor ballast is utilized in combination with an inductive ballast. The transistor ballast provides current control over a wide dynamic range up to a design current maximum at which maximum the transistor is saturated and the inductive ballast takes over the current limiting function. An operational amplifier is preferably connected in the base biassing circuit of the control transistor of the transistor ballast. In an embodiment wherein two sets of lamps with separate inductive ballasts are provided, the arc currents for the two ballasts are scaled or matched to provide the desired light output.

Widmayer, D.F.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Commercializing solar architecture  

SciTech Connect

The seminar discussions on attitudinal, technical, and institutional issues and the suggestions related to information development, acquisition, and dissemination; education and training; demonstrations and design competitions; and other actions are documented. Information on SERI's overall mission and a paper titled, The Architectural Role of SERI, and a matrix of barriers and actions from this assessment, related to the commercialization profile for passive solar heating, are attached as appendices.

Franta, G.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Classical capacity of bosonic broadcast communication and a new minimum output entropy conjecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work on the classical information capacities of bosonic channels has established the capacity of the single-user pure-loss channel, bounded the capacity of the single-user thermal-noise channel, and bounded the capacity region of the multiple-access channel. The latter is a multi-user scenario in which several transmitters seek to simultaneously and independently communicate to a single receiver. We study the capacity region of the bosonic broadcast channel, in which a single transmitter seeks to simultaneously and independently communicate to two different receivers. It is known that the tightest available lower bound on the capacity of the single-user thermal-noise channel is that channel's capacity if, as conjectured, the minimum von Neumann entropy at the output of a bosonic channel with additive thermal noise occurs for coherent-state inputs. Evidence in support of this minimum output entropy conjecture has been accumulated, but a rigorous proof has not been obtained. In this paper, we propose a new minimum output entropy conjecture that, if proved to be correct, will establish that the capacity region of the bosonic broadcast channel equals the inner bound achieved using a coherent-state encoding and optimum detection. We provide some evidence that supports this new conjecture, but again a full proof is not available.

Saikat Guha; Jeffrey H. Shapiro; Baris I. Erkmen

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

LBA-ECO DECAF Model Output Data Set Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECAF Model Output Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC announces the publication of the model output data product, Deforestation Carbon Flux (DECAF), from the LBA Land Use-Land Cover...

288

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The waveguide power divider comprises an input waveguide of rectangular cross-section coupled to multiple reduced height output waveguides of rectangular cross-section. The input is coupled to the output waveguides by axial slots. The length of the slots is selected such that the wave direction of the input waveguide is preserved in the output waveguides. The width of the output guide is equal to the width of the input waveguide so that the input and output guides have the same cutoff wavelength. Waves will then travel with the same phase velocity in the input and output guides. The unused ends of the input and output guides are terminated in matched loads. The load at the end of the input guide absorbs power that is not coupled to the output guides.

Moeller, C.P.

1986-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Robust MPC with output feedback of integrating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, it is presented a new contribution to the design of a robust MPC with output feedback, input constraints, and uncertain model. Multivariable predictive controllers have been used in industry to reduce the variability of the process output ...

J. M. Perez; D. Odloak; E. L. Lima

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

291

Proceedings: Commercial Refrigeration Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving refrigeration systems for commercial use can enhance both utility load factors and supermarket profits. This workshop has pinpointed research needs in commercial refrigeration and systems integration for a supermarket environment.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aerocapacitor commercialization plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

NONE

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Technology Commercialization Showcase - Home - Energy ...  

Small Business and Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) Partnership; ... The Department Of Energy Technology Commercialization Showcase provides effective ...

295

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian ...

296

Success Stories - EERE Commercialization Office  

Success Stories. As new energy efficient and renewable energy technologies emerge, so do potential business opportunities. These commercialization success stories ...

297

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian Renewable Energy ...

298

Inventor Resources | Technology Commercialization and ...  

Search Technologies; Patents; Contacts. TCP Director Connie Cleary. Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima ...

299

Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate The lesser of 25% of the total cost or $50,000 Program Info Funding Source RPS alternative compliance payments Start Date 11/1/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: $0.80/W (DC) for new systems; $0.50/W (DC) for additions to existing systems Solar Thermal: $0.12/rated or modeled kBtu/year for new systems with 15 or fewer collectors; $0.07/rated or modeled kBtu/year for new systems with

300

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Boiler Commercial Boiler Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis What's Covered All Federal purchases of hot water or steam boilers (using either oil or gas) with a rated capacity (Btu/h) of 300,000-10,000,000 must meet or exceed FEMP-designated thermal efficiencies. FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Boilers Table 1 displays the FEMP-designated minimum efficiency requirements for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heater: $75 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $1.50 - $3 /gallon, plus $50 Tri-State G&T incentive Resistive Heat: $8 /kW Electric Thermal Storage: $50 /unit or $12 /kW Air-Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150 /ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150 /ton Terminal Unit: $85 Motors: $8 - $13 /hp (CPL and Tri-State Combined Rebate) Provider Carbon Power and Light, Inc.

302

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II: Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table A2-12, p. B2-1....

303

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II: Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table 4-1, p. 4-4; and...

304

TEMPEST II--A NEUTRON THERMALIZATION CODE  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST II neutron thermalization code in Fortran for IBM 709 or 7090 calculates thermal neutron flux spectra based upon the Wigner-Wilkins equation, the Wilkins equation, or the Maxwellian distribution. When a neutron spectrum is obtained, TEMPEST II provides microscopic and macroscopic cross section averages over that spectrum. Equations used by the code and sample input and output data are given. (auth)

Shudde, R.H.; Dyer, J.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Commercial Building Profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Profiles Building Profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset includes simulation results from a national-scale study of the commercial buildings sector. Electric load profiles contain the hour-by-hour demand for electricity for each building. Summary tables describe individual buildings and their overall annual energy performance. The study developed detailed EnergyPlus models for 4,820 different samples in 2003 CBECS. Simulation output is available for all and organized by CBECS's identification number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and the stock if rebuilt using maximum efficiency technology (with typical weather). The following reports describe how the dataset was developed:

306

Aerogel commercialization: Technology, markets and costs  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of aerogels has been slow due to several factors including cost and manufacturability issues. The technology itself is well enough developed as a result of work over the past decade by an international-community of researchers. Several extensive substantial markets appear to exist for aerogels as thermal and sound insulators, if production costs can keep prices in line with competing established materials. The authors discuss here the elements which they have identified as key cost drivers, and they give a prognosis for the evolution of the technology leading to reduced cost aerogel production.

Carlson, G.; Lewis, D.; McKinley, K.; Richardson, J.; Tillotson, T.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

308

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(92) (92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this publication under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202-586-1617). The project was directed by Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202-586-1112) and Nancy L. Leach, Chief

309

Energy Efficient Commercial Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Technologies April 11th, 2012 Presented by: Warren Willits Energy Solutions Center (202) 824-7150 www.ESCenter.org Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2012 Jekyll Island, GA Todays Energy Efficient Technologies  Water Heating  Heating  Air Conditioning  Humidity Control  CHP / Cogeneration Atmospheric Direct Vent High Efficiency .7 EF Atmospheric water heaters now available 97 % efficient tank water heaters now available Traditional Tank Style Water Heating  Tankless Water Heaters  EF = .82 Standard Unit  EF = .97 Condensing  Solar Water Heaters  With H.E. gas back up systems Newer Water Heaters Water Heater Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Costs Electric Tank Water Heater Gas Water Heater

310

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionR. E. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion.of sewage effluent in an ocean current. Inst. of Tech. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Input--output capital coefficients for energy technologies. [Input-output model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Input-output capital coefficients are presented for five electric and seven non-electric energy technologies. They describe the durable goods and structures purchases (at a 110 sector level of detail) that are necessary to expand productive capacity in each of twelve energy source sectors. Coefficients are defined in terms of 1967 dollar purchases per 10/sup 6/ Btu of output from new capacity, and original data sources include Battelle Memorial Institute, the Harvard Economic Research Project, The Mitre Corp., and Bechtel Corp. The twelve energy sectors are coal, crude oil and gas, shale oil, methane from coal, solvent refined coal, refined oil products, pipeline gas, coal combined-cycle electric, fossil electric, LWR electric, HTGR electric, and hydroelectric.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Commercial Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap, detergent, or both and mechanical movement to clean clothes. Commercial clothes washers are used in commercial settings, multi-family housing, or laundromats. There are two classes of commercial clothes washers: front-loading and top-loading clothes washers. The current standard will save approximately 0.12 quads of energy and result in approximately $1.1 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2036. The standard will avoid about 6.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 1.3 million automobiles.

313

Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: Charting Wind, Thermal, Hydro Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Public Affairs Check out Bonneville Power Administration's new near real-time energy monitoring - it displays the output of all wind, thermal and hydro generation in...

314

Solar Thermal Technology Status, Performance, and Cost Estimates -- 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal power plants use mirrors to focus solar radiation onto a solar receiver, which heats a heat transfer fluid that drives either a turbine or heat engine to generate electricity. This study provides cost and performance information for three commercial or early commercial solar thermal electric technologies: parabolic trough (with and without thermal storage), molten salt power tower with thermal energy storage, and parabolic dish engine. Capital, operations, and maintenance cost estimates are...

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Thermal stability of electrodes in Lithium-ion cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis was used to identify thermal reactions in Sony-type lithium-ion cells and to correlate these reactions with interactions of cell constituents and reaction products. An electrochemical half-cell was used to cycle the anode and cathode materials and to set the state-of-charge (SOC). Three temperature regions of interaction were identified and associated with the SOC (degree of Li intercalation) of the cell. Anodes were shown to undergo exothermic reactions as low as 80 C involving decomposition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. The LiPF{sub 6} salt in the electrolyte (EC:PC:DEC/1M LiPF{sub 6}) was seen to play an essential role in this reaction. DSC analysis of the anodes from disassembled Sony cells showed similar behavior to the half-cell anodes with a strong exotherm beginning in the 80 C--90 C range. Exothermic reactions were also observed in the 200 C--300 C region between the intercalated lithium anodes, the LiPF{sub 6} salt, and the PVDF binder. These reactions were followed by a high-temperature reaction region, 300 C--400 C, also involving the PVDF binder and the intercalated lithium anodes. Cathode exothermic reactions with the PVDF binder were observed above 200 C and increased with the SOC (decreasing Li content in the cathode). No thermal reactions were seen at lower temperatures suggesting that thermal runaway reactions in this type of cell are initiated at the anode. An Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) was used to perform measurements of thermal runaway on commercial Sony Li-ion cells as a function of SOC. The cells showed sustained thermal output as low as 80 C in agreement with the DSC observations of anode materials but the heating rate was strongly dependent on the SOC.

ROTH,EMANUEL P.; NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

318

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

319

Xcel Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico) Xcel Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico) Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings...

320

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering developing test procedures, labels, and energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial pumps. Pumps exist in numerous applications, including agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. There are currently no federal standards or test procedures for commercial and industrial pumps. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document regarding commercial and industrial pumps. 78 FR 7304 (February 1, 2013).

322

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Home For BNL Inventors For Industry For Entrepreneurs Sponsored Research Search Technologies Patents Contacts TCP Director Connie Cleary Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima Upadhya Partnerships Mike Furey, Manager Ginny Coccorese Alison Schwarz Intellectual Property Legal Group (Legal Dept.) Dorene Price, Chief Intellectual Property Counsel Lars Husebo, Attorney Maria Pacella, Sr. Staff Specialist William Russell, Asst. Staff Specialist INNOVATION MEETS BUSINESS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. WE GRANT LICENSES for our intellectual property to existing and start up companies. WE SEEK FUNDING from experienced investors to develop our intellectual assets. Tech Commercialization News

323

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercialization Programs Commercialization Programs Through our commercialization programs, we help accelerate the transfer of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the marketplace. Clean Energy Alliance The Clean Energy Alliance is an alliance of the nation's top business incubators that provide business services to nascent clean energy entrepreneurs. NREL partners with these elite business incubators to help foster the growth of robust clean energy businesses and commercialize their technologies. Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development Formerly the Colorado Cleantech Initiative program, the Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED) is a joint effort between NREL, the State of Colorado, and affiliated stakeholders to provide

324

Commercial Weatherization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. Commercial buildings consume 19 percent of the energy used in the U.S.

325

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of ...

326

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure ...

327

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products...

328

Technology Commercialization Fund - Home - Energy ...  

How the Technology Commercialization Fund Works. When awarded, fund dollars must be spent on prototype advancement and cannot be used for scientific ...

329

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subpart W. Statutory Authority The current energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment are mandated by Part A-1, the "Certain Industrial Equipment" of...

330

OpenEI - commercial building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4040 en Commercial Reference Building: Quick Service Restaurant http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode441

331

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of new energy ...

332

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office - Energy  

Commercialization Contacts. Here you'll find contact information for any questions or comments you may have about the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ...

333

Available Technologies: Superinsulated Commercial Window ...  

Superinsulated Commercial Window Framing System. IB-3155. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Window and faade framing systems for non-residential building c ...

334

SF 6432-CI Commercial Items  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or alcoholic beverages while on the premises; Control : SF 6432-CI Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for Commercial Items Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release...

335

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amendments and Correction to Petitions for Waiver and Interim Waiver for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for...

336

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Standard Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering amending energy...

337

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Collection on Commercial Equipment Labeling Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy is seeking information...

338

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

339

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial fans and blowers. Fans and blowers are...

340

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for small electric motors beginning 2015. A small commercial or industrial electric motor converts electrical energy to rotating mechanical energy. When operating, the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High output lamp with high brightness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Using the output file from a Gaussian frequency calculation to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... extract the essential data from a Gaussian output file and compute thermodynamic functions at several temperatures. The basic data are also ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Today in Energy - Seasonal hydroelectric output drives down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased hydroelectric output in the Pacific Northwest drove daily, on-peak prices of electricity below $10 per megawatthour in late April (see chart above) at the ...

344

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with sealing duct air leakage in commercialassociated with sealing duct air leakage in the commercialby the air punctures the glue bridge sealing the leak. The

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications Specify actual fan design kW/CFM if desired. Ifconstant flow rate fan design power part-load-ratiorelevant than the original fan design data. Similarly, if

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the same time to the fan flow under design conditions; andat part-load fan operation as at design conditions. Thistime to the fan shaft power under design conditions; Part

Wray, Craig P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sizing and design, e.g. , excessive fan-power requirement,fan-power and energy savings could be realized by better design

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so that higher electricity rates are applied to the on- peakthe demand charges and TOU electricity rate would change theAs an example, the electricity rate schedules in two

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

countries because of current utility rate structures and thehours or both. Many utilities offer rate schedules whichare utility load curves, load factors, rates, capital and

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997).1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, American Society1997a.1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, Chapter 3, "Heat1997b. 1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, Chapter 32, ''

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infiltration rates, space conditioning energy use, and peakgas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughlymajority of this space conditioning energy passes through

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congress of Turkey, Izmir, Turkey, 1986, (in Turkish).mentals & Applications, Izmir, Turkey, June 27-July 8, 1988.

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility Southern California Edison San Dieao Gas & Elec. Co.Salt River Project Boston Edison No Maximum No Maxime'm Noin Southern Califor- nia Edison's (SCE) service area ($50/kW

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Research, Berkeley, CEDR-02-98. California EnergyDesign Research (CEDR), University of California; Berkeley.Design Research (CEDR), University of California, Berkeley.

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

London. 1964. C Compact Heat Exchangers, 2nd Edition, C NewLondon. 1964. C Compact Heat Exchangers, 2nd Ed. , McGraw- C

Wray, Craig P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used, i.e. , water, ice, and phase ch_. _gesystems. Of theseadvantages over the ice and phase change systems [7-9]: (1)As an alternative to ice, other phase change materials have

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of reduction in on-peak demand and the ratio of electrlcaluntil recently [1-3]. Peak demand is important becauseexpected increases in peak demand. Peak load energy is also

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design." Atlanta, American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, andRefrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers Brake horsepower Building Management System Constant air volume Center for Environmental Design

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design: lt was found that the systems designed by HVAC designers with little or no experience in field-erected refrigeration

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the Load Profile. $1 is the daily coolingload,c) illus- trates a design load profile for a partial storageDay Design Day Hourly Load Profile for a Building with a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air leakage, and heat conduction gains," Lawrence Berkeleyheat conduction losses due to both heat conduction through duct walls and

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains." Final Report ofof air leakage and heat conduction may lead to inappropriatethermal losses due to heat conduction through duct walls

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Efficient Thermal Energy Distribution in Commercial Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cconolllic studics havc shown, dccp rcductions in CO2 cmissions can nc achicvcd with cxisting tcchnologics cconomy or today's c.lrs thaI havc thc salnc pcrrormanl:C. nut lhcy would c(}sl 11()morc to own control for fucl-hound nitrogen would hc Icss costly for hiomass than for coal. Typical co.lls havc

364

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Daily Load Profiles for ASEAN Countries. (a) Indonesia, (b) Malaysia, (c) Philippines, and (

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the top story of a building, insulation located at theplenum. The building had R-11 insulation located above thebuildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation.

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Potential impact of consumer choice on cogenerator's short-run price and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

Conditions were derived under which optimal price-output combinations can be determined for a profit-maximizing cogenerator faced with a demand constraint for useful energy. Four cases were considered. In two cases, all energy produced was sold to the end-use market and, in the other two, some electricity was sold to the grid. The effects of price regulation on energy output were also covered. In the short-run, in all four cases, whether or not the necessary conditions for Pareto optimality are satisfied is problematic. If the cogenerator monopolizes alternative supplies of energy, price regulation will not necessarily reduce energy expenditures. The short-term effects of constrained energy demand can only be determined with a knowledge of the cost and demand functions of thermal energy and electricity.

Poyer, D.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor #12;Overview · Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) Air Brake System · North American Standard Level-1

368

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

369

3129 Commercial Analysis 20130205 LBNL - Home - Energy ...  

Commercialization-Analysis-&Roadmap-- ... theenergycontentofthegasand ... commercialized, it must meet a market demanda demand ...

370

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps...

371

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

372

Northern Municipal Power Agency - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category...

373

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local...

374

EIA Energy Kids - In Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Using & Saving Energy In Commercial Buildings. How do commercial buildings like offices, hospitals, schools, places of worship, warehouses, hotels, ...

375

Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are here Home Savings Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and...

376

Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Savings Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy...

377

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Assistance Program  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Commercialization Assistance Program. The NREL Commercialization Assistance Program (NCAP) helps emerging ...

378

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Agreements for Commercializing Technology. NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a ...

379

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial InstallerContractor Savings...

380

Events - EERE Commercialization Office - Home - Energy ...  

Bookmark Events - EERE Commercialization Office on Google; Bookmark Events - EERE Commercialization Office on Delicious; Rank Events - EERE ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

382

Energy analysis of facade-integrated photovoltaic systems applied to UAE commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a growing concern in the UAE. At present, the embodied energy pay-back time (EPBT) is the criterion used for comparing the viability of such technology against other forms. However, the impact of PV technology on the thermal performance of buildings is not considered at the time of EPBT estimation. If additional energy savings gained over the PV system life are also included, the total EPBT could be shorter. This paper explores the variation of the total energy of building integrated photovoltaic systems (BiPV) as a wall cladding system applied to the UAE commercial sector and shows that the ratio between PV output and saving in energy due to PV panels is within the range of 1:3-1:4. The result indicates that for the southern and western facades in the UAE, the embodied energy pay-back time for photovoltaic system is within the range of 12-13 years. When reductions in operational energy are considered, the pay-back time is reduced to 3.0-3.2 years. This study comes to the conclusion that the reduction in operational energy due to PV panels represents an important factor in the estimation of EPBT. (author)

Radhi, Hassan [Architectural Engineering Department, UAE University, Al-ain (United Arab Emirates)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Commercial Development Business Development 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Technology Commercialization www.techtransfer.umd.edu #12;OVERVIEWOVERVIEW · Opening remarks www.techtransfer.umd.edu #12;Types of Intellectual Property: PatentsTypes of Intellectual Property of Technology Commercialization www.techtransfer.umd.edu #12;Types of Intellectual Property: Copyright

Davies, Christopher

384

Commercialization of fuel-cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O'Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Mapping of Indian computer science research output, 1999---2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research output of India in computer science during 1999---2008 is analyzed in this paper on several parameters including total research output, its growth, rank and global publication share, citation impact, share of international collaborative ... Keywords: Computer science, Information technology, Mapping, Research priorities in computer

B. M. Gupta; Avinash Kshitij; Charu Verma

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module (Engineering Materials)  

SciTech Connect

The drawings listed on the Drawing List provide the data and specifications for constructing a SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module as used in the SLAC PEP storage ring instrumentation and control system. It is a CAMAC module used as an output interface module from CAMAC signals.

Not Available

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 548 Solar Thermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-548) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional

388

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) regulates the energy efficiency of small, large, and very large commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps. Commercial air conditioners and heat pumps are air-cooled, water-cooled, evaporatively-cooled, or water source unitary air conditioners or heat pumps that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps, and SPVUs, will save approximately 1.7 quads of energy and result in approximately $28.9 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. These standards will avoid about 90.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 31.1 million automobiles. The standard implemented in 2010 for very large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps will save approximately 0.43 quads of energy and result in approximately $4.3 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. The standard will avoid about 22.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 4.4 million automobiles.

389

Active solar thermal design manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual is aimed at systems design engineers, architects, system supplier/installers, and contractor/builders. Practical information for both skilled and inexperienced designers. Solar thermal applications focuses on residential and commercial space heating, potable hot water heating, process water heating, and space cooling.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Commercial fishery data from three proposed OTEC sites  

SciTech Connect

The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants may affect fish populations in the regions surrounding the plants. As an initial step in estimating the possible impacts of OTEC power plants on local fishery resources at three proposed sites, commercial fishery records were used to identify common commercially-important species and to obtain a general impression of the abundance of those species at the sites. The sites examind are in the waters adjacent to Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico (PROTEC), and in the Islands of Hawaii offshore from Kahe Point, Oahu (O'OTEC) and Keahole Point, Hawaii (HOTEC).

Ryan, C.J.; Jones, A.T.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heaters, gas-fired and oil-fired instantaneous water heaters and hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks. Commercial water heating equipment is used to...

395

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Packaged Boilers Determination Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated this rulemaking to...

396

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Packaged Boilers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of...

397

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Energy Conservation Standard Commercial Clothes Washers Energy Conservation Standard Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering whether to revise its energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers. This current rulemaking will satisfy the requirement to publish the second final rule by January 1, 2015 as mandated by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates The DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document for commercial clothes washers. 77 FR 48108 (August 13, 2012). Public Meeting Information

398

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Promoting Energy Savings for Businesses S igned by President Bush on August 8, 2005, the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) lays the foundation for the new Federal tax incentives for consumers and businesses that pursue energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy. For updated information about the tax incentives, see www.energy.gov. This web- site also describes other EPACT provisions of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building owners and lessees who purchase and install energy-saving products in their businesses can qualify for a tax deduction under EPACT. Buildings must achieve a 50 percent reduction in

399

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Commercial and Industrial Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Pumps are used in agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. Currently there are no energy conservation standards for pumps. The Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct an analysis of the energy use, emissions, costs, and benefits associated with this equipment during the commercial and industrial pumps energy conservation standards rulemaking. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document. 78 FR 7304 (Feb. 1, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking page.

400

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Compressors Determination Commercial and Industrial Compressors Determination Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to determine that commercial and industrial compressors meet the criteria for covered equipment under Part A-1 of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a Proposed Coverage Determination concerning commercial and industrial compressors. 77 FR 76972 (Dec. 31, 2012). Public Meeting Information No public meeting is scheduled at this time. Submitting Public Comments The comment period is closed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part A-1 of Title III (42 U.S.C. 6311-6317) establishes a similar program for ''Certain Industrial Equipment,'' which includes commercial refrigeration equipment. Amendments to...

402

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Large, and Very Large, Air-Cooled Commercial Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Pursuant to Section...

403

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for automatic commercial ice-making equipment cover maximum energy use and maximum condenser water use of cube ice machines with harvest rates between 50 and 2,500 lbs of ice...

404

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and heat pumps are air-cooled, water-cooled, evaporatively-cooled, or water source unitary air conditioners or heat pumps that are used for space conditioning of commercial...

405

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Industrial Fans and Blowers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are no federal standards or test procedures for commercial and...

406

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automatic Commercial Ice Makers Energy Conservation Standard Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The purpose of this rulemaking is to: 1)...

407

Intitutional constraints to fusion commercialization  

SciTech Connect

The major thrust of this report is that the long time frame associated with the development of commercial fusion systems in the context of the commercialization and institutional history of an allied technology, fission-power, suggests that fusion commercialization will not occur without active and broad-based support on the part of the Nation's political leaders. Its key recommendation is that DOE fusion planners devote considerable resources to analytical efforts aimed at determining the need for fusion and the timing of that need, in order to convince policymakers that they need do more than preserve fusion as an option for application at some indefinite point in the future. It is the thesis of the report that, in fact, an act of political vision on the part of the Nation's leaders will be required to accomplish fusion commercialization.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bemis, Jr., Curtis E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

CPC thermal collector test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of test procedures has evolved at Argonne National Laboratory for establishing the performance of compound parabolic and related concentrating thermal collectors with large angular fields of view. The procedures range from separate thermal and optical tests, to overall performance tests. A calorimetric ratio technique has been developed to determine the heat output of a collector without knowledge of the heat transfer fluid's mass flow rate and heat capacity. Sepcial attention is paid to the problem of defining and measuring the incident solar flux with respect to which the collector efficiency is to be calculated.

Reed, K A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research. 2 Typically, in a combined cycle power plant the exhaust from a gas combustion turbine is routed for commercial customers. Onsite cogeneration plants can supply thermal and electrical energy for 3 The World, cogeneration plants recover `waste' heat for thermal applications like space and hot water heating. Almost any

413

M-C Power commercialization program overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Competition in the electric generation market will increase, owing to unbundling and repackaging of electric energy services. One technology that will enable electric companies to expand their role in the energy services marketplace is the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Distributed power plants using MCFCs can fill the demand for localized, efficient, and environmentally friendly energy supplies at the lowest possible cost. This type of equipment will allow electric companies to supply the majority of a customer`s electric and thermal energy needs from small power plants located at the customer`s facilities. M-C Power`s mission is the development and commercialization of MCFC stacks. Advanced separator plates were designed, and cost of non-repeat hardware was reduced. In the technology development phase of the commercialization program, a 250 KW MCFC demonstration plant at the Naval Air Station Miramar in Sand Diego is the culminating event in the product development test project. Product requirements, economic analysis, and market entry are discussed. This is the 2nd year of a 5-year program.

Camara, E.H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

415

Generalized Exponential Markov and Model Output Statistics: A Comparative Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a comparative verification of Model Output Statistics (MOS) against Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM), a single station forecasting technique which uses only the surface observation and climatology as input. The verification was ...

Thomas J. Perrone; Robert G. Miller

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

417

Model-Inspired Predictors for Model Output Statistics (MOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses the problem of the choice of the predictors for the multiple linear regression in model output statistics. Rather than devising a selection procedure directly aimed at the minimization of the final scores, it is examined ...

Piet Termonia; Alex Deckmyn

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliance Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Email: carlisles@cvsa.org Phone: 301-830-6147 CVSA Levels of Inspections Level I Full inspection Level II Walk Around - Driver - Vehicle Level III Driver - Paperwork Level IV Special Project - Generally focus on one item CVSA Levels of Inspections Level V Vehicle Only Level VI Enhanced RAM Level VII Jurisdictional Mandated * 8 basic classes/year held in various states * Prerequisites: CVSA Level I and HAZMAT certified * Industry attends course * To date 135 classes/2268 attendees * Currently 702 certified Level VI

419

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s for chilled water thermal energy and primary loop supply28 Location for hot water thermal energy meter for Bldgsensors to determine thermal energy flow rates. Measurement

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

422

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

423

Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and, beginning in 2001, non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from ...

424

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 4 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived ...

425

Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology in Tennessee to demonstrate, test, evaluation, and showcase innovative commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety

426

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Speaker(s): Thomas Durkin Date: February 23, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Moira Howard-Jeweler This seminar presentation will be video-conferenced from our Washington, DC Projects office.) According to USGBC, LBNL, and CBECS data, commercial/institutional buildings use one quarter of all the energy consumed in the US. Depending on the geographic area of the country, heating can be as little as 30% (Houston), or as much as 68% (Minneapolis) of the building total. Mr. Durkin will share his experience in dramatically reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from completed projects shows 50 to 60%

427

Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only October 8, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the base model and other assumptions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement What is the deliverable fluid type? Water Steam What fuel is used? Gas Oil How many boilers will you purchase? unit(s) Performance Factors Existing What is the capacity of the existing boiler? MBtu/hr* What is the thermal efficiency of the existing boiler? % Et New What is the capacity of the new boiler?

428

An Input-Output Analysis of the Relationships between Communications and Travel for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial machinery manufacturing Commercial and service industry machinery HVAC and commercial refrigeration

Lee, Taihyeong; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

431

Commercially Valuable Smart Grid Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 4, 2010 1 February 4, 2010 1 Commercially Valuable Smart Grid Data Commercially Valuable Smart Grid Data Question: What is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) approach for ensuring confidentiality of information that contains confidential and/or proprietary information that recipients are required to submit in carrying out their Metrics and Benefits Reporting Plan obligations? Answer: DOE does not anticipate requiring delivery of any "proprietary" information, i.e., confidential information developed at private expense outside the DOE grant. For data developed under a SGIG grant, DOE has the right to obtain and publish such data. However, certain "commercially valuable data" as set forth in more detail below, may be protected from publication.

432

Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

available to all PGW commercial and industrial customers installing high efficiency boilers or eligible commercial food service equipment. All equipment must meet program...

434

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

435

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

436

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption...

437

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The...

438

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home Savings Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting...

439

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

440

Commercial Real Estate: Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-100 Energy Performance Rating for eligible commercial building types, and an Energy Use Intensity index for all commercial building types. > Set Energy Performance Goals. SPPs...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential and Commercial Integration Energy systems integration R&D at the small-scale, residential and commercial integration level encompasses diverse technologies such as...

442

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Conservation and Commercialization in...

443

OTEC- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers a commercial lighting retrofit program that provides rebates for commercial businesses that change existing lighting to more energy...

444

Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 To improve the ability of Federal agencies to...

445

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

446

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Commercialization Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Commercialization Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Commercialization Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center:...

447

Commercialization Support for Business Program (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commercialization Support for Business Program supports product and process commercialization and business development in all sectors and all regions of the province.

448

Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Name Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap...

449

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plumbing Products Test Procedure Plumbing Products Test Procedure Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy has proposed to update its test procedures for showerheads, faucets, water closets, urinals,and commercial prerinse spray valves, collectively known as plumbing products. This activity is mandated by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 2007 (EPCA). Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a final rule regarding test procedures for showerheads, faucets, water closets, urinals, and commercial prerinse spray valves. 78 FR 62970 (October 23, 2013). Public Meeting Information

450

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The world of quantum noise and the fundamental output process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stationary theory of quantum stochastic processes of second order is outlined. It includes KMS processes in wide sense like the equilibrium finite temperature quantum noise given by the Planck's spectral formula. It is shown that for each stationary noise there exists a natural output process output process which is identical to the noise in the infinite temperature limit, and flipping with the noise if the time is reversed at finite temperature. A canonical Hilbert space representation of the quantum noise and the fundamental output process is established and a decomposition of their spectra is found. A brief explanation of quantum stochastic integration with respect to the input-output processes is given using only correlation functions. This provides a mathematical foundation for linear stationary filtering transformations of quantum stochastic processes. It is proved that the colored quantum stationary noise and its time-reversed version can be obtained in the second order theory by a linear nonadapted filtering of the standard vacuum noise uniquely defined by the canonical creation and annihilation operators on the spectrum of the input-output pair.

V. P. Belavkin; O. Hirota; R. Hudson

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including commercial fryers, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

453

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

454

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

455

Commercial Cool Storage Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art handbook provides comprehensive guidance for designing ice and chilled-water storage systems for commercial buildings. HVAC engineers can take advantage of attractive rates and incentives offered by utilities to increase the market for cool storage systems.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Thermal Conversion Factors | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Conversion Factors Thermal Conversion Factors Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

457

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate Step 1 Incentive Limits (contact utility to determine current incentive limits): Single-family residential systems that displace natural gas: $2,719 Single-family residential systems that displace electricity or propane: $1,834 Commercial and multifamily residential systems that displace natural gas: $500,000 Commercial and multifamily residential systems that displace electricity or propane: $250,000

458

Solar thermal electric hybridization issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric systems have an advantage over many other renewable energy technologies because the former use heat as an intermediate energy carrier. This is an advantage as it allows for a relatively simple method of hybridization by using heat from fossil-fuel. Hybridization of solar thermal electric systems is a topic that has recently generated significant interest and controversy and has led to many diverse opinions. This paper discusses many of the issues associated with hybridization of solar thermal electric systems such as what role hybridization should play; how it should be implemented; what are the efficiency, environmental, and cost implications; what solar fraction is appropriate; how hybrid systems compete with solar-only systems; and how hybridization can impact commercialization efforts for solar thermal electric systems.

Williams, T A; Bohn, M S; Price, H W

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

460

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Maximal output purity and capacity for asymmetric unital qudit channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider generalizations of depolarizing channels to maps in which the identity channel is replaced by a convex combinations of unitary conjugations. We show that one can construct unital channels of this type for which the input which achieves maximal output purity is unique. We give conditions under which multiplicativity of the maximal p-norm and additivity of the minimal output entropy. We also show that the Holevo capacity need not equal log d - the minimal entropy as one might expect for a convex combination of unitary conjugations. Conversely, we give examples for which this condition holds, but the channel has no evident covariance properties.

Nilanjana Datta; Mary Beth Ruskai

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... commercial buildings, manufacturing, ... solar, wind, geothermal, ...

463

Bio-Imaging Technology Transfer and Commercialization ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-Imaging Technology Transfer and Commercialization Showcase. For Immediate Release: August 25, 2009. ...

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

465

Number of U.S. Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2

466

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5b

467

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5a

468

Mike Furey | Technology Commercialization and Partnerships  

Nonproliferation & National Security; Nuclear Science & Technology; Technology Commercialization & Partnerships; Sustainable Energy ...

469

BNL | Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | Call for ...  

Environmental Sciences; ... project management assistance; ... Commercialization Manager at Office of Technology Transfer and Partnerships ...

470

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7a

471

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table7c

472

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends

473

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7b

474

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies depending on utility Program Info Start Date Varies Expiration Date Varies State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on utility Provider Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company Certain municipal utilities in Massachusetts, in cooperation with

475

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: See program web site Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.06/kWh/yr saved CFL Bulbs: $1 - $5 CFL Fixtures: $22/fixture High Performance T8 Lighting Retrofit: $4-$20/fixture retrofit

476

Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Retrofit Lighting: $3 - $400 per unit New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50 per unit Provider Flathead Electric Cooperative Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program and a new

477

Wells Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Wells Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed....

478

Energy Efficiency Fund (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

479

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

480

The solar energy industries FY 1995 appropriations recommendations for the U. S. Department of Energy: The solar commercialization challenge  

SciTech Connect

This article contains the Solar Energy Industries Association budget recommendations for DOE for the commercialization of solar energy. Areas covered are photovoltaics, solar buildings, solar thermal, and other programs such as resource assessment and integrated resource planning.

Butler, B.; Sklar, S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal output commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage to concentrating solar thermal power plants expands both the amount of power and the timing of production. With thermal energy storage, plant power output can be firmed and shaped to better match consumer demand for electricity. Thermal storage associated with these plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity productio...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

Development of a pre-screening methodology to aid in determining potential energy savings in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology developed to aid in the determination of potential sources and the potential scale of energy savings in commercial buildings. As a pre-screening tool, the methodology is designed to serve as the first analysis of the buildings potential for energy savings using limited data prior to a site visit. A Microsoft Excel-based tool was developed to perform this analysis semi-automatically with user operation. A fundamental concept used in this methodology is that of the energy balance load, defined as heating plus electricity minus cooling. The methodology is designed to require only historical weather data, historical whole-building energy consumption data, the total conditioned floor area, and the basic function of the building. Upon following a short procedure developed and outlined in this thesis, this limited data yields information that can lead to conclusions about the buildings energy consumption. The output information includes estimates of a major building thermal parameterthe buildings overall heat transfer coefficient including the total outside air flow rate into the building. In addition to providing this information, the Excel tool includes already-formatted plots of the energy consumption commonly used in energy analysis. These include cooling, heating, and electricity vs. both outside air temperature and time. Three case studies illustrate the utility of this methodology. The calculated energy balance loadcalculated using parameters determined through this methodologyyielded values on average within 5.4% of measured values.

Hicks, Dave C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The Role of Energy Storage in Commercial Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motivation and Background of Study This project was motivated by the need to understand the full value of energy storage (thermal and electric energy storage) in commercial buildings, the opportunity of benefits for building operations and the potential interactions between a building and a smart grid infrastructure. On-site or local energy storage systems are not new to the commercial building sector; they have been in place in US buildings for decades. Most building-scale storage technologies are based on thermal or electrochemical storage mechanisms. Energy storage technologies are not designed to conserve energy, and losses associated with energy conversion are inevitable. Instead, storage provides flexibility to manage load in a building or to balance load and generation in the power grid. From the building owner's perspective, storage enables load shifting to optimize energy costs while maintaining comfort. From a grid operations perspective, building storage at scale could provide additional flexibility to grid operators in managing the generation variability from intermittent renewable energy resources (wind and solar). To characterize the set of benefits, technical opportunities and challenges, and potential economic values of storage in a commercial building from both the building operation's and the grid operation's view-points is the key point of this project. The research effort was initiated in early 2010 involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify these opportunities from a commercial buildings perspective. This report summarizes the early discussions, literature reviews, stakeholder engagements, and initial results of analyses related to the overall role of energy storage in commercial buildings. Beyond the summary of roughly eight months of effort by the laboratories, the report attempts to substantiate the importance of active DOE/BTP R&D activities in this space.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.; Finley, C.; Koritarov, V. S.; Molburg, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Fuli; Brackney, L.; Florita, A. R.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps. HID lamps are electric discharge lamps and include high-pressure sodium, mercury vapor, and metal halide lamps. HID lamps require an HID ballast to start and regulate electric current flow through the lamp. HID lamps are used in street and roadway lighting, area lighting such as for parking lots and plazas, industrial and commercial building interior lighting, security lighting for commercial, industrial, and residential spaces, and landscape lighting. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Energy Conservation Standard and Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Test Procedures.

487

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards for single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps as a separate equipment class since 2008. Before 2010, this equipment was regulated under the broader scope of commercial air conditioning and heating equipment. Single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps are commercial air conditioning and heating equipment with its main components arranged in a vertical fashion. They are mainly used in modular classrooms, modular office buildings, telecom shelters, and hotels, and are typically installed on the outside of an exterior wall or in a closet against an exterior wall but inside the building.

488

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clothes Washers Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential clothes washers since 1988. Residential clothes washers use a water solution of soap and/or detergent and mechanical agitation or other movement to clean clothes. These include automatic, semi-automatic, and "other" clothes washers (known collectively as "clothes washer products"). This category does not include commercial clothes washers used in commercial settings, multifamily housing, or coin laundries. Standards put in place in 1994, 2004, and 2007 will save approximately 16.4 quads of energy and result in approximately $346.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2036. The standards will avoid about 870.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 170.6 million automobiles.

489

Identification of Wiener systems with binary-valued output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is concerned with identification of Wiener systems whose outputs are measured by binary-valued sensors. The system consists of a linear FIR (finite impulse response) subsystem of known order, followed by a nonlinear function with a known parametrization ... Keywords: Binary-valued observations, Identification, Joint identifiability, Parameter estimation, Periodic inputs, Sensor thresholds, Wiener systems

Yanlong Zhao; Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin; Ji-Feng Zhang

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Improved Model Output Statistics Forecasts through Model Consensus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consensus forecasts are computed by averaging model output statistics (MOS) forecasts based on the limited-area fine-mesh (LFM) model and the nested grid model (NGM) for the three-year period 199092. The test consists of four weather elements (...

Robert L. Vislocky; J. Michael Fritsch

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Asymptotically efficient parameter estimation using quantized output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies identification of systems in which only quantized output observations are available. An identification algorithm for system gains is introduced that employs empirical measures from multiple sensor thresholds and optimizes their convex ... Keywords: Cramr-Rao bound, Efficient estimator, Quantized observation, System identification

Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

494

The continuity of the output entropy of positive maps  

SciTech Connect

Global and local continuity conditions for the output von Neumann entropy for positive maps between Banach spaces of trace-class operators in separable Hilbert spaces are obtained. Special attention is paid to completely positive maps: infinite dimensional quantum channels and operations. It is shown that as a result of some specific properties of the von Neumann entropy (as a function on the set of density operators) several results on the output entropy of positive maps can be obtained, which cannot be derived from the general properties of entropy type functions. In particular, it is proved that global continuity of the output entropy of a positive map follows from its finiteness. A characterization of positive linear maps preserving continuity of the entropy (in the following sense: continuity of the entropy on an arbitrary subset of input operators implies continuity of the output entropy on this subset) is obtained. A connection between the local continuity properties of two completely positive complementary maps is considered. Bibliography: 21 titles.

Shirokov, Maxim E [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

496

Polychlorinated biphenyls in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is planning to implement a conservation acquisition program in new and existing commercial buildings. In anticipation of that program, Bonneville is examining the potential environmental effects of conservation measures in commercial buildings. An important conservation measure is the installation of new energy-efficient lighting fixtures. Some of the old lighting fixtures that these new lights will be replacing were manufactured before 1978, when polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were still used in the capacitors of the lighting ballasts. This report focuses on a summary of information about PCBs in fluorescent light fixtures manufactured before 1978. A key issue associated with these PCBs is the potential effect of lamp change-outs on ballast failure. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) speculates that installing energy-efficient lamps in old, PCB-laden ballasts may contribute to ballast failure and PCB leaks, which is addressed in Section 3 of this report. Section 2 discusses applicable standards and regulations; Section 4 describes PCB concentrations in commercial buildings. Sections 5 and 6 discuss cleanup practices and disposal options. 4 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Foley, L.O.; Jarnagin, R.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System April 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial enhanced geothermal system (EGS) project to supply electricity to the grid. Based in Churchill County, Nevada, Ormat Technologies' Desert Peak 2 EGS project has increased power output of its nearby operating geothermal field by nearly 38 percent - providing an additional 1.7 megawatts of power to the grid and validating this emerging clean energy technology. "Developing America's vast renewable energy resources sustainably is an

498

Development of a commercial photovoltaic concentrator module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ojective of this work was to develop the design and prototype of a commercial high-concentration photovoltaic (PV) module. The design is for a 282-sun point-focus concentrating module. Most of the components, subassemblies, and design features incorporate simplifications and ease of manufacturing. The Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) module is designed to incorporate high-efficiency, single-crystal silicon PV cells. The housing is made with aluminum laminated for voltage stand-off and simultaneously providing high thermal conductivity. The Fresnel lens injection molded by American Optical (AO) as singles. The cell assembly consists of a copper heat spreader, a photovoltaic cell soldered, a top and bottom contact, and a reflective secondary optical element (SOE). The cell assemblies passed all of the initial electrical characterization and high-potential tests. Under environmental cycling, the only bond that failed was the PV cell-to-heat spreader interface. The other components (top contact, bottom contact, SOE) passed all the environmental cycling tests. The cell assemblies were designed to be mounted onto the receiver section with a thermally conductive RTV. This geometry was subjected to environmental testing. There was no delamination of this bond nor was there electrical breakdown when the assemblies were subjected to the hi-pot test. A mock module was fabricated for environmental evaluation. This module was subjected to the humidity/freeze cycling to assess the performance of the lens mounting design. This module was also subjected to the rain test after the humidity/freeze cycling and checked for water leaks. The lens showed small displacement from its original position after the environmental cycling. One tablespoon of water did collect inside the module.

Saifee, S.T.; Hutchison, G. [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Strategies for OPEC`s pricing and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines OPEC pricing and output strategies, both to provide an understanding of OPECs unwise price doubling in 1979-80 and also to analyze what strategy might serve it best for the future. We focus on the unavoidable uncertainty regarding the underlying parameters that characterize the world oil market (price elasticities, income growth rates), and the sensitivity of discounted OPEC revenue to changes in these parameters, for various pricing strategies. In 1979-80, OPEC chose a high-price strategy, which could have yielded good results (like many other price-paths) if the market`s underlying parameters had been more favorable. But the price elasticities of demand and non-OPEC supply were much higher than anticipated, so that OPEC did very poorly-not only in absolute terms, but also relative to what it could have achieved if it had set its price more cautiously. We search for a robustly optimal strategy for OPEC in the future, which will serve it well relative to other strategies, regardless of the true parameter values underlying the market (within some plausible range). We conclude that OPEC`s interests will be served best by a policy of moderate output growth, at a rate no faster than that of world income growth. This will require that OPEC slow its rate of output growth since 1985, cutting it at least in half. Slowing its output growth will allow OPEC gradually to regain the market share lost after its disastrous 1979-80 price doubling, but without jeopardizing its revenue, as might a policy of more rapid increases in output. This will yield a consistently good result for OPEC, relative to alternative strategies, over a fairly wide range of demand and supply conditions. 53 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Gately, D. [New York Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat