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1

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault,

3

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes

4

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

5

Definition: Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Gradient Holes "A hole logged by a temperature probe to determine the thermal gradient. Usually involves a hole...

6

Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes Thermal Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Gradient Holes Details Activities (50) Areas (39) Regions (4) NEPA(29) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Field wide fluid flow characteristics if an array of wells are drilled Thermal: Mapping and projecting thermal anomalies Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 5.00500 centUSD 0.005 kUSD 5.0e-6 MUSD 5.0e-9 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 16.501,650 centUSD 0.0165 kUSD 1.65e-5 MUSD 1.65e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 50.005,000 centUSD

7

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration...

10

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82 degrees C at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from

12

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures have been obtained to depths up to 133 m in 22 boreholes with measurements being made at least four times in each borehole. Geothermal gradients ranged from 240C/km to 450 0C/km. References Combs, J. (1 December 1976) Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=511217"

13

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley

14

Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et Al., 1993)...

15

Thermal Gradient Holes At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

16

Thermal Gradient Holes At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

17

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration...

18

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity...

19

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration...

20

Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al....  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

22

Thermal Gradient Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

23

Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

24

Thermal Gradient Holes At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

25

Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

26

Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

27

Thermal Gradient Holes At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

28

High Thermal Gradient Directional Solidification with Liquid Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High Thermal Gradient Directional Solidification with Liquid Metal Cooling and Its Application in the Processing of Nickel-Based Superalloys.

29

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Although not part of the current effort, two deep (approximately 2000 m) exploratory wells were drilled on the north flank of Hualalai near Puu Waawaa cinder cone. The geophysical data used for siting these wells were proprietary and hence unavailable for publication; however, the temperatures measured at the bottoms of the wells were reported to be below 20degrees C. Chemical analysis of water samples taken from these wells did not provide useful geothermal data due to contamination of the well water with drilling muds References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

30

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

31

High Thermal Gradient Directional Solidification and Its Application ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using zone-intensified overheating and liquid-metal cooling, high thermal gradients of up to 800 K/cm were achieved. Application of these methods in the ...

32

A New Horizontal Gradient, Continuous Flow, Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow, horizontal gradient, ice thermal diffusion chamber has been developed and tested for heterogeneous ice nucleation of aerosol particles under accurately controlled supersaturations and supercooling in the absence of a substrate. ...

E. M. Tomlinson; N. Fukuta

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The awardee conducted seismic, gravity, resistivity, and airborne magnetic surveys, drilled temperature-gradient wells, and selected a location for a test well (52-7). The test well was drilled to a total depth of 770 m during 2003. Maximum temperatures approached 140degrees C and a short flow test suggested that a production well could be drilled to 600 m and produce economic volumes of 130-140degrees C fluid. A final assessment of the resource is currently being performed. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

34

Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 8 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Crump%27s_Hot_Springs_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402699"

35

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 2 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Fish_Lake_Valley_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=511222" Categories:

36

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been characterized adequately to allow accurate siting or drilling of production wells. Some deep wells, several seismic lines, limited gravity surveys, and geochemical and geological studies have suggested that the geothermal

37

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2002) Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a

38

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1974) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1974) Coso Geothermal Area (1974) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1974 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use heat flow studies for the first time at Coso to indicate the presence or absence of abnormal heat Notes Located 10 sites for heat flow boreholes using available seismic ground noise and electrical resistivity data; data collected from 9 of 10; thermal conductivity measurements were completed using both the needle probe technique and the divided bar apparatus with a cell arrangement. In the upper few hundred meters of the subsurface heat is being transferred by a conductive heat transfer mechanism with a value of ~ 15 µcal/cm2sec; the background heat flow is ~ 3.5 HFU.

39

Geothermal potential of West-Central New Mexico from geochemical and thermal gradient data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To study the low temperature and Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of west-central New Mexico, 46 water samples were collected and geothermal gradient measurements were made in 29 wells. Water chemistry data indicate that all the samples collected are meteoric waters. High temperatures of samples taken from wells between Gallup and Tohatchi indicate these wells may derive water from a warm aquifer below the depth of the wells. The chemistries of the samples farther south on the Zuni Indian reservation suggest these waters are not circulating below 600 m of the surface. Geothermometry calculations support the conclusion that the waters sampled are meteoric. The geothermometry also indicates that the deep reservoir between Gallup and Tohatchi may be greater than 60/sup 0/C. Thermal gradient data indicate an area of high gradient on the Zuni Indian Reservation with a measured maximum of 67/sup 0/C/km between 181 m and 284 m. This high probably is not hydrologically controlled. The maximum gradients in the study area are 76/sup 0/C/km and 138/sup 0/C/km, measured just east of Springerville, Arizona. These gradients are undoubtedly controlled by circulating water, possibly heated by a magmatic source at depth and circulating back to the surface.

Levitte, D.; Gambill, D.T.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Four wells have been successfully drilled into this resource since the early 1980s using a combination of funds provided by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the United State Department of Energy (USDOE). The first three wells, FB-1, -2 and -3 have been discussed in a previous paper (Barker et al., 2005). The current status of the FBIC project to evaluate the potential geothermal resource under the reservation is that a deep

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ENERGY SCAVENGING BASED ON TRANSIENT THERMAL GRADIENTS: APPLICATION TO STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF AIRCRAFTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY SCAVENGING BASED ON TRANSIENT THERMAL GRADIENTS: APPLICATION TO STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING from its environment [2]. A possible source of energy could be thermal gradients. This paper the upper limit for the thermal energy that could be captured, let us consider a sealed tank containing 1 g

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

43

Thermal Gradient Holes At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

44

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

45

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

46

Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and related records from 28 wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) although somewhat constrained from accuracy by data gathering methods, extrapolate to undisturbed formation temperatures at specific depths below permafrost, and lead to calculated geothermal graidents between these depths. Tabulation of the results show that extrapolated undisturbed temperatures range from a minimum of 98/sup 0/F (37/sup 0/C) at 4000 feet (1220 m) to a maximum of 420/sup 0/F (216/sup 0/C) at 20,260 feet (6177 m) and that geothermal gradients range from 0.34/sup 0/F/100' (6/sup 0/C/km) between 4470 feet to 7975 feet (Lisburne No. 1) and 3.15/sup 0/F/100' (57/sup 0/C/km) between 6830 feet to 7940 feet (Drew Point No. 1). Essential information needed for extrapolations consists of: time-sequential bottom-hole temperatures during wire-line logging of intermediate and deep intervals of the borehole; the times that circulating drilling fluids had disturbed the formations; and the subsequent times that non-circulating drilling fluids had been in contact with the formation. In several wells presumed near direct measures of rock temperatures recorded from formation fluids recovered by drill stem tests (DST) across thin (approx. 10-20 foot) intervals are made available. We believe that the results approach actual values close enough to serve as approximations of the thermal regimes in appropriate future investigations. Continuous temperature logs obtained at the start and end of final logging operations, conductivity measurements, and relatively long-term measurements of the recovery from disturbance at shallow depths in many of the wells will permit refinements of our values and provide determination of temperatures at other depths. 4 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

Blanchard, D.C.; Tailleur, I.L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Estimation of in-situ thermal conductivities from temperature gradient measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been developed to study the effect of variable thermal conductivity of the formations, and the wellbore characteristics, on the fluid temperature behavior inside the wellbore during injection or production and after shut-in. During the injection or production period the wellbore fluid temperature is controlled mainly by the fluid flow rate and the heat lost from the fluid to the formation. During the shut-in period, the fluid temperature is strongly affected by differences in the formation thermal conductivities. Based on the results of the present analysis, two methods for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity were derived. First, the line source concept is extended to estimate values of the formation thermal conductivities utilizing the fluid temperature record during the transient period of injection or production and shut-in. The second method is applied when a well is under thermal equilibrium conditions. Values of the formation thermal conductivities can also be estimated by using a continuous temperature gradient log and by measuring the thermal conductivity of the formation at a few selected wellbore locations.

Hoang, V.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermal leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West. References Roy A. Cunniff, Roger L. Bowers (2005) Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I, Ii, And Iii For The Animas Valley, Nm Geothermal Resource Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Cunniff_%26_Bowers,_2005)&oldid=387460"

49

Clackamas 4800-foot thermal gradient hole: Cascade geothermal drilling: Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Power Company (Thermal) completed a thermal gradient hole to about 5000 feet (1524 m) total depth in Section 28, Township 8 South, Range 8 East, Willamette Meridian, Marion County, Oregon. The objective was to obtain data for the characterization of the deep hydrothermal regime in the Cascades volcanic region in order to better define its geothermal resource potential. The depth and location of the thermal gradient hole were designed by Thermal to test the basis of the Clackamas geothermal system exploration model developed by Chevron Resources Company.

Iovenitti, J.L.; D'Olier, W.L.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a non-equilibrated maximum temperature probably in the range of 157degrees C and a very complicated geologic structure.

51

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Brian D. Fairbank, Kim V. Niggemann (2004) Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Blue_Mountain_Area_(Fairbank_%26_Neggemann,_2004)&oldid=386709" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

52

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two separate phases of geothermal exploratory drilling have occurred on the lower East Rift. The first was essentially a wildcat venture with relatively little surface exploratory data having been gathered, whereas the second was initiated after somewhat more geoscience information had been acquired under the Hawaii Geothermal Project. The results of the successful exploratory drilling program on the Kilauea

53

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A deep borehole was drilled at the summit of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, between April 6 and July 9, 1973. The hole is located approximately 1 km south of the edge of Halemaumau crater (Figs. 1 and 2), a crater within the summit caldera of the volcano. The total depth of the hole is 1262 m (4141 ft) measured from the derrick floor at an altitude of 1102 m (3616 ft). A description of the drilling program and some of the results obtained have

54

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The first and only Seabee drilling project was the installation of five TGHs at the Camp Wilson region of the MCAGCC Marine base near Twenty-Nine Palms, CA. While the program was a success and GPO identified an anomaly where a deep, slim hole is to be drilled in June, 2010, the Seabee rig was sent oversees soon after drilling was completed. If/when another rig

55

Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

56

Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a silk protein which also has a very high thermal conductivity, I combine and extend the mentioned ideas, and propose the general conjecture that several major transitions of evolution were effected by thermal processes, with four additional partial conjectures: (1) The first organisms used heat engines during thermosynthesis in convection cells; (2) The first eukaryotic cells used MT during thermosynthesis in the thermal gradient above SHV; (3) The first metazoans used transport of water or in water during thermosynthesis above SHV under an ice-covered ocean during the Gaskiers Snowball Earth; and (4) The first mammalian brain used a thermal machinery based on thermal gradients in or across the cortex. When experimentally proven these conjectures, which are testable by the methods of synthetic biology, would significantly enhance our understanding of life.

Anthonie W. J. Muller

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Chocolate Mountains Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Shallow temperature gradient drilling began at the CMAGR in January of 2010. 13 temperature gradient holes were completed to a depth of 500' below ground surface. Sites were selected based on the compilation of previous exploration and resulting data is being integrated into the most recent geologic model. This model will form the basis for the selection of a deeper (2000'-4000') temperature gradient drilling campaign at the CMAGR in

58

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy recently completed a temperature gradient hole (TGH) drilling campaign. Results suggest multiple resources may exist on HAD lands. To further define the shallow resource, the Navy will drill one or two

59

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes From November 2008 to March 2009, Seabees from the Naval Construction Division (NCD) successfully completed fivetemperature gradient holes for the GPO. Samples taken from each hole were similar in nature; mixtures of sand and conglomerates with the occasional granite sections were typically encountered. Each hole varied slightly in depth, ranging from 600ft to 1,000ft; however, each hole has been completed to acceptable standards of the GPO. Upon completion of drilling, 3" metal tubing was inserted to

60

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500' deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400' encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

62

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Chocolate Mountains Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In lieu of Seabee TGH drilling, GPO awarded a large IDIQ TGH drilling contract in December, 2009. Over the next two years, 90 500-ft TGHs will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these programs can be found in the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne papers also available in this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A. Tiedeman, W. C. Huang (2010) Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview

63

Phase-field modeling of temperature gradient driven pore migration coupling with thermal conduction  

SciTech Connect

Pore migration in a temperature gradient (Soret effect) is investigated by a phase-field model coupled with a heat transfer calculation. Pore migration is observed towards the high temperature domain with velocities that agree with analytical solution. Due to the low thermal conductivity of the pores, the temperature gradient across individual pores is increased, which in turn, accelerates the pore migration. In particular, for pores filled with xenon and helium, the pore velocities are increased by a factor of 2.2 and 2.1, respectively. A quantitative equation is then derived to predict the influence of the low thermal conductivity of pores.

Liangzhe Zhang; Michael R Tonks; Paul C Millett; Yongfeng Zhang; Karthikeyan Chockalingam; Bulent Biner

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal lens elimination by gradient-reduced zone coupling of optical beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal gradient-reduced-zone laser includes a laser medium and an optically transparent plate with an index of refraction that is less than the index of refraction of the laser medium. The pump face of the laser medium is bonded to a surface of the optically transparent member. Pump light is directed through the transparent plate to optically pump the solid state laser medium. Heat conduction is mainly through the surface of the laser medium where the heat is introduced by the pump light. Heat flows in a direction opposite to that of the pump light because the side of the laser medium that is opposite to that of the pump face is not in thermal contact with a conductor and thus there is no heat flux (and hence, no temperature gradient), thus producing a thermal gradient-reduced zone. A laser cavity is formed around the laser medium such that laser light oscillating within the laser cavity reflects by total-internal-reflection from the interface between the pump face and the optically transparent plate and enters and exits through a thermal gradient-reduced zone.

Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Measurements of Electron Thermal Transport due to Electron Temperature Gradient Modes in a Basic Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production and identification of electron temperature gradient modes have already been reported [X. Wei, V. Sokolov, and A. K. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010)]. Now a measurement of electron thermal conductivity via a unique high frequency triple probe yielded a value of {chi}{sub perpendiculare} ranging between 2 and 10 m{sup 2}/s, which is of the order of a several gyrobohm diffusion coefficient. This experimental result appears to agree with a value of nonlocal thermal conductivity obtained from a rough theoretical estimation and not inconsistent with gyrokinetic simulation results for tokamaks. The first experimental scaling of the thermal conductivity versus the amplitude of the electron temperature gradient fluctuation is also obtained. It is approximately linear, indicating a strong turbulence signature.

Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

HYDROGEN REDISTRIBUTION IN THIN PLATES OF ZIRCONIUM UNDER LARGE THERMAL GRADIENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By using experimental data, the quantities determimng the extent of dissolved H redistribution under a thermal gradient in Zircaloy were calculated. It is concluded that the phenomenon of hydride precipitation by means of thermaI gradient diffusion of dissolved H in Zircaloy fuel plates and cladding places much more severe restrictions on the allowable pre-operation H content of such elements than was hitherto suspected. The specific effects of operating conditions on H content of plates and cladding are presented in detail. (M. H.R.)

Markowitz, J.M.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In lieu of Seabee TGH drilling, GPO awarded a large IDIQ TGH drilling contract in December, 2009. Over the next two years, 90 500-ft TGHs will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these programs can be found in the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne papers also available in this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A.

69

Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

70

Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Spencer Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Spencer Hot Springs?) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web

71

Excitonic enhancement of nonradiative energy transfer from a quantum well in the optical near field of energy gradient quantum dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excitonic enhancement of nonradiative energy transfer from a quantum well in the optical near field of energy gradient quantum dots Sedat Nizamoglu, Pedro Ludwig Hernández-Martínez, Evren Mutlugun, Durmus misfit strains on the band offsets of Zn1-xBexO/ZnO quantum wells: A first-principles analysis J. Appl

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

72

Well-posedness of a parabolic moving-boundary problem in the setting of Wasserstein gradient flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a gradient-flow framework based on the Wasserstein metric for a parabolic moving-boundary problem that models crystal dissolution and precipitation. In doing so we derive a new weak formulation for this moving-boundary problem and we show that this formulation is well-posed. In addition, we develop a new uniqueness technique based on the framework of gradient flows with respect to the Wasserstein metric. With this uniqueness technique, the Wasserstein framework becomes a complete well-posedness setting for this parabolic moving-boundary problem.

Jacobus W. Portegies; Mark A. Peletier

2008-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

Olander, D.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Quantitative analysis of damage in PBX 9501 subjected to a linear thermal gradient  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a series of experiments in which a cylinder of PBX 9501 is placed in a specially designed fixture with each end fixed at a different temperature. This arrangement sets up a thermal gradient in the explosive that is carefully controlled and maintained for a specified amount of time. This configuration has a number of advantages over thermally damaging separate pieces at a series of different temperatures, the principal one being that damage in this experiment is a continuous function of position. This makes analysis and distinction of regions easier and more straightforward. For the experiments reported in this paper, the explosive samples have been subjected to a series of different analysis techniques. We have used polarized light microscopy, physical adsorption, Raman spectroscopy, and small angle neutron and x-ray scattering in an attempt to characterize the particle morphology, porosity distribution, crack and void formation, and chemical state as a function of thermal treatment. While not all of the efforts were informative, the data clearly show trends and form a basis for understanding the effects of thermal damage on explosive behavior.

Asay, B. W. (Blaine W.); Henson, B. F. (Bryan F.); Peterson, P. D. (Paul D.); Mang, J. T. (Joseph T.); Smilowitz, L. B. (Laura B.); Dickson, P. M. (Peter M.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes twenty-three gold exploration holes were drilled by Newcrest Resources, Inc. during 2005 and 2006 along the range front. These holes approached or exceeded 300 m in depth and all holes encountered hot water and/or steam. Despite the high temperatures encountered at relatively shallow depths, there are no active geothermal features such as hot springs or steam vents at the surface. The presence of small outcrops of argillic alteration containing anomalous gold attracted the interest of exploration geologists. References Christopher Kratt, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Robin

76

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes MULTI-STAGE DRILLING Once a hole is drilled the natural-state pressure distribution with depth is essentially unrecoverable (Grant et al., 1982). One of the best ways to mitigate this effect is to use multi-stage drilling (White et al., 1975; Grant et al., 1982). This type of drilling was applied at Chena and its usefulness in understanding the natural flow regimes is demonstrated. Here, we illustrate how high-quality equilibrium temperature logs can often be used to identify permeable fractures. The independent interpretations of flow regimes based on temperature-depth curves and the

77

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Figure 1) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web site (www.nbmg.unr.edu/geothermal/gtmap.pdf), and from a PowerPoint presentation titled 'Geothermal Exploration Short Stories' posted on the Geothermal Resources Council web site

78

The Stability of Dilute Plasmas with Thermal and Composition Gradients. I. The Slow Conduction Limit: Overstable Gravity Modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the stability of a dilute plasma with thermal and composition gradients in the limit where conduction is slow compared to the dynamical timescale. We find necessary and sufficient conditions for stability when the background magnetic field is either parallel or perpendicular to the thermal and composition gradients that are parallel to the gravitational field. We provide approximate solutions for all the relevant modes involved, which are driven by gravity, conduction, and diffusion. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our findings for a representative galaxy cluster where helium has sedimented.

Pessah, Martin E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analysis of thermally induced permeability enhancement in geothermal injection wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is a common means of disposing of geothermal effluents and maintaining reservoir pressures. Contrary to the predictions of two-fluid models (two-viscosity) of nonisothermal injection, an increase of injectivity, with continued injection, is often observed. Injectivity enhancement and thermally-affected pressure transients are particularly apparent in short-term injection tests at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico. During an injection test, it is not uncommon to observe that after an initial pressure increase, the pressure decreases with time. As this typically occurs far below the pressure at which hydraulic fracturing is expected, some other mechanism for increasing the near-bore permeability must explain the observed behavior. This paper focuses on calculating the magnitude of the nearbore permeability changes observed in several nonisothermal injection tests conducted at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.S.; Iglesias, E.; Arellano, V.; Ortiz-Ramirez, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-9459. experimental Thermal energy storage in confinedAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Particle Swarm Optimization and Gradient Descent Methods for Optimization of PI Controller for AGC of Multi-area Thermal-Wind-Hydro Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic generation control (AGC) of three unequal interconnected Thermal, Wind and Hydro power plant has been designed with PI controller. Further computational intelligent technique Particle Swarm Optimization and conventional Gradient Descent ... Keywords: Automatic generation control, Particle swarm optimization, Gradient Descent method, Generation rate constraint, Area control error, Wind energy conversion system

Naresh Kumari, A N. Jha

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stratigraphy and alteration, 15 shallow thermal gradient holes, Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fifteen shallow thermal gradient drill holes were recently completed by Geothermal Power Corporation (GPCR) in the vicinity of the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. Five holes penetrated Tertiary granitic rocks and Precambrian gneiss east of the KGRA. Seven holes completed entirely in alluvium near the southwestern corner of the KGRA encountered a near-surface marker horizon of Pleistocene pumice and perlite. Maximum calculated alluvial sedimentation rates since initial deposition of this pumice and perlite range from 1 foot in 12,500 years to 1 foot in 2,300 years. Three holes east of the Mineral Mountains penetrated late Cenozoic basaltic andesite beneath a thin veneer of alluvium. All 15 GPCR drill holes appear to be peripheral to a central zone of anomalously high thermal gradient and low resisitivity delineated by previous investigations. GPCR-8 and -14, however, are characterized by high heat flow and relatively abundant manganese oxide mineralization, which may reflect a favorable hydrologic system controlling thermal fluid flow at depth. These holes thus seem most encouraging for discovery of a deeper high-temperature geothermal resource.

Hulen, J.B.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Chemical and isotopic data for water from thermal springs and wells of Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged NaCl-NaHCO/sub 3/ waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Oregon and near the contact of the Western Cascades with the High Cascades. Thermal springs in the central and northern parts of the Cascades generally issue moderately saline NaCl waters. Farther south in the Cascades, the thermal waters are high in CO/sub 2/ as well as chloride. Most thermal springs in northeastern Oregon issue dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters of high pH (>8.5). These waters are similar to the thermal waters which issue from the Idaho batholith, farther east. Most of the remaining thermal waters are Na mixed-anion waters. Based on the chemical geothermometers, Mickey Srpings, Hot Borax Lake, Alvord Hot Springs, Neal Hot Springs, Vale Hot Springs, Crump Well, Hunters (Lakeview) Hot Springs, and perhaps some of the springs in the Cascades are associated with the highest temperature systems (>150/sup 0/C).

Mariner, R.H.; Swanson, J.R.; Orris, G.J.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc.). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

Banovic, S.W.; Chan, H.M.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Acoustic emission from thermal-gradient cracks in UO$sub 2$  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study has been conducted to evaluate the potential use of acoustic emission to monitor thermal-shock damage in direct electrical heating of UO$sub 2$ pellets. In the apparatus used for the present tests, two acoustic- emission sensors were placed on extensions of the upper and lower electrical feedthroughs. Commercially available equipment was used to accumulate acoustic- emission data. The accumulation of events displayed on a cathode-ray-tube screen indicates the total number of acoustic-emission events at a particular location within the pellet stack. These tests have indicated that acoustic emission can be used to monitor thermal-shock damage in UO$sub 2$ pellets subjected to direct- electrical heating. 8 references. (auth)

Kennedy, C.R.; Kupperman, D.S.; Wrona, B.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermal Maturity and Organic Facies of Devonian Shales From Selected Wells  

SciTech Connect

An organic geochemical study was performed on core samples of the Devonian shale from wells in Ohio, Kentucky, and Illinois. The thermal maturity of the organic matter (kerogen) contained in the fine-grained sediments was investigated by vitrinite reflectance and kerogen coloration (Thermal Alteration Index). The results indicate that the organic matter has been thermally matured to the early stages of petroleum and associated gas generation. A suite of geochemical analyses designed to evaluate the organic richness, the hydrocarbon potential for gas, condensate, and/or oil, and the type of organic matter was performed on the samples analyzed for thermal maturity. In general, two types of organic facies were encountered. The rich organic facies (A) is characterized by abundant gas, gasoline, and gas-oil hydrocarbons, a high organic carbon content, and organic matter prone to gererate abundant oil and associated gas. Based on the geochemical data, a second type of organic facies (B) interbedded with the rich organic facies (A) was encountered in Kentucy and Ohio wells. Organic facies B consists of sediments relatively lean in organic carbon and gas-oil hydrocarbons, and abundant gas and gasoline hydrocarbons. In most cases, facies B is composed of woody and coaly types of kerogen. The woody-coaly kerogen is presumed to indicate a nonmarine derived depositional source prone to generate predominately gas (methane).

Zielinski, R. E.; Martin, L. J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and end of the cooling periods for both thermal perturbationduring cooling period are used for estimation of thermal andduring cooling period are used for estimation of thermal and

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Chemical and hydrologic data for selected thermal-water wells and nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data collected during January to July 1988 from 37 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho. Included are well and spring locations; well-construction, water-level, and water-use information; hydrographs of water levels in 3 wells; chemical and isotopic analyses of water from 18 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs; and drillers' logs from 23 wells. The purpose of the report is to make these data conveniently available to the public. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation (Two-Year Gradient Stress Relaxation Testing Update)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. A previous report (ORNL/TM-2008/089) discusses the testing and results from the original three year duration of the project. This testing included compression testing to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K, subsequent compression testing on cylindrical specimens to determine loading rates for stress relaxation testing, isothermal stress relaxation testing, and gradient stress relaxation testing. This report presents the results from the continuation of the gradient temperature stress relaxation testing and the resulting updated modeling.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Well kill (quenching) study of thermal producers in the South Belridge field, California  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a field study confirming that damage occurs during kill (quenching) operations of thermal producers in the South Belridge field, Kern County, CA. Implementation of the recommendations from this study are expected to decrease damage that occurs during quenching by an average of 0.5 BOPD/kill. Results indicate that producers completed with openhole, gravel-packed, slotted liners in high-permeability sandstones can sustain substantial, irreversible damage when subjected to unfiltered produced-water kills. The damage results when previously produced sand and fines, which have settled in the flowline, are reinjected into the wellbore. Most of the damage is in the slots and gravel pack. Previous studies, field tests, and laboratory work quantifying the amount and site of the damage are detailed. Methods of determining water-quality specifications needed to minimize damage that occurs during well kills are outlined. The approach presented can be used to identify and quantify damage in any field where producers require kills before workover operations. The current recommended kill procedure is also included.

Fram, J.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis and thermal-design improvements of downhole tools for use in hot-dry wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design improvements made for downhole thermal protection of systems based on results obtained from the analysis of the electronics, heat sink, and dewar packaged in a steel tubular body are described. Results include heat flux at the tool surface, temperature-time histories of each subsystem and isotherm contour plots during the simulation. The analysis showed that the thermal potential between the electronics and the heat sink was in the wrong direction and also was too small to remove heat entering the electronics section. Also, the conductance of the available heat transfer paths from electronics to heat sink was too small to remove that heat efficiently. Significant improvements in survival at high temperatures were achieved by increasing the available thermal capacity of the heat sink, increasing the thermal potential between the heat sink and electronics, and vastly increasing the conductance of the heat transfer paths.

Bennett, G.A.; Sherman, G.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Wellbore thermal simulation for geothermal wells. Survey of existing capability and industry needs and interest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four operating companies and five service companies in the petroleum and geothermal industry were contacted (1) to determine needs for wellbore temperature predictions during operations and (2) to evaluate interest in use of a wellbore thermal simulator (computer program) if developed by ERDA. As a basis for contacting industry, a literature survey was undertaken to assess the state-of-the-art and availability of wellbore thermal simulation capability. The literature review is summarized in the four tables of Appendix 1. Written abstracts of the individual articles is given in Appendix 2. The feedback from industry is presented in Appendix 3 in the form of completed questionaires.

Goodman, M.A.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

[Geothermal resource/reservoir investigations based on heat flow and thermal gradient data for the US]. 6. quarterly technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the second quarter of the second year of the contract activity has focused on the task of implementing the exploration well data base. In addition the author has continued to work on the tasks of the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. He is implementing the data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth/gradient/heat flow data to be used in conjunction with the regional temperature-depth/gradient/heat flow data base that he had already developed. The implementation this quarter has focused on the state of Nevada as the most number of wells are there and few of the wells have been previously available in a data base. A map is enclosed that updates the state of Nevada from the preliminary map in the first quarterly report. They presently are entering data into the geothermal data base. They now have over 1,000 sites in Nevada with data from the sources that they have access to at this time. The breakdown based on the data now entered into the data base is shown in a table.

Blackwell, D.D.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

[Geothermal resource/reservoir investigations based on heat flow and thermal gradient data for the US]. 7. quarterly technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the report period, activity has continued to focus on the task of implementing the exploration well data base. In addition the author has continued to work on the tasks of the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. He is implementing the data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth/gradient/heat flow data to be used in conjunction with the regional temperature-depth/gradient/heat flow data base that he had already developed. Some results of the implementation are included with this report in the form of graphic summaries of the data prepared from the assembled data base. He has continued to enter data into the geothermal data base. The implementation this quarter has continued to focus on the state of Nevada as the most number of wells are there and few of the wells have been previously available in a data base. During this quarter he has maintained the Internet home page illustrating and having available for distribution the regional data base and maps. The address of the page is http://www.smu.edu/{approximately}geothermal/.

Blackwell, D.D.

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

96

Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

Blackett, R.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Montana: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 225 records for Montana. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Montana. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Colorado: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 225 records for Colorado. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Colorado. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 314 records for Arizona. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Arizona. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 251 records for New Mexico. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for New Mexico. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Design, performance, and analysis of an aquifer thermal-energy-storage experiment using the doublet-well configuration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In March 1980 Auburn University began series of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) experiments using the doublet well configuration. The test site was in Mobile, Alabama. The objectives of the three experimental cycles were to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ATES concept, to identify and resolve operational problems, and to acquire a data base for developing and testing mathematical models. Pre-injection tests were performed and analyses of hydraulic, geochemical, and thermodynamic data were completed. Three injection-storage-recovery cycles had injection volumes of 25,402 m/sup 3/, 58,010 m/sup 3/, and 58,680 m/sup 3/ and average injection temperatures of 58.5/sup 0/C, 81.0/sup 0/C, and 79.0/sup 0/C, respectively. The first cycle injection began in February 1981 and the third cycle recovery was completed in November 1982. Attributable to the doublet well configuration no clogging of injection wells occurred. Energy recovery percentages based on recovery volumes equal to the injection volumes were 56, 45, and 42%. Thermal convection effects were observed. Aquifer nonhomogeneity, not detectable using standard aquifer testing procedures, was shown to reduce recovery efficiency.

Molz, F.J.; Melville, J.G.; Gueven, O.; Parr, A.D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Inventory of thermal springs and wells within a one-mile radius of Yucca Lodge, Truth or Consequences, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Equity Management Corporation proposes (1) to build about 30 condominiums at the present site of the Yucca Lodge, Truth or Consequences, New Mexico and (2) to heat the condominiums with the natural thermal waters that discharge from the property. To do so the corporation must satisfy the rules and regulations of four state and federal agencies. To satisfy some of the data requirements of these agencies and to provide basic data on the geohydrology of the area this report provides the results of a field inventory of the springs and wells within one mile of the lodge. Table 1 summarizes the data for eight springs and three sites where springs once issued. Table 2 summarizes the data on forty-four operable wells and thirty wells that are unusable in their present condition. Appendices list (1) wells presumed to be in the area but not located during field inspection and (2) wells that could be in the area, but were found to be beyond the one-mile radius. Temperature and specific conductance of the water show only minor variation within the recognized hot-water.

Schwab, G.E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Gradient Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Gradient Resources Name Gradient Resources Address 9670 Gateway Drive, Suite 200 Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89521 Sector Geothermal energy Year founded 1991 Company Type For Profit Phone number (775) 284-8842 Website http://www.gradient.com/ Region Rockies Area References Gradient Resources Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Gradient Resources is a company based in Reno, Nevada. Gradient Resources is engaged in the exploration and development of geothermal resources as well as the construction, ownership and operation of geothermal power plants. The Company is headquartered in Reno, Nevada with a regional office, drilling operations center, and well-cementing

108

Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

[Geothermal resource/reservoir investigations based on heat flow and thermal gradient data for the US]. 1. quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

The activities that have been carried out so far include planning for the development of the geothermal system data base that will be one of the main contract results. At this time the author is developing the specifications of the data base. He is also inventorying the geothermal areas for which data are available in the literature (published and open file) and the quantity of such data available. A map is enclosed with this report that gives the preliminary location of sites where multiple wells in individual geothermal systems are available in the literature as of 1990 and the location of individual wells in the data base that are classed as geothermal.

Blackwell, D.D.

1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal carrier emission and nonradiative recombinations in nonpolar (Al,Ga)N/GaN quantum wells grown on bulk GaN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate, via time-resolved photoluminescence, the temperature-dependence of charge carrier recombination mechanisms in nonpolar (Al,Ga)N/GaN single quantum wells (QWs) grown via molecular beam epitaxy on the a-facet of bulk GaN crystals. We study the influence of both QW width and barrier Al content on the dynamics of excitons in the 10-320 K range. We first show that the effective lifetime of QW excitons {tau} increases with temperature, which is evidence that nonradiative mechanisms do not play any significant role in the low-temperature range. The temperature range for increasing {tau} depends on the QW width and Al content in the (Al,Ga)N barriers. For higher temperatures, we observe a reduction in the QW emission lifetime combined with an increase in the decay time for excitons in the barriers, until both exciton populations get fully thermalized. Based on analysis of the ratio between barrier and QW emission intensities, we demonstrate that the main mechanism limiting the radiative efficiency in our set of samples is related to nonradiative recombination in the (Al,Ga)N barriers of charge carriers that have been thermally emitted from the QWs.

Corfdir, P.; Dussaigne, A.; Giraud, E.; Ganiere, J.-D.; Grandjean, N.; Deveaud-Pledran, B. [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Teisseyre, H. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Suski, T.; Grzegory, I. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Lefebvre, P. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb - UMR5221 - CNRS - Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier (France)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah: characterization of rock types and alteration in Getty Oil Company well Utah state 52-21  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Getty Oil Company well 52-21 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area was drilled to 7500 feet in predominantly upper amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks. All lithologies in the drill hole are pervasively but weakly altered: the alteration assemblage is chlorite + sericite + clays with occasional traces of calcite, above 2300 feet, and chlorite + sericite + clays + calcite +- epidote below 2500 feet. A zone of increased alteration intensity from approximately 1800 feet to 2300 feet occurs within and adjacent to a dacite dike which cuts the metamorphic rocks. A second zone of stronger alteration extends from 6000 feet to the bottom of the drill hole. The drill hole which is located approximately 5000 feet south of the center of the silica apron known as the Opal Mound was apparently drilled beyond the influence of acid, high-sulfate brines such as have affected the upper portions of drill holes 72-16, 76-1 and University of Utah 1A and 1B.

Ballantyne, G.H.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A numerical approach to evaluating what percentage of a living space is well-ventilated, for the assessment of thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bioclimatic approach to designing comfortable buildings in hot and humid tropical regions requires, firstly, some preliminary, important work on the building envelope to limit the energy contributions, and secondly, an airflow optimization of the building. For the first step, tools such as nodal or zonal models have been largely implemented. For the second step, the assessment of air velocities, in three dimensions and in a large space, can only be performed through the use of detailed models such as with CFD. This paper deals with the improvement of thermal comfort by ventilating around the occupants. For this purpose, the average velocity coefficient definition is modified to be adapted to CFD and the areas involving movement or the living spaces. We propose a new approach based on the derivation of a new quantity: the well-ventilated percentage of a living space. The well-ventilated percentage of a space allows a time analysis of the aeraulic behaviour of the building in its environment. These percentages can be over a period such as one day, a season or a year. These kinds of results are helpful for an architect to configure the rooms of a house according to their uses, the environment, the architectural choices and the constraints related to the design of bioclimatic buildings.

Alain Bastide; Alfred Jean Philippe Lauret; François Garde; Harry Boyer

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

114

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

115

Borehole Gravity Measurements In The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. The borehole gravimetric densities matched the well logs, but the surface gradient was found to be 0.0040 mgal/m higher than expected. When the borehole observations are corrected for the observed free air gradient above ground, they produce densities which are nearly uniformly higher than log densities by about 0.07 gm/cm{sup 3}. These measurements require densities in the depth range .5 to 3 km, for a radius of a few kilometers around State 2-14 to be as dense as those found in State 2-14. Combining the borehole gravity and calculated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, we find that this densified zone covers much of a broad thermal anomaly to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients  

SciTech Connect

The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

John Scott O'Dell

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Comparative studies of geothermal surveys in 3-meter and temperature-gradient holes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reliability of conducting temperature surveys within the upper 3 meters of the surface to map geothermal anomalies is demonstrated in experiments at two prospects in which deeper gradient hole data were obtained. The 3m temperatures faithfully outlined the thermal anomaly at McCoy, Nevada; and in Dixie Valley, NV 3m surveys reproduced and detailed patterns derived from 40m data. These encouraging results led to the development of multi-thermistor strings for logging the seasonal wave within the upper 3 meters. From many such logs, diffusivity variations can be detected, which might otherwise be misconstrued as thermal anomalies. The technique is demonstrated by a typical Basin-Range reconnaissance project. As many as 10 or more 3m holes can be emplaced in the time required for a conventional gradient well, and with considerably less impact on the environment.

Lang, A.L.; Deymonaz, J.; Pilkington, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steep Gradient Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steep Gradient Flume Steep Gradient Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Steep Gradient Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 20.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tilting flume from -1.5 to +16% slope; <3mm sedimentation recirculation capabilities; instrumentation rails Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 1 Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes

122

Retrieving Horizontal Temperature Gradients and Advections from Single-Station Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical wind shears measured by the Plattevilie, Colorado wind profiler were used in conjunction with the geostrophic thermal wind equation to retrieve the horizontal thermal gradients and associated advections for a case involving an upper-...

Paul J. Neiman; M. A. Shapiro

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: comparison of geotemp predictions to field data and evaluation of flow variables. Part II report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better understanding of temperatures in a well is needed to improve casing selection, cement design, drilling fluid formulation, packer selection, and many other aspects of well design. Two applications of GEOTEMP are presented which provide the calculations needed. First, the results of testing GEOTEMP predictions with analytical solutions and with field temperature data are presented. And second, sensitivity studies establish the importance of certain well variables on downhole temperatures. (MHR)

Wooley, G.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal regimes of Malaysian sedimentary basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly corrected and calibrated thermal data are important in estimating source-rock maturation, diagenetics, evolution of reservoirs, pressure regimes, and hydrodynamics. Geothermal gradient, thermal conductivity, and heat flow have been determined for the sedimentary succession penetrated by exploratory wells in Malaysia. Geothermal gradient and heat-flow maps show that the highest average values are in the Malay Basin. The values in the Sarawak basin are intermediate between those of the Malay basin and the Sabah Basin, which contains the lowest average values. Temperature data were analyzed from more than 400 wells. An important parameter that was studied in detail is the circulation time. The correct circulation time is essential in determining the correct geothermal gradient of a well. It was found that the most suitable circulation time for the Sabah Basin is 20 hr, 30 hr for the Sarawak Basin and 40 hr for the Malay Basin. Values of thermal conductivity, determined from measurement and calibrated calculations, were grouped according to depositional units and cycles in each basin.

Abdul Halim, M.F. (Petronas Research and Scientific Services, Selangor (Malaysia))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Multi-gradient drilling method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-gradient system for drilling a well bore from a surface location into a seabed includes an injector for injecting buoyant substantially incompressible articles into a column of drilling fluid associated with the well bore. Preferably, the substantially incompressible articles comprises hollow substantially spherical bodies.

Maurer, William C. (Houston, TX); Medley, Jr., George H. (Spring, TX); McDonald, William J. (Houston, TX)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Salt concentration gradient solar ponds: modeling and optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation design tool has been developed to simulate dynamic thermal performance for salinity gradient solar ponds. This program will be available to the public through the SERI Solar Analysis Methods Center. Dynamic programming techniques are applied to allow significant user flexibility in analyzing pond performance under realistic load and weather conditions. Finite element techniques describe conduction heat transfer through the pond, earth, and edges. Results are presented that illustrate typical thermal performance of salinity gradient ponds. Sensitivity studies of salty pond thermal performance with respect to geometry, load, and optical transmission are included.

Jayadev, T. S.; Henderson, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Borehole Gravity Measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2-14 in the depth range 0.5 to 3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The above-ground gradient was found to be 4.1 {micro}gal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, they find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Borehole Gravity Measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2-14 in the depth range 0.5 to 3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The above-ground gradient was found to be 0.0040 mgal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, they find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

Youngquist, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

131

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A high-gradient high-duty-factor RF photo-cathode electron gun  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient, high-duty factor RF photocathode gun. The gun is designed to operate at high repetition rate or CW, with high gradient on the cathode surface to minimize emittance growth due to space charge forces at high bunch charge. The gun may also be operated in a solenoidal magnetic field for emittance compensation. The design is intended for use in short-pulse, high-charge, and high-repetition rate applications such as linac based X-ray sources. We present and compare the results of gun simulations using different codes, as well as RF and thermal analysis of the structure.

Robert Rimmer; N. Hartman; S. Lidia; S.H. Wang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nickel gradient electrode  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates generally to rechargeable batteries, and, in particular, relates to batteries that use nickel electrodes. It provides an improved nickel electrode with a selected gradient of additive materials. The concentration of additives in the impregnating solution are controlled during impregnation such that an additive gradient is generated. In the situation where the highest ionic conductivity is needed at the current collector boundary with the active material, the electrochemical impregnating solution is initially high in additive, and at the end of impregnation has been adjusted to significantly lower additive concentration. For chemical impregnation, the electrodes are similarly dipped in solutions that are initially high in additive. This invention is suitable for conventional additives such as cobalt, cadmium, barium, manganese, and zinc. It is therefore one objective of the invention to provide an improved nickel electrode of a battery cell with an additive in the active material to increase the life of the battery cell. Another objective is to provide for an improved nickel electrode having a greater concentration of additive near the current collector of nickel.

Zimmerman, A.H.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron March 11, 2013 - 6:00pm Addthis Since 1960, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has been one of the world's premiere particle accelerators, well known for the three Nobel Prizes won as a result of research performed there. The AGS name is derived from the concept of alternating gradient focusing, in which the field gradients of the accelerator's 240 magnets are successively alternated inward and outward, permitting particles to be propelled and focused in both the horizontal and vertical plane at the same time. In this 1958 photo, giant magnets await installation into the AGS accelerator ring tunnel at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

136

Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron March 11, 2013 - 6:00pm Addthis Since 1960, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has been one of the world's premiere particle accelerators, well known for the three Nobel Prizes won as a result of research performed there. The AGS name is derived from the concept of alternating gradient focusing, in which the field gradients of the accelerator's 240 magnets are successively alternated inward and outward, permitting particles to be propelled and focused in both the horizontal and vertical plane at the same time. In this 1958 photo, giant magnets await installation into the AGS accelerator ring tunnel at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

137

Generalized Stochastic Gradient Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#1;#2;#3;#2;#4;#5;#6;#7;#8;#2; #11;#12; #14;#15;#5;#16;#12;#7;#14; #1;#4;#5; #7;#2;#3;#12; #17;#2;#5;#4;#3;#7;#3;#18; George W. Evans, Seppo Honkapohja and Noah Willams #19;#14;#12; #20;#2;#4; #21;#22;#22;#23; #24;#25;#26;#27; #22;#23;#28;#23; #1... ;#2;#3;#4;#3;#2;#4;#5;#6;#4;#7;#8;#2;#3;#6; #4; #11;#3;#12;#2;#8;#3;#4; #6;#14;#15;#11;#16;#16;#11;#2;#17; Generalized Stochastic Gradient Learning? George W. Evans University of Oregon Seppo Honkapohja University of Cambridge Noah Williams Princeton...

Evans, George W; Honkapohja, Seppo; Williams, Noah

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect

A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Isobaric groundwater well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fundamental Limits to Position Determination by Concentration Gradients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Position determination in biological systems is often achieved through protein concentration gradients. Measuring the local concentration of such a protein with a spatially-varying distribution allows the measurement of position within the system. In order for these systems to work effectively, position determination must be robust to noise. Here, we calculate fundamental limits to the precision of position determination by concentration gradients due to unavoidable biochemical noise perturbing the gradients. We focus on gradient proteins with first order reaction kinetics. Systems of this type have been experimentally characterised in both developmental and cell biology settings. For a single gradient we show that, through time-averaging, great precision can potentially be achieved even with very low protein copy numbers. As a second example, we investigate the ability of a system with oppositely directed gradients to find its centre. With this mechanism, positional precision close to the centre improves more slowly with increasing averaging time, and so longer averaging times or higher copy numbers are required for high precision. For both single and double gradients, we demonstrate the existence of optimal length scales for the gradients, where precision is maximized, as well as analyzing how precision depends on the size of the concentration measuring apparatus. Our results provide fundamental constraints on the positional precision supplied by concentration gradients in various contexts, including both in developmental biology and also within a single cell.

Filipe Tostevin; Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Martin Howard

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

Time delay learning by gradient descent in recurrent neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) possess an implicit internal memory and are well adapted for time series forecasting. Unfortunately, the gradient descent algorithms which are commonly used for their training have two main weaknesses: the slowness and ...

Romuald Boné; Hubert Cardot

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well Orlando SilvaOrlando Silva #12; The Problem CO2 or gas injection well Questions Injection of scCO2 vs. gaseous CO2. Other relevant examples: - gas and therefore the CO2 injection rate. caprock reservoir geothermal gradient hydrostatic gradient well CO2 bubble

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

147

Incremental criticality and yield gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Criticality and yield gradients are two crucial diagnostic metrics obtained from Statistical Static Timing Analysis (SSTA). They provide valuable information to guide timing optimization and timing-driven physical synthesis. Existing work in the literature, ...

Jinjun Xiong; Vladimir Zolotov; Chandu Visweswariah

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

First Look at Gradient Crystals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamline 7.3.3. When current is applied to the block copolymer, as in charging a battery, a new structure emerges. balsara-gradient cystals (a) "Sundial" x-ray scattering...

149

Thermal conductivity of mass-graded graphene flakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we investigate thermal conductions in mass-graded graphene flakes by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It shows mass-graded graphene flakes reveal no thermal rectification effect in thermal conduction process. Dependences of thermal conductivity upon the heat fluxes and the mass gradients are studied. It is found that thermal conductivity would be dramatically decreased by increasing the mass gradients. We also discuss the influence of thermal curvatures and thermal expansions upon the thermal conduction process in mass-graded graphene flakes.

Cheh, Jigger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quantification of Texture and Microstructure Gradients in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strain Gradient and Degradation in Magnetic Properties: Focus Transformer Steel · Strain Gradient Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Modeling of Alpha-Iron.

151

Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS operating at 30 GHz. It was shown that the ratio of maximum surface electric field to accelerating field at the metal wall is only 0.35-0.4 for DLA, much smaller than the value 2.2 for HDS; and the ratio of surface magnetic field to accelerating field is 3.0 mA/V for DLA, compared with 3.45 mA/V for HDS. These values bode well for DLA in helping to avoid breakdown and to reducing pulsed surface heating and fatigue. The shunt impedance is found to be 160-175 M{Omega}/m for DLA, as compared to 99 M{Omega}/m for HDS. Conclusions are reached from this project that CVD diamond appears promising as a dielectric with a high threshold for RF breakdown, and that rectangular accelerator structures can be devised using planar CVD diamond elements that could be operated at higher acceleration gradients with low probability of RF breakdown, as compared with corresponding all-metallic structures.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Harvesting useful electric energy from ambient thermal gradients and/or temperature fluctuations is immensely important. For many years, a number of direct and indirect thermal-to-electrical energy… (more)

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

154

Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs Shervin propose a joint thermal and energy management technique specifically designed for heterogeneous MPSo technique simultaneously reduces the thermal hot spots, temperature gradients, and energy consumption

Simunic, Tajana

155

Scaffold Gradients: Finding the Right Environment for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaffold Gradients: Finding the Right Environment for Developing Cells. For Immediate Release: May 25, 2010. ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Gradient Combinatorial Libraries via Modulated Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Libraries via Modulated Light Exposure. Bookmark and Share Gradient Combinatorial Libraries via Modulated Light Exposure. ...

157

Evaluating the effects of temperature gradients and currents nonuniformity in on-chip interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper provides a compact but accurate electro-thermal model of a long wiring on-chip interconnect embedded in the complex layout of a ULSI digital circuit. The proposed technique takes into account both the effect of temperature gradients over the ... Keywords: Current nonuniformity, Electro-thermal model, On-chip interconnect, Propagation delay

N. Spennagallo; L. Codecasa; D. D'Amore; P. Maffezzoni

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of liquid lift approach to dual gradient drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past, the oil and gas industry has typically used the single gradient system to drill wells offshore. With this system the bottom hole pressure was controlled by a mud column extending from the drilling rig to the bottom of the wellbore. This mud column was used to achieve the required bottom hole pressure. But, as the demand for oil and gas increased, the industry started exploring for oil and gas in deep waters. Because of the narrow margin between the pore and fracture pressures it is somewhat difficult to reach total depth with the single gradient system. This led to the invention of the dual gradient system. In the dual gradient method, heavy density fluid runs from the bottom hole to the mudline and a low density fluid from the mudline to the rig floor so as to maintain the bottom hole pressure. Several methods have been developed to achieve the dual gradient drilling principle. For this research project, we paid more attention to the liquid lift, dual gradient drilling (riser dilution method). This method of achieving dual gradient drilling was somewhat different from the others, because it does not utilize elaborate equipment and no major changes are made on the existing drilling rigs. In this thesis the technical feasibility of using the liquid lift method over the other methods of achieving dual gradient drilling was determined. A computer program was developed to simulate the wellbore hydraulics under static and dynamic conditions, injection rate and base fluid density required to dilute the riser fluid and finally, u-tubing phenomena. In this thesis we also identified some problems associated with the liquid lift method and recommendations were made on how these problems can be eliminated or reduced. Emphases were placed on the effect of u-tubing, injection rate of base fluid at the bottom of the riser and well control issues facing this system.

Okafor, Ugochukwu Nnamdi

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of liquid lift approach to dual gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past, the oil and gas industry has typically used the single gradient system to drill wells offshore. With this system the bottom hole pressure was controlled by a mud column extending from the drilling rig to the bottom of the wellbore. This mud column was used to achieve the required bottom hole pressure. But, as the demand for oil and gas increased, the industry started exploring for oil and gas in deep waters. Because of the narrow margin between the pore and fracture pressures it is somewhat difficult to reach total depth with the single gradient system. This led to the invention of the dual gradient system. In the dual gradient method, heavy density fluid runs from the bottom hole to the mudline and a low density fluid from the mudline to the rig floor so as to maintain the bottom hole pressure. Several methods have been developed to achieve the dual gradient drilling principle. For this research project, we paid more attention to the liquid lift, dual gradient drilling (riser dilution method). This method of achieving dual gradient drilling was somewhat different from the others, because it does not utilize elaborate equipment and no major changes are made on the existing drilling rigs. In this thesis the technical feasibility of using the liquid lift method over the other methods of achieving dual gradient drilling was determined. A computer program was developed to simulate the wellbore hydraulics under static and dynamic conditions, injection rate and base fluid density required to dilute the riser fluid and finally, u-tubing phenomena. In this thesis we also identified some problems associated with the liquid lift method and recommendations were made on how these problems can be eliminated or reduced. Emphases were placed on the effect of u-tubing, injection rate of base fluid at the bottom of the riser and well control issues facing this system.

Okafor, Ugochukwu Nnamdi

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On Thermally Direct Circulations in Moist Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expression is derived for the critical horizontal gradient of subcloud-layer ?e in radiative-convective equilibrium, sufficient for the onset of thermally direct, zonally symmetric circulations. This corresponds to zero absolute vorticity at ...

Kerry A. Emanuel

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermal Stability of the World Ocean Thermoclines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the strong variation with temperature of the thermal expansion coefficient of seawater, both horizontal and vertical mixing that perturb the gradients produce changes of volume, usually a decrease, that shift mass relative to the earth'...

N. P. Fofonoff

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

164

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

165

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

166

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

167

251 Thermal Gradient Cycling with Simultaneous Silicate Particle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of LiMnxFe1-xPO4 Glass and Glass-Ceramics for Lithium Ion Battery .... and Comparing the Inhibition Effect of Chromate, Bromate and Molybdate on the ...

168

Effects of Composition and Thermal Gradients on Rapid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit · Direct Precipitation of Sr-doped LaP3O9 Thin Film Electrolytes for ...

169

Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

170

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal...

171

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal...

172

Revisiting an Old Concept: The Gradient Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gradient wind is defined as a horizontal wind having the same direction as the geostrophic wind but with a magnitude consistent with a balance of three forces: the pressure gradient force, the Coriolis force, and the centrifugal force arising ...

Keith F. Brill

173

Ion temperature gradient instability and anomalous transport  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses experiments in ion temperature gradient instability and anomalous transport in the CLM steady state device. (LSP).

Sen, A.K.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Near Boundary Gradient Zone: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyzing Upper Tails of Grain Size Distributions Using Extreme Value ... Strain Gradient and Degradation in Magnetic Properties: Focus Transformer Steel.

175

Locally exact modifications of discrete gradient schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Locally exact integrators preserve linearization of the original system at every point. We construct energy-preserving locally exact discrete gradient schemes for arbitrary multidimensional canonical Hamiltonian systems by modifying classical discrete gradient schemes. Modifications of this kind are found for any discrete gradient.

Cie?li?ski, Jan L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A method for filtering hot spring noise from shallow temperature gradient data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for separating shallow heat source effects from temperature gradient data is presented. The technique makes use of the depth dependent information available in the wave number spectrum of the gradient data. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated on a two-dimensional numerical model of a geothermal system containing a deep geothermal reservoir which is masked by a warm, shallow aquifer and a thermal spring. This geothermal system is representative of those found throughout the Basin and Range province. The resulting filtered gradients produce an excellent prediction of the temperatures in the modeled geothermal reservoir.

Li, T.M.C.; Chandler, C.A.; Ferguson, J.F.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Scaling limits for gradient systems in random environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For interacting particle systems that satisfies the gradient condition, the hydrodynamic limit and the equilibrium fluctuations are well known. We prove that under the presence of a symmetric random environment, these scaling limits also hold for almost every choice of the environment, with homogenized coefficients that does not depend on the particular realization of the random environment.

P. Goncalves; M. D. Jara

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geothermal Gradients in Oregon, 1985-1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This data set is comprised of three groups of temperature-depth data. All the sites are located in southeastern Oregon. The first is a set of 7 wells logged during 1993 in south central Oregon in the Basin and Range province. All these wells, with the exception of the Blue Mountain Oil well, are water wells. These wells were part of a geothermal reconnaissance of this area. The Blue Mountain oil well of this set has been described by Sass et al. (1971) as well. Gannet in the vicinity of the Vale, Oregon (Bowen and Blackwell, 1972; Blackwell et al., 1978) geothermal system in Malheur County. These wells were logged in 1986 during a study of the area described by Gannett (1988). There are 17 wells (plus one relog) in this data set. All these wells are in a small area just east of the town of Vale in Malheur County. The second set of data consists of a group of wells that were logged by Marshall The third set of data represents the results of an exploration project in the general area of the Lake Owyhee thermal area in Malheur County. This data set is comprised of 16 wells. This data set was collected by Hunt Energy Corporation and made available though the efforts of Roger Bowers. A small scale map of the locations of the wells is shown in Figure 1. The well location and some pertinent information about the wells is shown in Table 1. The detailed lists of temperature-depth data and plots for each well, either individually or with a group, follow the list of references cited.

Blackwell, D.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

180

Density-gradient theory: a macroscopic approach to quantum confinement and tunneling in semiconductor devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density-gradient theory provides a macroscopic approach to modeling quantum transport that is particularly well adapted to semiconductor device analysis and engineering. After some introductory observations, the basis of the theory in macroscopic and ... Keywords: Continuum, Density-gradient, Electron transport, Quantum confinement, Quantum tunneling, Semiconductor device simulation, Thermodynamics

M. G. Ancona

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Interpretation of well log data from four drill holes at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well logs from four drill holes, Utah State Geothermal Wells 14-2, 52-21 and 72-16 and Geothermal Power Corporation's thermal gradient hole GPC-15 have been digitized, plotted and studied. This study had three objectives: (1) to present the well log data in a convenient format for easy study, (2) to determine the nature of the geothermal reservoir rock and fluid properties, and (3) to make some inference on fluid entry locations in the boreholes and their effect on heat flow. The temperature logs and gradients computed from these logs have been used to examine heat flow in the vicinity of the four drill holes. Assumed and calculated thermal conductivities have been used in the analyses, 4 mcal/cm /sup 0/C sec for the alluvium and 7 mcal/cm /sup 0/C sec for the crystalline rocks. The data indicate that 14-2 and 72-16 reside in a dominantly convective heat flow environment, whereas GPC-15 and 52-21 reside in a dominantly conductive heat flow environment. The convective regions are believed to be fracture controlled and only portions of each hole reside totally in a convective region; in each case it is the upper bedrock portion of the hole. In every case the alluvium or upper portion of the alluvium acts as a thermal blanket over the system. Maximum heat flow among the holes, 40 ..mu.. cal/cm/sup 2/ sec, occurs in the vicinity of 72-16 and the lowest heat flow, 4 ..mu.. cal/cm/sup 2/ sec, in the vicinity of GPC-15. (MHR)

Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large, M.Sc. Candidate University of Hawaii at Manoa Department of Oceanography Hawaii Natural Energy

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

185

Gradient Projection Methods for Quadratic Programs and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 30, 2003 ... Gradient Projection Methods for Quadratic Programs and Applications in Training Support Vector Machines. Thomas Serafini (serafini.thomas ...

186

Temperature-gradient and heat flow data, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of 16 shallow and intermediate-depth temperature-gradient holes were drilled for Sunoco Energy Development Co. in Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada, on leases held by Aminoil USA, Inc., under the cost-sharing industry-linked program of the Department of Energy. Thirteen shallow (85-152 m) and 3 intermediate-depth (360-457 m) holes were completed and logged during the period June through September, 1979. The locations of these holes and of pre-existing temperature-gradient holes are shown on plate 1. This report constitutes a final data transmittal and disclosure of results. The drilling subcontractor was Southwest Drilling and Exploration, Inc. of Central, Utah. They provided a Gardner-Denver 15W rig, a 3-man crew, and supporting equipment. A l l holes were drilled with mud as the circulating medium. Drilling histories for each hole are summarized in table 1. GeothermEx, Inc. performed on-site geological descriptions of the cuttings; obtained several temperature profiles for each hole, including an equilibrium profile taken 23 days or more after cessation of drilling; selected samples for thermal conductivity measurements; integrated temperature, temperature-gradient, and heat-flow data obtained in this project with published values; and prepared this report.

Koenig, James B.; Gardner, Murray C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood.

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

189

A Mean-Gradient Model of the Dry Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mean-gradient model of the dry convective boundary layer is developed using a convective mass flux representation of the turbulent fluxes. A top-hat model of thermals is used to represent the average characteristics of updrafts and downdrafts ...

Shouping Wang; Bruce A. Albrecht

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

191

Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost circulation results in very high costs per foot drilled.

Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geothermal gradient map of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geothermal gradient map is needed in order to determine the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource of the United States. Based on published and unpublished data (including new measurements) the HDR program will produce updated gradient maps annually, to be used as a tool for resource evaluation and exploration. The 1980 version of this map is presented.

Kron, A.; Heiken, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

194

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

195

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

196

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Geothermal energy well casing seal  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water. The super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop steam generator-turbine-alternator combination for the beneficial generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water regenerated at the surface-located system is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a fluid bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The deep well pump system is supported within the well casing pipe from the earth's surface by the turbine exhaust steam conduit. In view of differential expansion effects on the relative lengths of the casing pipe and the exhaust steam conduit, a novel flexible seal is provided between the suspended turbine-pump system and the well pipe casing. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures.

Matthews, H.B.

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Well Flix Program Details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well Flix's in the Well-U library. These DVD's have been made available so employees may learn about a variety of fitness for a one-week basis at no cost. Contact Well U at well-u-info@rochester.edu for DVD rental. Click the link

Portman, Douglas

200

Universal Gradient Methods for Convex Optimization Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 18, 2013 ... methods (e.g. [9], [10], [1]), which increase the rate of convergence of the gradient schemes much above the limits of Black-Box Complexity ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Continuous spray forming of functionally gradient materials  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Plasma Processes Inc. have produced a Functional Gradient Material (FGM) through advanced vacuum plasma spray processing for high heat flux applications. Outlined in this paper are the manufacturing methods used to develop a four component functional gradient material of copper, tungsten, boron, and boron nitride. The FGM was formed with continuous gradients and integral cooling channels eliminating bondlines and providing direct heat transfer from the high temperature exposed surface to a cooling medium. Metallurgical and x-ray diffraction analyses of the materials formed through innovative VPS (vacuum plasma spray) processing are also presented. Applications for this functional gradient structural material range from fusion reactor plasma facing components to missile nose cones to boilers.

McKechnie, T.N.; Richardson, E.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

Hersam, Mark C. (Evanston, IL); Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Arnold, Michael S. (Northbrook, IL)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

Hersam, Mark C. (Evanston, IL); Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Arnold, Michael S. (Northbrook, IL)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Chiral symmetry and the Yang--Mills gradient flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years, the Yang--Mills gradient flow was shown to be an attractive tool for non-perturbative studies of non-Abelian gauge theories. Here a simple extension of the flow to the quark fields in QCD is considered. As in the case of the pure-gauge gradient flow, the renormalizability of correlation functions involving local fields at positive flow times can be established using a representation through a local field theory in 4+1 dimensions. Applications of the extended flow in lattice QCD include non-perturbative renormalization and O(a) improvement as well as accurate calculations of the chiral condensate and of the pseudo-scalar decay constant in the chiral limit.

Martin Lüscher

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Plasma wave propagation with a plasma density gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma waves with the plasma diffusion velocity u{sub n} due to a plasma density gradient are described in a positive column plasma. The ion wave is generated by the perturbation of the operating frequency 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and it propagates with the group velocity u{sub g{approx}}c{sub s}{sup 2}/u{sub n{approx}}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}) m/s, where c{sub s} is the acoustic velocity in a fine tube fluorescent lamp, while the electron wave cannot be generated with a turbulence of low frequency less than the electron oscillation frequency {omega}{sub pe}. The propagation of the lighting signal observed in long tube fluorescent lamps is well understood with the propagation of ion waves occurring along the plasma density gradient.

Cho, Guangsup; Choi, Eun-Ha; Uhm, Han Sup [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Nowon Wallgye, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gradient type optimization methods for electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density functional theory (DFT) in electronic structure calculations can be formulated as either a nonlinear eigenvalue or direct minimization problem. The most widely used approach for solving the former is the so-called self-consistent field (SCF) iteration. A common observation is that the convergence of SCF is not clear theoretically while approaches with convergence guarantee for solving the latter are often not competitive to SCF numerically. In this paper, we study gradient type methods for solving the direct minimization problem by constructing new iterations along the gradient on the Stiefel manifold. Global convergence (i.e., convergence to a stationary point from any initial solution) as well as local convergence rate follows from the standard theory for optimization on manifold directly. A major computational advantage is that the computation of linear eigenvalue problems is no longer needed. The main costs of our approaches arise from the assembling of the total energy functional and its grad...

Zhang, Xin; Wen, Zaiwen; Zhou, Aihui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The gradient flow in a twisted box  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the perturbative behavior of the gradient flow in a twisted box. We apply this information to define a running coupling using the energy density of the flow field. We study the step-scaling function and the size of cutoff effects in SU(2) pure gauge theory. We conclude that the twisted gradient flow running coupling scheme is a valid strategy for step-scaling purposes due to the relatively mild cutoff effects and high precision.

Ramos, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SLAC/CERN High Gradient Tests of An X Band Accelerating Section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High frequency linear collider schemes envisage the use of rather high accelerating gradients: 50 to 100 MV/m for X-band and 80 MV/m for CLIC. Because these gradients are well above those commonly used in accelerators, high gradient studies of high frequency structures have been initiated and test facilities have been constructed at KEK [1], SLAC [2] and CERN [3]. The studies seek to demonstrate that the above mentioned gradients are both achievable and practical. There is no well-defined criterion for the maximum acceptable level of dark current but it must be low enough not to generate unacceptable transverse wakefields, disturb beam position monitor readings or cause RF power losses. Because there are of the order of 10,000 accelerating sections in a high frequency linear collider, the conditioning process should not be too long or difficult. The test facilities have been instrumented to allow investigation of field emission and RF breakdown mechanisms. With an understanding of these effects, the high gradient performance of accelerating sections may be improved through modifications in geometry, fabrication methods and surface finish. These high gradient test facilities also allow the ultimate performance of high frequency/short pulse length accelerating structures to be probed. This report describes the high gradient test at SLAC of an X-band accelerating section built at CERN using technology developed for CLIC.

Loewen, Roderick J

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully coupled processes consisting of: thermoporoelastic deformation, hydraulic conduction, thermal osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has

210

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT edit Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and...

211

Diversity, Body Mass, and Latitudinal Gradients in Primates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gradients in regional diversity of New World birds. GlobalT. (2003). Assessment of the diversity of African primates.of the latitudinal diversity gradient. American Naturalist,

Harcourt, A. H.; Schreier, B. M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

213

Well-centered meshing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A well-centered simplex is a simplex whose circumcenter lies in its interior, and a well-centered mesh is a simplicial mesh in which every simplex is… (more)

Vanderzee, Evan B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

216

Results of the 1988 geothermal gradient test drilling project for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

During late summer and early fall of 1988, the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) completed drilling eight shallow geothermal gradient test wells in the southern Washington Cascade Range. This report describes the preliminary results of the 1988 drilling and gradient measuring, and summarizes our current perspectives on distribution and magnitude of the geothermal resource potential in the southern Washington Cascades. 18 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Barnett, D.B.; Korosec, M.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gradient effects on the fracture of inhomogeneous materials  

SciTech Connect

Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) have a spatial variation in physical properties that can be tailored to meet the needs of a specific application and/or to minimize internal stresses arising from thermal and elastic mismatch. Modeling these materials as inhomogeneous continua allows assessment of the role of the gradient without requiring detailed knowledge of the microstructure. Motivated by the relative difficulty of obtaining analytical solutions to boundary value problems for FGMs, an accurate finite-element code is developed for obtaining numerical planar and axisymmetric linear thermoelastic solutions. In addition an approximate analytical technique for mapping homogeneous-modulus solutions to those for FGMs is assessed and classes of problems to which it applies accurately are identified. The fracture mechanics analysis of FGMs can be characterized by the classic stress intensities, KI and KII, but there has been scarce progress in understanding the role of the modulus gradient in determining fracture initiation and propagation. To address this question, a statistical fracture model is used to correlate near-tip stresses with brittle fracture initiation behavior. This describes the behavior of a material experiencing fracture initiation away from the crack tip. Widely dispersed zones of fracture initiation sites are expected. Finite-length kinks are analyzed to describe the crack path for continuous crack growth. For kink lengths much shorter than the gradient dimension, a parallel stress term describes the deviation of the kinking angle from that for homogeneous materials. For longer kinks there is a divergence of the kink angle predicted by the maximum energy release rate and the pure opening mode criteria.

Becker, T.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

219

Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

222

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

METALLICITY GRADIENTS OF THICK DISK DWARF STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the metallicity distribution of the Galactic thick disk using F, G, and K dwarf stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 8. Using the large sample of dwarf stars with proper motions and spectroscopically determined stellar parameters, metallicity gradients in the radial direction for various heights above the Galactic plane and in the vertical direction for various radial distances from the Galaxy center have been found. In particular, we find a vertical metallicity gradient of -0.113 {+-} 0.010 (-0.125 {+-} 0.008) dex kpc{sup -1} using an isochrone (photometric) distance determination in the range 1 kpc solar neighborhood. Metallicity gradients in the thin and thick disks are important probes into possible formation scenarios for our Galaxy and a consistent picture is beginning to emerge from results using large spectroscopic surveys, such as the ones presented here.

Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Zhao Gang, E-mail: carrell@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

1982-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Laser window with annular grooves for thermal isolation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser window or other optical element which is thermally loaded, heats up and causes optical distortions because of temperature gradients between the center and the edge. A number of annular grooves, one to three or more, are formed in the element between a central portion and edge portion, producing a web portion which concentrates the thermal gradient and thermally isolates the central portion from the edge portion, producing a uniform temperature profile across the central portion and therefore reduce the optical distortions. The grooves are narrow and closely spaced with respect to the thickness of the element, and successive grooves are formed from alternate sides of the element.

Warner, B.E.; Horton, J.A.; Alger, T.W.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

The LLNL/UCLA high gradient inverse free electron laser  

SciTech Connect

We describe the Inverse Free Electron Accelerator currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Upon completion of this accelerator, high brightness electrons generated in the photoinjector blowout regime and accelerated to 50 MeV by S-band accelerating sections will interact with > 4 TW peak power Ti:Sapphire laser in a highly tapered 50 cm undulator and experience an acceleration gradient of > 200 MeV/m. We present the final design of the accelerator as well as the results of start-to-end simulations investigating preservation of beam quality and tolerances involved with this accelerator.

Moody, J. T.; Musumeci, P.; Anderson, G.; Anderson, S.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Gibson, D.; Tremaine, A.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Using Cepheids to determine the galactic abundance gradient I. The solar neighbourhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of studies of abundance gradients in the galactic disk have been performed in recent years. The results obtained are rather disparate: from no detectable gradient to a rather significant slope of about -0.1 dex kpc -1. The present study concerns the abundance gradient based on the spectroscopic analysis of a sample of classical Cepheids. These stars enable one to obtain reliable abundances of a variety of chemical elements. Additionally, they have well determined distances which allow an accurate determination of abundance distributions in the galactic disc. Using 236 high resolution spectra of 77 galactic Cepheids, the radial elemental distribution in the galactic disc between galactocentric distances in the range 6-11 kpc has been investigated. Gradients for 25 chemical elements (from carbon to gadolinium) are derived...

S. M. Andrievsky; V. V. Kovtyukh; R. E. Luck; J. R. D. Lepine; D. Bersier; W. J. Maciel; B. Barbuy; V. G. Klochkova; V. E. Panchuk; R. U. Karpischek

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The long range migration of hydrogen through Zircaloy in response to tensile and compressive stress gradients  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zircaloy-4, which is used widely as a core structural material in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), picks up hydrogen during service. Hydrogen solubility in Zircaloy-4 is low and zirconium hydride phases precipitate after the Zircaloy-4 lattice becomes supersaturated with hydrogen. These hydrides embrittle the Zircaloy-4, degrading its mechanical performance as a structural material. Because hydrogen can move rapidly through the Zircaloy-4 lattice, the potential exists for large concentrations of hydride to accumulate in local regions of a Zircaloy component remote from its point of entry into the component. Much has been reported in the literature regarding the long range migration of hydrogen through Zircaloy under concentration gradients and temperature gradients. Relatively little has been reported, however, regarding the long range migration of hydrogen under stress gradients. This paper presents experimental results regarding the long range migration of hydrogen through Zircaloy in response to both tensile and compressive stress gradients. The importance of this driving force for hydrogen migration relative to concentration and thermal gradients is discussed.

Kammenzind, B.F.; Berquist, B.M.; Bajaj, R.; Kreyns, P.H.; Franklin, D.G.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, J.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hard thermal effective action in QCD through the thermal operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the application of the thermal operator to the zero temperature retarded Green's functions, we derive in a simple way the well known hard thermal effective action in QCD. By relating these functions to forward scattering amplitudes for on-shell particles, this derivation also clarifies the origin of important properties of the hard thermal effective action, such as the manifest Lorentz and gauge invariance of its integrand.

Ashok Das; J. Frenkel

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Preliminary interpretation of thermal data from the Nevada Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of data from 60 wells in and around the Nevada Test Site, including 16 in the Yucca Mountain area, indicates a thermal regime characterized by large vertical and lateral gradients in heat flow. Estimates of heat flow indicate considerable variation on both regional and local scales. The variations are attributable primarily to hydrologic processes involving interbasin flow with a vertical component of (seepage) velocity (volume flux) of a few mm/yr. Apart from indicating a general downward movement of water at a few mm/yr, the reults from Yucca Mountain are as yet inconclusive. The purpose of the study was to determine the suitability of the area for proposed repository sites.

Sass, J.H.; Lachenbruch, A.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thirty Stage Annular Centrifugal Contactor Thermal Profile Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thirty stage 5 cm annular centrifugal contactor cascade has been assembled and tested to obtain thermal profiles during both ambient and heated input conditions of operation. Thermocouples were installed on every stage as well as feed inputs and Real-time data was taken during experiments lasting from two to eight hours at total flow rates of 0.5 to 1.4 liters per minute. Ambient temperature profile results show that only a small amount of heat is generated by the mechanical energy of the contactors. Steady state temperature profiles mimic the ambient temperature of the lab but are higher toward the middle of the cascade. Heated inlet solutions gave temperature profiles with smaller temperature gradients, more driven by the temperature of the inlet solutions than ambient lab temperature. Temperature effects of solution mixing, even at rotor speeds of 4000 rpm, were not measurable.

David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms water in overlying aquifers. Some of the areas of hot water, such as Roosevelt, Pavant-Black Rock, and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, probably have a potential to produce electricity; the estimated potential at Roosevelt is 300 megawatts. But the many areas of warm and hot water whose temperatures are too low to produce electricity may still have their waters utilized for space heating, as is planned for Monroe, for greenhouses, and for the processing of farm produce. In this report are tables that give records of about 1500 thermal springs and wells, 66 yield hot water, more than 400 yield warm water, and more than 1000 yield slightly warm water. The records include location, ownership, temperature, yield, depth (of wells), geologic unit, and some chemical analyses.

Goode, Harry D.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hydrodynamic gradient expansion in gauge theory plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We utilize the fluid-gravity duality to investigate the large order behavior of hydrodynamic gradient expansion of the dynamics of a gauge theory plasma system. This corresponds to the inclusion of dissipative terms and transport coefficients of very high order. Using the dual gravity description, we calculate numerically the form of the stress tensor for a boost-invariant flow in a hydrodynamic expansion up to terms with 240 derivatives. We observe a factorial growth of gradient contributions at large orders, which indicates a zero radius of convergence of the hydrodynamic series. Furthermore, we identify the leading singularity in the Borel transform of the hydrodynamic energy density with the lowest nonhydrodynamic excitation corresponding to a `nonhydrodynamic' quasinormal mode on the gravity side.

Michal P. Heller; Romuald A. Janik; Przemyslaw Witaszczyk

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

Anderson, Norman L. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

Kutasov, I.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Temperature gradients in a portion of Michigan: a review of the usefulness of data from the AAPG geothermal survey of North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature gradient data derived from drill holes in an east-west zone through the center of the southern peninsula of Michigan are analyzed. The purpose of this work is to investigate possible problems in utilizing the American Association of Petroleum Geologists data base. Michigan was chosen because a review of that State's geothermal potential shows inconsistencies between gradients from shallow wells and nearby deeper wells and because the geology of the State is relativey simple. The structure and stratigraphy are discussed because an understanding of Michigan basin geology makes it easier to predict the influence of lithology on the basin's geothermal gradients. Explanations for elevated gradients are reviewed. (MHR)

Vaught, T.L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

245

Energy Gradient Theory of Hydrodynamic Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new universal theory for flow instability and turbulent transition is proposed in this study. Flow instability and turbulence transition have been challenging subjects for fluid dynamics for a century. The critical condition of turbulent transition from theory and experiments differs largely from each other for Poiseuille flows. In this paper, a new mechanism of flow instability and turbulence transition is presented for parallel shear flows and the energy gradient theory of hydrodynamic instability is proposed. It is stated that the total energy gradient in the transverse direction and that in the streamwise direction of the main flow dominate the disturbance amplification or decay. A new dimensionless parameter K for characterizing flow instability is proposed for wall bounded shear flows, which is expressed as the ratio of the energy gradients in the two directions. It is thought that flow instability should first occur at the position of Kmax which may be the most dangerous position. This speculation is confirmed by Nishioka et al's experimental data. Comparison with experimental data for plane Poiseuille flow and pipe Poiseuille flow indicates that the proposed idea is really valid. It is found that the turbulence transition takes place at a critical value of Kmax of about 385 for both plane Poiseuille flow and pipe Poiseuille flow, below which no turbulence will occur regardless the disturbance. More studies show that the theory is also valid for plane Couette flows and Taylor-Couette flows between concentric rotating cylinders.

Hua-Shu Dou

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Properties of Geopressured Brines and Wells in the Gulf Coast and Opportunities for Industrial/Research Participation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft. Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of U.S. locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. The assumed ranges in resource characteristics include: depth from -12,000 to > -20,000 feet, brine flow rate from 20,000 to 40,000 bpd, temperature from 300 to 400 F, bottomhole pressure from 12,000 to 18,500 psi; salinity from 20,000 to 200,000 mg/L, gas-water ratio from 40 to 80 scf/bbl., and condensate from a trace to production. Energy in the geopressured resource includes gas, thermal, and hydraulic energy. It has been estimated that there are 6,000 quads of methane and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the Gulf Coast area geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Estimates run as high as 50,000 quad for the thermal energy (Wallace et al, 1978). Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells includes: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. Outside agency interest includes the U.S.G.S., N.S.F., G.R.I., and possibly other areas within DOE. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells.

Wys, J. Nequs- de

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Weak Pressure Gradient Approximation and Its Analytical Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A weak pressure gradient (WPG) approximation is introduced for parameterizing supradomain-scale (SDS) dynamics, and this method is compared to the relaxed form of the weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation in the context of 3D, linearized, ...

David M. Romps

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Surface Temperature Gradients as Diagnostic Indicators of Midlatitude Circulation Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zonal and meridional surface temperature gradients are considered to be determinants of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns. However, there has been limited investigation of these gradients as diagnostic aids. Here, the twentieth-century ...

Christina Karamperidou; Francesco Cioffi; Upmanu Lall

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alternatives to the gradient in optimal transfer line buffer allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes several directions to replace the gradient in James Schor's gradient algorithm to solve the dual problem. The alternative directions are: the variance and standard deviation of buffer levels, the ...

Tanizar, Ketty, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Irradiance gradients in the presence of participating media and occlusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a technique for computing translational gradients of indirect surface reflectance in scenes containing participating media and significant occlusions. These gradients describe how the incident radiance field changes with respect ...

Wojciech Jarosz; Matthias Zwicker; Henrik Wann Jensen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Numerical Tests of the Weak Pressure Gradient Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-resolving simulations of convection over a surface temperature hot spot are used to evaluate the weak pressure gradient (WPG) and weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximations. The premise of the relaxed form of WTG—that vertical velocity ...

David M. Romps

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Response of a Uniform Horizontal Temperature Gradient to Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a uniform horizontal temperature gradient to prescribed fixed heating is calculated in the context of an extended version of surface quasigeostrophic dynamics. It is found that for zero mean surface flow and weak cross-gradient ...

Maarten H. P. Ambaum; Panos J. Athanasiadis

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mixed Layer Restratification Due to a Horizontal Density Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restratification in the surface mixed layer driven by a horizontal density gradient following a storm is examined. For a constant layer depth H and constant buoyancy gradient |bx| = M2, geostrophic adjustment leads to new stratification with ...

Amit Tandon; Chris Garrett

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Enhancement of Diffusive Transport by Nonequilibrium Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. The steady-state diffusive flux in a finite system subject to a concentration gradient is enhanced because of long-range correlations between concentration fluctuations and fluctuations of the velocity parallel to the concentration gradient. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as \\ln(L/L_{0}) in quasi-two dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it grows as L_{0}^{-1}-L^{-1}, where L_{0} is a reference length. The predictions of a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory, closely related to second-order mode-mode coupling analysis, are compared to results from particle simulations and a finite-volume solver and excellent agreement is observed. We elucidate the direct connection to the long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function in finite systems, as well as finite-size corrections employed in molecula...

Donev, A; Bell, J B; Garcia, A L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Enhancement of Diffusive Transport by Nonequilibrium Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. The steady-state diffusive flux in a finite system subject to a concentration gradient is enhanced because of long-range correlations between concentration fluctuations and fluctuations of the velocity parallel to the concentration gradient. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as \\ln(L/L_{0}) in quasi-two dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it grows as L_{0}^{-1}-L^{-1}, where L_{0} is a reference length. The predictions of a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory, closely related to second-order mode-mode coupling analysis, are compared to results from particle simulations and a finite-volume solver and excellent agreement is observed. We elucidate the direct connection to the long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function in finite systems, as well as finite-size corrections employed in molecular dynamics calculations. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the nonlinear advective terms need to be retained in the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics when modeling transport in small-scale finite systems.

A. Donev; A. de la Fuente; J. B. Bell; A. L. Garcia

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analytical and experimental studies for thermal plasma processing of materials  

SciTech Connect

Work continued on thermal plasma processing of materials. This quarter, ceramic powders of carbides, aluminium nitride, oxides, solids solutions, magnetic and non magnetic spinels, superconductors, and composites have been successfully synthesized in a Triple DC Torch Plasma Jet Reactor (TTPR) and in a single DC Plasma Jet Reactor. All the ceramic powders with the exception of AIN were synthesized using a novel injection method developed to overcome the problems associated with solid injection, in particular for the single DC plasma jet reactor, and to realize the benefits of gas phase reactions. Also, initial experiments have been performed for the deposition of diamond coatings on Si wafers using the TTPR with methane as the carbon source. Well faceted diamond crystallites were deposited on the surface of the wafers, forming a continuous one particle thick coating. For measuring temperature and velocity fields in plasma systems, enthalpy probes have been developed and tested. The validity has been checked by performing energy and mass flux balances in an argon plasma jet operated in argon atmosphere. Total Gibbs free energy minimization calculations using a quasi-equilibrium modification have been applied to simulate several chemical reactions. Plasma reactor modelling has been performed for the counter-flow liquid injection plasma synthesis experiment. Plasma diagnostics has been initiated to determine the pressure gradient in the coalesced part of the plasma jet. The pressure gradient drives the diffusion of chemical species which ultimately controls the chemical reactions. 4 figs.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Mechanical well jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a mechanical well jar having inner and outer tubular members movable longitudinally relative to each other a limited distance. Means for connecting one of the members to a pipe string extends above the jar. Means connect the other member to the pipe string below the jar. Annular shoulders on the members engage to limit the relative longitudinal movement of the members. The improvement comprises: laterally spaced, arcuate cam plates each attached to the inner surface of the outer member by threaded members that extend through the wall of the outer member and that can be removed from outside the outer member to allow the cam plates to be removed and repaired or replaced.

Burton, C.A.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

259

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

How temperature gradients are determined in toroidal plasmas  

SciTech Connect

It is commonly assumed in modern-day toroidal plasmas that the edge ion or electron temperature is sufficiently low so that the edge temperature can be neglected with respect to the center temperature. For example, in a detached plasma, where the boundary condition is understood reasonably well, it is both theoretically and experimentally justified to say that the edge temperature can be approximately zero. Now in a toroidal plasma bounded by a divertor, it is theoretically possible to design a divertor such that each pair of electron and hydrogen ion can carry, on average, 3/2(kTe + kTi). Then, in the absence of recycling, the temperature gradients in the scrape-off layer can be made zero or at least, less than 1/a, where a is the plasma radius. Under that boundary condition, the temperature gradient inside the plasma vanishes. Realizing this in practice is difficult but not impossible. The problem is discussed in this paper. 1 ref.

Yoshikawa, Shoichi.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A linear helicon plasma device with controllable magnetic field gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current free double layers (CFDLs) are localized potential structures having spatial dimensions - Debye lengths and potential drops of more than local electron temperature across them. CFDLs do not need a current for them to be sustained and hence they differ from the current driven double layers. Helicon antenna produced plasmas in an expanded chamber along with an expanding magnetic field have shown the existence of CFDL near the expansion region. A helicon plasma device has been designed, fabricated, and installed in the Institute for Plasma Research, India to study the role of maximum magnetic field gradient as well as its location with respect to the geometrical expansion region of the chamber in CFDL formation. The special feature of this machine consisting of two chambers of different radii is its capability of producing different magnetic field gradients near the physical boundary between the two chambers either by changing current in one particular coil in the direction opposite to that in other coils and/or by varying the position of this particular coil. Although, the machine is primarily designed for CFDL experiments, it is also capable of carrying out many basic plasma physics experiments such as wave propagation, wave coupling, and plasma instabilities in a varying magnetic field topology. In this paper, we will present the details of the machine construction, its specialties, and some preliminary results about the production and characterization of helicon plasma in this machine.

Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

Jirka, Gerhard H.

263

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs: Leave The Pack Behind & Wellness Centre, UTSC Mental Wellness ­ mental health awareness program focusing on mental health, coping on healthy relationships, sexually transmitted infections and birth control Health & Wellness Centre

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

264

Application of high temperature superconductors to high-gradient magnetic separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a powerful technique which can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, This technology can separate magnetic solids from other solids, liquids or gases. As the name implies HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. HGMS separators usually consist of a high-field solenoid magnet, the bore of which contains a fine-structured, ferromagnetic matrix material. The matrix material locally distorts the magnetic field and creates large field gradients in the vicinity of the matrix elements. These elements then become trapping sites for magnetic particles and are the basis for the magnetic separation. In this paper we discuss the design and construction of a prototype HGMS unit using a magnet made with high temperature superconductors (HTS). The prototype consists of an outer vacuum vessel which contains the HTS solenoid magnet The magnet is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield and multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets. The magnet, thermal shield and current leads all operate in a vacuum and are cooled by a cryocooler. High temperature superconducting current leads are used to reduce the heat leak from the ambient environment to the HTS magnet.

Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Worl, L.W.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electron cyclotron maser emission mode coupling to the z-mode on a longitudinal density gradient in the context of solar type III bursts  

SciTech Connect

A beam of super-thermal, hot electrons was injected into maxwellian plasma with a density gradient along a magnetic field line. 1.5D particle-in-cell simulations were carried out which established that the EM emission is produced by the perpendicular component of the beam injection momentum. The beam has a positive slope in the distribution function in perpendicular momentum phase space, which is the characteristic feature of a cyclotron maser. The cyclotron maser in the overdense plasma generates emission at the electron cyclotron frequency. The frequencies of generated waves were too low to propagate away from the injection region, hence the wavelet transform shows a pulsating wave generation and decay process. The intensity pulsation frequency is twice the relativistic cyclotron frequency. Eventually, a stable wave packet formed and could mode couple on the density gradient to reach frequencies of the order of the plasma frequency that allowed for propagation. The emitted wave is likely to be a z-mode wave. The total electromagnetic energy generated is of the order of 0.1% of the initial beam kinetic energy. The proposed mechanism is of relevance to solar type III radio bursts, as well as other situations, when the injected electron beam has a non-zero perpendicular momentum, e.g., magnetron.

Pechhacker, R.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Results of geothermal gradient core hole TCB-1, Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site, Guatemala, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical field studies conducted in 1988 and 1989 at the Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site in Guatemala indicated that there is a substantial shallow heat source beneath the area of youngest volcanism. To obtain information on subsurface temperatures and temperature gradients, stratigraphy, hydrothermal alteration, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids, a geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to 808 m low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro volcano Complex, 300 km south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, dated at 2,910 years. Gases from acid-sulfate springs near Laguna Ixpaco consistently yield maximum estimated subsurface temperatures of 250--300{degrees}C. The temperature versus depth curve from TCB-1 does not show isothermal conditions and the calculated thermal gradients from 500--800 m is 230{degrees}C/km. Bottom hole temperature is 238{degrees}C. Calculated heat flow values are nearly 9 heat flow units (HFU). The integration of results from the TCB-1 gradient core hole with results from field studies provides strong evidence that the Tecuamburro area holds great promise for containing a commercial geothermal resource.

Adams, A.I.; Chipera, S.; Counce, D.; Gardner, J.; Goff, S.; Goff, F.; Heiken, G.; Laughlin, A.W.; Musgrave, J.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Aycinena, S.; Martinelli, L. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O.; Revolorio, M.; Roldan, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion); D

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Kramers' formula for chemical reactions in the context of Wasserstein gradient flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive Kramers' formula as singular limit of the Fokker-Planck equation with double-well potential. The convergence proof is based on the Rayleigh principle of the underlying Wasserstein gradient structure and complements a recent result by Peletier, Savar\\'e and Veneroni.

Michael Herrmann; Barbara Niethammer

2010-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oil well jar  

SciTech Connect

A jar for use in imparting jarring blows to an object lodged in the bore of a well. The jar includes a mandrel member and outer telescopically related tubular member, the mandrel member and said tubular member being telescopically movable between an extended and a collapsed position of the jar. One of the members is connected to a drill string while the other of the members is connected to the object to be jarred. Telescopically overlapping portions of the members provide an annular chamber for confining an operating fluid. A sleeve and a cylinder extend into the chamber and into an essentially fluid tight fit with each other for a selected portion of the telescopic travel between the extended and collapsed positions. An operating fluid bypass is provided in the first one of the members, the bypass being in fluid communication with the operating fluid above and below the sleeve, the bypass including a channel. An orifice is disposed in the channel. A filter, distinct from said orifice, is provided by controlling the clearences between the sleeve and the first one of the members.

Sutliff, W. N.

1985-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook, Volume II: Advanced Concepts in Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume I contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the steam power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Vol...

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

271

Soil Carbon Dynamics Along an Elevation Gradient in the Southern Appalachian Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of soil C dynamics in the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is at the center of many science questions related to global climate change. The purpose of this report is to summarize measured trends in environmental factors and ecosystem processes that affect soil C balance along elevation gradients in the southern Appalachian Mountains of eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina, USA. Three environmental factors that have potentially significant effects on soil C dynamics (temperature, precipitation, and soil N availability) vary in a predictable manner with altitude. Forest soil C stocks and calculated turnover times of labile soil C increase with elevation, and there is an apparent inverse relationship between soil C storage and mean annual temperature. Relationships between climate variables and soil C dynamics along elevation gradients must be interpreted with caution because litter chemistry, soil moisture, N availability, and temperature are confounded; all potentially interact in complex ways to regulate soil C storage through effects on decomposition. Some recommendations are presented for untangling these complexities. It is concluded that past studies along elevation gradients have contributed to a better but not complete understanding of environmental factors and processes that potentially affect soil C balance. Furthermore, there are advantages linked to the use of elevation gradients as an approach to climate change research when hypotheses are placed in a strong theoretical or mechanistic framework. Climate change research along elevation gradients can be both convenient and economical. More importantly, ecosystem processes and attributes affecting soil C dynamics along elevation gradients are usually the product of the long-term interactions between climate, vegetation, and soil type. Investigations along elevation gradients are a useful approach to the study of environmental change, and its effect on soil processes, which can complement data obtained from controlled, large-scale, field experiments as well as other empirical and theoretical approaches to climate change research.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

272

Exploration geothermal gradient drilling, Platanares, Honduras, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a review and summary of the core drilling operations component of the Honduras Geothermal Resource Development Project at the Platanares geothermal prospect in Honduras, Central America. Three intermediate depth (428 to 679 m) coreholes are the first continuously cored geothermal exploration boreholes in Honduras. These coring operations are part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) effort funded by the Agency for International Development (AID) and implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) in cooperation with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (ENEE) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy, thermal gradient, and flow test data of the boreholes. The primary objectives of this coring effort were (1) to obtain quantitative information on the temperature distribution as a function of depth, (2) to recover fluids associated with the geothermal reservoir, (3) to recover 75% or better core from the subsurface rock units, and (4) to drill into the subsurface rock as deeply as possible in order to get information on potential reservoir rocks, fracture density, permeabilities, and alteration histories of the rock units beneath the site. The three exploration coreholes drilled to depths of 650, 428 and 679 m, respectively, encountered several hot water entries. Coring operations and associated testing began in mid-October 1986 and were completed at the end of June 1987.

Goff, S.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Ruefenacht, H.D.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.; Ramos, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients  

SciTech Connect

Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

275

FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition of YSZ for Use in Thermal Barrier Coatings - Faraday Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition of YSZ for Use in Thermal Barrier Coatings-Faraday Technology Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are employed to protect gas turbine engine components. These coating systems provide thermal, oxidation, and mechanical protection; reduce thermal gradients; and lower the metal substrate surface temperature, extending the life of the engine components. Faraday Technology, Inc. (Faraday) is developing a new manufacturing process, the

276

THE EXTENSIVE AGE GRADIENT OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of small systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is likely to have been a balance between external environmental effects and internal processes within their own relatively shallow potential wells. Assessing how strong such environmental interactions may have been is therefore an important element in understanding the baryonic evolution of dSphs and their derived dark matter distribution. Here we present results from a wide-area CTIO/MOSAIC II photometric survey of the Carina dSph, reaching down to about two magnitudes below the oldest main-sequence turnoff (MSTO). This data set enables us to trace the structure of Carina in detail out to very large distances from its center, and as a function of stellar age. We observe the presence of an extended structure made up primarily of ancient MSTO stars, at distances between 25' and 60' from Carina's center, confirming results in the literature that Carina extends well beyond its nominal tidal radius. The large number statistics of our survey reveals features such as isophote twists and tails that were undetected in other previous, shallower surveys. This is the first time that such unambiguous signs of tidal disruption have been found in a Milky Way 'classical' dwarf other than Sagittarius. We also demonstrate the presence of a negative age gradient in Carina directly from its MSTOs, and trace it out to very large distances from the galaxy center. The signs of interaction with the Milky Way make it unclear whether the age gradient was already in place before Carina underwent tidal disruption.

Battaglia, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Irwin, M. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB03 0HA (United Kingdom); Tolstoy, E.; De Boer, T. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Mateo, M., E-mail: gbattaglia@oabo.inaf.it [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1090 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Measurement of Thermal Dependencies of PBG Fiber Properties  

SciTech Connect

Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) represent a class of optical fibers which have a wide spectrum of applications in the telecom and sensing industries. Currently, the Advanced Accelerator Research Department at SLAC is developing photonic bandgap particle accelerators, which are photonic crystal structures with a central defect used to accelerate electrons and achieve high longitudinal electric fields. Extremely compact and less costly than the traditional accelerators, these structures can support higher accelerating gradients and will open a new era in high energy physics as well as other fields of science. Based on direct laser acceleration in dielectric materials, the so called photonic band gap accelerators will benefit from mature laser and semiconductor industries. One of the key elements to direct laser acceleration in hollow core PCFs, is maintaining thermal and structural stability. Previous simulations demonstrate that accelerating modes are sensitive to the geometry of the defect region and the variations in the effective index. Unlike the telecom modes (for which over 95% of the energy propagates in the hollow core) most of the power of these modes is located in the glass at the periphery of the central hole which has a higher thermal constant than air ({gamma}{sub SiO{sub 2}} = 1.19 x 10{sup -6} 1/K, {gamma}{sub air} = -9 x 10{sup -7} 1/K with {gamma} = dn/dT). To fully control laser driven acceleration, we need to evaluate the thermal and structural consequences of such modes on the PCFs. We are conducting series of interferometric tests to quantify the dependencies of the HC-633-02 (NKT Photonics) propagation constant (k{sub z}) on temperature, vibration amplitude, stress and electric field strength. In this paper we will present the theoretical principles characterizing the thermal behavior of a PCF, the measurements realized for the fundamental telecom mode (TE{sub 00}), and the experimental demonstration of TM-like mode propagation in the HC-633-02 fiber.

Laouar, Rachik

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wells, and for steam-injection wells, in thermal ?elds255/mi. 2 ) for steam-injection wells on a per-thermal-?eld331 ft) for steam-injection wells. Demographics and land use

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and fracturing'' of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Andersson, O. (VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden)); Willemsen, A. (IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and ``fracturing`` of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Andersson, O. [VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden); Willemsen, A. [IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Constant field gradient planar cavity structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cavity structure is described having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, R.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

High-gradient compact linear accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter.

Carder, B.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Napersville, IL); Kobylinski, Thadeus P. (Lisle, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness counselor you may call, email, or simply stop by the Center for Student Wellness to leave a note for a wellness counselor-304-5564 (p) 212-304-5560 (p) 212-544-1967 (f) Email: studentwellness@columbia.edu Wellness information

Grishok, Alla

292

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

294

Heat pipe thermal control of slender optics probes  

SciTech Connect

The thermal design for a stereographic viewing system is presented. The design incorporates an annular heat pipe and thermal isolation techniques. Test results are compared with design predictions for a prototype configuration. Test data obtained during heat pipe startup showing temperature gradients along the evaporator wall are presented. Correlations relating maximum wall temperature differences to a liquid Reynolds number were obtained at low power levels. These results are compared with Nusselt's Falling Film theory.

Prenger, F.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

296

SLAC/CERN high gradient tests on an X-band accelerating section  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High frequency linear collider schemes envisage the use of rather high accelerating gradients: 50 to 100 MV/m for X-band and 80 MV/m for CLIC. Because these gradients are well above those commonly used in accelerators, high gradient studies of high frequency structures have been initiated and test facilities have been constructed at KEK [1], SLAC [2] and CERN [3]. The studies seek to demonstrate that the above mentioned gradients are both achievable and practical. There is no well-defined criterion for the maximum acceptable level of dark current but it must be low enough not to generate unacceptable transverse wakefields, disturb beam position monitor readings or cause RF power losses. Because there are of the order of 10,000 accelerating sections in a high frequency linear collider, the conditioning process should not be too long or difficult. The test facilities have been instrumented to allow investigation of field emission and RF breakdown mechanisms. With an understanding of these effects, the high grad...

Wang, J W; Loewen, R J; Ruth, Ronald D; Vlieks, A E; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

DC Resistivity Survey (Gradient Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Gradient Array) edit Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

299

Better Mini-Batch Algorithms via Accelerated Gradient Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Better Mini-Batch Algorithms via Accelerated Gradient Methods Andrew Cotter Toyota Technological Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago nati@ttic.edu Karthik Sridharan Toyota Technological Institute

300

Engineering chemoattractant gradients using controlled release polysaccharide microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemoattractant gradients play important roles in the normal function of immune system, from lymphocyte homeostasis to mounting efficient immune responses against infection. Improved fundamental knowledge about the role ...

Wang, Yana, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An accelerated proximal gradient algorithm for nuclear norm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 27, 2009 ... An accelerated proximal gradient algorithm for nuclear norm regularized least squares problems. Kim-Chuan Toh (mattohkc ***at*** nus.edu.sg)

302

Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of temperature gradient metamorphism in snow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the presence of a sufficient temperature gradient, snow evolves from an isotropic network of ice crystals to a transversely isotropic system of depth hoar… (more)

Staron, Patrick Joseph.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gradient methods for convex minimization: better rates under ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 20, 2013 ... Gradient methods for convex minimization: better rates under weaker conditions. Hui Zhang(hhuuii.zhang ***at*** gmail.com)

304

Evaluation of the Miamsburg Salt-Gradient, Solar Pond  

SciTech Connect

This project is directed toward data collection and evaluation of the performance of the largest working, salt-gradient, solar pond in the world.

Wittenberg, Layton J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high density of steam injection wells for thermal recovery.kilometres 20 miles Steam-injection wells per km 2 (mi 2 )average number of steam injection well blowouts and blowouts

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Two-Gradient Convection in a Vertical Slot with Maxwell-Cattaneo Heat Conduction  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of the Maxwell-Cattaneo law of heat conduction (MCHC) on the 1D flow in a vertical slot subject to both vertical and horizontal temperature gradients. The gravitational acceleration is allowed to oscillate, which provides an opportunity to investigate the quantitative contribution of thermal inertia as epitomized by MCHC. The addition of the time derivative in MCHC increases the order of the system. We use a spectral expansion with Rayleigh's beam functions as the basis set, which is especially suited to fourth order boundary value problems (BVP). We show that the time derivative (relaxation of the thermal flux) has a dissipative nature and leads to the appearance of purely real negative eigenvalues. Yet it also increases the absolute value of the imaginary part and decreases the absolute value of the real part of the complex eigenvalues. Thus, the system has a somewhat more oscillatory behavior than the one based on Fourier's heat conduction law (FHC)

Papanicolaou, N. C. [Department of Computer Science, University of Nicosia, P.O. Box 24005, 1700 Nicosia (Cyprus); Christov, C. I. [Department of Mathematics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-1010 (United States); Jordan, P. M. [Entropy Reversal Consultants (L.L.C), P. O. Box 691, Abita Springs, LA 70420 (United States); Code 7181, Naval Research Lab., Stennis Space Ctr., MS 39529 (United States)

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009 Vendor Health Risk Assessment Online Content and Decision (Wellness Partners: American Specialty Health) !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" Blue Shield of CA !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" CIGNA (Wellness and DM Partner: Healthways) !" !" !" ! HealthNet !" !" !" ! Kaiser

Kay, Mark A.

309

RMOTC - Testing - Openhole Logging Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Openhole Logging Well RMOTC Openhole Logging Well RMOTC has drilled a vertical well that is specifically designated for openhole logging tests. It was drilled to 5,450 feet and has...

310

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

311

Productivity index of multilateral wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the history of petroleum science there are a vast variety of productivity solutions for different well types, well configurations and flow regimes. The main… (more)

Nunsavathu, Upender Naik.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut Wells Jump to: navigation, search Name Connecticut Wells Place Bethlehem, Connecticut Zip 6751 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump...

313

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and...

314

T2CG1, a package of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers for TOUGH2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most of the computational work in the numerical simulation of fluid and heat flows in permeable media arises in the solution of large systems of linear equations. The simplest technique for solving such equations is by direct methods. However, because of large storage requirements and accumulation of roundoff errors, the application of direct solution techniques is limited, depending on matrix bandwidth, to systems of a few hundred to at most a few thousand simultaneous equations. T2CG1, a package of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers, has been added to TOUGH2 to complement its direct solver and significantly increase the size of problems tractable on PCs. T2CG1 includes three different solvers: a Bi-Conjugate Gradient (BCG) solver, a Bi-Conjugate Gradient Squared (BCGS) solver, and a Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) solver. Results from six test problems with up to 30,000 equations show that T2CG1 (1) is significantly (and invariably) faster and requires far less memory than the MA28 direct solver, (2) it makes possible the solution of very large three-dimensional problems on PCs, and (3) that the BCGS solver is the fastest of the three in the tested problems. Sample problems are presented related to heat and fluid flow at Yucca Mountain and WIPP, environmental remediation by the Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System, and geothermal resources.

Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.; Antunez, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electron Thermal Microscopy Todd Brintlinger,, Yi Qi, Kamal H. Baloch, David Goldhaber-Gordon,| and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrical and thermal modeling. This provides a generic and adaptable platform for nanoscale thermal, probe shape, water meniscus, etc.). Near-field optical techniques4 similarly must rely on a given, as is illustrated in Figure 2. To create local temperature gradients, metal heater wires were fabricated

Goldhaber-Gordon, David

316

A bimetal and electret-based converter for thermal energy harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new device able to turn thermal gradients into electricity by using a bimetal-based heat engine coupled to an electrostatic converter. A two-steps conversion is performed: (i) a curved bimetallic strip turns the thermal gradient into a mechanical movement (thermal-to-mechanical conversion) that is (ii) then converted into electricity thanks to an electret-based electrostatic converter (mechanical-to-electrical conversion). An output power up to 5.5uW on a hot source at 50{\\deg}C has already been reached, validating this new concept.

Boisseau, S; Monfray, S; Puscasu, O; Skotnicki, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM The Wellness Lifestyle Program is located in Reynolds will actively participate in the wellness program to make Reynolds Hall a healthy and supportive place or more consequences: conduct referral; administrative removal from the Wellness Program and

Weston, Ken

318

Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Multi-objective Optimization Design for Gradient Stiffness Leaf Spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gradient stiffness leaf spring is of a positive meaning for increasing the ride smooth of vehicle, which has a more stable natural frequency of leaf spring stiffness. A multi-objective optimization model of Gradient stiffness leaf spring of vehicles ... Keywords: leaf spring, multi-objective, optimization design

Qin-man Fan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

325

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

THE DISPOSAL OF POWER REACTOR WASTE INTO DEEP WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of wastes from the processing of solid fuel elements and from solid blanket elements is discussed. The subjects considered include extraction of uranium by several methods, the removal of element jackets, the treatment of uraxium -zirconium fuel elements, disposal into deep wells, the hydraulics of wells, thermal considerations of disposal aquifers regional hydrology, potential deep-well disposal areas in the U. S., aud the cost of disposal. (J.R.D.)

de Laguna, W.; Blomeke, J.O.

1957-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

Gradient projection anti-windup scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is a well-recognized fact that control saturation affects virtually all practical control systems. It leads to controller windup, which degrades/limits the system's closed-loop performance, and may cause catastrophic ...

Teo, Chun Sang Justin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

ESTIMATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL CONDUCTIVITIES FROM TEMPERATURE GRADIENT MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

where: pc v • phonon heat capacity, c• phonon velocity,fluid density, the specific heat capacity of the fluid. Thean l8cm Values of heat capacities diameter casing for three

Hoang, V.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ESTIMATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL CONDUCTIVITIES FROM TEMPERATURE GRADIENT MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By analyzing the heat transfer process inside the tubing andnatural convection heat transfer process, three equationsis the dominant heat transfer process during shut-in, the

Hoang, V.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ESTIMATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL CONDUCTIVITIES FROM TEMPERATURE GRADIENT MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a Cir- culating Drilling Fluid," Journal of Petroleumtemperature after drilling, or injecting fluid. Bullard [14

Hoang, V.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Indiana Memorial Union Wells Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Franklin Hall Bryan Hall Law Indiana Memorial Union Jordan Hall Morrison Hall Wells Library Loop (0.5 miles) IMU to Greenhouse (0.3 miles) Business to Law School (0.75 miles) Wells Library to Morrison Hall (0.5 miles) Wells Library to Muisc Library (0.4 miles) #12;

Indiana University

333

Vascular flora and gradient analysis of the Natchez Trace Parkway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vascular plant collections were made on the Natchez Trace Parkway over a 15 month period beginning in August 2004. These collections along with previous work done by the National Park Service (NPS) produced a flora of 750 genera and 2196 species in 167 families. Five collection trips were made so as to include as much of the growing season as possible (August 2004, March, May, July and October 2005). Specimens were collected from 500 sites along the Parkway as well as at 50 quadrat locations. The largest families, by species numbers, are Asteraceae (298 species), Poaceae (236 species), Cyperaceae (148 species), Fabaceae (133 species) and Rosaceae (73 species), which accounted for 40.4% of the flora. A Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and TWINSPAN analysis were performed on data collected from 49 sites along the length of the Natchez Trace Parkway (NATR). It was found that the major environmental gradient (Axis 1) affecting the species composition of the site was to be the level of disturbance. The sites with high levels of disturbance were characterized as grassland field sites, while those areas with low levels of disturbance were characterized as forested sites. The TWINSPAN analysis produced 29 groupings, of which eight were found to be valid groupings. Through the course of the study, almost 450 new species were added to the current knowledge of the Natchez Trace Parkway by the NPS. In addition, one prospective endangered species was located, which will aid the NPS in future management practices within the park.

Phillips, Nena Mae Monique

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

335

Tubular well tool receiving conduit  

SciTech Connect

In combination, a well packer and a tubular well tool receiving conduit are described which consists of: a well packer having an expandable and retractable anchoring teeth and an expandable and retractable seal spaced from the anchoring teeth, a tubular well conduit including, a first plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit for coacting with the anchoring teeth for supporting the well tool in the conduit, a second plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit and positioned for coacting with the expandable seal for providing multiple seal points with the seal.

Durst, D.G.; Morris, A.J.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well temperature and pressure distributions can be measured by production logging or downhole permanent sensors, such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensors (DTS). Correct interpretation of temperature and pressure data can be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very difficult. In addition, the continuous measurement provides transient temperature behavior which increases the complexity of the problem. To interpret these measured data correctly, a comprehensive model is required. In this study, an interpretation model is developed to predict flow profile of a horizontal well from downhole temperature and pressure measurement. The model consists of a wellbore model and a reservoir model. The reservoir model can handle transient, multiphase flow and it includes a flow model and a thermal model. The calculation of the reservoir flow model is based on the streamline simulation and the calculation of reservoir thermal model is based on the finite difference method. The reservoir thermal model includes thermal expansion and viscous dissipation heating which can reflect small temperature changes caused by pressure difference. We combine the reservoir model with a horizontal well flow and temperature model as the forward model. Based on this forward model, by making the forward calculated temperature and pressure match the observed data, we can inverse temperature and pressure data to downhole flow rate profiles. Two commonly used inversion methods, Levenberg- Marquardt method and Marcov chain Monte Carlo method, are discussed in the study. Field applications illustrate the feasibility of using this model to interpret the field measured data and assist production optimization. The reservoir model also reveals the relationship between temperature behavior and reservoir permeability characteristic. The measured temperature information can help us to characterize a reservoir when the reservoir modeling is done only with limited information. The transient temperature information can be used in horizontal well optimization by controlling the flow rate until favorite temperature distribution is achieved. With temperature feedback and inflow control valves (ICVs), we developed a procedure of using DTS data to optimize horizontal well performance. The synthetic examples show that this method is useful at a certain level of temperature resolution and data noise.

Li, Zhuoyi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

338

Force-Gradient Nested Multirate Methods for Hamiltonian System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force-gradient decomposition methods are used to improve the energy preservation of symplectic schemes applied to Hamiltonian systems. If the potential is composed of different parts with strongly varying dynamics, this multirate potential can be exploited by coupling force-gradient decomposition methods with splitting techniques for multi-time scale problems to further increase the accuracy of the scheme and reduce the computational costs. In this paper, we derive novel force-gradient nested methods and test them numerically. Such methods can be used to increase the acceptance rate for the molecular dynamics step of the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm (HMC) and hence improve its computational efficiency.

Dmitry Shcherbakov; Matthias Ehrhardt; Michael Günther; Michael Peardon

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Water Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water producing from Lithologic formation from which water is produced. at depth Top of water producing formation (ft) to Base of water producing formation (ft) Static water level Static water level below casingWater Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page: This list contains location and identification

Frank, Thomas D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production  

SciTech Connect

Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

OpenEI - well records  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4320 en Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2911 - 31811) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode469

The Alabama...

343

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE Solar Decathlon: Wells Fargo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas emissions and building sustainably, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States and has been widely recognized for sustainability leadership in...

345

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U.S. Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) has been conducting geothermal exploration activities in the Camp Wilson area of Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twenty-nine Palms, CA, for almost two years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For several decades the GPO has worked

347

Forced Disturbances in a Zero Absolute Vorticity Gradient Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations show the presence of localized regions in the atmosphere with diminished potential vorticity gradients, an example being the tropical upper troposphere where convective heating plays an important role. The present work investigates ...

Paul F. Choboter; Gilbert Brunet; Sherwin A. Maslowe

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

On the Computation of Gradients from Observations over Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical scheme is developed to compute the gradients of observations taken over complex terrain. The method is applied to an artificial example to demonstrate the scheme. An application is made to surface pressure observations between ...

Fred J. Kopp; Paul L. Smith; Harold D. Orville

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Asymmetric Tidal Mixing due to the Horizontal Density Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratification and turbulent mixing exhibit a flood–ebb tidal asymmetry in estuaries and continental shelf regions affected by horizontal density gradients. The authors use a large-eddy simulation (LES) model to investigate the penetration of a ...

Ming Li; John Trowbridge; Rocky Geyer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Arizona Cool Season Surface Wind and Pressure Gradient Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average sea-level pressure gradients that produce sustained surface winds above 8 kt for at least six consecutive hours during the cool season at predetermined key stations in or adjacent to Arizona are investigated. Only wind directions ...

Ira S. Brenner

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

On Computing the Surface Horizontal Pressure Gradient over Elevated Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are proposed for calculating the surface horizontal pressure gradient or geostrophic wind in a local area over elevated terrain from randomly spaced surface observations. These procedures avoid many of the problems associated with sea-...

Maurice Danard

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

On Computing the Horizontal Pressure Gradient Force in Sigma Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corby et al. present a finite-difference expression for the horizontal pressure gradient force in sigma coordinates that, in a barotropic atmosphere where the temperature varies linearly with logarithm of pressure, has the same net truncation ...

Maurice Danard; Qing Zhang; John Kozlowski

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Optimization Online - Conjugate gradient methods based on secant ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 28, 2011 ... fukushima-nct.ac.jp) H Yabe(yabe ***at*** rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp). Abstract: Conjugate gradient methods have been paid attention to, because they ...

354

Steady Coastal Circulation Due to Oceanic Alongshore Pressure Gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A depth-averaged barotropic model is used to investigate the steady response of the coastal ocean to alongshore pressure gradients imposed by the deep ocean. Solution indicate that the dimensionless continental margin width ? is the appropriate ...

Jason H. Middleton

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For...

356

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Quantum-limited measurement of magnetic-field gradient with entangled atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to detect the microwave magnetic-field gradient by using a pair of entangled two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. We consider the two spatially separated condensates to be coupled to the two different magnetic fields. The magnetic-field gradient can be determined by measuring the variances of population differences and relative phases between the two-component condensates in two wells. The precision of measurement can reach the Heisenberg limit. We study the effects of one-body and two-body atom losses on the detection. We find that the entangled atoms can outperform the uncorrelated atoms in probing the magnetic fields in the presence of atom losses. The effect of atom-atom interactions is also discussed.

H. T. Ng

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

An Expression for the Temperature Gradient in Chaotic Fields  

SciTech Connect

A coordinate system adapted to the invariant structures of chaotic magnetic fields is constructed. The coordinates are based on a set of ghost-surfaces, defined via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The construction of the chaotic coordinates allows an expression describing the temperature gradient across a chaotic magnetic field to be derived. The results are in close agreement with a numerical calculation.

S.R. Hudson

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Streamer formation in plasma with a temperature gradient  

SciTech Connect

Turbulence produced by a temperature gradient in a collisional plasma is investigated. The system evolves to a state in which highly elongated streams of plasma move up and down the temperature gradient. The resulting transport greatly exceeds estimates based on mixing length arguments. It is argued that such streams are the preferred nonlinear state of turbulent fluctuations driven by both delT/sub e/ and delT/sub i/.

Drake, J.F.; Guzdar, P.N.; Hassam, A.B.

1988-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal stimulation of an east-flank injection well, the first step in the creation of a heat exchanger at depth. Well datasets from the east flank of the Coso Geothermal Field...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

What's new in well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drillers know that the most important tools used in well control are preparation and knowledge. That fact is reinforced by government agency requirements for certification of responsible people on the rig, particularly in sensitive public areas like offshore waters. And existing problems like shallow gas blowouts and kick control in conventional wells have been complicated by industry's move to horizontal wells and underbalanced drilling. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) in the US and Europe is devoting a major effort to well control technology. It sponsored a comprehensive conference in Houston in November 1993, plus a well control trainer's Roundtable meeting in Houston in March. The IADC Well Control Conference for Europe is scheduled for June 8--10, 1994, in Stavanger, Norway, with an important 22-paper program. In this article, World Oil has selected several presentations from the two US IADC conferences noted above. These selections are noted by the authors as being of wide and current interest to the industry, they include: (1) horizontal well considerations, (2) a proposed new well killing method, (3) underbalanced drilling, (4) a new onsite simulator, and (5) IADC's school accreditation program. Summaries shown here cover only major topics. Original papers should be consulted for important details.

Snyder, R.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Square wells, quantum wells and ultra-thin metallic films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eigenvalue equations for the energy of bound states of a particle in a square well are solved, and the exact solutions are obtained, as power series. Accurate analytical approximate solutions are also given. The application of these results in the physics of quantum wells are discussed,especially for ultra-thin metallic films, but also in the case of resonant cavities, heterojunction lasers, revivals and super-revivals.

Victor Barsan

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Applications of Irreversible Thermodynamics: Bulk and Interfacial Electronic, Ionic, Magnetic, and Thermal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Irreversible thermodynamics is a widely-applicable toolset that extends thermodynamics to describe systems undergoing irreversible processes. It is particularly useful for describing macroscopic flow of system components, whether conserved (e.g., particle number) or non-conserved (e.g., spin). We give a general introduction to this toolset and calculate the entropy production due to bulk and interfacial flow. We compare the entropy production and heating rate of bulk and interfacial transport, as well as interfacial charge and spin transport. We then demonstrate the power and applicability of this toolset by applying it to three systems. We first consider metal oxide growth, and discuss inconsistency in previous theory by Mott. We show, however, that Mott's solution is the lowest order of a consistent asymptotic solution, with the ion and electron concentrations and fluxes going as power series in t^-k/2, where k = 1, 2, .... We find that this gives corrections to the "parabolic growth law" that has oxide thickness going as t^1/2; the lowest order correction is logarithmic in t. We then consider the effect on spin of electric currents crossing an interface between a ferromagnet (FM) and non-magnetic material (NM). Previous theories for electrical potential and spin accumulation neglect chemical or magnetic contributions to the energy. We apply irreversible thermodynamics to show that both contributions are pivotal in predicting the spin accumulation, particularly in the NM. We also show that charge screening, not considered in previous theories, causes spin accumulation in the FM, which may be important in ferromagnetic semiconductors. Finally, we apply irreversible thermodynamics to thermal equilibration in a thin-film FM on a substrate. Recent experiments suggest that applying a thermal gradient across the length of the system causes a spin current along the thickness; this spin current is present much farther from the heat sources than expected. We find that, although the interaction between the separate thermal equilibration processes increases the largest equilibration length, thermal equilibration does not predict a length as large as the experimentally measured length; it does predict, however, a thermal gradient along the thickness that has the shape of the measured spin current.

Sears, Matthew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Geothermal-well design handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified process is presented for estimating the performance of geothermal wells which are produced by natural, flashing flows. The well diameter and depth, and reservoir conditions must be known; then it is possible to determine the total pressure drop in a flowing well, and therefore to find the fluid pressure, temperature, and steam quality at the wellhead. By applying the handbook process to several input data sets, the user can compile sufficient information to determine the interdependence of input and output parameters. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

Rinehart, Ben N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Upgrades in thermal protection for downhole instruments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurement of geophysical parameters in progressively deeper and hotter wells has prompted design changes that improve the performance of downhole instruments and their associated thermal protection systems. This report provides a brief description of the mechanical and thermal loads to which these instruments and systems are subjected. Each design change made to the passive thermal protection system is described along with its resulting improvement. An outline of work being done to scope an active thermal protection system and the preliminary qualitative results are also described. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Bennett, G.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Well servicing rig market report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article profiles the well servicing industry, focusing on the problems facing the industry under currently depressed market conditions. The problems of rising operating costs, oil price uncertainty, and aging equipment are addressed specifically.

Killalea, M

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Segregation of Aerosols by Cloud-Nucleating Activity. Part I: Design, Construction, and Testing of A High-Flux Thermal Diffusion Cloud Chamber for Mass Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a thermal diffusion cloud chamber operated in series with an aerodynamic dichotomous separator that can segregate aerosol particles by their abilities to nucleate cloud droplets. The apparatus takes advantage of compensating gradients ...

Lee Harrison; Halstead Harrison

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Heat flow and geothermal gradients of Irian Jaya-Papua New Guinea: Implications for regional hydrocarbon exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compilation of published and unpublished bottom hole temperatures (corrected for circulation times) obtained from open files and reports of the Indonesian Petroleum Association, Papua Geologic Survey, and the Southeast Asia Petroleum Society, together with published oceanographic heat flow analyses from the surrounding seas, allow an analysis of the regional heat flow and geothermal gradients of New Guinea. In two dimensions the thermal trends may be described as a pervasive west-northwest striking Cordilleran core of cool (2 HFU->4{degree}C/100 m) on the northwest, northeast, east, and southwest. As a first approximation, the heat flow may be viewed as directly proportional to the crustal thickness (as demonstrated from north-south transects across the Central Cordillera), inversely proportional to the age of the ocean crust (offshore), and perturbed by crustal heterogeneities proximal to plate boundaries (e.g., the Northern New Guinea Fault System). As a result, the heat flow distribution affords a record of post-Cretaceous tectonic activities of New Guinea. Using the spatial distribution of geothermal gradients and specific source rock ages, kinetic calculations of hydrocarbon maturities confirmed by recent drilling results suggest thermal variations through space and time that cannot be modeled simply as a function of present day static temperatures. Therefore, in terms of utilizing the present thermal information, hydrocarbon basin exploration strategies must also take into account the tectonically perturbed heat flow history of the region.

Bettis, P.K. (Expatriate-Congo, Houston, TX (USA)); Pigott, J.D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Scaling of Macroscopic Properties of Porous Sediments Experiencing Compaction: Implications for Geothermal Gradient and Methane Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Porous sediments in geological systems experience stress by the above-laying mass and consequent compaction, which may be significantly nonuniform across the massif. We derive scaling laws for the compaction of sediments of similar geological origin. With these laws, we evaluate the dependence of the transport properties of a fluid-saturated porous medium (permeability, effective molecular diffusivity, hydrodynamic dispersion, and thermal conductivity) on its porosity. In particular, we demonstrate irrelevance of the assumption of a uniform geothermal gradient for systems with nonuniform compaction and importance of the derived scaling laws for mathematical modelling of methane hydrate deposits, which are believed to have potential for impact on global climate change and Glacial-Interglacial cycles.

Goldobin, Denis S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Downward continuation of temperature gradients at MacFarlane's Hot Spring, Northern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

MacFarlane's Hot Spring is located on the eastern margin of the Black Rock Desert of northwest Nevada. Detailed temperature logs from thirty-eight shallow boreholes (500 feet) and six intermediate depth boreholes (1500-2000 feet) have been used to construct a temperature gradient contour map covering approximately 144 square miles, both within and adjacent to the geothermal area. These temperature gradients were then continued downward through a detailed conductivity model to complete the threedimensional thermal picture. The principal results are as follows: The maximum measured temperature is 178/sup 0/F at 2,000 feet, and the maximum projected temperatures at greater depths are not likely to exceed the 250-350/sup 0/F range. The area of hydrothermal activity is confined to the western front of a structural platform bounded by two roughly parallel normal faults. The anomaly is best explained in terms of a simple groundwater flow model. The groundwater flows west through the structural platform and ascends when it intersects the conduit provided by the fault. The faults on the eastern side of the platform permit recharge to the system.

Swanberg, C.A.; Bowers, R.L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

380

SiN{sub x}-induced intermixing in AlInGaAs/InP quantum well through interdiffusion of group III atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the composition profiles within intermixed and non-intermixed AlInGaAs-based multiple quantum wells structures by secondary ion mass spectrometry and observe that the band gap blue shift is mainly attributed to the interdiffusion of In and Ga atoms between the quantum wells and the barriers. Based on these results, several AlInGaAs-based single quantum well (SQW) structures with various compressive strain (CS) levels were grown and their photoluminescence spectra were investigated after the intermixing process involving the encapsulation of thin SiN{sub x} dielectric films on the surface followed by rapid thermal annealing. In addition to the annealing temperature, we report that the band gap shift can be also enhanced by increasing the CS level in the SQW. For instance, at an annealing temperature of 850 Degree-Sign C, the photoluminescence blue shift is found to reach more than 110 nm for the sample with 1.2%-CS SQW, but only 35 nm with 0.4%-CS SQW. We expect that this relatively larger atomic compositional gradient of In (and Ga) between the compressively strained quantum well and the barrier can facilitate the atomic interdiffusion and it thus leads to the larger band gap shift.

Lee, Ko-Hsin; Thomas, Kevin; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Manganaro, Marina; Corbett, Brian [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Pelucchi, Emanuele; Peters, Frank H. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Padture, Nitin

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Nitin Padture

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermal Conductivity Prediction of Nano Fluid Using ANN/GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal conductivities of nano fluid in a two-phase having different compositions of both base fluid as well as nano particles in a closed ...

385

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Second thermal storage applications workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Carbon Nitrogen, and Oxygen Galactic Gradients: A Solution to the Carbon Enrichment Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eleven models of Galactic chemical evolution, differing in the carbon, nitrogen,and oxygen yields adopted, have been computed to reproduce the Galactic O/H values obtained from H II regions. All the models fit the oxygen gradient, but only two models fit also the carbon gradient, those based on carbon yields that increase with metallicity due to stellar winds in massive stars (MS) and decrease with metallicity due to stellar winds in low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS). The successful models also fit the C/O versus O/H evolution history of the solar vicinity obtained from stellar observations. We also compare the present day N/H gradient and the N/O versus O/H and the C/Fe, N/Fe, O/Fe versus Fe/H evolution histories of the solar vicinity predicted by our two best models with those derived from H II regions and from stellar observations. While our two best models fit the C/H and O/H gradients as well as the C/O versus O/H history, only Model 1 fits well the N/H gradient and the N/O values for metal poor stars but fails to fit the N/H values for metal rich stars. Therefore we conclude that our two best models solve the C enrichment problem, but that further work needs to be done on the N enrichment problem. By adding the C and O production since the Sun was formed predicted by Models 1 and 2 to the observed solar values we find an excellent agreement with the O/H and C/H values of the solar vicinity derived from H II regions O and C recombination lines. One of the most important results of this paper is that the fraction of carbon due to MS and LIMS in the interstellar medium is strongly dependent on time and on the galactocentric distance; at present about half of the carbon in the interstellar medium of the solar vicinity has been produced by MS and half by LIMS.

L. Carigi; M. Peimbert; C. Esteban; J. Garcia-Rojas

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Inhomogeneous holographic thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sudden injection of energy in a strongly coupled conformal field theory and its subsequent thermalization can be holographically modeled by a shell falling into anti-de Sitter space and forming a black brane. For a homogeneous shell, Bhattacharyya and Minwalla were able to study this process analytically using a weak field approximation. Motivated by event-by-event fluctuations in heavy ion collisions, we include inhomogeneities in this model, obtaining analytic results in a long wavelength expansion. In the early-time window in which our approximations can be trusted, the resulting evolution matches well with that of a simple free streaming model. Near the end of this time window, we find that the stress tensor approaches that of second-order viscous hydrodynamics. We comment on possible lessons for heavy ion phenomenology.

V. Balasubramanian; A. Bernamonti; J. de Boer; B. Craps; L. Franti; F. Galli; E. Keski-Vakkuri; B. Müller; A. Schäfer

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

390

Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-FG0291ER-40648. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration.'' This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design and fabrication of a 17GHz of photocathode gun, Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration using a 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders. This report is organized as follows. The development of an rf gun design and research progress on the picosecond laser system is summarized in Sec. 2, the status of the studies of the LBL/Haimson high gradient structure, using a 50 MW free-electron laser is summarized in Sec. 3, and theoretical research progress is described in Sec. 4. Supporting material is contained in Appendices A-G.

Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Danly, B.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Universal estimate of the gradient for parabolic equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a modification of the estimate for weighted Sobolev norms of solutions of parabolic equations such that the matrix of the higher order coefficients is included into the weight for the gradient. More precisely, we found the upper limit estimate that can be achieved by variations of the zero order coefficient. As an example of applications, an asymptotic estimate was obtained for the gradient at initial time. The constant in the estimates is the same for all possible choices of the dimension, domain, time horizon, and the coefficients of the parabolic equation. As an another example of application, existence and regularity results are obtained for parabolic equations with time delay for the gradient.

Nikolai Dokuchaev

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

392

Simulation of a Microfluidic Gradient Generator using Lattice Boltzmann Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidics provides a powerful and versatile technology to accurately control spatial and temporal conditions for cell culturing and can therefore be used to study cellular responses to gradients. Here we use Lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM) to solve both the Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) for the fluid and the coupled convection-diffusion equation (CDE) for the compounds that form the diffusion-based gradient. The design of a microfluidic chamber for diffusion-based gradients must avoid flow through the cell chamber. This can be achieved by alternately opening the source and the sink channels. The fast toggling of microfluidic valves requires switching between different boundary conditions. We demonstrate that the LBM is a powerful method for handling complex geometries, high Peclet number conditions, discontinuities in the boundary conditions, and multiphysics coupling.

Simon, Tanaka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Top hole drilling with dual gradient technology to control shallow hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently the "Pump and Dump" method employed by Exploration and Production (E&P) companies in deepwater is simply not enough to control increasingly dangerous and unpredictable shallow hazards. "Pump and Dump" requires a heavy dependence on accurate seismic data to avoid shallow gas zones; the kick detection methods are slow and unreliable, which results in a need for visual kick detection; and it does not offer dynamic well control methods of managing shallow hazards such as methane hydrates, shallow gas and shallow water flows. These negative aspects of "Pump and Dump" are in addition to the environmental impact, high drilling fluid (mud) costs and limited mud options. Dual gradient technology offers a closed system, which improves drilling simply because the mud within the system is recycled. The amount of required mud is reduced, the variety of acceptable mud types is increased and chemical additives to the mud become an option. This closed system also offers more accurate and faster kick detection methods in addition to those that are already used in the "Pump and Dump" method. This closed system has the potential to prevent the formation of hydrates by adding hydrate inhibitors to the drilling mud. And more significantly, this system successfully controls dissociating methane hydrates, over pressured shallow gas zones and shallow water flows. Dual gradient technology improves deepwater drilling operations by removing fluid constraints and offering proactive well control over dissociating hydrates, shallow water flows and over pressured shallow gas zones. There are several clear advantages for dual gradient technology: economic, technical and significantly improved safety, which is achieved through superior well control.

Elieff, Brandee Anastacia Marie

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Assembly and testing of a composite heat pipe thermal intercept for HTS current leads  

SciTech Connect

We are building high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads for a demonstration HTS-high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system cooled by a cryocooler. The current leads are entirely conductively cooled. A composite nitrogen heat pipe provides efficient thermal communication, and simultaneously electrical isolation, between the lead and an intermediate temperature heat sink. Data on the thermal and electrical performance of the heat pipe thermal intercept are presented. The electrical isolation of the heat pipe was measured as a function of applied voltage with and without a thermal load across the heat pipe. The results show the electrical isolation with evaporation, condensation and internal circulation taking place in the heat pipe.

Daugherty, M.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Williams, P.M.; Boenig, H.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A simplified implementation of a gradient-enhanced damage model with transient length scale effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gradient-enhanced damage models with constant gradient activity suffer from spurious damage growth at high deformation levels. This issue was resolved by Geers et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 160(1---2):133---153, 1998) by expressing the gradient ... Keywords: Continuum damage mechanics, Gradient-enhanced damage models, Regularized media, Transient internal length scale

S. Saroukhani; R. Vafadari; A. Simone

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

Ernst, W.D.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Speed-gradient principle for nonstationary processes in thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The speed-gradient variational principle (SG-principle) is formulated and applied to thermodynamical systems. It is shown that Prigogine's principle of minimum entropy production and Onsager's symmetry relations can be interpreted in terms of the SG-principle and, therefore, are equivalent to each other. In both cases entropy of the system plays a role of the goal functional. The speed-gradient formulation of thermodynamic principles provide their extended versions, describing transient dynamics of nonstationary systems far from equilibrium. As an example a model of transient (relaxation) dynamics for maximum entropy principle is derived.

Alexander L. Fradkov

2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

DOE Geothermal well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective stimulation treatment requires the interaction of four separate items: frac fluids, proppants, equipment, and planned and properly engineered schedules. While there are good fluid systems and proppants, only judicious combinations and a well thought out schedule which uses all of these materials and available equipment to best advantage is an optimum stimulation treatment. Generally, high flow rates and convective cooling can be used either with conventional (planar) fracturing or with a dendritic fracturing technique. Many of todays fluid systems have been tested to above 400/sup 0/F. Some fluids have survived quite well. Current tests on proppants have shown temperature sensitivities in sand; however, there are resin coated materials and sintered bauxite which are not temperature sensitive. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.; Campbell, D.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Comparison of two-equation turbulence models for boundary layers with pressure gradient  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares the performance of eight low Reynolds number k-epsilon and k-omega models for high Reynolds number, incompressible turbulent boundary layers with favorable, zero, and adverse pressure gradients. Results obtained underscore the k-epsilon model's unsuitability for such flows. Even more seriously, the k-epsilon model is demonstrated to be inconsistent with the well-established physical structure of the turbulent boundary layer, and low Reynolds number corrections cannot remove the inconsistency. By contrast, the k-omega model, with and without low Reynolds number modifications, proves to be very accurate for all of the tests conducted. 16 refs.

Wilcox, D.C. (DCW Industries, Inc., La Canada, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Cauchy problem for a quasilinear parabolic equation with gradient absorption  

SciTech Connect

The qualitative properties of solutions to the Cauchy problem for a degenerate parabolic equation containing a nonlinear operator of Baouendi-Grushin type and with gradient absorption whose density depends on time, as well as the space variables, are investigated. Bounds for the diameter of the support of the solution which are sharp with respect to time are obtained, together with its maximum. A condition which determines whether or not the phenomenon of decay to zero of the total mass of the solution occurs is discovered. Bibliography: 35 titles.

Markasheva, Vera A; Tedeev, Anatoli F [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Donetsk (Ukraine)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improved geothermal well logging tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal well logging tool has been designed to operate at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi. The logging tool will initially consist of a manometer, a gradiomanometer and a thermometer; the electrical and mechanical design is such that a flowmeter and a caliper can be added as a later development. A unique feature of the logging tool is that it contains no downhole active electronics. The manometer is a standard high temperature pressure gauge. The gradiomanometer consists of a differential pressure gauge which is coupled to ports separated vertically by 2 ft. The differential pressure gauge is a new development; it is designed to measure a differential pressure up to 2 psi at a line pressure of 10,000 psi. The thermometer is a platinum resistance thermometer previously developed for oil well logging. The pressure gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges to be connected in series and driven from a constant current supply. This arrangement makes it possible to use a standard seven-conductor cable with no downhole switching. The joints in the sonde are electron beam welded, thus eliminating any sealed joints in the sonde wall. The logging tool will be tested first in an autoclave and in a geothermal well later in the program.

Kratz, H.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermally Induced Groundwater Flow Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the transient residual thermal signal resulting from an underground nuclear test (buried below the water table) and its potential to affect local groundwater flow and radionuclide migration in a saturated, fractured, volcanic aquifer system. Thermal profiles measured in a drillback hole between 154 days and 6.5 years after the test have been used to calibrate a non-isothermal model of fluid flow. In this process, they have estimated the magnitude and relative changes in permeability, porosity and fracture density between different portions of the disturbed and undisturbed geologic medium surrounding the test location. The relative impacts of buoyancy forces (arising from the thermal residual of the test and the background geothermal gradient) and horizontal pressure gradients on the post-test flow system are better understood. A transient particle/streamline model of contaminant transport is used to visualize streamlines and streaklines of the flow field and to examine the migration of non-reactive radionuclides. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand the effects of local and sub-regional geologic features, and the effects of fractured zones on the movement of groundwater and thermal energy. Conclusions regarding the overall effect of the thermal regime on the residence times and fluxes of radionuclides out of the system are drawn, and implications for more complicated, reactive contaminant transport are discussed.

Maxwell, R.M.; Tompson, A.F.B.; Rambo, J.T.; Carle, S.F.; Pawloski, G.A.

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Low Speed Nano/Micro/Meso-Scale Rarefied Flows Driven by Temperature and Pressure Gradients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no moving parts and is driven by thermal creep flow, which in one version is generated by applying/meso-scale solid state compressor or vacuum pump, now relatively well known as the Knudsen Compressor. It has-equilibrium because of rarefaction effects. Consequently the constitutive relations for the stress tensor and the heat

Alexeenko, Alina

406

Digital Manufacturing of Gradient Meshed SOFC Sealing Composites with Self-Healing Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) hold great promise for clean power generation. However, high temperature stability and long term durability of the SOFC components have presented serious problems in SOFC technological advancement and commercialization. The seals of the fuel cells are the most challenging area to address. A high temperature gas seal is highly needed which is durable against cracking and gas leakage during thermal cycling and extended operation. This project investigates a novel composite seal by integrating 3D printed shape memory alloy (SMA) wires into a glass matrix. The SMA we use is TiNiHf and the glass matrix we use is SrO-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (SLABS). Dilatometry shows to be an extremely useful tool in providing the CTEs. It pinpoints regions of different CTEs under simulated SOFC thermal cycles for the same glass. For the studied SLABS glass system, the region with the greatest CTE mismatch between the glass seal and the adjacent components is 40-500 C, the typical heating and cooling regions for SOFCs. Even for low temperature SOFC development, this region is still present and needs to be addressed. We have demonstrated that the proposed SLABS glass has great potential in mitigating the thermal expansion mismatch issues that are limiting the operation life of SOFCs. TiNiHf alloy has been successfully synthesized with the desired particle size for the 3DP process. The TiNiHf SMA shape memory effect very desirably overlaps with the problematic low CTE region of the glass. This supports the design intent that the gradient structure transition, phase transformation toughening, and self-healing of the SMA can be utilized to mitigate/eliminate the seal problem. For the 3DP process, a new binder has been identified to match with the specific chemistry of the SMA particles. This enables us to directly print SMA particles. Neutron diffraction shows to be an extremely useful tool in providing information regarding the austenite to martensite phase transformation, SMA alloy lattice constant change, and the corresponding thermal stress from the glass matrix. It pinpoints regions of SMA phase transformation and the thermal stress effect under simulated SOFC thermal cycles. The bilayer test shows that there is still much work to be done for the proper integration of the seal components. Large scale production should lower the cost associated with the proposed approach, especially on the raw material cost and 3D printing.

Kathy Lu; Christopher Story; W.T. Reynolds

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Deepening At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Well Deepening Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Glass Mountain region of northern California, which is considered to be one of the sites of the greatest untapped geothermal potential in the lower 48 states, is the focus of an exploration project to identify the characteristics of the resource at the Fourmile Hill location (northwest of Medicine Lake in T44N R3E). The objective of Phase I work was to deepen a temperature gradient well to finalize the assessment of the site. The temperature gradient well - TGH88-28 - was completed in October 2001 and

409

Dual valve well pump installation  

SciTech Connect

A reciprocating electric motor-pump assembly for lifting well fluid on downstroke of the motor pump assembly, the pump including a barrel below the motor having dual combined inlet and outlet valve means at the lower end thereof, the pump piston moving in the barrel having annular grooves therearound to prevent differential pressure sticking, the electric cable supplying the electric motor being tubular to vent the pump and prevent vacuum or gas lock, there being a packer about the valve barrel separating the outlet valve means thereabove from the inlet valve means therebelow and a packer above the motor about a production tubing including an upper standing valve.

Holm, D. R.

1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

Submarine oil well production apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A submergible apparatus for producing an oil or gas well beneath the surface of a body of water consists of an oil and gas separator having a pair of elongated horizontal ballast tanks attached thereto and means for selectively filling the ballast tanks with water or air. A pair of movable buoyancy vessels is attached to the separator and means for selectively moving the buoyancy vessels to alternate positions with respect to the separator are provided so that the apparatus has maximum stability while being towed on the surface of the body of water or submerged therein. (16 claims)

McMinn, R.E.; Tournoux, P.M.; Milnes, D.S.

1973-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Solar Thermal Generation Technologies: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is experiencing renewed activity and investment. The shift is partly due to new interest in large-scale centralized electricity generation, for which STE is well suited and offers the lowest cost for solar-specific renewable portfolio standards. With policymaking and public interest driven by concerns such as global climate change, atmospheric emissions, and traditional fossil fuel price and supply volatility, STE is increasing...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

413

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

414

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

415

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INL’s Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

416

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Existing geologic data show that the basalt has been broken by complex intersecting fault zones at the hot springs. Natural state hot water flow patterns in the fracture network will be interpreted from temperature gradient wells and then tested with moderate depth core holes. Production and injection well tests of the core holes will be monitored with an innovative combination of Flowing Differential Self-Potential (FDSP) and resistivity tomography surveys. The cointerpretation of all these highly detailed geophysical methods sensitive to fracture permeability patterns and water flow during the well tests will provide unprecedented details on the structures and flow in a shallow geothermal aquifer and support effective development of the low temperature reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets.

417

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solar-thermal technology. Annual technical progress report FY 1981. Volume II. Technical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

After a brief description of the Solar Thermal Technology Program, its goals, objectives, and benefits, progress is reported in the five technologies addressed by the program: central receiver, parabolic dish, parabolic trough, hemispherical bowl, and salt-gradient solar ponds. Component technology development and systems experiments and analyses are reported for the central receiver, parabolic dish, and parabolic trough concepts. Also reported are test programs at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Parabolic Dish Test Site support to dish development, and experiments at test facilities supporting parabolic trough program. Research on hemispherical bowl and salt-gradient solar ponds is briefly summarized, including the Crosbyton Solar Power Project (hemispherical bowl) and the Salton Sea Project (solar pond). Also reported are research and advanced development efforts in materials research, fuels and chemicals, and applied thermal research, and supporting programs, including the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users Association activities, environmental control studies, and solar thermal insolation assessment. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Oil displacement through a porous medium with a temperature gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of a temperature gradient on oil recovery in a two-dimensional pore-network model. The oil viscosity depends on temperature as, $\\mu_o=exp(B/T)$, where $B$ is a physico-chemical parameter depending on the type of oil, and $T$ is the temperature. A temperature gradient is applied across the medium in the flow direction. Initially, the porous medium is saturated with oil and, then, another fluid is injected. We have considered two cases representing different injection strategies. In the first case, the invading fluid viscosity is constant (finite viscosity ratio) while in the second one, the invading fluid is inviscid (infinite viscosity ratio). Our results show that, for the case of finite viscosity ratio, recovery increases with $\\Delta T$ independently on strength or sign of the gradient. For an infinite viscosity ratio, a positive temperature gradient is necessary to enhance recovery. Moreover, we show that, for $\\Delta T>0$, the percentage of oil recovery generally decreases (inc...

Oliveira, C L N; Herrmann, H J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Learning to search: Functional gradient techniques for imitation learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming robot behavior remains a challenging task. While it is often easy to abstractly define or even demonstrate a desired behavior, designing a controller that embodies the same behavior is difficult, time consuming, and ultimately expensive. ... Keywords: Autonomous navigation, Functional gradient techniques, Grasping, Imitation learning, Nonparametric optimization, Planning, Quadrupedal locomotion, Robotics, Structured prediction, Subgradient methods

Nathan D. Ratliff; David Silver; J. Andrew Bagnell

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

On the Pressure Gradient Force Error in ?-Coordinate Spectral Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pressure gradient force error of the spectral technique used in combination with the ? vertical coordinate was examined in an idealized case of an atmosphere at rest and in hydrostatic equilibrium. Small-scale (one-point and three-point) ...

Zavis?a I. Janji?

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the decision variable and use incremental gradient methods that operate upon ... P : Rnr×nc ? R will be a matrix regularizer which will control some measure of complexity ...... indicating longer epochs (although the operating system reports 24 processors). .... The power of convex relaxation: Near-optimal matrix completion.

424

An accelerated proximal gradient algorithm for nuclear norm ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 27, 2009 ... algorithm that does not require more than one gradient evaluation at each .... semidefinite program as follows; see [38] for details: .... The expected number svk is set by the following procedure. ...... 12 (1981), 989–1000. ... estimation in multivariate linear regression, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society:.

425

Well simulation using Refrigerant 114  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple method for the investigation of thermodynamic (substance) similarity in the two-phase domain is introduced based on the assumptions of a simplified model fluid. According to this method, the investigation of the conditions for thermodynamic similarity between substances in the two-phase region reveals the important role the latent heat of evaporation (h/sub fg/) plays in the definition of the property scales. These greatly influence the dynamic and geometric similarity of the process under investigation. The introduction of the thermodynamic similarity property scales into the energy conservation equations for a certain process (e.g., flow up a geothermal well) brings forth a thermodynamic length scale and kinetic energy scale. Refrigerant 114 has been examined for similarity with water substance according to this method and found to be adequate for geothermal well simulation in the laboratory. Low pressures and temperatures and a substantial reduction of mass flow rates and geometric scales are a few of the advantages of using R114 for such experiments.

Nikitopoulos, D.E.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Maeder, P.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

427

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma  

SciTech Connect

The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

Batool, Nazia [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); National Center of Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Center of Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Optimal Well-Group Distribution of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is critical to determine how the well group arranges for application of the GWSHP system. Based on the fact that water movement is the most important factor influencing heat transfer in an aquifer, this paper presents a two-step analysis method and analyzes the inter-well thermal transfixion method as follows. First, we forecast the least influence radius through calculating the thermal diffusion function of aquifer. Then, we perform an analysis on the inter-well thermal transfixion, using the streamline analysis method and doing a quantitative analysis of the effects that inter-well distance and flux have on it. We discuss the well group arrangement and puts forward optimal scheme by means of the thermal diffusion and streamline simulation.

Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Well-Group Distribution of Groundwater Source Heat Pump System Optimized Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is the key question that how does the well group arrange for application of GWSHP system. Based on the fact that the water movement is the important factor of heat transfer on aquifer, this paper presents two steps analysis method and analyze the inter-well thermal transfixion, method as follows: (1) Forecast the least influence radius through calculating the thermal diffusion function of aquifer; (2) The analysis on the inter-well thermal transfixion makes use of the streamline analysis method and makes quantitative analysis of the effect that inter-well distance and flux make on it. It labors the well group arrangement and puts forward optimal scheme by means of the thermal diffusion and streamline simulation.

Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

Roth, B.A.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

435

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

436

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

437

Analysis of Transient Pressure Tests for Olkaria Exploration Wells  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of transient pressure tests for Olkaria West wells shows that both infinite acting and double porosity models can be used to analyze the well behaviour and infer reservoir properties from fall-off steps of long enough duration, in wells where no significant thermal recovery occurs. The double porosity model gives better estimates of reservoir properties than the infinite acting model, for long fall-off steps in wells intercepting fractures. Semilog methods give fairly good estimates of reservoir transmissivity for the long fall-off steps but are highly inaccurate when used independently, especially for the short fall-off steps conducted in most of the wells. Double porosity models can also be used for recovery test analyses where two phase transients are not significant. 6 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Haukwa, Charles B.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Evaluation of a geothermal well logging, DST and Pit test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly discusses logging and testing operations and certain related physical aspects in geothermal well evaluations. A good understanding of thermal and hydrological characteristics of geothermal reservoirs are essential in geothermal well evaluations. Within geothermal reservoirs, in evaluating the wells, the two most important parameters that first could be estimated, then measured or calculated, are temperature and productivity. Well logs and wireline surveys are means of measuring formation temperatures. Drill Stem Tests (DST's) or Pit Tests are means of determining formation productivity. Geochemistry and Petrology are currently accepted as two evaluation yardsticks in geothermal well evaluations. investigations of cuttings and cores during drilling operations, along with studies on formation waters could be used in a predictive nature for temperature and productivity and could yield useful information on the resource.

Tansev, Erdal O.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

440

Method for gravel packing wells  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

Jones, L.G.

1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

Richard O'Shaughnessy

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Three approaches to classical thermal field theory  

SciTech Connect

Research Highlights: > Classical thermal field theory admits three equivalent path integral formulations. > Classical Feynman rules can be derived for all three formulations. > Quantum Feynman rules reduce to classical ones at high temperatures. > Classical Feynman rules become much simpler when superfields are introduced. - Abstract: In this paper we study three different functional approaches to classical thermal field theory, which turn out to be the classical counterparts of three well-known different formulations of quantum thermal field theory: the closed-time path (CTP) formalism, the thermofield dynamics (TFD) and the Matsubara approach.

Gozzi, E., E-mail: gozzi@ts.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, Miramare - Grignano, 34151 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Penco, R., E-mail: rpenco@syr.edu [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-1130 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Bimetal-and-electret-based thermal energy harvesters - Application to a battery-free Wireless Sensor Node  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a thermal energy harvester turning thermal gradients into electricity by coupling a bimetallic strip to an electret-based converter: the bimetallic strip behaves as a thermal-to-mechanical power converter turning thermal gradients into mechanical oscillations that are finally converted into electricity with the electret. Output powers of 5.4uW were reached on a hot source at 70{\\deg}C, and, contrary to the previous proofs of concept, the new devices presented in this paper do not require forced convection to work, making them compatible with standard conditions of thermal energy harvesting and environments such as hot pipes, pumps and more generally industrial equipment. Finally, ten energy harvesters have been parallelized and combined to a self-starting power management circuit made of a flyback converter to supply a battery-free Wireless Temperature Sensor Node, sending information every 100 seconds after its startup state.

Boisseau, S; Monfray, S; Despesse, G; Puscasu, O; Arnaud, A; Skotnicki, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

On Haney-Type Surface Thermal Boundary Conditions for Ocean Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haney-type surface thermal boundary conditions linearly connect net downward surface heat flux Q to air–sea temperature difference (gradient-type condition) ?T1 or to climate/synoptic sea temperature difference (restoring-type condition) ?T2 by a ...

Peter C. Chu; Yuchun Chen; Shihua Lu

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design a hydraulic and thermal stimulation of an east-flank injection well, the first step in the...

446

Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elastic Relaxation and Correlation Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with Ferroelectric Domains in (001) BiFeO3 Nanostructures Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with Ferroelectric Domains in (001) BiFeO3 Nanostructures Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (MSD and CNM) have recently performed first worldwide studies of effects of nanopatterning on fundamental phenomena in mutiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) nanostructures, using the APS-CNM nanoprobe beam (50 nm diameter). Nano-focused x-ray diffraction microscopy provided new insights into the relationship between film strain and ferroelectric domains in nanostructures, namely: i) an out-of-plane strain enhancement of as much as -1.8% Δc/c in a BFO film-based nanostructure relative to a planar film; ii) out-of-plane BFO C-axis

447

Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gradient instabilities of electromagnetic waves in Hall thruster plasma  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a linear analysis of gradient plasma instabilities in Hall thrusters. The study obtains and analyzes the dispersion equation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves based on the two-fluid model of a cold plasma. The regions of parameters corresponding to unstable high frequency modes are determined and the dependence of the increments and intrinsic frequencies on plasma parameters is obtained. The obtained results agree with those of previously published studies.

Tomilin, Dmitry [Department of Electrophysics, Keldysh Research Centre, Moscow 125438 (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

MEASURING LOCAL GRADIENT AND SKEW QUADRUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC IRS.  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of local linear errors at RHIC interaction regions using an ''action and phase'' analysis of difference orbits has already been presented. This paper evaluates the accuracy of this technique using difference orbits that were taken when known gradient errors and skew quadrupole errors were intentionally introduced. It also presents action and phase analysis of simulated orbits when controlled errors are intentionally placed in a RHIC simulation model.

CARDONA,J.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,R.; PTITSYN,V.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

452

High Gradient Operation with the CEBAF Upgrade RF Control System  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. Energy will be upgraded to 12 GeV with the addition of 10 new high gradient cryomodules (17+ MV/m). The higher gradients pose significant challenges beyond what the present analog low level RF (LLRF) control systems can handle reliably; therefore, a new LLRF control system is needed. A prototype system has been developed incorporating a large FPGA and using digital down and up conversion to minimize the need for analog components. The new system is more flexible and less susceptible to drifts and component nonlinearities. Because resonance control is critical to reach high gradients quickly, the new cryomodules will include a piezoelectric tuner for each cavity, and the LLRF controls must incorporate both feedback and feed-forward methods to achieve optimal resonance control performance. This paper discusses development of the new RF system, system performance for phase and amplitude stability and resonance control under Lorentz detuning measured during recent tests on a prototype cryomodule.

J. Hovater; G. Davis; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; Lawrence King; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Microstructure and Thermal Conductivity of Hydrated Calcium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the above-mentioned temperature gradients, the effect of the 150 °C temperature gradient is not ... Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. ...

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

457

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

458

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Gradient Genesis of Stratospheric Trace Species in the Subtropics and around the Polar Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms that control the formation and decay of meridional gradients in stratospheric trace species in the subtropics and around the polar vortex are investigated using a gradient genesis equation that uses mass-weighted isentropic zonal ...

Kazuyuki Miyazaki; Toshiki Iwasaki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wind Mixing In a Turbulent Surface Layer in the Presence of a Horizontal Density Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a horizontal density gradient of buoyancy on the turbulent kinetic energy budget of the surface mixed layer in the ocean is discussed. The combination of a horizontal buoyancy gradient and a vertical shear of the horizontal velocity ...

Johan Rodhe

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal gradient wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Mechanisms Controlling Variability of the Interhemispheric Sea Surface Temperature Gradient in the Tropical Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) fields in the tropical Atlantic is explored for composites of extremely STRONG and WEAK northward SST gradients, because these are known to control the basinwide pressure gradient, latitude ...

Richard G. Wagner

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Spatiotemporal Variation of the Vertical Gradient of Rainfall Rate Observed by the TRMM Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and spatial variation of the vertical gradient of rainfall rate was investigated using global precipitation data observed by the Precipitation Radar (PR) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The vertical gradient ...

Masafumi Hirose; Kenji Nakamura

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Eddy-Driven Buoyancy Gradients on Eastern Boundaries and Their Role in the Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that eddy fluxes of buoyancy at the eastern and western boundaries maintain alongshore buoyancy gradients along the coast. Eddy fluxes arise near the eastern and western boundaries because on both coasts buoyancy gradients ...

Paola Cessi; Christopher L. Wolfe

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Definition: Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Observation Wells An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that...

465

Definition: Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploratory Well An exploratory well is...

466

Definition: Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Well Deepening Reentering an existing well and...

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Definition: Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Production Wells A well drilled with the...

468

Thermal Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there are increasing evidence for a thermal emission component that accompanies the overall non-thermal spectra of the prompt emission phase in GRBs. Both the temperature and flux of the thermal emission show a well defined temporal behavior, a broken power law in time. The temperature is nearly constant during the first few seconds, afterwards it decays with power law index alpha ~0.7. The thermal flux also decays at late times as a power law with index beta ~2.1. This behavior is very ubiquitous, and was observed in a sample currently containing 32 BATSE bursts. These results are naturally explained by considering emission from the photosphere. The photosphere of a relativistically expanding plasma wind strongly depends on the angle to the line of sight, theta. As a result, thermal emission can be seen after tens of seconds. By introducing probability density function P(r,theta) of a thermal photon to escape the plasma at radius r and angle theta, the late time behavior of the flux can be reproduced analytically. During the propagation below the photosphere, thermal photons lose energy as a result of the slight misalignment of the scattering electrons velocity vectors, which leads to photon comoving energy decay epsilon'(r)~r^{-2/3}. This in turn can explain the decay of the temperature observed at late times. Finally, I show that understanding the thermal emission is essential in understanding the high energy, non-thermal spectra. Moreover, thermal emission can be used to directly measure the Lorentz factor of the flow and the initial jet radius.

Asaf Pe'er

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

469

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal