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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

2

Thermal conductivity of mass-graded graphene flakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we investigate thermal conductions in mass-graded graphene flakes by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It shows mass-graded graphene flakes reveal no thermal rectification effect in thermal conduction process. Dependences of thermal conductivity upon the heat fluxes and the mass gradients are studied. It is found that thermal conductivity would be dramatically decreased by increasing the mass gradients. We also discuss the influence of thermal curvatures and thermal expansions upon the thermal conduction process in mass-graded graphene flakes.

Cheh, Jigger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Thermal fatigue behavior of US and Russian grades of beryllium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 KW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degrees}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stress in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S-300F-H, Sr-200, I-400, extruded high purity. HIP`d sperical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be(SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Guiniatouline, R.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (USSR); Kupriynov, I.B. [Russian Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (USSR)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Thermal transformations of nitrogen and sulfur forms in peat related to coalification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical pathways for nitrogen and sulfur transformations during coalification are elucidated by comparing the chemical forms of unaltered peats, lignites, and coals and pyrolyzed peats using a combination of spectroscopic techniques in unaltered peats, the NMR and XPS spectra are consistent with the presence of amide nitrogen. The spectra indicate that a thermal transformation of amide nitrogen into pyrrolic and pyridinic forms occurs after thermal stress that is roughly equivalent to lignitification. High total nitrogen levels are found in pyrolyzed peats relative to lignites and higher-rank coals, suggesting that some amides initially found in peat are lost via nonthermal pathways during coalification. Lignites contain the highest levels of quaternary nitrogen, and they are associated with protonated pyridinic structures. Most quaternary nitrogen is formed during lignitification as a result of the creation and interaction of basic nitrogen species with acidic functionalities and is lost completely during bitumenization. Sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (S-XANES) of unaltered peats detect the presence of disulfide, mercapto, aliphatic sulfide, and aromatic forms of organically bound sulfur. XPS and S-XANES results show that the relative level of aromatic sulfur increases as the severity of peat pyrolysis increases. The relative level of aromatic sulfur increases through the selective loss of disulfide, aliphatic sulfide, and SO{sub 3} groups and through the transformation of aliphatic sulfur forms. Aliphatic sulfur is present mostly as mercapto and disulfide species in peats and in lignites but not in higher-rank coals. These results indicate that mercapto and disulfide species are lost after lignitification. Organic sulfur in peats exist mainly as aromatic forms, consistent with the level of aromatic sulfur increasing with the increasing degree of coalification. 91 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

S.R. Kelemen; M. Afeworki; M.L. Gorbaty; P.J. Kwiatek; M. Sansone; C.C. Walters; A.D. Cohen [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

EFFECT OF ELECTROLYZER CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE ON HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS NET THERMAL EFFICIENCY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid Sulfur cycle is gaining popularity as a possible means for massive production of hydrogen from nuclear energy. Several different ways of carrying out the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis step are being pursued by a number of researchers. These alternatives are evaluated with complete flowsheet simulations and on a common design basis using Aspen Plus{trademark}. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assess the performance potential of each configuration, and the flowsheets are optimized for energy recovery. Net thermal efficiencies are calculated for the best set of operating conditions for each flowsheet and the results compared. This will help focus attention on the most promising electrolysis alternatives. The sensitivity analyses should also help identify those features that offer the greatest potential for improvement.

Gorensek, M

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sulfur distribution in the oil fractions obtained by thermal cracking of Jordanian El-Lajjun oil Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the thermal cracking process of the El-Lujjan oil shale showed that the yield of oil was around 12 wt of the boiling point for different distillate fractions. Sulfur in Jordanian oil shale was found to be mainly the dominant phases in these fractions. q 2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction Oil shale

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

7

Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally ...

Mirfayzi, S R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Guiniatouline, R.N. [Efremov Institute, (Russia); Kupriynov, I.B. [Russian Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russia)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally the total neutron cross-section is derived using FEA in an inverse iteration form.

S. R. Mirfayzi

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hygro-Thermal Performance of Imperfectly Protected Below-Grade Walls with Interior Insulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates the performance of three different types of insulation installed in the interior of a basement wall system in a below-grade wall system.… (more)

Wolfgang, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of the Production Cost for Various Grades of Biomass Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Process flow sheets were developed for the thermal treatment of southern pine wood chips at four temperatures (150, 180, 230, and 270 degrees C) and two different scales (20 and 100 ton/hour). The larger capacity processes had as their primary heat source hot gas assumed to be available in quantity from an adjacent biorefinery. Mass and energy balances for these flow sheets were developed using Aspen Plus process simulation software. The hot gas demands in the larger processes, up to 1.9 million lb/hour, were of questionable feasibility because of the volume to be moved. This heat was of low utility because the torrefaction process, especially at higher temperatures, is a net heat producer if the organic byproduct gases are burned. A thermal treatment flow sheet using wood chips dried in the biorefinery to 10% moisture content (rather than 30% for green chips) with transfer of high temperature steam from the thermal treatment depot to the biorefinery was also examined. The equipment size information from all of these cases was used in several different equipment cost estimating methods to estimate the major equipment costs for each process. From these, factored estimates of other plant costs were determined, leading to estimates (+ / - 30% accuracy) of total plant capital cost. The 20 ton/hour processes were close to 25 million dollars except for the 230 degrees C case using dried wood chips which was only 15 million dollars because of its small furnace. The larger processes ranged from 64-120 million dollars. From these capital costs and projections of several categories of operating costs, the processing cost of thermally treated pine chips was found to be $28-33 per ton depending on the degree of treatment and without any credits for steam generation. If the excess energy output of the two 20 ton/hr depot cases at 270 degrees C can be sold for $10 per million BTU, the net processing cost dropped to $13/ton product starting with green wood chips or only $3 per ton if using dried chips from the biorefinery. Including a 12% return on invested capital raised all of the operating cost results by about $20/ton.

Robert S Cherry; Rick A. Wood; Tyler L Westover

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nanostructured Sulfur Electrodes for Long-Life Lithium Batteries  

Berkeley Lab researcher Elton Cairns has developed a technology that addresses limitations of developing a commercial-grade lithium / sulfur battery. ...

13

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Physical Properties of Normal Grade Biodiesel and Winter Grade Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this study, optical and thermal properties of normal grade and winter grade palm oil biodiesel were investigated. Surface Plasmon Resonance and Photopyroelectric technique were used to evaluate the samples. The dispersion curve and thermal diffusivity were obtained. Consequently, the variation of refractive index, as a function of wavelength in normal grade biodiesel is faster than winter grade palm oil biodiesel, and the thermal diffusivity of winter grade biodiesel is higher than the thermal diffusivity of normal grade biodiesel. This is attributed to the higher palmitic acid C16:0 content in normal grade than in winter grade palm oil biodiesel.

Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini; Mohd Maarof Moksin; Harrison Lau; Lik Nang; Monir Norozi; W. Mahmood; Mat Yunus; Azmi Zakaria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

Norman, John H. (LaJolla, CA)

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Magnetron-sputter deposition of Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} thin films and their conversion into pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) by thermal sulfurization for photovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the fabrication of FeS{sub 2} (pyrite) thin films by sulfurizing Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} that were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Under the selected sputtering conditions, Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystal films are obtained and the nanocrystals tend to locally cluster and closely pack into ricelike nanoparticles with an increase in film thickness. Meanwhile, the film tends to crack when the film thickness is increased over {approx}1.3 {mu}m. The film cracking can be effectively suppressed by an introduction of a 3-nm Cu intermediate layer prior to Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} deposition. However, an introduction of a 3-nm Al intermediate layer tends to enhance the film cracking. By post-growth thermal sulfurization of the Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} thin films in a tube-furnace, FeS{sub 2} with high phase purity, as determined by using x ray diffraction, is obtained. Optical absorption spectroscopy was employed to characterize the resultant FeS{sub 2} thin films, which revealed two absorption edges at 0.9 and 1.2 eV, respectively. These two absorption edges are assigned to the direct bandgap (0.9 eV) and the indirect allowed transitions (1.2 eV) of FeS{sub 2}, respectively.

Liu Hongfei; Chi Dongzhi [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Organic binders for road building based on the products of thermal dissolution of baltic shales and the sulfurous shales of the Volga region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is given on the technology of the thermal dissolution of shales and the characteristics of organic binders based on the liquid products obtained, and their applicability for road building is shown.

Rudenskii, A.V.; Gorlov, E.G.; Poshekhonova, T.A.; Rudenskaya, I.M.; Shpil'berg, M.B.; Vol-Epshtein, A.V.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Sulfur tolerant anode materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel ULSD LSD Off-Road Ultra-Low Sulfur Highway Diesel Fuel (15 ppm Sulfur Maximum). Required for use in all model year 2007 and later highway diesel vehicles...

19

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by I. J. Pickering and G. N. George by I. J. Pickering and G. N. George Sulfur is essential for all life, but it plays a particularly central role in the metabolism of many anaerobic microorganisms. Prominent among these are the sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that oxidize sulfide (S2-) to sulfate (SO42-). Many of these organisms can store elemental sulfur (S0) in "globules" for use when food is in short supply (Fig. 1). The chemical nature of the sulfur in these globules has been an enigma since they were first described as far back as 1887 (1); all known forms (or allotropes) of elemental sulfur are solid at room temperature, but globule sulfur has been described as "liquid", and it apparently has a low density – 1.3 compared to 2.1 for the common yellow allotrope a-sulfur. Various exotic forms of sulfur have been proposed to explain these properties, including micelles (small bubble-like structures) formed from long-chain polythionates, but all of these deductions have been based upon indirect evidence (for example the density was estimated by flotation of intact cells), and many questions remained.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

22

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor Fluctuating Low-GradeThermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Trifluoromethyl Sulfur Pentafluoride (SF5CF3) and Sulfur Hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Pentafluoride (SF5CF3) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) from Dome Concordia graphics Graphics data Data Investigators W. T. Sturges,1 T. J. Wallington,2 M. D. Hurley,2 K....

25

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not recommended for treatment of wastes containing high concentrations of nitrates because of potentially dangerous reactions between sulfur, nitrate, and trace quantities of organics. Recently, the process has been adapted for the treatment of liquid elemental mercury and mercury contaminated soil and debris.

KALB, P.

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Why sequence Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing bacteria for sulfur pollution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing bacteria for sulfur pollution remediation? Burning sulfur-containing fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, contributes significantly to global environmental problems, such as air pollution and acid rain, besides contributing to the loss of the ozone layer. One method of managing sulfur compounds released as byproducts from industrial processes is to scrub them out using chemical treatments and activated charcoal beds. A lower-cost solution relies on incorporating alkaliphic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria into biofilters to convert the volatile and toxic compounds into insoluble sulfur for easier removal. Discovered in the last decade, these bacteria have been found to thrive in habitats that span the full pH range. The bacteria could have applications

29

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

30

Ice Formation by Sulfate and Sulfuric Acid Aerosol Particles under Upper-Tropospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice formation in ammoniated sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under upper-tropospheric conditions was studied using a continuous flow thermal diffusion chamber. This technique allowed for particle exposure to controlled temperatures and ...

Yalei Chen; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; David C. Rogers; D. Eli Sherman

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

It's Elemental - The Element Sulfur  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phosphorus Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine The Element Sulfur [Click for Isotope Data] 16 S Sulfur 32.065 Atomic Number: 16 Atomic Weight: 32.065 Melting Point: 388.36 K (115.21°C or 239.38°F) Boiling Point: 717.75 K (444.60°C or 832.28°F) Density: 2.067 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word sulvere and the Latin word sulphurium. Say what? Sulfur is pronounced as SUL-fer. History and Uses: Sulfur, the tenth most abundant element in the universe, has been known since ancient times. Sometime around 1777, Antoine Lavoisier convinced the rest of the scientific community that sulfur was an element. Sulfur is a

32

Why sequence purple sulfur bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

purple sulfur bacteria? purple sulfur bacteria? The process by which plants and some bacteria can convert light energy to sugar, or photosynthesis, is crucial to global food webs, and complicated. Very little is known about the photosynthetic bacteria in the purple sulfur bacteria group, which may represent one of the most primitive photosynthetic organisms and are capable of carbon fixation and sequestration in both light and dark conditions with the help of sulfur compounds. Purple sulfur bacteria are autotrophic and can synthesize organic compounds from inorganic sources. Researchers hope to learn more by sequencing nine type strains of purple sulfur bacteria that are found in freshwater, brackish and marine systems. The information would lead to a better understanding of the process of photosynthesis as well as the global

33

Development of the Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen via the thermochemical splitting of water is being considered as a primary means for utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors to provide fuel for a hydrogen economy. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is one of the baseline candidates identified by the U.S. Department of Energy [1] for this purpose. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that only involves sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen compounds. Recent work has resulted in an improved process design with a calculated overall thermal efficiency (nuclear heat to hydrogen, higher heating value basis) approaching 50%. Economic analyses indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant employing the HyS Process in conjunction with an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor system can produce hydrogen at competitive prices. Experimental work has begun on the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer, the major developmental component in the cycle. Proof-of-concept tests have established proton-exchange-membrane cells (a state-of-the-art technology) as a viable approach for conducting this reaction. This is expected to lead to more efficient and economical cell designs than were previously available. Considerable development and scale-up issues remain to be resolved, but the development of a viable commercial-scale HyS Process should be feasible in time to meet the commercialization schedule for Generation IV gas-cooled nuclear reactors.

Summers, William A.; Steimke, John L

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

Better Batteries from Waste Sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 28, 2013 ... Although there are some industrial uses for sulfur, the amount generated from refining fossil fuels far outstrips the current need for the element.

35

RECENT ADVANCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In the HyS Process, sulfur dioxide is oxidized in the presence of water at the electrolyzer anode to produce sulfuric acid and protons. The protons are transported through a cation-exchange membrane electrolyte to the cathode and are reduced to form hydrogen. In the second stage of the process, the sulfuric acid by-product from the electrolyzer is thermally decomposed at high temperature to produce sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The two gases are separated and the sulfur dioxide recycled to the electrolyzer for oxidation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been exploring a fuel-cell design concept for the SDE using an anolyte feed comprised of concentrated sulfuric acid saturated with sulfur dioxide. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint compared to a parallel-plate electrolyzer design. This paper will provide a summary of recent advances in the development of the SDE for the HyS process.

Hobbs, D.

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Jozewicz, Wojciech (Chapel Hill, NC)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Why Sequence Bacteria That Reduce Sulfur Compounds?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria That Reduce Sulfur Compounds? Combustion of sulfur-containing fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, contributes significantly to global environmental problems, such...

40

CSP Policies & Procedures Process for Grade Appeals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSP Policies & Procedures Process for Grade Appeals Grade Appeals ­ Generally speaking, once grades

Leistikow, Bruce N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

Schoffs, G.R.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alkali metal/sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

Anand, Joginder N. (Clayton, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CLOSEOUT REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR PRESSURIZED BUTTON CELL TEST FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the Close-Out Report for design and partial fabrication of the Pressurized Button Cell Test Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This facility was planned to help develop the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) that is a key component of the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for generating hydrogen. The purpose of this report is to provide as much information as possible in case the decision is made to resume research. This report satisfies DOE Milestone M3GSR10VH030107.0. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by watersplitting. The HyS Cycle utilizes the high temperature (>800 C) thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both high thermodynamic efficiency and low hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. Sulfur dioxide from the decomposer is cycled back to electrolyzers. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. Anode and cathode are formed by spraying a catalyst, typically platinized carbon, on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). SRNL has been testing SDEs for several years including an atmospheric pressure Button Cell electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2} active area) and an elevated temperature/pressure Single Cell electrolyzer (54.8 cm{sup 2} active area). SRNL tested 37 MEAs in the Single Cell electrolyzer facility from June 2005 until June 2009, when funding was discontinued. An important result of the final months of testing was the development of a method that prevents the formation of a sulfur layer previously observed in MEAs used in the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle electrolyzer. This result is very important because the sulfur layer increased cell voltage and eventually destroyed the MEA that is the heart of the cell. Steimke and Steeper [2005, 2006, 2007, 2008] reported on testing in the Single Cell Electrolyzer test facility in several periodic reports. Steimke et. al [2010] issued a final facility close-out report summarizing all the testing in the Single Cell Electrolyzer test facility. During early tests, significant deterioration of the membrane occurred in 10 hours or less; the latest tests ran for at least 200 hours with no sign of deterioration. Ironically, the success with the Single Cell electrolyzer meant that it became dedicated to long runs and not available for quick membrane evaluations. Early in this research period, the ambient pressure Button Cell Electrolyzer test facility was constructed to quickly evaluate membrane materials. Its small size allowed testing of newly developed membranes that typically were not available in sizes large enough to test in the Single Cell electrolyzer. The most promising membranes were tested in the Single Cell Electrolyzer as soon as sufficient large membranes could be obtained. However, since the concentration of SO{sub 2} gas in sulfuric acid decreases rapidly with increasing temperature, the ambient pressure Button Cell was no longer able to achieve the operating conditions needed to evaluate the newer improved high temperature membranes. Significantly higher pressure operation was required to force SO{sub 2} into the sulfuric acid to obtain meaningful concentrations at increased temperatures. A high pressure (200 psig), high temperature (120 C) Button Cell was designed and partially fabricated just before funding was discontinued in June 2009. SRNL completed the majority of the design of the test facility, including preparation of a process and instrument drawing (P&ID) and preliminary designs for the major components. SRNL intended to complete the designs and procu

Steeper, T.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Commercial Grade Dedication RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the CGD activities for office of Environmental Management...

45

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel August 20, 2013 - 8:53am Addthis Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur...

46

Energy Basics: Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur...

47

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur content. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires 80% of the highway diesel fuel refined in or...

48

HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT FY09 SECOND QUARTER REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) is to develop the nuclear hydrogen production technologies necessary to produce hydrogen at a cost competitive with other alternative transportation fuels. The focus of the NHI is on thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis that can be powered by heat from high temperature gas reactors. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with the primary responsibility to perform research and development in order to characterize, evaluate and develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) thermochemical process. This report documents work during the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, for the period between January 1, 2009 and March 31, 2009. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that is part of the 'Sulfur Family' of cycles. As a sulfur cycle, it uses high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and to regenerate the sulfur dioxide reactant. The second step of the process uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to split water and produce hydrogen by electrochemically reacting sulfur dioxide with H{sub 2}O. The SDE produces sulfuric acid, which is then sent to the acid decomposer to complete the cycle. The DOE NHI program is developing the acid decomposer at Sandia National Laboratory for application to both the HyS Process and the Sulfur Iodine Cycle. The SDE is being developed at SRNL. During FY05 and FY06, SRNL designed and conducted proof-of-concept testing for a SDE using a low temperature, PEM fuel cell-type design concept. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency, small footprint and potential for low capital cost, characteristics that are crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. During FY07, SRNL extended the range of testing of the SDE to higher temperature and pressure, conducted a 100-hour longevity test with a 60-cm{sup 2} single cell electrolyzer, and designed and built a larger, multi-cell stack electrolyzer. During FY08, SRNL continued SDE development, including development and successful testing of a three-cell electrolyzer stack with a rated capacity of 100 liters per hour. The HyS program for FY09 program will address improving SDE performance by focusing on preventing or minimizing sulfur deposition inside the cell caused by SO{sub 2} crossover, reduction of cell voltage for improved efficiency, an extension of cell operating lifetime. During FY09 a baseline technology development program is being conducted to address each of these issues. Button-cell (2-cm{sup 2}) and single cell (60-cm{sup 2}) SDEs will be fabricated and tested. A pressurized button-cell test facility will be designed and constructed to facilitate addition testing. The single cell test facility will be upgraded for unattended operation, and later for operation at higher temperature and pressure. Work will continue on development of the Gas Diffusion Electrode (GDE), or Gap Cell, as an alternative electrolyzer design approach that is being developed under subcontract with industry partner Giner Electrochemical Systems. If successful, it could provide an alternative means of preventing sulfur crossover through the proton exchange membrane, as well as the possibility for higher current density operation based on more rapid mass transfer in a gas-phase anode. Promising cell components will be assembled into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and tested in the single cell test facility. Upon modification for unattended operation, test will be conducted for 200 hours or more. Both the button-cell and modified single cell facility will be utilized to demonstrate electrolyzer operation without sulfur build-up limitations, which is a Level 1 Milestone.

Herman, D; David Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Timothy Steeper, T; John Steimke, J; Mark Elvington, M

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Process for recovery of sulfur from acid gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur is recovered from the H.sub.2 S present in gases derived from fossil fuels by heating the H.sub.2 S with CO.sub.2 in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of a catalyst selected as one which enhances the thermal dissociation of H.sub.2 S to H.sub.2 and S.sub.2. The equilibrium of the thermal decomposition of H.sub.2 S is shifted by the equilibration of the water-gas-shift reaction so as to favor elemental sulfur formation. The primary products of the overall reaction are S.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. Small amounts of COS, SO.sub.2 and CS.sub.2 may also form. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture results in a substantial increase in the efficiency of the conversion of H.sub.2 S to elemental sulfur. Plant economy is further advanced by treating the product gases to remove byproduct carbonyl sulfide by hydrolysis, which converts the COS back to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S. Unreacted CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H.sub.2 and CO, which has value either as a fuel or as a chemical feedstock and recovers the hydrogen value from the H.sub.2 S.

Towler, Gavin P. (Kirkbymoorside, GB2); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized 10 and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

Moore, W.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

Moore, William E. (Manassas, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Seal for sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI); Minck, Robert W. (Lathrup Village, MI); Williams, William J. (Northville, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Upgrading Below Grade Spaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patrick H. Huelman, Sam Breidenbach, Steve Schirber Patrick H. Huelman, Sam Breidenbach, Steve Schirber NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Upgrading Below Grade Spaces Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder March 1, 2012 Austin, TX * Act 1: Technical Challenges & Opportunities - Pat Huelman, University of Minnesota * Act 2: Assessing Homeowner Priorities & Risks - Sam Breidenbach, TDS Custom Construction * Act 3: An Industry Perspective - Steve Schirber, Cocoon Act 1. Upgrade Below Grade * Basement Remodeling: It Doesn't Get Any Riskier! - Combustion safety - Foundation moisture - Radon (& other soil gases) - Biologicals (mold, dust mites, etc.) - Garage gases (if attached) * And front and center are uncontrolled... - negative pressures in basements (beyond stack)

54

Process for reducing sulfur in coal char  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

Gasior, Stanley J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kenny, Richard F. (Venetia, PA)

1976-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Why Sequence Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria? Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria? Several environmental problems, such as acid rain, biocorrosion, etc., are caused by sulfur compounds, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). A sustainable process to remove these sulfur compounds is the production of elemental sulfur from H2S-containing gas streams by the use of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. In this process, H2S is absorbed into the alkaline solution in the scrubber unit, followed by the biological oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur and the recycling of water. With this two-step process, a variety of gas streams (i.e., natural gas, synthesis gas, biogas, and refinery gas) can be treated. For the treatment of sulfate-containing waste streams, an extra step has to be introduced: the transformation of sulfate into H2S by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In

56

Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency by sulfur and/or chlorine containing compounds atfired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds Nai-Qiang Yanremoval. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (

Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

World petroleum-derived sulfur production  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts in new uses for sulfur, among them those of the Sulfur Development Institute of Canada, have resulted in the development of several new product markets. Petroleum and natural gas derived sulfurs are finding use as asphalt extenders in road construction throughout North America and as concrete extenders and substitutes for Portland cement in the construction industries of Mexico and the Middle East. Their use in masonry blocks is now being commercialized. Canada is the world's largest producer of commercial sulfur; 80% of it is used as a processing chemical in the form of sulfuric acid. Saudi Arabia, recently having begun to commercialize its vast resources, is constructing plants for the extraction of sulfur from natural gas and plans to export between 6 and 7 x 10/sup 5/ tons annually, much of it for fertilizer manufacture to India, Tunisia, Italy, Pakistan, Greece, Morocco, and Thailand.

Cantrell, A.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

60

Topsoe`s Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process: An alternative technology for recovering refinery sulfur  

SciTech Connect

The Topsoe Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process is a catalytic process which produces concentrated sulfuric acid from refinery streams containing sulfur compounds such as H{sub 2}S (Claus plant feed), Claus plant tail gas, SO{sub 2} (FCC off-gas, power plants), and spent sulfuric acid (alkylation acid). The WSA process recovers up to 99.97% of the sulfur value in the stream as concentrated sulfuric acid (93--98.5 wt%). No solid waste products or waste water is produced and no chemicals are consumed in the process. The simple process layout provides low capital cost and attractive operating economy. Twenty four commercial WSA plants have been licensed. The WSA process is explained in detail and comparisons with alternative sulfur management technology are presented. Environmental regulations applying to SO{sub x} abatement and sulfuric acid production plants are explained in the context of WSA plant operation.

Ward, J.W. [Haldor Topsoe, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Advanced Use of the OWL Grade Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Use of the OWL Grade Book #12;Notes Overview The Grade Book has many features to help you organize, release, and compile grades. This manualette will discuss the following advanced Grade Book the Grade Book, creating columns or adding and releasing grades, please see the Basic Use of the OWL Grade

Lennard, William N.

63

Using MMS with the OWL Grade Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using MMS with the OWL Grade Book #12;Notes Overview While MMS provides you with an easy way to maintain and manage your students'grades, the OWL Grade Book offers a simple and secure method into the OWL Grade Book, as well as export grades from the OWL Grade Book into MMS. Page 2 Transfer Grades from

Lennard, William N.

64

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sulfur  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine Isotopes of the Element Sulfur Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

65

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Retail Prices for Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Beginning July 26, 2010 publication of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) price became fully represented by the Diesel Average All Types price. As of December 1, ...

67

Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

68

Sulfur  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

69

Energy Basics: Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur content. The U.S. Environmental Protection...

70

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to study the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production. There were three reactions in this cycle: Bunsen reaction, sulfuric… (more)

Dan, Huang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Lithium/Sulfur Batteries Based on Doped Mesoporous Carbon ...  

A sulfur/carbon composite material was prepared by heat treatment of doped mesoporous carbon and elemental sulfur at a temperature inside a stainless steel vessel ...

75

Basic Use of the OWL Grade Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic Use of the OWL Grade Book #12;Notes Overview The Grade Book tool provides an easy and convenient way for instructors to manage grades and distribute them to students. Using the Grade Book. This handout will show you how to: · Access the Grade Book · Create a column in the Grade Book · Add

Lennard, William N.

76

Connected gradings and fundamental group.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to provide explicit computations of the fundamental group of several algebras. For this purpose, given a $k$-algebra $A$, we consider the category of all connected gradings of $A$ by a group $G$ and we study the relation between gradings and Galois coverings. This theoretical tool gives information about the fundamental group of $A$, which allows its computation using complete lists of gradings.

Claude Cibils (I3M); Maria Julia Redondo (Departamento De Matematica UNS); Andrea Solotar (Departamento De Matematica UBA)

77

THE EFFECT OF ANOLYTE PRODUCT ACID CONCENTRATION ON HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE PERFORMANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle (Fig. 1) is one of the simplest, all-fluids thermochemical cycles that has been devised for splitting water with a high-temperature nuclear or solar heat source. It was originally patented by Brecher and Wu in 1975 and extensively developed by Westinghouse in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As its name suggests, the only element used besides hydrogen and oxygen is sulfur, which is cycled between the +4 and +6 oxidation states. HyS comprises two steps. One is the thermochemical (>800 C) decomposition of sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and water. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} = SO{sub 2} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O. The other is the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis of water to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and hydrogen (H{sub 2}), SO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O = H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, E{sup o} = -0.156 V, explaining the 'hybrid' designation. These two steps taken together split water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} using heat and electricity. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the University of South Carolina (USC) have successfully demonstrated the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers (Fig. 2) for the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis (sulfur oxidation) step, while Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully demonstrated the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition (sulfur reduction) step using a bayonet-type reactor (Fig. 3). This latter work was performed as part of the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration at General Atomics (GA). The combination of these two operations results in a simple process that will be more efficient and cost-effective for the massive production of hydrogen than alkaline electrolysis. Recent developments suggest that the use of PEMs other than Nafion will allow sulfuric acid to be produced at higher concentrations (>60 wt%), offering the possibility of net thermal efficiencies around 50% (HHV basis). The effect of operation at higher anolyte concentrations on the flowsheet, and on the net thermal efficiency for a nuclear-heated HyS process, is examined and quantified.

Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Sulfur-graphene oxide material for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur-graphene oxide material for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes Sulfur-graphene oxide material for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes Theoretical specific energy and theoretical energy density Scanning electron micrograph of the GO-S nanocomposite June 2013 Searching for a safer, less expensive alternative to today's lithium-ion batteries, scientists have turned to lithium-sulfur as a possible chemistry for next-generation batteries. Li/S batteries have several times the energy storage capacity of the best currently available rechargeable Li-ion battery, and sulfur is inexpensive and nontoxic. Current batteries using this chemistry, however, suffer from extremely short cycle life-they don't last through many charge-discharge cycles before they fail. A research team led by Elton Cairns and Yuegang Zhang has developed a new

80

Appalachian No. 1 Refinery District Sulfur Content (Weighted ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appalachian No. 1 Refinery District Sulfur Content (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Percent)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Genetics Curriculum for Grade 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetics Curriculum for Grade 5 Genetics Curriculum for Grade 5 Name: Darin W Meyer Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am teaching a fifth grade science class and I have a student that is very interested in doing an individual project on genetics. Specifically he is interested in heredity, dominant/recessive genes, cross breeding, DNA, RNA. Any suggestion for projects that he could do? I would be interested in having him do something collaboratively with another student teacher etc so that he has some on-line experience. I would be grateful for any help that anyone could give me. I could also use more sources on info for me to use as I direct his study. This fifth grade student is capable of content in the 9-10 grade range. I do have rats and mice in my room. What about a little breeding program?

82

Sulfur Resistant Electrodes for Zirconia Oxygen Sensors ...  

Prototype - A zirconia O2 sensor with a Tb-YSZ electrode was tested in a high sulfur coal fired power plant side by side with a normal zirconia O2 ...

83

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

84

Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

Eller, Phillip G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kubas, Gregory J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Incorporation of sulfur, chlorine, and carbon into electroplated Cu thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microstructure of electroplated Cu thin films and the contamination with incorporated additives were investigated in dependence on the galvanostatic deposition parameters and thermal treatment. Sulfur, chlorine, and carbon were analysed as impurities ... Keywords: 61.72.Ss, 66.30.Jt, 68.35.Dv, 68.43.Mn, 81.15.Pq, 82.45.Vp, 85.40.Ls, Additive incorporation, Additive surface adsorption, Copper, Electrochemical deposition, Impurities

M. Stangl; J. Acker; S. Oswald; M. Uhlemann; T. Gemming; S. Baunack; K. Wetzig

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Sodium sulfur battery design for the ETX-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chloride Silent Power Limited (CSPL) has developed a number of laboratory and field test batteries in support of its sodium sulfur development program. The most demanding of these test batteries is being developed for the Ford ETX-II electric vehicle, under a three year contract from the US Department of Energy. A major milestone of this program is to build and test an Intermediate Deliverable (ID) battery which is a fully representative section of the final battery. This will allow the performance predictions to be evaluated using an operational battery before the final battery is built and delivered. The performance predictions for the battery have been made and are described in this paper. The Intermediate Deliverable Battery, representing one third of the full battery both electrically and thermally, has now been built and preliminary test results are available.

Mangan, M.F.; Leadbetter, A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Parallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Carbonate rocks record the inorganic carbon isotope composition of the oceanic reservoir through geologicalParallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur, University of California-Riverside, Riverside California 92521-0423, USA b Department of Geological Sciences

Saltzman, Matthew R.

88

Chlorine Free Technology for Solar-Grade Silicon Manufacturing: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the development of the solar energy industry, a significant increase of polysilicon feedstock (PSF) production will be required in near future. The creation of special technology of solar grade polysilicon feedstock production is an important problem. Today, semiconductor-grade polysilicon is mainly manufactured using the trichlorosilane (SiHCl3) distillation and reduction. The feed-stock for trichlorosilane is metallurgical-grade silicon, the product of reduction of natural quartzite (silica). This polysilicon production method is characterized by high energy consumption and large amounts of wastes, containing environmentally harmful chlorine based compounds. In the former USSR the principles of industrial method for production of monosilane and polycrystalline silicon by thermal decomposition of monosilane were founded. This technology was proved in industrial scale at production of gaseous monosilane and PSF. We offered new chlorine free technology (CFT). Originality and novelty of the process were confirmed by Russian and US patents.

Strebkov, D. S.; Pinov, A. P.; Zadde, V. V.; Lebedev, E. N.; Belov, E. P.; Efimov, N. K.; Kleshevnikova, S. I.; Touryan, K.; Bleak, D.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Microchannel Distillation of JP-8 Jet Fuel for Sulfur Content Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In microchannel based distillation processes, thin vapor and liquid films are contacted in small channels where mass transfer is diffusion-limited. The microchannel architecture enables improvements in distillation processes. A shorter height equivalent of a theoretical plate (HETP) and therefore a more compact distillation unit can be achieved. A microchannel distillation unit was used to produce a light fraction of JP-8 fuel with reduced sulfur content for use as feed to produce fuel-cell grade hydrogen. The HETP of the microchannel unit is discussed, as well as the effects of process conditions such as feed temperature, flow rate, and reflux ratio.

Zheng, Feng; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Huang, Xiwen; King, David L.

2006-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fast Corn Grading System Verification and Modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fast corn grading system can replace the traditional method in unofficial corn grading locations. The initial design of the system proved that it can… (more)

Smith, Leanna Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Investigation of new heat exchanger design performance for solar thermal chemical heat pump.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The emergence of Thermally Driven Cooling system has received more attention recently due to its ability to utilize low grade heat from engine, incinerator… (more)

Cordova, Cordova

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Study in Low Grade Thermal Energy Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous growth in global energy demands, fluctuations in fossil fuel prices along with ... Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores:  ...

93

Sulfur isotopic evidence for controls on sulfur incorporation in peat and coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyritic sulfur isotope [delta][sup 34]S values were used as a measure of two principal controls on sulfur incorporation in peat and coal: the availability of sulfate, and the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the peat-forming mire. Relatively low [delta][sup 34]S values indicated an open system with a relatively abundant supply of sulfate that exceeded the rate of sulfate reduction to sulfide, whereas relatively high [delta][sup 34]S values indicated a closed system with a more limited supply of sulfate. For example, in the high-sulfur (>3% S), Holocene deposits of Mud Lake, Florida, pyritic sulfur [delta][sup 34]S values decreasing sharply across the transition from peat to the overlying lacustrine sapropel, which corresponds to an increased supply of sulfate from the lake waters. Likewise, syngenetic pyrite in the high-sulfur Minto coal bed (Pictou Group, Westphalian C) in New Brunswick, Canada, show up to 10% negative shifts in [delta][sup 34]S in attrital layers containing detrital quartz and illite, consistent with an increased supply of sulfate from streams entering the peat-forming mire. In contrast, positive pyritic sulfur [delta][sup 34]S values in high-sulfur, channel-fill coal beds (lower Breathitt Formation, Middle Pennsylvanian) in eastern Kentucky indicate that a steady supply of sulfate was exhausted by very active microbial sulfate reduction in the channel-fill peat.

Spiker, E.C.; Bates, A.L. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method of making a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of making a portion of a sodium sulfur battery is disclosed. The battery portion made is a portion of the container which defines the volume for the cathodic reactant materials which are sulfur and sodium polysulfide materials. The container portion is defined by an outer metal casing with a graphite liner contained therein, the graphite liner having a coating on its internal diameter for sealing off the porosity thereof. The steel outer container and graphite pipe are united by a method which insures that at the operating temperature of the battery, relatively low electrical resistance exists between the two materials because they are in intimate contact with one another.

Elkins, Perry E. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore, steel production by virtue of its sulfur aluminum alloys and is used in oxide form in dry cell batteries. The overall level and nature of manganese consumption in batteries was denoted by the expansion on schedule of domestic capacity for production

Torgersen, Christian

96

Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to evaluate the combustion performance of and emissions from a fluidized bed combustor during the combustion of mixtures of high sulfur and/or high chlorine coals and municipal solid waste (MSW). The project included four major tasks, which were as follows: (1) Selection, acquisition, and characterization of raw materials for fuels and the determination of combustion profiles of combination fuels using thermal analytical techniques; (2) Studies of the mechanisms for the formation of chlorinated organics during the combustion of MSW using a tube furnace; (3) Investigation of the effect of sulfur species on the formation of chlorinated organics; and (4) Examination of the combustion performance of combination fuels in a laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor. Several kinds of coals and the major combustible components of the MSW, including PVC, newspaper, and cellulose were tested in this project. Coals with a wide range of sulfur and chlorine contents were used. TGA/MS/FTIR analyses were performed on the raw materials and their blends. The possible mechanism for the formation of chlorinated organics during combustion was investigated by conducting a series of experiments in a tube furnace. The effect of sulfur dioxide on the formation of molecular chlorine during combustion processes was examined in this study.

Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Multiple-sulfur isotope effects during photolysis of carbonyl sulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine sulfur isotope effects during ultraviolet photolysis of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) to carbon monoxide (CO) and elemental sulfur (S[superscript 0]). The OCS gas at 3.7 to 501 ...

Lin, Ying

98

Microwave assisted sulfur infusion technique and the corresponding ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Li-S battery is quite attractive due to the usage of elemental sulfur as cathode. The theoretical capacity of sulfur cathode is 1672 mAh/g, which

99

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

100

EM Commerical Grade Dedication Class Slides  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grade Dedication Grade Dedication www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 DOE TRAINING DOE TRAINING Commercial Grade Commercial Grade Dedication Dedication Training Training MODULE 1 Overview of CGD Process www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Course Objectives  Define the terms "commercial grade item" and "commercial grade services" g  Understand the process for commercial grade dedication (CGD)  Describe the bases for implementing each element of the generic process and how they relate to NQA-1 requirements and Electric Power Research Institute requirements and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Guidelines  Describe each element of the process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reducing Sulfur Hexafluoride Use at LANSCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U N C L A S S I F I E D U N C L A S S I F I E D Reducing Sulfur Hexafluoride Use at LANSCE Hank Alvestad presents to the Fugitive Emissions Working Group September 8, 2011...

102

Sulfuric acid thermoelectrochemical system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectrochemical system in which an electrical current is generated between a cathode immersed in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution and an anode immersed in an aqueous buffer solution of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate. Reactants consumed at the electrodes during the electrochemical reaction are thermochemically regenerated and recycled to the electrodes to provide continuous operation of the system.

Ludwig, Frank A. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low quality natural gas processing with the integrated CFZ/CNG Claus process is feasible for low quality natural gas containing 10% or more of CO{sub 2}, and any amount of H{sub 2}S. The CNG Claus process requires a minimum CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas of about 100 psia (15% CO{sub 2} for a 700 psia feed gas) and also can handle any amount of H{sub 2}S. The process is well suited for handling a variety of trace contaminants usually associated with low quality natural gas and Claus sulfur recovery. The integrated process can produce high pressure carbon dioxide at purities required by end use markets, including food grade CO{sub 2}. The ability to economically co-produce high pressure CO{sub 2} as a commodity with significant revenue potential frees process economic viability from total reliance on pipeline gas, and extends the range of process applicability to low quality gases with relatively low methane content. Gases with high acid gas content and high CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S ratios can be economically processed by the CFZ/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes. The large energy requirements for regeneration make chemical solvent processing prohibitive. The cost of Selexol physical solvent processing of the LaBarge gas is significantly greater than the CNG/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes.

Damon, D.A. [CNG Research Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siwajek, L.A. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W. [BOVAR Inc., AB (Canada). Western Research

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases: high calcium fly-ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accordance with the present invention include preparing an aqueous slurry composed of a calcium alkali source and a source of reactive silica and/or alumina, heating the slurry to above-ambient temperatures for a period of time in order to facilitate the formation of sulfur-absorbing calcium silicates or aluminates, and treating the gas with the heat-treated slurry components. Examples disclosed herein demonstrate the utility of these processes in achieving improved sulfur-absorbing capabilities. Additionally, disclosure is provided which illustrates preferred configurations for employing the present processes both as a dry sorbent injection and for use in conjunction with a spray dryer and/or bagfilter. Retrofit application to existing systems is also addressed.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Chang, John C. S. (Cary, NC)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermoelectric energy converter for generation of electricity from low-grade heat  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric energy conversion device which includes a plurality of thermoelectric elements is described. A hot liquid is supplied to one side of each element and a cold liquid is supplied to the other side of each element. The thermoelectric generator may be utilized to produce power from low-grade heat sources such as ocean thermal gradients, solar ponds, and low-grade geothermal resources. (WHK)

Jayadev, T.S.; Benson, D.K.

1980-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

PELICAN ISLAND Graded dirt road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audubon SanctuaryRecommended route A B C D E F 0.5 mile BOLIVAR PENINSULA N to Crystal Beach Paved road #12;Bryan Beach Old Brazos River 1 mile N Paved road Graded dirt road Walking path Dike/Berm Mudflat

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

107

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect

The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

CATALYST EVALUATION FOR A SULFUR DIOXIDE-DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. Testing examined the activity and stability of platinum and palladium as the electrocatalyst for the SDE in sulfuric acid solutions. Cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry revealed that platinum provided better catalytic activity with much lower potentials and higher currents than palladium. Testing also showed that the catalyst activity is strongly influenced by the concentration of the sulfuric acid electrolyte.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effect of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from corncob on the tensile, thermal and barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals fromcorncob (CNC) on the tensile, thermal, and barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposites was evaluated. The CNC were prepared by sulfuric acid hydrolysis at 45°C for 60 minutes, ...

Hudson Alves Silvério, Wilson Pires Flauzino Neto, Daniel Pasquini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Grade 91 Steel Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed analysis of service experience with Grade 91 steels, as well as the results of long-term laboratory tests, has demonstrated that there are key issues associated with use of this tempered martensitic steel that require detailed consideration. These issues include:Review of composition effectsInfluence of fabrication variables on propertiesInfluence of heat treatment on propertiesWelding and post-weld heat treatment ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

Najjar, Mitri S. (Hopewell Junction, NY); Corbeels, Roger J. (Wappingers Falls, NY); Kokturk, Uygur (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide absorbents for lean-burn diesel engine emission control  

SciTech Connect

It is known that sulfur oxides contribute significantly and deleteriously to the overall performance of lean-burn diesel engine aftertreatment systems, especially in the case of NOx traps. A Ag-based, fast regenerable SO2 absorbent has been developed and will be described. Over a temperature range of 300oC to 550oC, it absorbs almost all of the SO2 in the simulated exhaust gases during the lean cycles and can be fully regenerated by the short rich cycles at the same temperature. Its composition has been optimized as 1 wt% Pt-5wt%Ag-SiO2, and the preferred silica source for the supporting material has been identified as inert Cabosil fumed silica. The thermal instability of Ag2O under fuel-lean conditions at 230oC and above makes it possible to fast regenerate the sulfur-loaded absorbent during the following fuel-rich cycles. Pt catalyst helps reducing Ag2SO4 during rich cycles at low temperatures. And the chemically inert fumed SiO2 support gives the absorbent long term stability. This absorbent shows great potential to work under the same lean-rich cycling conditions as those imposed on the NOx traps, and thus, can protect the downstream particulate filter and the NOx trap from sulfur poisoning.

Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2010-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly progress report, June--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2}, and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this first quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. One high surface area molybdenum catalyst has been prepared. An existing unit at IGT is being modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures(> 1300{degrees}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2 through 5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD(thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD(flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been received.

Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Removal of sulfur compounds from combustion product exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are disclosed for removing sulfur containing contaminents from a combustion product exhaust. The removal process is carried out in two stages wherein the combustion product exhaust is dissolved in water, the water being then heated to drive off the sulfur containing contaminents. The sulfur containing gases are then resolublized in a cold water trap to form a concentrated solution which can then be used as a commercial product.

Cheng, Dah Y. (Palo Alto, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

116

Polymer Electrolytes for Rechargeable Lithium/Sulfur Batteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the rapid development of portable electronics, hybrid-electric and electric cars, there is great interest in utilization of sulfur as cathodes for rechargeable lithium batteries.… (more)

Zhao, Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Better Batteries from Waste Sulfur - Materials Technology@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 04/28/2013. Transforming waste sulfur into lightweight plastic that could lead to better batteries for electric cars is possible through a new chemical

118

Average prices for spot sulfur dioxide emissions allowances at ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The weighted average spot price for sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions allowances awarded to winning bidders at Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) annual auction on ...

119

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery  

Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed an innovative design for a battery, made primarily of sodium and sulfur, that holds promise for both ...

120

Available Technologies: Lithium / Sulfur Cells with Long Cycle ...  

A team of Berkeley Lab battery researchers led by Elton Cairns has invented an advanced lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cell that, for the first time, offers ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery ...  

Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed an innovative design for a battery, made primarily of sodium and sulfur, that holds promise for both large-scale grid ...

122

Reductive Sulfur-fixation Smelting of Stibnite Concentrate in Sodium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new process to extracted antimony directly from stibnite concentrate by reductive sulfur-fixation smelting in sodium molten salt has been ...

123

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

124

Mechanism of Sulfur-containing Aryl Polyphosphonate as Flame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanism of Sulfur-containing Aryl Polyphosphonate as Flame Retardant for PET. Author(s), Deng Yi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Deng Yi.

125

Sulfur removal and comminution of carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Finely divided, clean coal or other carbonaceous material is provided by forming a slurry of coarse coal in aqueous alkali solution and heating the slurry under pressure to above the critical conditions of steam. The supercritical fluid penetrates and is trapped in the porosity of the coal as it swells in a thermoplastic condition at elevated temperature. By a sudden, explosive release of pressure the coal is fractured into finely divided particles with release of sulfur-containing gases and minerals. The finely divided coal is recovered from the minerals for use as a clean coal product.

Narain, Nand K. (Bethel Park, PA); Ruether, John A. (McMurray, PA); Smith, Dennis N. (Herminie, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Sulfur removal and comminution of carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Finely divided, clean coal or other carbonaceous material is provided by forming a slurry of coarse coal in aqueous alkali solution and heating the slurry under pressure to above the critical conditions of steam. The supercritical fluid penetrates and is trapped in the porosity of the coal as it swells in a thermoplastic condition at elevated temperature. By a sudden, explosive release of pressure the coal is fractured into finely divided particles with release of sulfur-containing gases and minerals. The finely divided coal is recovered from the minerals for use as a clean coal product. 2 figs.

Narain, N.K.; Ruether, J.A.; Smith, D.N.

1987-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

Epler, John

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Washington Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) ... History; Gasoline, All Grades : Through Retail Outlets: ...

129

North Carolina Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Area: ... History; Gasoline, All Grades : Through Retail ...

130

Sulfur tolerance of selective partial oxidation of NO to NO2 in a plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO2 to achieve efficient reduction of NOx and particulates in diesel exhaust. These technologies include the use of selective catalytic reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons, NOx adsorption, and continuously regenerated particulate trapping. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO2 is also active in converting SO2 to SO3 . The SO3 leads t o increase in particulates and/or poison active sites on the catalyst. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO2 in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO2 without oxidizing SO2 to SO3 .

Penetrante, B; Brusasco, R M; Merritt, B T; Vogtlin, G E

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

MULTIPLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY WITH SULFATE REDUCERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MULTIPLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY WITH SULFATE REDUCERS*, DONALD E. CANFIELD**, and KIRSTEN S. HABICHT** ABSTRACT. Multiple sulfur isotope measurements of sulfur disproportionation indicate that different types of metabolic processes impart differ- ent multiple isotope

Kaufman, Alan Jay

132

Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the direct sulfur recovery process. Final report, February 1990--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently recovering up to 99% or higher amounts of elemental sulfur from SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration tail-gas produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems by reacting the tail-gas with a small slipstream of coal gas. In this project, the DSRP was demonstrated with simulated gases at bench-scale with 3-in. diameter, 1-L size catalytic reactors. Fundamental kinetic and modeling studies were conducted to explain the significantly higher than thermodynamically expected sulfur recoveries in DSRP and to enable prediction of sulfur recovery in larger reactors. Technology transfer activities to promote the DSRP consisted of publications and discussions with architectural engineering firms and industrial parties especially IGCC system developers. Toward the end of the project, an agreement was signed with an IGCC system developer to scale up the DSRP and test it with actual gases in their 10-MW (thermal) coal gasification pilot-plant under a cooperative R&D agreement with the US Department of Energy.

Gangwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer for sulfuric acid decomposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus, constructed of ceramics and other corrosion resistant materials, for decomposing sulfuric acid into sulfur dioxide, oxygen and water using an integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer unit comprising a bayonet-type, dual-tube, counter-flow heat exchanger with a catalytic insert and a central baffle to increase recuperation efficiency.

Moore, Robert (Edgewood, NM); Pickard, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Parma, Jr., Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Gelbard, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Lenard, Roger X. (Edgewood, NM)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Distribution and origin of sulfur in Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The sulfur content of 1,225 samples of Green River oil shale from two core holes in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, ranges from nearly 0 to 4.9 weight percent. In one core hole, the average sulfur content of a sequence of oil shale 555 m thick, which represents nearly the maximum thickness of oil shale in the basin, is 0.76 weight percent. The vertical distribution of sulfur through the oil shale is cyclic. As many as 25 sulfur cycles have lateral continuity and can be traced between the core holes. Most of the sulfur resides in iron sulfides (pyrite, marcasite, and minor. pyrrhotite), and small amounts are organically bound in kerogen. In general, the concentration of sulfur correlates moderately with oil shale yield, but the degree of association ranges from quite high in the upper 90 m of the oil shale sequence to low or none in the leached zone and in illitic oil shale in the lower part of the sequence. Sulfur also correlates moderately with iron in the carbonate oil shale sequence, but no correlation was found in the illitic samples. Sulfide mineralization is believed to have occurred during early and late stages of diagenesis, and after lithification, during development of the leached zone. Significant amounts of iron found in ankeritic dolomite and in illite probably account for the lack of a strong correlation between sulfur and iron.

Dyni, J.R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PNNL-14537 Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results S.J. Smith E;PNNL-14537 Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results PNNL Research Report Joint Global Change Research Institute 8400 Baltimore Avenue College Park, Maryland 20740 #12;PNNL-14537

Hultman, Nathan E.

137

Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating  

SciTech Connect

A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

Ludwig, Frank A. (Irvine, CA); Higley, Lin R. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

EM Commerical Grade Dedication Class Slides  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PowerPoint presentation used in the EM sponsored commercial grade dedication (CGD) class. This class is designed to provide an understanding of the process for CGD.

139

Thermal degredation of the shales of the Volga region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal degredation of the combustible shales of the Saratov and Orenburg provinces containing 45-50% of organic matter has been investigated on batchwise and continuous laboratory apparatuses and experiments have been performed on the distillation of combined liquid dissolution products and on the hydrogenation of a high-poiling extract of the dissolution. The possibility has been shown of producing from these shales organic binders for road building, an ash-free power fuel (sulfur content about 1%) and ''shale petroleum'' (sulfur content 0.1%).

Vol-Epshtein, A.S.; Bregadze, T.A.; Gorlov, E.G.; Rudenskaya, I.M.; Rudenskii, A.V.; Samorodov, A.V.; Shipil'berg, M.B.; Tuchkova, T.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High-sulfur coals in the eastern Kentucky coal field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eastern Kentucky coal field is notable for relatively low-sulfur, [open quotes]compliance[close quotes] coals. Virtually all of the major coals in this area do have regions in which higher sulfur lithotypes are common, if not dominant, within the lithologic profile. Three Middle Pennsylvanian coals, each representing a major resource, exemplify this. The Clintwood coal bed is the stratigraphically lowest coal bed mined throughout the coal field. In Whitley County, the sulfur content increase from 0.6% at the base to nearly 12% in the top lithotype. Pyrite in the high-sulfur lithotype is a complex mixture of sub- to few-micron syngenetic forms and massive epigenetic growths. The stratigraphically higher Pond Creek coal bed is extensively mined in portions of the coal field. Although generally low in sulfur, in northern Pike and southern Martin counties the top one-third can have up to 6% sulfur. Uniformly low-sulfur profiles can occur within a few hundred meters of high-sulfur coal. Pyrite occurs as 10-50 [mu]m euhedra and coarser massive forms. In this case, sulfur distribution may have been controlled by sandstone channels in the overlying sediments. High-sulfur zones in the lower bench of the Fire Clay coal bed, the stratigraphically highest coal bed considered here, are more problematical. The lower bench, which is of highly variable thickness and quality, generally is overlain by a kaolinitic flint clay, the consequence of a volcanic ash fall into the peat swamp. In southern Perry and Letcher counties, a black, illite-chlorite clay directly overlies the lower bench. General lack of lateral continuity of lithotypes in the lower bench suggests that the precursor swamp consisted of discontinuous peat-forming environments that were spatially variable and regularly inundated by sediments. Some of the peat-forming areas may have been marshlike in character.

Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M. (Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)); Eble, C.F. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery: Task 2. Topical report, September 30, 1992--August 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to present conceptual designs developed to treat a large portion of proven domestic natural gas reserves which are low quality. The conceptual designs separate hydrogen sulfide and large amounts of carbon dioxide (>20%) from methane, convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, produce a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide as EOR or food grade CO{sub 2}, and vent residual CO{sub 2} virtually free of contaminating sulfur containing compounds. A secondary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to review existing gas treatment technology and identify existing commercial technologies currently used to treat large volumes of low quality natural gas with high acid content. Section II of this report defines low quality gas and describes the motivation for seeking technology to develop low quality gas reserves. The target low quality gas to be treated with the proposed technology is identified, and barriers to the production of this gas are reviewed. Section III provides a description of the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFG)-CNG technologies, their features, and perceived advantages. The three conceptual process designs prepared under Task 2 are presented in Section IV along with the design basis and process economics. Section V presents an overview of existing gas treatment technologies, organized into acid gas removal technology and sulfur recovery technology.

Cook, W.J.; Neyman, M.; Brown, W. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W.; Kuehn, L.; O`Connell, J.; Paskall, H.; Dale, P. [Bovar, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Power-grade butanol recovery and utilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an alternative to the traditional recovery systems, it was proposed in a previous publication that the n-butanol/acetone/ethanol fermentation products could be recovered as a power grade fuel blend and used directly as a fuel. This would affect a savings in process energy requirements because each chemical component would not have to be processed individually to technical grade purity. Further, some residual water could be tolerated in the fuel blend. To develop such a power grade fuel recovery scheme beyond the conceptual stage, the Energy Research and Resource Division of the Kansas Energy Office undertook a two-fold program to demonstrate and test a power grade butanol/acetone/ethanol fuel recovery system, and further to demonstrate the feasibility of using the fuel blend in a standard type engine. A development program was initiated to accomplish the following objectives: design and test an operational power grade butanol recovery plant that would operate at one liter per hour output; and test and assess the performance of power grade butanol in a spark ignition automotive engine. This project has demonstrated that recovery of a power grade butanol fuel blend is simple and can be accomplished at a considered energy advantage over ethanol. It was further demonstrated that such a power grade blend works well in a typical spark ignition engine.

Noon, R.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Requirements Flowdown and Graded Approach to QA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Graded Approach Model and Expectation Graded Approach Model and Expectation Page 1 of 18 Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 1: Requirements Flow Down Task #1.9 - Complete White Paper covering procurement QA process flow diagram Draft White Paper and Amended Flow Diagram Project Area 4: Graded Approach Implementation Task #4.4 - In coordination with Project Focus Area #1, provide an EM expectation for application of the graded approach to procurement. EM Graded Approach Procedure for Procurements Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Y Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker,

145

Thermally activated heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

This article describes research to develop efficient gas-fired heat pumps heat and cool buildings without CFCs. Space heating and cooling use 46% of all energy consumed in US buildings. Air-conditioning is the single leading cause of peak demand for electricity and is a major user of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Advanced energy conversion technology can save 50% of this energy and eliminate CFCs completely. Besides saving energy, advanced systems substantially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas), sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides, which contribute to smog and acid rain. These emissions result from the burning of fossil fuels used to generate electricity. The Office of Building Technologies (OBT) of the US Department of Energy supports private industry`s efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in buildings. To help industry, OBT, through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is currently working on thermally activated heat pumps. OBT has selected the following absorption heat pump systems to develop: generator-absorber heat-exchange (GAX) cycle for heating-dominated applications in residential and light commercial buildings; double-condenser-coupled (DCC) cycle for commercial buildings. In addition, OBT is developing computer-aided design software for investigating the absorption cycle.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280.degree. C. and containing as little as 36 mol % ethylene and about 41-51 mol % sulfur dioxide; and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10.degree.-50.degree. C., and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

Johnson, Richard (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Low Temperature Sorbents for removal of Sulfur Compounds from fluid feed Streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sorbent material is provided comprising a material reactive with sulfur, a binder unreactive with sulfur and an inert material, wherein the sorbent absorbs the sulfur at temperatures between 30 and 200 C. Sulfur absorption capacity as high as 22 weight percent has been observed with these materials.

Siriwardane, Ranjan

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Low Temperature Sorbents for Removal of Sulfur Compounds from Fluid Feed Streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sorbent material is provided comprising a material reactive with sulfur, a binder unreactive with sulfur and an inert material, wherein the sorbent absorbs the sulfur at temperatures between 30 and 200 C. Sulfur absorption capacity as high as 22 weight percent has been observed with these materials.

Siriwardane, Ranjani

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Soft Approach to Encapsulate Sulfur: Polyaniline Nanotubes for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Long Cycle Life  

SciTech Connect

Applications of rechargeable batteries are diverse and range from storing energy from renewable resources such as wind generators and solar arrays , powering electric vehicles and portable electronic devices. Significant R&D efforts have focused on achieving high energy density, long cycling life, low cost, and safety.1 Among all known rechargeable battery systems, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have attracted considerable attention.2, 3 Elemental sulfur is abundant, and is a very attractive cathode material for lithium batteries because of its high theoretical capacity (1672 mAh g-1) and specific energy (2600 Wh kg-1), assuming complete reaction of lithium with sulfur to form Li2S.

Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Schwenzer, Birgit; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Nie, Zimin; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

Upgrading Below-Grade Spaces: Assessing Priorities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Below-Grade Spaces: Below-Grade Spaces: Assessing Priorities Sam Breidenbach [Cold climate bias] Gap-Balancing risk and homeowner expectations * Managing risk and challenges for contractors - Moisture, mold and liability - Durability/Sustainability - Design/build vs. owner's architect - Contract language to reduce liability - Aligning technical details with specific situations - Below grade spaces are business opportunities - Selling and Competition Gap-Balancing risk and homeowner expectations * Homeowner Expectations and Priorities - Focused on "house beautiful" until technical failure occurs - Health related issues - Opportunity to conserve energy - Cost vs. value-"inexpensive additional space" - Expectations not aligned with physical realities.

151

System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Facility Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

153

Diesel Emissions Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine the impact of fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems that could be implemented to lower emissions of NO{sub x} and PM from on-highway trucks in the 2002-2004 time frame.

None

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Novel Sulfur-Tolerant Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the unique advantages of SOFCs over other types of fuel cells is the potential for direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels (it may involve internal reforming). Unfortunately, most hydrocarbon fuels contain sulfur, which would dramatically degrade SOFC performance at parts-per-million (ppm) levels. Low concentration of sulfur (ppm or below) is difficult to remove efficiently and cost-effectively. Therefore, knowing the exact poisoning process for state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFCs with Ni-YSZ cermet anodes, understanding the detailed anode poisoning mechanism, and developing new sulfur-tolerant anodes are essential to the promotion of SOFCs that run on hydrocarbon fuels. The effect of cell operating conditions (including temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, cell voltage/current density, etc.) on sulfur poisoning and recovery of nickel-based anode in SOFCs was investigated. It was found that sulfur poisoning is more severe at lower temperature, higher H{sub 2}S concentration or lower cell current density (higher cell voltage). In-situ Raman spectroscopy identified the nickel sulfide formation process on the surface of a Ni-YSZ electrode and the corresponding morphology change as the sample was cooled in H{sub 2}S-containing fuel. Quantum chemical calculations predicted a new S-Ni phase diagram with a region of sulfur adsorption on Ni surfaces, corresponding to sulfur poisoning of Ni-YSZ anodes under typical SOFC operating conditions. Further, quantum chemical calculations were used to predict the adsorption energy and bond length for sulfur and hydrogen atoms on various metal surfaces. Surface modification of Ni-YSZ anode by thin Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating was utilized to enhance the sulfur tolerance. A multi-cell testing system was designed and constructed which is capable of simultaneously performing electrochemical tests of 12 button cells in fuels with four different concentrations of H{sub 2}S. Through systematical study of state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFC button cells, it is seen that the long-term sulfur poisoning behavior of those cells indicate that there might be a second-stage slower degradation due to sulfur poisoning, which would last for a thousand hour or even longer. However, when using G-18 sealant from PNNL, the 2nd stage poisoning was effectively prohibited.

Lei Yang; Meilin Liu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has investigated new metal oxide catalysts for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as CO. Significant progress in catalyst development has been made during the course of the project. We have found that fluorite oxides, CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, and rare earth zirconates such as Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} are active and stable catalysts for reduction Of SO{sub 2} by CO. More than 95% sulfur yield was achieved at reaction temperatures about 450{degrees}C or higher with the feed gas of stoichiometric composition. Reaction of SO{sub 2} and CO over these catalysts demonstrated a strong correlation of catalytic activity with the catalyst oxygen mobility. Furthermore, the catalytic activity and resistance to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} poisoning of these catalysts were significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of transition metals, such as Co, Ni, Co, etc. The resulting transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalyst has superior activity and stability, and shows promise in long use for the development of a greatly simplified single-step sulfur recovery process to treat variable and dilute SO{sub 2} concentration gas streams. Among various active composite catalyst systems the Cu-CeO{sub 2} system has been extensively studied. XRD, XPS, and STEM analyses of the used Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst found that the fluorite crystal structure of ceria was stable at the present reaction conditions, small amounts of copper was dispersed and stabilized on the ceria matrix, and excess copper oxide particles formed copper sulfide crystals of little contribution to catalytic activity. A working catalyst consisted of partially sulfated cerium oxide surface and partially sulfided copper clusters. The overall reaction kinetics were approximately represented by a first order equation.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

METHOD TO PREVENT SULFUR ACCUMULATION INSIDE MEMBRANE ELECTRODE ASSEMBLY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HyS is conceptually the simplest of the thermochemical cycles and involves only sulfur chemistry. In the HyS Cycle hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced at the cathode of the electrochemical cell (or electrolyzer). Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is oxidized at the anode to form sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and protons (H{sup +}) as illustrated below. A separate high temperature reaction decomposes the sulfuric acid to water and sulfur dioxide which are recycled to the electrolyzers, and oxygen which is separated out as a secondary product. The electrolyzer includes a membrane that will allow hydrogen ions to pass through but block the flow of hydrogen gas. The membrane is also intended to prevent other chemical species from migrating between electrodes and undergoing undesired reactions that could poison the cathode or reduce overall process efficiency. In conventional water electrolysis, water is oxidized at the anode to produce protons and oxygen. The standard cell potential for conventional water electrolysis is 1.23 volts at 25 C. However, commercial electrolyzers typically require higher voltages ranging from 1.8 V to 2.6 V [Kirk-Othmer, 1991]. The oxidation of sulfur dioxide instead of water in the HyS electrolyzer occurs at a much lower potential. For example, the standard cell potential for sulfur dioxide oxidation at 25 C in 50 wt % sulfuric acid is 0.29 V [Westinghouse, 1980]. Since power consumption by the electrolyzers is equal to voltage times current, and current is proportional to hydrogen production, a large reduction in voltage results in a large reduction in electrical power cost per unit of hydrogen generated.

Steimke, J.; Steeper, T.; Herman, D.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Elvington, M.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Analysis for sulfur forms in coal and on coal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A review and critical evaluation of all available literature on the determination of sulfur and sulfur forms in coal and on coal and pyrite surfaces is being performed. Approximately 200 citations through 1984 have been catalogued and reviewed, and approximately 100 additional citations since 1984 have been identified. Work is nearing completion on the collection and critical evaluation of the more recent literature. A few articles requested through the interlibrary loan system still need to be received and analyzed, and several articles in unusual foreign languages need to be evaluated. Methods used for sampling, sample preparation, and analysis of sulfur and sulfur forms in samples arising from the spherical oil agglomeration process have been reviewed. Recommendations are being made for assessing the quality of analyses provided by commercial laboratories, for assuring that preparation procedures do not alter sulfur forms in samples, and for determining the ability of sampling procedures to obtain representative samples. Several concerns about the applicability of the ASTM procedure for the determination of pyrite sulfur in micronized coal and oil-agglomerated samples have been raised. 5 refs., 1 tab.

Markuszewski, R.; Chriswell, C.D.; Norton, G.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Classes and Grades of Ductile Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Ductile iron properties of various industry and international standards...Table 1 Ductile iron properties of various industry and international standards Grade Tensile strength 0.2% offset yield

159

Requirements Flowdown and Graded Approach to QA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides the method for applying a graded approach to procurement activities across Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM).  The document is to be used by EM...

160

Commercial Grade Dedication Survey and Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This survey was conducted to obtain input from EM contractors on processes used to perform Commercial Grade Item (CGI) dedication.  The intended use of this information is to form the basis for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sub-Grade Corrosion Inspection Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry maintains an immense number of transmission and distribution structures that are subject to sub-grade corrosion. As this vast fleet ages, the inspection, assessment, and maintenance of existing facilities have become increasingly important topics. This report is a comprehensive summary of corrosion basics as they apply to sub-grade corrosion in tubular structures. Coverage includes the electrochemical mechanisms of corrosion, types of corrosion, laboratory methods for measurin...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT NEEDS FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fiscal year 2008 studies in electrolyzer component development have focused on the characterization of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) after performance tests in the single cell electrolyzer, evaluation of electrocatalysts and membranes using a small scale electrolyzer and evaluating the contribution of individual cell components to the overall electrochemical performance. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies of samples taken from MEAs testing in the SRNL single cell electrolyzer test station indicates a sulfur-rich layer forms between the cathode catalyst layer and the membrane. Based on a review of operating conditions for each of the MEAs evaluated, we conclude that the formation of the layer results from the reduction of sulfur dioxide as it passes through the MEA and reaches the catalyst layer at the cathode-membrane interface. Formation of the sulfur rich layer results in partial delamination of the cathode catalyst layer leading to diminished performance. Furthermore we believe that operating the electrolyzer at elevated pressure significantly increases the rate of formation due to increased adsorption of hydrogen on the internal catalyst surface. Thus, identification of a membrane that exhibits much lower transport of sulfur dioxide is needed to reduce the quantity of sulfur dioxide that reaches the cathode catalyst and is reduced to produce the sulfur-rich layer. Three candidate membranes are currently being evaluated that have shown promise from preliminary studies, (1) modified Nafion{reg_sign}, (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI), and (3) sulfonated Diels Alder polyphenylene (SDAPP). Testing examined the activity for the sulfur dioxide oxidation of platinum (Pt) and platinum-alloy catalysts in 30 wt% sulfuric acid solution. Linear sweep voltammetry showed an increase in activity when catalysts in which Pt is alloyed with non-noble transition metals such as cobalt and chromium. However when Pt is alloyed with noble metals, such as iridium or ruthenium, the kinetic activity decreases. We recommend further testing to determine if these binary alloys will provide the increased reaction kinetic needed to meet the targets. We also plan to test the performance of these catalyst materials for both proton and sulfur dioxide reduction. The latter may provide another parameter by which we can control the reduction of sulfur dioxide upon transport to the cathode catalyst surface. A small scale electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2}) has been fabricated and successfully installed as an additional tool to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on electrolyzer and MEA performance. Currently this electrolyzer is limited to testing at temperatures up to 80 C and at atmospheric pressure. Selected electrochemical performance data from the single cell sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer were analyzed with the aid of an empirical equation which takes into account the overpotential of each of the components. By using the empirical equation, the performance data was broken down into its components and a comparison of the potential losses was made. The results indicated that for the testing conditions of 80 C and 30 wt% sulfuric acid, the major overpotential contribution ({approx}70 % of all losses) arise from the slow reaction rate of oxidation of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that in order to meet the target of hydrogen production at 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V and 50 wt% sulfuric acid, identification of a better catalyst for sulfur dioxide oxidation will provide the largest gain in electrolyzer performance.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Massachusetts Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Area: ... History; Gasoline, All Grades : Through Retail Outlets: ...

164

Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: Development of High Energy Lithium-Sulfur Cells for Electric Vehicle Applications  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: Sion Power is developing a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery, a potentially cost-effective alternative to the Li-Ion battery that could store 400% more energy per pound. All batteries have 3 key parts—a positive and negative electrode and an electrolyte—that exchange ions to store and release electricity. Using different materials for these components changes a battery’s chemistry and its ability to power a vehicle. Traditional Li-S batteries experience adverse reactions between the electrolyte and lithium-based negative electrode that ultimately limit the battery to less than 50 charge cycles. Sion Power will sandwich the lithium- and sulfur-based electrode films around a separator that protects the negative electrode and increases the number of charges the battery can complete in its lifetime. The design could eventually allow for a battery with 400% greater storage capacity per pound than Li-Ion batteries and the ability to complete more than 500 recharge cycles.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

166

Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Process Development Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Thermochemical Process is a means of producing hydrogen via water-splitting through a combination of chemical reactions and electrochemistry. Energy is supplied to the system as high temperature heat (approximately 900 C) and electricity. Advanced nuclear reactors (Generation IV) or central solar receivers can be the source of the primary energy. Large-scale hydrogen production based on this process could be a major contributor to meeting the needs of a hydrogen economy. This project's objectives include optimization of the HyS process design, analysis of technical issues and concerns, creation of a development plan, and laboratory-scale proof-of-concept testing. The key component of the HyS Process is the SO2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). Studies were performed that showed that an electrolyzer operating in the range of 500-600 mV per cell can lead to an overall HyS cycle efficiency in excess of 50%, which is superior to all other currently proposed thermochemical cycles. Economic analysis indicated hydrogen production costs of approximately $1.60 per kilogram for a mature nuclear hydrogen production plant. However, in order to meet commercialization goals, the electrolyzer should be capable of operating at high current density, have a long operating lifetime , and have an acceptable capital cost. The use of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) technology, which leverages work for the development of PEM fuel cells, was selected as the most promising route to meeting these goals. The major accomplishments of this project were the design and construction of a suitable electrolyzer test facility and the proof-of-concept testing of a PEM-based SDE.

Summers, William A.; Buckner, Melvin R.

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

SNG or syn-gas from wet solid waste and low grade fuels  

SciTech Connect

The substitute natural gas (SNG) or a synthesis gas (syngas) is prepared by partly oxidizing wastes and low-grade fuels (peat, lignite, many forms of biomass) containing 0.5-30 times as much water as the dry solids with O or air at 240-300/sup 0/C and 70-100 atmospheres. Sulfur in high S coal is oxidized selectively to SO/sub 4//sup -2/, and the heat to bring the combustible to the necessary temperature is supplied by burning part of the combustible itself. The residual solids (now 70-95% of the original fuel) are mechanically separated from all but 0.5-2 lb water. These solids come from the dewatering unit at a high pressure and may be passed, without loss of pressure or temperature to be gasified in conventional processes and gasifiers by partial oxidation.

Othmer, D.F.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt-based commercial alloys. The corrosion rates in these tests are reported and how they may or may not relate to the corrosion behavior in an operating thermochemical cycle is discussed.

Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Process for removal of sulfur compounds from fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel gases such as those produced in the gasification of coal are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate matter by contact with molten metal salt. The fuel gas and salt are intimately mixed by passage through a venturi or other constriction in which the fuel gas entrains the molten salt as dispersed droplets to a gas-liquid separator. The separated molten salt is divided into a major and a minor flow portion with the minor flow portion passing on to a regenerator in which it is contacted with steam and carbon dioxide as strip gas to remove sulfur compounds. The strip gas is further processed to recover sulfur. The depleted, minor flow portion of salt is passed again into contact with the fuel gas for further sulfur removal from the gas. The sulfur depleted, fuel gas then flows through a solid absorbent for removal of salt droplets. The minor flow portion of the molten salt is then recombined with the major flow portion for feed to the venturi.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA); Stegen, Gary E. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Introductory Material Grade Level& Content Area: Grade 6-8 Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introductory Material Grade Level& Content Area: Grade 6-8 Physics Title of Lesson: ENERGY Main Concept/Big Idea: Energy and its types Objective: TSWBAT Accurately define energy Accurately compare and contrast the two types of energy Standards: Standard 3.2.10.B2: Explain how the overall energy flowing

VanDieren, Monica

174

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumente...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... 10 Acronyms BPCS Basic Process Control System CGD Commercial Grade Dedication CHAP Consolidated Hazard Analysis Process...

175

Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

Basu, Arunabha (Aurora, IL); Meyer, Howard S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA); Leppin, Dennis (Chicago, IL); Wangerow, James R. (Medinah, IL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

Axial grading of inert matrix fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Why sequence Sulfur cycling in the Frasassi aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sulfur cycling in the Frasassi aquifer? sulfur cycling in the Frasassi aquifer? The terrestrial subsurface remains one of the least explored microbial habitats on earth, and is critical for understanding pollutant migration and attenuation, subsurface processes such as limestone dissolution (affecting porosity), and the search for life elsewhere in the solar system and beyond. The deep and sulfidic Frasassi aquifer (of Ancona, Italy) has emerged as a model system for studying sulfur cycling in the terrestrial subsurface, and this sequencing project has relevance for developing applications for wastewater treatment and capabilities relevant for radionuclide, metal and organic pollutant remediation that can be applied at environments at DOE subsurface sites. Principal Investigators: Jennifer Macalady, Penn State University

178

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Phase Equilibria II. Phase Equilibria Title Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1996 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Frank R. McLarnon, and John S. Newman Journal Journal of the Electrochemistry Society Volume 143 Issue 2 Pagination 412-417 Keywords 25 ENERGY STORAGE, 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE, ALUMINIUM OXIDES, equilibrium, performance, PHASE DIAGRAMS, PHOSPHIDES, PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM SULFIDES, SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES Abstract Equilibrium open-circuit cell voltage data from a sodium/{beta}{double_prime}-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cell utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, and 0.332 and a sodium atom fraction ranging from 0 to 0.4 were interpreted to construct ternary phase diagrams of the Na-P-S ternary system at 350 and 400 C.

179

Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Design, construction, and characterization of a facility for neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252  

SciTech Connect

A study of neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252 as a neutron source is reported. Both internal and external target geometries are investigated. The facility designed for and used in this study is described. The external target geometry is found to be inappropriate because of the low thermal neutron flux at the sample location, which must be outside the biological shielding. The internal target geometry is found to have a sufficient thermal neutron flux, but an excessive gamma ray background. A water filled plastic facility, rather than the paraffin filled steel one used in this study, is suggested as a means of increasing flexibility and decreasing the beackground in the internal target geometry.

Layfield, J.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Status of Initial Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Graphite Grades for NGNP Appkications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current candidate graphite grades for the core structures of NGNP include grades NBG-17, NBG-18, PCEA and IG-430. Both NBG-17 and NBG-18 are manufactured using pitch coke, and are vibrationally molded. These medium grain products are produced by SGL Carbon SAS (France). Tayo Tanso (Japan) produces IG-430 which is a petroleum coke, isostatically molded, nuclear grade graphite. And PCEA is a medium grain, extruded graphite produced by UCAR Carbon Co. (USA) from petroleum coke. An experimental program has been initiated to develop physical and mechanical properties data for these current candidate graphites. The results will be judged against the requirements for nuclear grade graphites set forth in ASTM standard D 7219-05 "Standard Specification for Isotropic and Near-isotropic Nuclear Graphites". Physical properties data including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion, and mechanical properties data including tensile, compressive and flexural strengths will be obtained using the established test methods covered in D-7219 and ASTM C 781-02 "Standard Practice for Testing Graphite and Boronated Graphite Components for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors". Various factors known to effect the properties of graphites will be investigated. These include specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation (ag and wg) within a billet, and billet-to-billet variations. The current status of the materials characterization program is reported herein. To date billets of the four graphite grades have been procured, and detailed cut up plans for obtaining the various specimens have been prepared. Particular attention has been given to the traceability of each specimen to its spatial location and orientation within a billet.

Strizak, Joe P [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Catalyst Activity and Post-operation Analyses of Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts Used in the Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of hydrogen by splitting of water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition can be achieved by a series of particular chemical reactions that establish a thermochemical cycle [1]. Among the high number of thermochemical water-splitting cycles proposed in the literature [2], the sulfur-based group is of considerable interest. All the sulfur-based cycles employ the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2. The produced O2 corresponds to the O2 generated from water in the overall cycle. Research performed at the Idaho National Laboratory [3] has found that even one of the most stables catalysts, Pt supported on low surface area titania, deactivates with time on stream (TOS). To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, samples of 1% Pt supported on titania (rutile) catalyst were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different TOSs between 0 and 548 h and a number of chemical and spectroscopic analyses applied to the spent samples.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C. Burch; Patrick J. Pinhero; Helen H. Farrell

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.  

SciTech Connect

The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Understanding Premium Power Grades: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many utility customers, quality of power has become as important as reliability of power, and providing this required quality serves as the basis of a premium power offering. This report addresses the key technical and economic issues related to premium power grades that utilities, regulators, and end users need to understand to make informed decisions.

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Proposed use of antimonyl sulfate in a sulfuric-acid cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proposed use of antimonyl sulfate in a sulfuric acid thermochemical hydrogen cycle is outlined. The principal advantage would be the separate evolution of sulfur dioxide and oxygen in high temperature steps.

Jones, W.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tier 2 Vehicle and Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program

189

A design strategy applied to sulfur resistant lean NOx̳ automotive catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst poisoning due to sulfur compounds derived from fuel sulfur presents a major challenge, intractable thus far, to development of many advanced technologies for automotive catalysts such as the lean NOx, trap. Under ...

Tang, Hairong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Polyol-free synthesis of uniformly dispersed Pt/graphene oxide electrocatalyst by sulfuric acid treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyol-free synthesis of highly loaded Pt catalysts on sulfuric-acid-treated graphene oxide (SGO) was reported. Sulfuric acid treatment increased the surface hydroxyl groups on graphene oxide (GO), which contributed to the reduction of Pt precursors ...

Tae Kyu Lee, Hyang Jin Park, Min Ki Kwon, Ju Hae Jung, Junbom Kim, Seung Hyun Hur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack, having a reformer adapted to reform a hydrocarbon fuel stream containing sulfur contaminants, thereby providing a reformate stream having sulfur; a sulfur trap fluidly coupled downstream of the reformer for removing sulfur from the reformate stream, thereby providing a desulfurized reformate stream; and a metering device in fluid communication with the reformate stream upstream of the sulfur trap and with the desulfurized reformate stream downstream of the sulfur trap. The metering device is adapted to bypass a portion of the reformate stream to mix with the desulfurized reformate stream, thereby producing a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

Mukerjee, Subhasish (Pittsford, NY); Haltiner, Jr., Karl J (Fairport, NY); Weissman, Jeffrey G. (West Henrietta, NY)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results showed that both temperature and concentration of the coagulants substantially impact corrosion rates. The corrosion rates increased with the increase of temperature and concentration. The results from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that chloride caused more serious pitting than sulfate anion on both aluminum and steel specimens. Although SEM confirmed the existence of pitting corrosion, the results of weight loss indicated that the uniform corrosion predominate the corrosion mechanism, and pitting corrosion played a less important role. The test proved that PFS was less corrosive than FC, which may lead to the large-scale application of PFS in waste treatment. The kinetics of the new desulfurization process has been studied. The study results provide the theoretical guidance for improving sulfur removal efficiency and controlling the quality of PFS.

Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus process also allow for use of the methane/H{sub 2}S separation unit as a Claus tail gas treating unit by recycling the CNG Claus tail gas stream. This allows for virtually 100 percent sulfur recovery efficiency (virtually zero SO{sub 2} emissions) by recycling the sulfur laden tail gas to extinction. The use of the tail gas recycle scheme also deemphasizes the conventional requirement in Claus units to have high unit conversion efficiency and thereby make the operation much less affected by process upsets and feed gas composition changes. The development of these technologies has been ongoing for many years and both the CFZ and the TPC processes have been demonstrated at large pilot plant scales. On the other hand, prior to this project, the CNG Claus process had not been proven at any scale. Therefore, the primary objective of this portion of the program was to design, build and operate a pilot scale CNG Claus unit and demonstrate the required fundamental reaction chemistry and also demonstrate the viability of a reasonably sized working unit.

Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Flue Gas Sulfuric Acid Measurement Method Improvements: Second Interim Report, December 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improve the ability of electric utilities with coal and oil-fired power plants to measure and report sulfuric emissions. Most coal and oil-fired utility boilers will trigger Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) reporting for sulfuric acid. The Controlled Condensation System (CCS) method for measuring flue gas sulfuric acid concentrations is believed to provide one of the best methods for measuring sulfuric acid in flue gas. However, there are situations where the CCS method m...

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

South Dakota No 2 Diesel Ultra Low Sulfur Less than 15 ppm Retail ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota No 2 Diesel Ultra Low Sulfur Less than 15 ppm Retail Sales by Refiners (Thousand Gallons per Day)

196

New improved standard for electron probe determination of organic sulfur in fossil fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on petroleum coke that is stable under an electron beam and contains a uniform sulfur content. Hence, it is a suitable standard for analysis of organic sulfur content of coal. It should be as applicable for analysis of organic sulfur in other fossil fuels. This standard is available for distribution.

Harris, L.A.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Gooley, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Revisit Carbon/Sulfur Composite for Li-S Batteries  

SciTech Connect

To correlate the carbon properties e.g. surface area and porous structure, with the electrochemical behaviors of carbon/sulfur (C/S) composite cathodes for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, four different carbon frameworks including Ketjen Black (KB, high surface area and porous), Graphene (high surface area and nonporous), Acetylene Black (AB, low surface area and nonporous) and Hollow Carbon Nano Sphere (HCNS, low surface area and porous) are employed to immobilize sulfur (80 wt.%). It has been revealed that high surface area of carbon improves the utilization rate of active sulfur and decreases the real current density during the electrochemical reactions. Accordingly, increased reversible capacities and reduced polarization are observed for high surface area carbon hosts such as KB/S and graphene/S composites. The porous structure of KB or HCNS matrix promotes the long-term cycling stability of C/S composites but only at relatively low rate (0.2 C). Once the current density increases, the pore effect completely disappears and all Li-S batteries show similar trend of capacity degradation regardless of the different carbon hosts used in the cathodes. The reason has been assigned to the formation of reduced amount of irreversible Li2S on the cathode as well as shortened time for polysulfides to transport towards lithium anode at elevated current densities. This work provides valuable information for predictive selection on carbon materials to construct C/S composite for practical applications from the electrochemical point of view.

Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin; Li, Xiaohong S.; Zuo, Pengjian; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

THE SOLAR FLARE SULFUR ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F spacecraft observed several sulfur X-ray lines in three of its four channels covering the wavelength range 3.8-6.1 A during solar flares. The fluxes are analyzed to give the sulfur abundance. Data are chosen for when the instrument parameters were optimized. The measured fluxes of the S XV 1s{sup 2}-1s4p (w4) line at 4.089 A gives A(S) = 7.16 {+-} 0.17 (abundances on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12) which we consider to be the most reliable. Estimates from other lines range from 7.13 to 7.24. The preferred S abundance estimate is very close to recent photospheric abundance estimates and to quiet-Sun solar wind and meteoritic abundances. This implies no fractionation of sulfur by processes tending to enhance the coronal abundance from the photospheric that depend on the first ionization potential (FIP), or that sulfur, though its FIP has an intermediate value of 10.36 eV, acts like a 'high-FIP' element.

Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622, Kopernika 11, Wroclaw (Poland); Phillips, K. J. H. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, V. D., E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl, E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl, E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru [Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for Nuclear Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two Sulfur-based cycles--the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) and the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS)--have emerged as the leading thermochemical water-splitting processes for producing hydrogen utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors. Numerous international efforts have been underway for several years to develop the SI Cycle, but development of the HyS Cycle has lagged. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background, current status, recent development results, and the future potential for this thermochemical process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology since 2004 to evaluate and to conduct research and development for the HyS Cycle. Process design studies and flowsheet optimization have shown that an overall plant efficiency (based on nuclear heat converted to hydrogen product, higher heating value basis) of over 50% is possible with this cycle. Economic studies indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant based on this process can be economically competitive, assuming that the key component, the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer, can be successfully developed. SRNL has recently demonstrated the use of a proton-exchange-membrane electrochemical cell to perform this function, thus holding promise for economical and efficient hydrogen production.

Summers, William A.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.; Buckner, Melvin R.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Superconductivity at 35 K in Graphite-Sulfur Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report magnetization measurements performed on graphite–sulfur composites which demonstrate a clear superconducting behavior below the critical temperature Tc0 = 35 K. The Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect, screening supercurrents, and magnetization hysteresis loops characteristic of type-II superconductors were measured. The results indicate that the superconductivity occurs in a small sample fraction, possibly related to the sample surface.

R. Ricardo Da Silva; J. H. S. Torres; Y. Kopelevich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vapor-Liquid Partitioning of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing operating cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This study focused on the partitioning of sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate between the liquid and vapor phases.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process for removal of sulfur oxides from waste gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for removing sulfur oxides from waste gas is provided. The gas is contacted with a sorbent selected from sodium bicarbonate, trona and activated sodium carbonate and, utilizing an alkaline liquor containing borate ion so as to reduce flow rates and loss of alkalinity, the spent sorbent is regenerated with an alkaline earth metal oxide or hydroxide.

Lowell, P.S.; Phillips, J.L.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited similar conventional UO? fuel. Weapons-grade MOX behavior. However, MOX fuel rods feature higher fuel centerline temperatures due to a lower thermal conductivity. Moreover, higher diffusion in MOX fuel results in a slightly higher fission gas release. Finally, MOX fuel shows better mechanical behavior than UO? fuel due to lower pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and rod deformation. These results indicate that the MOX fuel meets all potential licensing requirements.

Bellanger, Philippe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Population, Economy and Energy Use’s Influence on Sulfur Emissions in the United States Since 1900  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper seeks to identify how changes in population, economic activity, and energy use have influenced sulfur emissions during this century. A linear model is presented which characterizes sulfur emissions as the product of these driving forces. The change in sulfur emissions is formulated as a function of changes in these trends. During this century, population growth and increasing economic activity have put upward pressure on sulfur emissions. The declining energy intensity of the economy and the transition from coal to less sulfur intensive fuels have reduced sulfur emissions. The net effect of all drivers has been moderate growth in sulfur emissions from 1900 to present. Since 1973, increased energy efficiency and the shift from an industrial to a commercially oriented economy have lowered the energy intensity of the economy. The increased use of low sulfur coal and reduced sulfur emissions from metal smelters have lowered the sulfur intensity of energy. These factors have combined to cause sulfur emissions to decline by 25%.

Kissock, J. K.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Commercial Grade Dedication Survey and Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 3-Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication 3.1-Complete a survey of selected EM contractors to identify the process and basis for their CGI dedication program including safety classification of items being dedicated for nuclear applications within their facilities Completed Survey Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Yes Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker, D. Amerine No EM QA Corporate Board: No Energy Facility Contractors Group EM/EFCOG Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area #3 -Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication Implementation and Nuclear

208

Microsoft Word - Title page grade5.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 th grade Author: Angelique Harshman Editors: Beverly Baker, Angelique Harhsman, Rebecca Shankland, and Sue Watts Layout & Design: Claire Roybal of Claire Roybal & Associates Ltd. Pajarito Plateau Field Science Curriculum 5th Grade Lesson 2 Page 30 OVERVIEW OF LESSON In this activity, students will examine how tree parts work together, learn about the importance of snags for wildlife, and survey a wooded area for snags. STUDENT OBJECTIVES * Students will actively learn how all the parts of a tree function. * Students will participate in a scientific study analyzing a wooded area near their school. * Students will discuss the impact human activity can have on the environment. BACKGROUND Trees are truly amazing organisms. They are powered

209

Sub-Grade Corrosion Management Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry maintains an immense number of transmission and distribution structures that are subject to sub-grade corrosion. As this vast fleet ages, the inspection, assessment, and remediation of existing facilities have become increasingly important topics. This report is a comprehensive summary of corrosion basics including the electrochemical mechanisms of corrosion, types of corrosion, the role of environmental factors, laboratory methods for measuring corrosion, field methods for lo...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sulfur tolerant anode materials. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method of burning sulfur-containing fuels in a fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of burning a sulfur-containing fuel in a fluidized bed of sulfur oxide sorbent wherein the overall utilization of sulfur oxide sorbent is increased by comminuting the bed drain solids to a smaller average particle size, preferably on the order of 50 microns, and reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed. In comminuting the bed drain solids, particles of spent sulfur sorbent contained therein are fractured thereby exposing unreacted sorbent surface. Upon reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed, the newly-exposed unreacted sorbent surface is available for sulfur oxide sorption, thereby increasing overall sorbent utilization.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Student Grading Policies: Legal Issues and Administrative Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study focuses on the legal aspects of school district grading policies. Given parental and student challenges to assigned grades, a school district and its employees must be prepared to respond appropriately to substantive and procedural claims. ...

Richard A. Gregory

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design  

SciTech Connect

Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

Jamil A. Khan

2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon Production ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon ... Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies.

215

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

216

Fabrication of Highly Luminescent Graded Core/Shell ...  

Paul Alivisatos, Erik Scher, and Liberato Manna have grown graded shells on CdSe core nanorods. Traditional techniques have ...

217

In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine into MDCK Cells Sulfur is essential for life. It plays important roles in the amino acids methionine and cysteine, and has a structural function in disulfide bonds. As a component of iron-sulfur clusters it takes part in electron and sulfur transfer reactions.1 Glutathione, a sulfur-containing tripeptide, is an important part of biological antioxidant systems.2 Another example for the biological relevance of sulfur is the amino acid taurine, which is present in high concentrations in algae and the animal kingdom. Taurine has been implicated in a range of physiological phenomena, but its osmolytic role in cell volume regulation has been studied in greatest detail.3 In situ information on sulfur is rare despite its important biological role. This is due to the fact that sulfur is not easily accessible with most biophysical techniques. In recent years, sulfur x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has become increasingly important in the study of sulfur species in biological systems.4 The near-edge region of the XAS spectrum is a sensitive probe of electronic structure and hence chemical form.5

218

Sulfur recovery in U.S. refineries is at an all-time high  

SciTech Connect

Environmental pressures are reducing allowable sulfur emissions and tightening fuel sulfur specifications on a global basis. Combined with an increasingly sour crude slate, this means that ever-greater quantities of sulfur are recovered each year. Sulfur is produced through three main routes: Frasch mining, recovery from pyrites, and recovery from crude oil and natural gas. Sulfur recovery from US refineries reached an all-time high in 1995: 13,753 metric tons/calendar day (mt/cd). Frasch mining has lost its place as the primary source of elemental sulfur. Current demand patterns for sulfur are expected to continue through the next decade. About half of world sulfur production will be used to produce phosphatic fertilizers. The other half will be used in some 30 chemically oriented industries. The data reported in this article were collected by the US Bureau of Mines/US Geological Survey, unless otherwise noted. The paper discusses sulfur from natural gas, sulfur from refineries, sulfur prices, imports and exports.

Swain, E.J. [Swain (Edward J.), Houston, TX (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Generation CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on

220

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. IV: Synthesis and the Sulfur Anomaly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compiled a large sample of O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar abundances which have been determined for 85 galactic planetary nebulae in a consistent and homogeneous manner using spectra extending from 3600-9600 Angstroms. Sulfur abundances have been computed using the near IR lines of [S III] 9069,9532 along with [S III] temperatures. We find average values, expressed logarithmically with a standard deviation, of log(S/O)=-1.91(+/-.24), log(Cl/O)=-3.52(+/-.16), and log(Ar/O)=-2.29(+/-.18), numbers consistent with previous studies of both planetary nebulae and H II regions. We also find a strong correlation between [O III] and [S III] temperatures among planetary nebulae. In analyzing abundances of Ne, S, Cl, and Ar with respect to O, we find a tight correlation for Ne-O, and loose correlations for Cl-O and Ar-O. All three trends appear to be colinear with observed correlations for H II regions. S and O also show a correlation but there is a definite offset from the behavior exhibited by H II regions and stars. We suggest that this S anomaly is most easily explained by the existence of S^+3, whose abundance must be inferred indirectly when only optical spectra are available, in amounts in excess of what is predicted by model-derived ionization correction factors. Finally for the disk PNe, abundances of O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar all show gradients when plotted against galactocentric distance. The slopes are statistically indistinguishable from one another, a result which is consistent with the notion that the cosmic abundances of these elements evolve in lockstep.

R. B. C. Henry; K. B. Kwitter; Bruce Balick

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Double Perovskite Materials for use as Sulfur Tolerant Anodes in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase Change Materials for Enhancing Heat Transfer in Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) · Phase Field Simulation of ...

224

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control - Energy Innovation ...  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels;

225

Sulfur Lamps-The Next Generation of Efficient Light?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Sulfur Lamps-The Next Generation of Efficient Light? The figure above is a schematic of the system installed at the National Air and Space Museum and the DOE headquarters in Washington, D.C., Light from the sulfur lamp is focused by a parabolic reflector so that it enters the light pipe within a small angular cone. Light travels down the pipe, reflecting off the prismatic film (A) that lines the outer acrylic tube. The prismatic film reflects the light through total internal reflection (C), an intrinsically efficient process. Some of the light striking the film (at A) is not reflected and "leaks out" of the pipe walls (B), giving the pipe a glowing appearance. A light ray that travels all the way down the pipe will strike the mirror at the end (D) and return back up the pipe.

226

Reduction of phosphogypsum with high-sulfur petroleum coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of concentrated simple and complex fertilizers which contain P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ in water-soluble form is accomplished on the basis of wet-process phosphoric acid, which is produced by sulfuric acid decomposition of phosphate raw materials. A waste product of production of wet-process phosphoric acid is phosphogypsum (4.2-5.6 t dry dihydrate per t P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ in the phosphoric acid). Solving the problems related to utilization of phosphogypsum often becomes the limiting factor in the construction of new enterprises and the expansion of existing ones. Utilizing phosphogypsum is a basic requirement for the creation of zero-waste technology for production of phosphorus-containing fertilizers. This article discusses the production of sulfuric acid and calcium oxide (cement) by reductive decomposition of this large-tonnage waste.

Smolenskaya, E.A.; Koshkarov, V.Y.; Prokhorov, A.G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Spray-dryer scrubbers for high-sulfur coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spray-dryer scrubbers for sulfur-dioxide removal from flue gases have been a developing technology for several years. Because spray-dryer scrubbers offer several potential advantages over wet scrubbing, they are attractive to the utility industry. Some of these advantages are: 1) a simpler waste-disposal problem, 2) higher energy efficiency, 3) lower water comsumption, 4) lower capital cost, 5) lower operating costs, 6) less exotic materials of construction, 7) simpler operation, and 8) ability to consume some plant waste water in the spray dryer. The paper provides a broad survey of the state of the art as it might be useful to electric utilitites using high-sulfur coal.

Henry, J.M.; Robards, R.F.; Wells, W.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Method of making sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports. Also disclosed are methods of making these membranes via sequential electroless plating techniques, wherein the method of making the membrane includes decomposing any organic ligands present on the substrate, reducing the palladium crystallites on the substrate to reduced palladium crystallites, depositing a film of palladium metal on the substrate and then depositing a second, gold film on the palladium film. These two metal films are then annealed at a temperature between about 200.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C. to form a sulfur-resistant, composite PdAu alloy membrane.

Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO); Lusk, Mark (Golden, CO); Thoen, Paul (Littleton, CO)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

Removal of sulfur from recycle gas streams in catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes improvement in a process for catalytically reforming a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock boiling in the gasoline range, wherein the reforming is conducted in the presence of hydrogen in a reforming process unit under reforming conditions, the process unit comprised of serially connected reactors, each of the reactors containing a reforming catalyst, and which process unit also includes a regeneration circuit for regenerating the catalyst after it becomes coked, the regeneration comprising treatment with a sulfur containing gas, and which process unit also includes a gas/liquid separator wherein a portion of the gas is recycled and the remaining portion is collected as make-gas. The improvement comprises using a sulfur trap, containing a catalyst comprised of about 10 to about 70 wt. % nickel dispersed on a support, between the gas/liquid separator and the first reactor.

Boyle, J.P.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

More Economical Sulfur Removal for Fuel Processing Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enabled TDA to develop and commercialize its direct oxidation process-a simple, catalyst-based system for removing sulfur from natural gas and petroleum-that was convenient and economical enough for smaller fuel processing plants to use. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) of Wheat Ridge, CO, formed in 1987, is a privately-held R&D company that brings products to market either by forming internal business

231

SUSCEPTIBILIT MAGNTIQUE DE QUELQUES SULFURES ET OXYDES DE PLUTONIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

susceptibilite magnétique des sulfures de plutonium : PuS, Pu3S4, PU2S3CXI PuS2. Ces composes non conduc- teurs, semble-t-il, aussi pu3+. II. Prdparation des produits. - II.1. PURET� DES PRODUITS. - Le plutonium que'appuyant sur des mesures cristallographiques, que dans PuS2 et Pu2s3(x le plutonium ait la valence trois. Il

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

Shale, Correll C. (Morgantown, WV); Cross, William G. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Apparatus for catalytic reforming with continuous sulfur removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for continuously removing residual sulfur from a naptha stream has a primary manganous oxide absorber, a secondary parallel manganous oxide absorber and valve and duct means for by-passing the primary absorber and directing the naptha feed stream to the secondary absorber. The apparatus also includes means for removing manganous oxide from the primary absorber and nitrogen purge means for purging the same.

Novak, W. J.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the second program quarter from October 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993, under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92114. This program has co-ordinated funding for Task 1 from IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program (SMP), while DOE is funding Tasks 2--8. Progress in all tasks are reported. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. An existing unit at IGT was modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures (>1300{degree}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2--5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD (thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD (flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been installed and calibrated. A total of seventy runs on MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, ZrS{sub 2} catalysts as well as quartz wool were performed. As high as 61% H{sub 2}S conversion was observed.

Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Observations of the atmospheric sulfur cycle on SAGA 3  

SciTech Connect

During the Soviet/American Gases and Aerosols (SAGA) 3 program in February and March 1991 the authors measured a wide variety of sulfur compounds simultaneously in the equatorial Pacific marine boundary layer. They made measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and size-resolved aerosol non-sea-salt sulfate (NSS), and methane sulfonate (MSA). Some of the observed ratios contradict commonly held views of the marine sulfur cycle: the large DMS/NSS ratio implies that NSS may not be the primary product of DMS oxidation under some conditions. The authors also found much more DMS than SO{sub 2}, which may suggest that SO{sub 2} is not always an intermediate in DMS oxidation. The small SO{sub 2}/NSS ratio also supports the idea that most NSS was not formed from SO{sub 2}. Although the measured ratios of MSA/NSS were similar to previous observations in this region, much of the MSA was contained on supermicron particles, in contrast to both the NSS and the earlier MSA observations at higher latitudes. This implies that MSA/NSS ratios in ice cores may not accurately reflect the MSA/NSS ratios in their source areas. 51 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Huebert, B.J.; Howell, S.; Laj, P. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States); Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S.; Quinn, P.K. [NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States); Yegorov, V. [State Committee for Hydrometeorology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development of the sodium/sulfur technology for energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has supported the development of the sodium-sulfur technology since 1973. The programs have focused on progressing core aspects of the technology and completing initial battery engineering for both mobile and stationary applications. An overview of the Office of Energy Management (OEM) activities is contained in this paper. Two major development programs have been active: the first with Ford Aerospace and Communications Corporation (1975 to 1985), and the second with Chloride Silent Power Limited (1985 to 1990). With the completion this year of the qualification of a cell suitable for initial Solar Energy Systems (SES) applications, the emphasis of future DOE/OEM sodium/sulfur programs will shift to SES-battery engineering and development. The initial effort will resolve a number of issues related to the feasibility of utilizing the sodium/sulfur technology in these large-scale applications. This multi-year activity will represent the initial phase of an integrated long-term DOE-supported program to produce a commercially viable battery system.

Landgrebe, A. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Energy Management); Magnani, N.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a "nonequilibrium" plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show-that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a nonequilibrium'' plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hydrogen and sulfur production from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur. The plasma process involves dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a ``nonequilibrium`` plasma in a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. After the dissociation process, sulfur is condensed and sold just as is currently done. The remaining gases are purified and separated into streams containing the product hydrogen, the hydrogen sulfide to be recycled to the plasma reactor, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. This process has particular implications for the petroleum refining industry, in which hydrogen is a widely used reagent and must be produced from increasingly scarce hydrocarbon resources. The modular nature of the new process may also offer economic advantages over small-scale waste treatment technologies widely used in the natural-gas industry. Laboratory-scale experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide indicate that conversions exceeding 90% are possible with appropriate reactor design and that the energy required to dissociate hydrogen sulfide is low enough for the plasma process to be economically competitive. In addition, the experiments show that typical refinery acid-gas streams are compatible with the plasma process and that all by-products can be treated with existing technology.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Akutan geothermal system, which is a part of Alaska's Aleutian volcanic arc, has several known thermal springs and a known fumarole field. It is reported to be one of the few high-grade geothermal resources in Alaska with a potential for further development as a geothermal energy resource. However, there is paucity of data and limited understanding and characterization of this system for optimal resource development. We used cloud-free summer-time thermal infrared (TIR) images

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241

Using ISC & GIS to predict sulfur deposition from coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research project was to determine if atmospheric sources have the potential of contributing significantly to the sulfur content of grazed forage. Sulfur deposition resulting from sulfur dioxide emissions from coal- fired power plants was predicted utilizing the Industrial Source Complex Long-Term (ISCLT2) Model for the areas ofa interest in East Texas. GRASS, a geographical information system (GIS), was used to pull together all predicted values from ISCLT2 and present them in the form of predicted sulfur deposition maps with different ranges of deposition. Two field trips to NE Texas were taken to obtain data on soil and forage sulfur content. GRASS was used extensively in the planning process before each trip and the global positioning system was also used extensively during the trip to locate sampling sites and to obtain the geographical location of each site. The methodology developed predicts that 11 to 21 kg sulfur/ha per year can be deposited as far as 100 to 160 km from the source. Data from both field trips do not show a statistical significant relation between predicted sulfur deposition and either soil or forage sulfur content. However, the data do show that there is a trend of increasing soil and forage sulfur content as predicted sulfur deposition increases.

Lopez, Jose Ignacio

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Rhodococcuc rhodochrous  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. An effective pre- combustion coal desulfurization process should ideally be capable of removing both organic and inorganic sulfur. A variety of techniques exist for the removal of inorganic sulfur from coal, but there is currently no cost-effective method for the pre-combustion removal of organic sulfur. Recent developments have demonstrated that microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal. However, lengthy treatment times are required. Moreover, the removal of organic sulfur form coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal sample for subsequent biodesulfurization. Physical/chemical processes primarily designed for the removal of pyritic sulfur may also cause substantial increases in the porosity and surface area of the coal which may facilitate the subsequent removal of organic sulfur by microoganisms. During the current quarter, coal samples that have been chemically pretreated with methanol, ammonia, and isopropanol were examined for the removal of organic sulfur by the microbial culture IGTS8, an assay for the presence of protein in coal samples was developed, and a laboratory-scale device for the explosive comminution of coal was designed and constructed.

Srivastava, V.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Production of low-sulfur binder pitch from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. In this project, two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with thermocracking: (1) the use of conventionally cleaned coal with low ({approximately}1%) sulfur as a mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids prior to thermocracking. In Case 1, the crude pitch is being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in an existing IGT bench-scale reactor, followed by distillation of the scrubbing solvent and light-to-middle oils to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, the crude pitch for biodesulfurization is the same material previously studied, which was obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT mild gasification PRU in 1990. Biodesulfurization is to be performed by contacting the pitch with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous either as live cultures or in the form of concentrated biocatalyst. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are to be conducted in a continuous flash thermocracker (FTC) constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. The finished pitch is then characterized for physical and chemical properties (density, softening point, QI, TI, coking value, and elemental composition), and compared to typical specifications for binder pitches. This quarter, 45 kg of IBC-109 coal was obtained and sized to 40 x 80 mesh for mild gasification. Laboratory experiments were conducted to identify means of dispersing or emulsifying pitch in water to render is accessible to biocatalysts, and exploratory desulfurization tests on one-gram pitch samples were begun.

Knight, R.A. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ford/DOE sodium-sulfur battery electric vehicle development and demonstration. Phase I-1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of Phase I-A analyses and design studies are presented. The objective of the Phase I-A effort was to evaluate the sodium-sulfur battery, in an existing conventional production automobile, as a potential power source for an electric vehicle. The Phase I-A work was divided into five (5) major sub-tasks as follows: vehicle specification sub-task; NaS battery packaging study sub-task; vehicle packaging layout sub-task; electrical system study sub-task; and system study sub-tasks covering performance and economy projections, powertrain and vehicle safety issues and thermal studies. The major results of the sodium-sulfur battery powered electric vehicle study program are: the Fiesta was chosen to be the production vehicle which would be modified into a 2-passenger, electric test bed vehicle powered by a NaS battery; the vehicle mission was defined to be a 2-passenger urban/suburban commuter vehicle capable of at least 100 miles range over the CVS driving cycle and a wide open throttle capability of 0 to 50 mph in 14 seconds, or less; powertrain component specifications were defined; powertrain control strategy has been selected; and a suitable test bed vehicle package scheme has been developed.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Lithium Polysulfidophosphates: A Family of Lithium-Conducting Sulfur-Rich Compounds for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Given the great potential for improving the energy density of state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries by a factor of 5, a breakthrough in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries will have a dramatic impact in a broad scope of energy related fields. Conventional Li-S batteries that use liquid electrolytes are intrinsically short-lived with low energy efficiency. The challenges stem from the poor electronic and ionic conductivities of elemental sulfur and its discharge products. We report herein lithium polysulfidophosphates (LPSP), a family of sulfur-rich compounds, as the enabler of long-lasting and energy-efficient Li-S batteries. LPSP have ionic conductivities of 3.0 10-5 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 8 orders of magnitude higher than that of Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high Li-ion conductivity of LPSP is the salient characteristic of these compounds that impart the excellent cycling performance to Li-S batteries. In addition, the batteries are configured in an all-solid state that promises the safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

Lin, Zhan [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL; Fu, Wujun [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Turning wastes into high grade ecoproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of precursors has a strong influence on the structure and properties of the activated carbons (AC). At the same time, their adsorption capacity is determined by the condition of manufacturing during the thermal processes. This study was undertaken ... Keywords: adsorption, depollution, microporosity, renewable ecoproducts, wastes re-use

Georgeta Predeanu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear-Grade Graphite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear Grade Graphite Dennis C. Kunerth and Timothy R. McJunkin Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 This paper discusses the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear grade graphite performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Graphite is a composite material highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. As a result, material variations are expected within individual billets as well billet to billet and lot to lot. Several methods of evaluating the material have been explored. Particular technologies each provide a subset of information about the material. This paper focuses on techniques that are applicable to in-service inspection of nuclear energy plant components. Eddy current examination of the available surfaces provides information on potential near surface structural defects and although limited, ultrasonics can be utilized in conventional volumetric inspection. Material condition (e.g. micro-cracking and porosity induced by radiation and stress) can be derived from backscatter or acousto-ultrasound (AU) methods. Novel approaches utilizing phased array ultrasonics have been attempted to expand the abilities of AU techniques. By combining variable placement of apertures, angle and depth of focus, the techniques provide the potential to obtain parameters at various depths in the material. Initial results of the study and possible procedures for application of the techniques are discussed.

Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage General Atomics logo Graphic of a diagram of squares and circles connected by arrows. Sulfur-based TES can compensate for diurnal and seasonal insolation fluctuations. General Atomics, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is demonstrating the engineering feasibility of using a sulfur-based thermochemical cycle to store heat from a CSP plant and support baseload power generation. Approach There are three main project objectives under this award: Study the sulfur generating disproportionation reaction and develop it into a practical engineering process step. Carry out preliminary process components design and experimental validation. The engineering data will be used for process integration between the CSP plant, the sulfur processing and storage plant, and the electricity generation unit.

251

Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent Tuning of Properties of Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins Figure 1. Schematic repre-sentation of the common active-site iron-sulfur cluster structural motif. Proteins containing Fe4S4 iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous in nature and catalyze one-electron transfer processes. These proteins have evolved into two classes that have large differences in their electrochemical potentials: high potential iron-sulfur proteins (HiPIPs) and bacterial ferredoxins (Fds). The role of the surrounding protein environment in tuning the redox potential of these iron sulfur clusters has been a persistent puzzle in biological electron transfer [1]. Although HiPIPs and Fds have the same iron sulfur structural motif - a cubane-type structure - (Figure 1), there are large differences in their electrochemical

252

Characterization of a transient +2 sulfur oxidation state intermediate from the oxidation of aqueous sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation H{sub 2}S to sulfate involves a net transfer of eight electrons and occurs through the formation of several partially oxidized intermediates with oxidation states ranging from {minus}1 to +5. Known intermediates include elemental sulfur (oxidation state 0), polysulfides (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: 0), sulfite (+4) and thiosulfate (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: +5). A noticeable gap in this series of intermediates is that of a +2 sulfur oxidation state oxoacid/oxoanion species, which was never detected experimentally. Here, we present evidence of the transient existence of +2 oxidation state intermediate in the Ni(II)-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous sulfide. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize this species; they suggest that it has a sulfoxylate ion (SO{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) structure.

Vairavmurthy, M.A.; Zhou, Weiqing

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Conceptual design of a sodium sulfur cell for US electric-van batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design of an advanced sodium/sulfur cell for US electric-van applications has been completed. The important design factors included specific physical and electrical requirements, service life, manufacturability, thermal management, and safety. The capacity of this cell is approximately the same as that for the ``PB`` cell being developed by Silent Power Limited (10 Ah). The new cell offers a 50% improvement in energy capacity and nearly a 100% improvement in peak power over the existing PB cells. A battery constructed with such cells would significantly exceed the USABC`s mid-term performance specifications. In addition, a similar cell and battery design effort was completed for an advanced passenger car application. A battery using the van cell would have nearly 3 times the energy compared to lead-acid batteries, yet weigh 40% less; a present-day battery using a cell specifically designed for this car would provide 50% more energy in a package 60% smaller and 50% lighter.

Binden, P.J. [Beta Power, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

Gorensek, M.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Grading of lumber using stress waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to develop stress wave grading technology suitable for small lumber mills. Specific goals include: 1) develop an ultrasonic probe configuration to facilitate real-time grain angle and edge knot measurement, 2) determine the statistical correlation between localized stress wave indices and lumber tensile strength and 3) compare the ultrasonic technique with other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurements including static MOE, impact stress wave and transverse vibration. Two hundred pieces of 2 x 6 Southern Pine lumber were randomly sampled. Material properties and NDE measurements such as static MOE, impact stress wave and transverse vibration MOEs were collected for the lumber. Before proceeding with final ultrasonic testing, pilot studies were done to study the effect of the strength reducing factors, such as grain angle and edge knots, on ultrasonic wave velocity. Wave velocity decreased as grain angle increased, with more apparent loss taking place at lower angles. The presence of edge knots decreased the wave velocity as measured along the narrow edge of the lumber. Using the knowledge gained from the pilot studies an ultrasonic probe configuration was devised to detect gross grain angle and edge knots. The tests were carried on the lumber using the configuration. Statistical models from localized stress wave indices were developed to predict the tensile strength. The linear correlation between predicted and actual ultimate tensile strength was 0.724. Ultrasonic testing was a slightly better predictor of ultimate tensile strength than shortspan bending, impact stress wave and transverse vibration techniques which had linear correlations of 0.716, 0.696 and 0.716 respectively. Separately including impact stress wave and transverse vibration MOEs into the ultrasonic model resulted in improved linear correlations of 0.769 and 0.787, respectively. In summary, knowledge from this study will be useful in the continuing development of stress wave lumber grading technology. Even though the results were only slightly better than those with short span bending and transverse vibration techniques, the ultrasonic technique appears to be promising for grading of wood.

Bethi, Rajeshwar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Optimization of mesoporous carbon structures for lithium–sulfur battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous carbon (MC) with tunable pore sizes (22nm, 12nm, 7nm, and 3nm) and pore volumes (from 1.3 to 4.8 cc/g) containing sulfur inside the pores were systematically studied as mesoporous carbon-sulfur (MCS) composite electrodes for Li-S batteries. Investigation on these MCS composites reveals that the pore structure has no influence on the battery performance at full sulfur loading conditions (the pore volume is fully filled by sulfur) but the maximum sulfur loading capability is higher for MC with larger pore volume. MC with large pore volumes, partial sulfur filling (part of the pore volume left unfilled), and surface modification, can have reasonably high sulfur loading, improved electrical and ionic contacts of sulfur with MC and with electrolytes, which subsequently promotes the battery performance. An initial capacity of ~1250 mAh/g (based on sulfur) and 650 mAh/g capacity retention over 100 cycles were obtained with 50 wt% sulfur loading in the MC with 22nm pore size (4.8 cc/g). When the surface of MCS was coated with Clevios P to reduce the dissolve of polysulfide anions in electrolytes, it exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of ~1390 mAh/g and improved cycling stability with capacity retention of ~840 mAh/g over 100 cycles. The reported correlation among the structure, sulfur filling, surface modification and the electrochemical performance of the MCS composite cathodes provides guidance in designing new electrodes for lithium-sulfur batteries

Li, Xiaolin; Cao, Yuliang; Qi, Wen N.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Mietek, Jaroniec; Zhang, Jiguang; Schwenzer, Birgit; Liu, Jun

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

Microsoft Word - Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Tech Brief DRAFT bbl 08-24.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AT A GLANCE AT A GLANCE  eliminates excavation expense  applicable to large or small sites  straightforward deployment  uses heat to distribute sulfur throughout a soil  mercury reacts with sulfur to form immobile and insoluble minerals  patent applied for TechBrief Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Amendment for Sequestering Mercury in Contaminated Soil Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a method of targeting mercury in contaminated soil zone by use of sulfur vapor heated gas. Background Mercury contamination in soil is a common problem in the environment. The most common treatment is excavation - a method that works well for small sites where the

259

Utah Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

260

Table 17. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

"Resellers'Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." 17. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content and Sales Type Energy Information Administration ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon...

262

Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

200 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon...

263

Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

200 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon...

264

Lithium / Sulfur Cells with Long Cycle Life and High Specific Energy  

A team of Berkeley Lab battery researchers led by Elton Cairns has invented an advanced lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cell that, for the first time, offers ...

265

Illinois No 2 Diesel Ultra Low Sulfur Less than 15 ppm ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Illinois No 2 Diesel Ultra Low Sulfur Less than 15 ppm Wholesale/Resale Volume by Refiners (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 ... Propane, No.1 ...

266

Sulfur/Carbon Composites and Additives for Li/S batteries  

Sulfur/Carbon Composites and Additives for Li/S batteries Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

267

Assessing Potential Acidification of Marine Archaeological Wood Based on Concentration of Sulfur Species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of sulfur in marine archaeological wood presents a challenge to conservation. Upon exposure to oxygen, sulfur compounds in waterlogged wooden artifacts are being oxidized, producing sulfuric acid. This speeds the degradation of the wood, potentially damaging specimens beyond repair. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to identify the species of sulfur present in samples from the timbers of the Mary Rose, a preserved 16th century warship known to undergo degradation through acidification. The results presented here show that sulfur content varied significantly on a local scale. Only certain species of sulfur have the potential to produce sulfuric acid by contact with oxygen and seawater in situ, such as iron sulfides and elemental sulfur. Organic sulfurs, such as the amino acids cysteine and methionine, may produce acid but are integral parts of the wood's structure and may not be released from the organic matrix. The sulfur species contained in the sample reflect the exposure to oxygen while submerged, and this exposure can differ greatly over time and position. A better understanding of the species pathway to acidifications required, along with its location, in order to suggest a more customized and effective preservation strategy. Waterlogged archaeological wood, frequently in the form of shipwrecks, is being excavated for historical purposes in many countries around the world. Even after extensive efforts towards preservation, scientists are discovering that accumulation of sulfate salts results in acidic conditions on the surfaces of the artifacts. Sulfuric acid degrades structural fibers in the wood by acid hydrolysis of cellulose, accelerating the decomposition of the ship timbers. Determining the sulfur content of waterlogged wood is now of great importance in maritime archaeology. Artifact preservation is often more time consuming and expensive than the original excavation; but it is key to the availability of objects for future study as well as maintaining the integrity of historical data and preserving the value of museum pieces. Sulfur occurs in a wide number of oxidation states from -2 to +6, and appears in numerous organic and inorganic compounds in nature. However, it is a very minor component of wood. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a valuable technique because it has the ability to detect very low concentrations of sulfur in the specimen. XAS is also sensitive to differences in oxidation states, as well as long and short range order in molecules.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Status of Heavy Vehicle Diesel Emission Control Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DECSE test program is well under way to providing data on effects of sulfur levels in diesel fuel on performance of emission control technologies.

George Sverdrup

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

CE IGCC Repowering plant sulfuric acid plant. Topical report, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

A goal of the CE IGCC Repowering project is to demonstrate a hot gas clean-up system (HGCU), for the removal of sulfur from the product gas stream exiting the gasifier island. Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) intends to use a HGCU developed by General Electric Environmental Services (GEESI). The original design of this system called for the installation of the HGCU, with a conventional cold gas clean-up system included as a full-load operational back-up. Each of these systems removes sulfur compounds and converts them into an acid off-gas. This report deals with the investigation of equipment to treat this off-gas, recovering these sulfur compounds as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or some other form. ABB CE contracted ABB Lummus Crest Inc. (ABB LCI) to perform an engineering evaluation to compare several such process options. This study concluded that the installation of a sulfuric acid plant represented the best option from both a technical and economic point of view. Based on this evaluation, ABB CE specified that a sulfuric acid plant be installed to remove sulfur from off-gas exiling the gas clean-up system. ABB LCI prepared a request for quotation (RFQ) for the construction of a sulfuric acid production plant. Monsanto Enviro-Chem Inc. presented the only proposal, and was eventually selected as the EPC contractor for this system.

Chester, A.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Novel Type of Carbon Coated Sulfur Nanoparticles for Li/S Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SEM image shows that the size of carbon coated sulfur nanoparticles is ... Performances of Nanoporous Carbon Anode for Super Lithium Ion Capacitor.

271

SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sulfur-tolerant natural gas reforming for fuel-cell applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An attractive simplification of PEM-FC systems operated with natural gas would be the use of a sulfur tolerant reforming catalyst, but such a catalyst has… (more)

Hennings, Ulrich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: Part II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The activities of sodium sulfur (NaS) battery research in Korea ... The presentation was focused on the development of tubular NaS batteries ...

274

Method of making a functionally graded material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gelcasting method of making an internally graded article alternatively includes the steps of: preparing a slurry including a least two different phases suspended in a gelcasting solution, the phases characterized by having different settling characteristics; casting the slurry into a mold having a selected shape; allowing the slurry to stand for a sufficient period of time to permit desired gravitational fractionation in order to achieve a vertical compositional gradient in the molded slurry; gelling the slurry to form a solid gel while preserving the vertical compositional gradient in the molded slurry; drying the gel to form a dried green body; and sintering the dry green body to form a solid object, at least one property thereof varying along the vertical direction because of the compositional gradient in the molded slurry.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Walls, Claudia A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Thermal regeneration of an electrochemical concentration cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are described for thermally regenerating an electrochemical concentration cell having first and second aluminum electrodes respectively positioned in contact with first and second electrolytes separated by an ion exchange member, the first and second electrolytes being composed of different concentrations of an ionic solvent and a salt, preferably an aluminum halide. The ionic solvent may be either organic or inorganic with a relatively low melting point, the ionic solvent and the salt form a complex wherein the free energy of formation of said complex is less than about -5 kcal/mole. A distillation column using solar heat or low grade industrial waste heat receives the first and second electrolytes and thermally decomposes the salt-solvent complex to provide feed material for the two half cells.

Krumpelt, M.; Bates, J.K.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method of making a functionally graded material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gelcasting method of making an internally graded article includes the steps of: preparing at least two slurries, each of the slurries including a different gelcastable powder suspended in a gelcasting solution, the slurries characterized by having comparable shrinkage upon drying and sintering thereof; casting the slurries into a mold having a selected shape, wherein relative proportions of the slurries is varied in at least one direction within the selected shape; gelling the slurries to form a solid gel while preserving the variation in relative proportions of the slurries; drying the gel to form a dried green body; and sintering the dry green body to form a solid object, at least one property thereof varying because of the variation in relative proportions of the starting slurries. A gelcasting method of making an internally graded article alternatively includes the steps of: preparing a slurry including a least two different phases suspended in a gelcasting solution, the phases characterized by having different settling characteristics; casting the slurry into a mold having a selected shape; allowing the slurry to stand for a sufficient period of time to permit desired gravitational fractionation in order to achieve a vertical compositional gradient in the molded slurry; gelling the slurry to form a solid gel while preserving the vertical compositional gradient in the molded slurry; drying the gel to form a dried green body; and sintering the dry green body to form a solid object, at least one property thereof varying along the vertical direction because of the compositional gradient in the molded slurry.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Walls, Claudia A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A matrix description for $K_1$ of graded rings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current paper is dedicated to the study of the classical $K$-theory of graded rings. Let $A$ be a $\\Gamma$ graded ring with identity 1, where the grading $\\Gamma$ is an abelian group. We associate a category with suspension to the $\\Gamma$ graded ring $A$, this allows us to generalize Bass' $K_1$ group to the setting of $\\Gamma$ graded rings. The generalized graded $K_1^{gr}$ is not only an abelian group but also a $\\mathbb Z[\\Gamma]$-module. Furthermore the generalization implies that there exists "locally" a matrix description for $K_1^{gr}$ of graded rings. The matrix description reveals a possibility for computing $K_1^{gr}$ of various types of graded rings. The generalized $K_1^{gr}$ satisfies the well known $K$-theory exact sequence $$ K_{1}^{gr}(A,I)\\to K_1^{gr}(A)\\to K_1^{gr}(A/I) $$ for any graded ideal $I$ of $A$. Finally, as an easy application, we compute $K^{gr}_1$ of cross products.

Zuhong Zhang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

282

Table 28. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly January 2012 56 Table 28. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

283

Table 31. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 76 Table 31. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

284

Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

285

Creation of Spinel and Functionally Graded Nano-Materials through ...  

Creation of Spinel and Functionally Graded Nano-Materials through Displacement Reactions Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

286

Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

287

Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

288

Vocabulary Development and Instruction: A Handbook for Primary Grade Teachers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT AND INSTRUCTION: A HANDBOOK FOR PRIMARY GRADE TEACHERS by Mary B. Alldrin Master of Arts in Education Reading/Language Arts Option California State… (more)

Alldrin, Mary B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Sales for Resale  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refiner Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type ... Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: ... Alabama: 2.759: 2.740: 2.731: ...

290

Oil-Grade Alloy 718 in Oil Field Drilling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the performance of oil-grade alloy 718 for applications in bottom hole ... Additive Manufacturing for Superalloys - Producibility and Cost.

291

Bioleaching and electrobioleaching of low grade copper sulfide ore ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Low grade Copper sulfide ore of Sarcheshmeh copper mine of Iran was leached using bioleaching mode and electrobioleaching mode.

292

Extracting Alumina from Low Grade Bauxite with Ammonium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alumina extracted rate can be about 82% to process low grade gibbsite from Indonesia. Proceedings Inclusion? Planned: Light Metals Volume ...

293

Optimal shape control of functionally graded smart plates using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and displacement control gains for the shape control of the functionally graded ... placement control gain values for the closed loop feedback control. The effect ...

294

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 September 1998...

295

Table 34. Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly January 2012 88 Table 34. Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type and PAD ...

296

Metallurgical Analysis to Evaluate Cracking in a 316L Grade ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A spiral heat exchanger (SHE) constructed of Grade 316L stainless steel developed a leak after eight years of service as a condenser on a  ...

297

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 935: ...

298

Remark on the Serre-Swan theorem for graded manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining the Batchelor theorem and the Serre-Swan theorem, we come to that, given a smooth manifold $X$, a graded commutative $C^\\infty(X)$-algebra $\\cA$ is isomorphic to the structure ring of a graded manifold with a body $X$ iff it is the exterior algebra of some projective $C^\\infty(X)$-module of finite rank. In particular, it follows that odd fields in field theory on a smooth manifold $X$ can be represented by graded functions on some graded manifold with body $X$.

G. Sardanashvily

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a kind of abundant biomass, pine black charcoal, was firstly used as a substitute for coals to reduce low-grade manganese oxide ores.

300

Elimination of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Production | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Elimination of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Production | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evolution of Anode Grade Calcined Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The term "anode grade coke" has been used as a broad definition to describe delayed coke with a sponge structure containing relatively low levels of trace ...

302

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Experimental Simulation of Vertical Displacement Events and Thermal Shock Scenarios on Different Beryllium Grades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PFC and FW Materials Issues / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

M. Roedig; V. Barabash; R. Eaton; T. Hirai; I. Kupriyanov; J. Linke; X. Liu; A. Schmidt; Zh. Wang

304

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Mack Trucks Inc.), a filter recycler (American Wastes Industries), and a low-sulfur fuel supplier (Equilon, a joint venture between Shell and Texaco).

Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report will review progress of the initial 4 months of a three-year effort between Cummins Engine Company and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand and improve the performance and sulfur tolerance of the materials used in the NOx adsorber after-treatment technology in order to meet both performance and reliability standards required for diesel engines. The goal of this project is to enable NOx after-treatment technologies that will meet both EPA 2007 emission standards and customer cost, reliability and durability requirements. The project will consist of three phases. First, the efforts will focus on understanding the current limitation of capture, regeneration and durability of existing NOx adsorber materials, especially with respect to their sulfur tolerance. With this developing understanding, efforts will also be focused on the optimization of the NOx absorber chemical and material properties to increase performance and durability over many regeneration cycles. We anticipate that improved materials will be tested and evaluated, in partnership with Cummins, on diesel vehicle engines over expected operating conditions.

Kim, Do Heui; Chin, Ya-Huei; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Stork, Kevin; Broering, L. C.; Stafford, R. J.; Stang, J. H.; Chen, H.-Y.; Cooper, B.; Hess, H.; Lafyatis, D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Investigation of a sulfur reduction technique for mild gasification char  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this program is to investigate the desulfurization of mild gasification char using hydrogen/methane mixtures in a laboratory-scale experimental study. In the first year of the two- year program, char is being treated with mixtures of H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at temperatures of 1100{degrees}C to 1550{degrees}F and pressures of 50 to 100 psig. The effects of temperature, pressure, residence time, gas velocity, and gas composition on sulfur removal and carbon gasification are being determined. The batch experiments are being performed in a nominal 2-inch-ID stainless-steel, batch, fluidized-bed reactor. The char to be desulfurized was produced by the IGT mild gasification process research unit (PRU) in a recently completed DOE/METC-sponsored technology development program. The parent coal was Illinois No. 6 from a preparation plant, and the char from the selected test contains 4.58 wt% sulfur. In the first quarter, we have obtained and prepared a char for the desulfurization tests. Ultimate and proximate analyses were performed on this char, and its pore size distribution and surface area were determined. Also this quarter, the fluidized-bed reactor system was constructed and equipped with high pressure mass flow controllers and a high pressure sintered metal filter to remove fines from the effluent gas stream.

Knight, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

311

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INL’s Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

312

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

313

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

314

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

Gary M. Blythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Sulfur isotope fractionation during oxidation of sulfur dioxide: gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals and aqueous oxidation by H2O2, O3 and iron catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oxidation of SO[subscript 2] to sulfate is a key reaction in determining the role of sulfate in the environment through its effect on aerosol size distribution and composition. Sulfur isotope analysis has been used to ...

Harris, E.

317

Production of low sulfur binder pitich from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. Previously, flash thermocracking (FTC) was used to successfully upgrade the properties of mild gasification pitch, yielding a suitable blending stock for use as a binder in the production of carbon electrodes for the aluminum industry. However, in pitches from high-sulfur (4%) Illinois coal, the pitch sulfur content (2%) was still higher than preferred. In this project two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with FTC: (1) the use of a moderate-sulfur (1.2%) Illinois coal as mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids from high-sulfur coal prior to FTC. In Case 1, the liquids are being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor, followed by distillation to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, biodesulfurization with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8 biocatalyst is being performed on crude pitch obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT MILDGAS PRU in 1990. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are being conducted in a continuous FTC reactor constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. This quarter, mild gasification of IBC-109 coal was completed, producing 450 g of coal liquids, which were then distilled to recover 329 g of Case 1 crude pitch. Next month, the pitch will be subjected to FTC treatment and evaluated. Biodesulfurization experiments were performed on Case 2 pitch dispersed in l-undecanol, resulting in sulfur reductions of 15.1 to 21.4%. This was marginally lower than the 24.8% desulfurization obtained in l-dodecanol, but separation of pitch from the dispersant was facilitated by the greater volatility of l-undecanol.

Knight, R.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Prostate cancer grading: Gland segmentation and structural features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to grade prostate malignancy using digitized histopathological specimens of the prostate tissue. Most of the approaches proposed in the literature to address this problem utilize various textural features ... Keywords: Benign, Carcinoma, Gland segmentation, Gleason grading system, Nuclei, Prostate cancer

Kien Nguyen; Bikash Sabata; Anil K. Jain

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Grading of construction aggregate through machine vision: Results and prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, crushed aggregate to be used in construction is graded using sieves. We describe an innovative machine vision approach to such grading. Our operational scenario is one where a camera takes images from directly overhead of a layer of aggregate ... Keywords: Construction industry, Image database, Machine vision, Supervised and unsupervised classification, Wavelet transform

Fionn Murtagh; Xiaoyu Qiao; Paul Walsh; P. A. M. Basheer; Danny Crookes; Adrian Long

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream (1st Grade) Lesson Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream (1st Grade) Lesson Plan Science Standards Addressed (From the Colorado=0 Standard 1 - Physical Science 1st Grade: Outcome 1: Solids and liquids have unique properties) Large Metal or plastic mixing bowl Wire whisk and wooden spoon 4 cups heavy cream 1-1/2 Half & Half

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessing historical global sulfur emission patterns for the period 1850--1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions from energy-producing and metal production activities have become an important factor in better understanding the relationship between humans and the environment. Concerns about (1) acid rain effects on the environment and (2) anthropogenic aerosols affecting possible global change have prompted interest in the transformation and fate of sulfur in the environment. One step in assessing the importance of sulfur emissions is the development of a reliable regional emission inventory of sulfur as a function of time. The objective of this research effort was to create a homogeneous database for historical sulfur emission estimates for the world. The time from 1850--1990 was selected to include the period of industrialization form the time the main production of fuels and minerals began until the most recent year for which complete production data exist. This research effort attempts to correct some of the deficiencies associated with previous global sulfur emission estimates by (1) identifying those production activities that resulted in sulfur emissions by country and (2) calculating historical emission trends by country across years. An important component of this study was the comparison of the sulfur emission results with those of previous studies.

Lefohn, A.S. [A.S.L. and Associates, Helena, MT (United States); Husar, J.D.; Husar, R.B. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis; Brimblecombe, P. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on the Performance of Lean NOx Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluate the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on the performance of low temperature and high temperature Lean-NOx Catalysts. Evaluate the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on the performance of the Lean-NOx Catalysts with different fuel sulfur contents.

Ren, Shouxian

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

East Antarctic ice core sulfur isotope measurements over a complete glacial-interglacial cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Antarctic ice core sulfur isotope measurements over a complete glacial-interglacial cycle B Center and Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA J. Savarino and R] Both sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate preserved in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica have

Kaufman, Alan Jay

324

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

325

Possible Mechanism for Superconductivity in Sulfur—Common Theme for Unconventional Superconductors?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sulfur has recently been found to be a superconductor at high pressure. At ?93 GPa Tc is 10.1 K, and the sulfur is in a base-centered orthorhombic (b.c.o.) structure. At ?160 GPa Tc is 17 K and sulfur is in a rhombohedral (?-Po) structure. The mechanism for superconductivity in sulfur is not known; in particular, a band-structure calculation does not find superconductivity in sulfur until 500 GPa. Following from work by Anderson, in a 2D strongly interacting, non-fermi liquid system with some degree of disorder at T = 0, the only known conducting state is a superconductor. Following this idea it has been suggested that both the HTc cuprates and 2D electron gas systems are superconductors with planar conducting planes. Similarly, here we suggest that the mechanism for conductivity in sulfur are 2D conducting planes which emerge as the planar rings in sulfur at low pressure pucker at higher pressures (b.c.o. and ?-Po). As well, we note some other consequences for study of HTc materials of Anderson’s work. Recently Struzhkin et al. [1] have found that at high pressures sulfur becomes a superconductor. At low pressure sulfur is an insulator with a planar ring structure. Struzhkin et al. find that at ?93 GPa sulfur is a superconductor with Tc of 10.1 K. At this pressure sulfur adopts a base-centered orthorhombic (b.c.o.) structure [2] in which the planar rings are now puckered. At ?160 GPa Struzhkin et al. find Tc of 17 K. At this pressure sulfur is in a rhombohedral phase (?-Po structure) [3] which also features puckered rings. The mechanism for superconductivity of sulfur is not completely well understood. Indeed, Struzhkin et al. note that using band-structure calculations of electron-phonon interactions Zakharov and Cohen [4] found sulfur to be superconducting above 550 GPa, but not at the much lower pressure in which superconductivity was found experimentally. Here we suggest that similarly to proposed mechanisms

Eric Lewin Altschuler; Martin Lades

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High-grade paper recycling: A program management perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling of high-grade paper is one method of reducing the use of natural resources and the amount of waste being emitted into the environment, both in the process of manufacturing and in the disposal of unneeded documents. The Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) is a significant user of high-grade paper, thus recycling represents a potential saving to society in the form of lessened negative impact on the environment as the result of AFMC operations. The possibility also exists for AFMC to reduce operating costs. The purpose of this study is to explore means of reducing high-grade paper disposal by AFMC, examine program management of high-grade paper recycling by AFMC, and apply effective program management processes to the AFMC high-grade paper recycling program.

Carter, R.L.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test and is most commonly used. Sulfur hexafluoride use has ...

Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c[subscript 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sulfur isotope effect produced by sulfate reducing microbes is commonly used to trace biogeochemical cycles of sulfur and carbon in aquatic and sedimentary environments. To test the contribution of intracellular coupling ...

Sim, Min Sub

329

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast

330

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a total of approximately 2 million barrels, and

331

Simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides from combustion gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the simultaneous removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides from power plant stack gases comprising contacting the stack gases with a supported iron oxide catalyst/absorbent in the presence of sufficient reducing agent selected from the group consisting of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and mixtures thereof, to provide a net reducing atmosphere in the SO.sub.x /NO.sub.x removal zone. The sulfur oxides are removed by absorption substantially as iron sulfide, and nitrogen oxides are removed by catalytic reduction to nitrogen and ammonia. The spent iron oxide catalyst/absorbent is regenerated by oxidation and is recycled to the contacting zone. Sulfur dioxide is also produced during regeneration and can be utilized in the production of sulfuric acid and/or sulfur.

Clay, David T. (Longview, WA); Lynn, Scott (Walnut Creek, CA)

1976-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Microsoft Word - INFLUENCE OF SULFUR REMOVAL ON IGCC PERFORMANCE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results in a moderate increase in the power plant total investment, and a lower power plant thermal efficiency leading to an overall significant increase in the kW...

333

Study on Double-Layered Pellet Roasting of Sulfur & Arsenic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy · Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

334

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal sulfide sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal-sulfur compound. Spent metal-sulfur compound is regenerated to re-usable metal oxide by moving a bed of spent metal-sulfur compound progressively through a single regeneration vessel having a first and second regeneration stage and a third cooling and purging stage. The regeneration is carried out and elemental sulfur is generated in the first stage by introducing a first gas of sulfur dioxide which contains oxygen at a concentration less than the stoichiometric amount required for complete oxidation of the spent metal-sulfur compound. A second gas containing sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen at a concentration sufficient for complete oxidation of the partially spent metal-sulfur compound, is introduced into the second regeneration stage. Gaseous sulfur formed in the first regeneration stage is removed prior to introducing the second gas into the second regeneration stage. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the third cooling and purging stage. Except for the gaseous sulfur removed from the first stage, the combined gases derived from the regeneration stages which are generally rich in sulfur dioxide and lean in oxygen, are removed from the regenerator as an off-gas and recycled as the first and second gas into the regenerator. Oxygen concentration is controlled by adding air, oxygen-enriched air or pure oxygen to the recycled off-gas.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY); Gal, Eli (Lititz, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Low quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project comprises a Base Program and an Optional Program. The Base Program, which included NEPA reporting, process design and an experimental research plan for the optional program, was completed August 31, 1993 with submission of the Task 2 Final Report. The Optional Program, Task 3, began in July 1994. The project goal is to further develop and demonstrate two of the component technologies of the CFZ-CNG Process: (1) pilot-scale triple-point crystallization of carbon dioxide, producing commercially pure carbon dioxide from contaminated carbon dioxide at the rate of 25 ton/day, and (2) bench-scale modified high pressure Claus technology, recovering elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide at the rate of 200 lb/day.

Siwajek, L.A. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Kuehn, L. [Bovar Corp., Houston, TX (United States). Western Research

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

Lin, Zhan [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber for use as a sulfur removal subsystem in transportation fuel cell systems. Results suggest that an on-board GAC adsorber may not be attractive due to size and weight constraints. However, it may be feasible to install this GAC adsorber at methanol distribution stations, where space and weight are not a critical concern. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the GAC adsorber concept will be attractive if the spent AC can be regenerated for reuse. These preliminary analyses were made on basis of very limited breakthrough data obtained from the bench-scale testing. Optimization on dynamic testing parameters and study on regeneration of spent AC are needed.

Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sederquist, R. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Method of forming and starting a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of forming a sodium sulfur battery and of starting the reactive capability of that battery when heated to a temperature suitable for battery operation is disclosed. An anodic reaction zone is constructed in a manner that sodium is hermetically sealed therein, part of the hermetic seal including fusible material which closes up openings through the container of the anodic reaction zone. The hermetically sealed anodic reaction zone is assembled under normal atmospheric conditions with a suitable cathodic reaction zone and a cation-permeable barrier. When the entire battery is heated to an operational temperature, the fusible material of the hermetically sealed anodic reaction zone is fused, thereby allowing molten sodium to flow from the anodic reaction zone into reactive engagement with the cation-permeable barrier.

Paquette, David G. (Costa Mesa, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/ Sales Type: Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets Gasoline, All Grades - Other End Users Gasoline, All Grades - Sales for Resale Gasoline, All Grades - DTW (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Rack (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Bulk (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Regular Gasoline - Other End Users Regular Gasoline - Sales for Resale Regular Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Midgrade Gasoline - Other End Users Midgrade Gasoline - Sales for Resale Midgrade Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Premium - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Premium Gasoline - Other End Users Premium Gasoline - Sales for Resale Premium Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Period: Monthly Annual

342

Ultra-low Sulfur Reduction Emission Control Device/Development of an On-board Fuel Sulfur Trap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell has completed working on a multiyear program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an 'on-vehicle' desulfurization fuel filter for both light duty and heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NOx adsorbers. The NOx adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and '2007-Rule' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters was also examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. In the second phase of the program a light duty diesel engine test was also demonstrated. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consisted of four phases. Phase I focused on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II concentrated on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III studied life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV focused on efficacy and benefits in the desulfation steps of a NOx adsorber on both a heavy and light duty engine. The project team included a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Navistar Inc. (formerly International Truck & Engine Corporation) and Mack Trucks Inc.), and filter recycler (American Wastes Industries).

Rohrbach, Ron; Barron, Ann

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 3: A new reactor concept without uranium or thorium for burning weapons-grade plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) requested that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) examine concepts that focus only on the destruction of 50,000 kg of weapons-grade plutonium. A concept has been developed by the INEL for a low-temperature, low-pressure, low-power density, low-coolant-flow-rate light water reactor that destroys plutonium quickly without using uranium or thorium. This concept is very safe and could be designed, constructed, and operated in a reasonable time frame. This concept does not produce electricity. Not considering other missions frees the design from the paradigms and constraints used by proponents of other dispositioning concepts. The plutonium destruction design goal is most easily achievable with a large, moderate power reactor that operates at a significantly lower thermal power density than is appropriate for reactors with multiple design goals. This volume presents the assumptions and requirements, a reactor concept overview, and a list of recommendations. The appendices contain detailed discussions on plutonium dispositioning, self-protection, fuel types, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, off-site radiation releases, and economics.

Ryskamp, J.M.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Fletcher, C.D. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Enrollment Management Systems Page 1 To upload a syllabus to a class, navigate to Online Grading. To navigate to Online Grading from the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grading. To navigate to Online Grading from the student search, select the applications tab in the navigation bar at the top of the screen. Select Online Grading. Once you enter Online Grading, you will see icon will appear next to the class you have added a syllabus to. Keep in mind that the syllabus is term

Palmeri, Thomas

345

Initial Assessment of Sulfur-Iodine Process Safety Issues and How They May Affect Pilot Plant Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur-iodine process to make hydrogen by the thermochemical splitting of water is under active development as part of a U.S. Department of Energy program. An integrated lab scale system is currently being designed and built. The next planned stage of development is a pilot plant with a thermal input of about 500 kW, equivalent to about 30,000 standard liters per hour of hydrogen production. The sulfur-iodine process contains a variety of hazards, including temperatures up to 850 ºC and hazardous chemical species including SO2, H2SO4, HI, I2, and of course H2. The siting and design of a pilot plant must consider these and other hazards. This report presents an initial analysis of the hazards that might affect pilot plant design and should be considered in the initial planning. The general hazards that have been identified include reactivity, flammability, toxicity, pressure, electrical hazards, and industrial hazards such as lifting and rotating equipment. Personnel exposure to these hazards could occur during normal operations, which includes not only running the process at the design conditions but also initial inventory loading, heatup, startup, shutdown, and system flushing before equipment maintenance. Because of the complexity and severity of the process, these ancillary operations are expected to be performed frequently. In addition, personnel could be exposed to the hazards during various abnormal situations which could include unplanned phase changes of liquids or solids, leaks of process fluids or cooling water into other process streams, unintentional introducion of foreign species into the process, and unexpected side reactions. Design of a pilot plant will also be affected by various codes and regulations such as the International Building Code, the International Fire Code, various National Fire Protection Association Codes, and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

Robert S. Cherry

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Sulfur Partitioning During Vitrification of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The sodium bearing tank waste (SBW) at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains high concentrations of sulfur (roughly 5 mass% of SO3 on a nonvolatile oxide basis). The amount of sulfur that can be feed to the melter will ultimately determine the loading of SBW in glass produced by the baseline (low-temperature, joule-heated, liquid-fed, ceramic-lined) melter. The amount of sulfur which can be fed to the melter is determined by several major factors including: the tolerance of the melter for an immiscible salt layer accumulation, the solubility of sulfur in the glass melt, the fraction of sulfur removed to the off-gas, and the incorporation of sulfur into the glass up to it?s solubility limit. This report summarizes the current status of testing aimed at determining the impacts of key chemical and physical parameters on the partitioning of sulfur between the glass, a molten salt, and the off-gas.

Darab, John G.; Graham, Dennis D.; Macisaac, Brett D.; Russell, Renee L.; Smith, Harry D.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Studies on the production of ultra-clean coal by alkali-acid leaching of low-grade coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of low-grade coal in thermal power stations is leading to environmental pollution due to the generation of large amounts of fly ash, bottom ash, and CO{sub 2} besides other pollutants. It is therefore important to clean the coal before using it in thermal power stations, steel plants, or cement industries etc. Physical beneficiation of coal results in only limited cleaning of coal. The increasing environmental pollution problems from the use of coal have led to the development of clean coal technologies. In fact, the clean use of coal requires the cleaning of coal to ultra low ash contents, keeping environmental norms and problems in view and the ever-growing need to increase the efficiency of coal-based power generation. Therefore this requires the adaptation of chemical cleaning techniques for cleaning the coal to obtain ultra clean coal having ultra low ash contents. Presently the reaction conditions for chemical demineralization of low-grade coal using 20% aq NaOH treatment followed by 10% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching under reflux conditions have been optimized. In order to reduce the concentration of alkali and acid used in this process of chemical demineralization of low-grade coals, stepwise, i.e., three step process of chemical demineralization of coal using 1% or 5% aq NaOH treatment followed by 1% or 5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching has been developed, which has shown good results in demineralization of low-grade coals. In order to conserve energy, the alkali-acid leaching of coal was also carried out at room temperature, which gave good results.

Nabeel, A.; Khan, T.A.; Sharma, D.K. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

351

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

352

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method for Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,922,792 entitled "Method for Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a neutralization/sequestration method that concomitantly treats bauxite residues from aluminum production processes, as well as brine wastewater from oil and gas production processes. The method uses an integrated approach that coincidentally treats multiple industrial waste by-product streams. The end results include neutralizing caustic

354

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery. The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500--1,000 angstroms. 2 figs.

Tischer, R.P.; Winterbottom, W.L.; Wroblowa, H.S.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector (14) for a sodium/sulfur battery (10). The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material (16) formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500-1000 angstroms.

Tischer, Ragnar P. (Birmingham, MI); Winterbottom, Walter L. (Farmington Hills, MI); Wroblowa, Halina S. (West Bloomfield, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

360

Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued Geographic Area Month Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Grades 11 and 12 Low Alloy Steel Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design conditions of different fossil power boilers vary, and in a large power generating system, many different alloys can be used in various product forms. Although specifications and standards apply to these alloys, utility engineers frequently need basic metallurgical information to8212part of an ongoing series of metallurgical handbooks developed under the EPRI Fossil Materials and Repair Program (Program 87)8212is Grade 11 and Grade 12 steels.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Solar-Grade Silicon from Metallurgical-Grade Silicon Via Iodine Chemical Vapor Transport Purification: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the atmospheric-pressure in an ''open'' reactor, SiI2 transfers from a hot (>1100C) Si source to a cooler (>750C) Si substrate and decomposes easily via 2SiI2 Si+ SiI4 with up to 5?m/min deposition rate. SiI4 returns to cyclically transport more Si. When the source is metallurgical-grade Si, impurities can be effectively removed by three mechanisms: (1) differing free energies of formation in forming silicon and impurity iodides; (2) distillation; and (3) differing standard free energies of formation during deposition. Distillation has been previously reported. Here, we focused on mechanisms (1) and (3). We made feedstock, analyzed the impurity levels, grew Czochralski single crystals, and evaluated crystal and photovoltaic properties. Cell efficiencies of 9.5% were obtained. Incorporating distillation (step 2) should increase this to a viable level.

Ciszek, T. F.; Wang, T. H.; Page, M. R.; Bauer, R. E.; Landry, M. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Applying Safety Treatments To Rail-Highway At-Grade Crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Treatments To Rail-Highway At-Grade Crossings Douglas12! SECTION 2: AT-GRADE RAIL CROSSING SAFETYTreatments at Rail-Highway Level Crossings.. 51!

Cooper, Douglas L; Ragland, David R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method of activating limestone for enhanced capture of sulfur from post combustion gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Calcium based sulfur sorbent is prepared in a highly reactive form for use in removing gaseous sulfur species from coal combustion gases by heating finely divided limestone particles at a temperature of at least 2,000 K for a period of 5 to 50 milliseconds and quenching the particles by bringing them to a temperature below 1,400 K before they become sintered. For application to a coal combustion system, the quenching step may be carried out in the post coal combustion zone along with the reaction of the particles with sulfur. The initial heating step is performed outside of the zone because of the high temperatures required in that step, which would result in decomposition of the calcium-sulfur product.

Abichandan, J.S.; Holcombe, N.T.; Litka, A.F.; Woodroffe, J.A.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established a new, sharply lower standard for the maximum sulfur content of on-highway diesel fuel, to take effect October 1, 1993.

Tancred Lidderdale

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Case Study of an Unusual Long-Range Sulfur Transport Episode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of extremely high fine particulate sulfur concentrations during early April 1983 in the western United States are linked to a strong cyclone over the midwestern United States. The strong winds around this cyclone circulated polluted ...

James F. Bresch; Elmar R. Reiter

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Removal and Transformation of Sulfur Species During Regeneration of Poisoned Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur K-edge XANES was used to monitor sulfur species transforming from sulfides to sulfates during steam + air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. The catalyst was tested for multiple reaction/regeneration cycles. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H{sub 2}S-poisoned nickel catalyst. Although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H{sub 2} reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Diesel Emissions Control- Sulfur Effects (DECSE): Summary of PM Results and Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine the impact of fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems that could be implemented to lower emissions of NOx and PM from on-highway trucks in the 2002-2004 time frame.

Gorse, Jr. Robert A.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on the Performance of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research focus: - Impact of sulfur on: Catalyst performance; Short term catalyst durability. This presentation summarizes results from fresh catalyst performance evaluations - WVU contracted to conduct DOC and Lean NOx catalyst testing for DECSE DECSE program. (experimental details discussed previously)

Whitacre, Shawn D.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cost-benefit analysis of ultra-low sulfur jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of aviation has spurred increased study of its environmental impacts and the possible mitigation thereof. One emissions reduction option is the introduction of an Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) jet fuel standard for ...

Kuhn, Stephen (Stephen Richard)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents  

SciTech Connect

To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong.

Mingshi Wang; Dangyu Song; Baoshan Zheng; R.B. Finkelman [Institute of Geochemistry, Guiyang (China). State Key Lab of Environmental Geochemistry

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

A New Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer to Measure the Volatile Sulfuric Acid Aerosol Fraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was developed with the intention to measure the fraction of sulfuric acid in marine fine aerosols (Dp < 150 nm). This work focused on the design and calibration of an aerosol conditioner ...

D. A. Orsini; A. Wiedensohler; F. Stratmann; D. S. Covert

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of Sulfur and Hydrocarbon Fuels on Titanate/Ceria SOFC Anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to develop low-cost, high-performance anodes that offer low polarization resistance as well as improved tolerance for nonidealities in anode environment such as redox cycles, sulfur and other poisons, and hydrocarbons.

Marina, O.A.; Pedersen, L.R.; Stevenson, J.W.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thermal-sprayed, thin-film pyrite cathodes for thermal batteries -- Discharge-rate and temperature studies in single cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using an optimized thermal-spray process, coherent, dense deposits of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) with good adhesion were formed on 304 stainless steel substrates (current collectors). After leaching with CS{sub 2} to remove residual free sulfur, these served as cathodes in Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells. The cells were tested over a temperature range of 450 C to 550 C under baseline loads of 125 and 250 mA/cm{sup 2}, to simulate conditions found in a thermal battery. Cells built with such cathodes outperformed standard cells made with pressed-powder parts. They showed lower interracial resistance and polarization throughout discharge, with higher capacities per mass of pyrite. Post-treatment of the cathodes with Li{sub 2}O coatings at levels of >7% by weight of the pyrite was found to eliminate the voltage transient normally observed for these materials. Results equivalent to those of standard lithiated catholytes were obtained in this manner. The use of plasma-sprayed cathodes allows the use of much thinner cells for thermal batteries since only enough material needs to be deposited as the capacity requirements of a given application demand.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; DAI,JINXIANG; XIAO,T. DANNY; REISNER,DAVID

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

Guidotti, Ronald Armand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Minimizing sulfur contamination and rinse water volume required following a sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide clean by performing a chemically basic rinse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixtures (SPM) are commonly used in the semiconductor industry to remove organic contaminants from wafer surfaces. This viscous solution is very difficult to rinse off wafer surfaces. Various rinsing conditions were tested and the resulting residual contamination on the wafer surface was measured. The addition of small amounts of a chemical base such as ammonium hydroxide to the rinse water has been found to be effective in reducing the surface concentration of sulfur and also mitigates the particle growth that occurs on SPM cleaned wafers. The volume of room temperature water required to rinse these wafers is also significantly reduced.

Clews, P.J.; Nelson, G.C.; Resnick, P.J.; Matlock, C.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lakshmi, Lakshmi Dharmarajan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rodriquez, Jason [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Hooper, Sean [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Porat, I. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Ulrich, Luke [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Woese, Carl [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hydrogen generation process. Final report. [Hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical process based on electrolysis of sulfurous acid  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic feasibility of a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical hydrogen generation process based on the electrolysis of sulfurous acid was assessed. The experimental studies performed were concentrated on those areas important to the success of the process. These included the electrolysis, acid concentration, and sulfur trioxide reduction steps. Engineering and economic studies on the system were also performed to assess its potential for ultimate utilization and to provide information of value in planning the future course of the program.

Farbman, G.H.; Koump, V.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Degradation of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects in fuels containing sulfur  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC from ~1000 ºC to ~750 ºC may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects and as balance of plant (BOP) materials. This paper provides insight on the material performance of nickel, ferritic steels, and nickel-based alloys in fuels containing sulfur, primarily in the form of H2S, and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to sulfur in the gas stream.

Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.4 Thermal Modeling . . . . . . . .63 Table 4.3: Thermal Hot Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Performance-Efficient Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . .

Co?kun, Ay?e K?v?lc?m

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Sulfur polymer cement stabilization of elemental mercury mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, is a problem throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report describes the development and testing of a process to immobilize elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, in a form that is non-dispersible, will meet EPA leaching criteria, and has low mercury vapor pressure. In this stabilization and solidification process (patent pending) elemental mercury is mixed with an excess of powdered sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and additives in a vessel and heated to {approximately}35 C, for several hours, until all of the mercury is converted into mercuric sulfide (HgS). Additional SPC is then added and the mixture raised to 135 C, resulting in a homogeneous molten liquid which is poured into a suitable mold where is cools and solidifies. The final stabilized and solidified waste forms were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, as well as tested for leaching behavior and mercury vapor pressure. During this study the authors have processed the entire inventory of mixed mercury waste stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

Melamed, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Patel, B.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sulfur gas sensor using a calcium fluoride solid electrolyte  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sulfur gas potentials in the H/sub 2/S + H/sub 2/ buffer gases were measured by a galvanic cell Ps/sub 2/(g),Au(Pt)/(MoS/sub 2/ + CaS)/CaF/sub 2//(Cu + Cu/sub 2/S + CaS)/Au(Pt) in the temperature range from 650/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C and Ps/sub 2/ region from 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -10/ atm. A quick response time (within 5 to 10 min) in emf with the change of Ps/sub 2/ at a given temperature was observed by placing a MoS/sub 2/ and CaS mixed pellet auxiliary electrode at the bottom of the cylindrical single-crystal CaF/sub 2/ electrolyte. The observed emf's agreed well with with those calculated from the Nernst equation. Using this sensor, Ps/sub 2/ values in the SO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/S gas system were also evaluated from the measured emf at 827/sup 0/C and were found to be in close agreement with those calculated from the thermochemical tables.

Toniguchi, M.; Wakihara, M.; Uchida, T.; Hirakawa, K.; Nii, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Smart battery controller for lithium/sulfur dioxide batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Army purchases millions of lithium sulfur dioxide batteries for use in portable electronics equipment. Because of their superior rate capability and service life over a wide variety of conditions, lithium batteries are the power source of choice for military equipment. There is no convenient method of determining the available energy remaining in partially used lithium batteries; hence, users do not take full advantage of all the available battery energy. Currently, users replace batteries before each mission, which leads to premature disposal, and results in the waste of millions of dollars in battery energy every year. Another problem of the lithium battery is that it is necessary to ensure complete discharge of the cells when the useful life of the battery has been expended, or when a hazardous condition exists; a hazardous condition may result in one or more of the cells venting. The Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory has developed a working prototype of a smart battery controller (SBC) that addresses these problems.

Atwater, T.; Bard, A.; Testa, B.; Shader, W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations ...

391

Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Experimental and computational investigations of sulfur-resistant bimetallic catalysts for reforming of biomass gasification products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experimental studies of supported catalysts was used to identify H{sub 2}S-resistant biomass gasification product reforming catalysts. DFT calculations were used to search for bimetallic, nickel-based (1 1 1) surfaces with lower sulfur adsorption energies and enhanced ethylene adsorption energies. These metrics were used as predictors for H{sub 2}S resistance and activity toward steam reforming of ethylene, respectively. Relative to Ni, DFT studies found that the Ni/Sn surface alloy exhibited enhanced sulfur resistance and the Ni/Ru system exhibited an improved ethylene binding energy with a small increase in sulfur binding energy. A series of supported bimetallic nickel catalysts was prepared and screened under model ethylene reforming conditions and simulated biomass tar reforming conditions. The observed experimental trends in activity were consistent with theoretical predictions, with observed reforming activities in the order Ni/Ru > Ni > Ni/Sn. Interestingly, Ni/Ru showed a high level of resistance to sulfur poisoning compared with Ni. This sulfur resistance can be partly explained by trends in sulfur versus ethylene binding energy at different types of sites across the bimetallic surface.

Rangan, Meghana; Yung, Matthew M.; Medlin, J. William (NREL); (Colorado)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Utilization of high sulfur coal in carbon fiber production. Final report, April 1993--August 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PYROGRAF-III{trademark} is a highly graphitic vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) produced by the chemical vapor deposition of carbon on metallic catalysts in the temperature range of 1000{degrees}C. This is entirely different from commercial carbon fiber, which is made by first forming a filament and then graphitizing it in a high temperature oven. For PYROGRAF-III{trademark} small amounts of sulfur in the form of hydrogen sulfide are added to the process to enhance the yield. This method of supplying the necessary sulfur is both expensive and hazardous since hydrogen sulfide is flammable, toxic, and corrosive. To supply the sulfur more economically and safely, high sulfur coal was proposed as a replacement for the hydrogen sulfide gas. Applied Sciences, Inc. is the sole producer of this material in pound quantities. The primary objective of research grant OCDO-922-8 was to demonstrate that Ohio`s high sulfur coal can replace the expensive, toxic hydrogen sulfide in the production of vapor grown carbon fiber as well as become a partial or complete source of carbon. The secondary objective was to analyze the exhaust for the release of harmful sulfur compounds and to project the economic potential of the use of coal.

Burton, D.J.; Guth, J.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. An effective pre- combustion coal desulfurization process should ideally be capable of removing both organic and inorganic sulfur. A variety of techniques exist for the removal of inorganic sulfur from coal, but there is currently no cost-effective method for the pre-combustion removal of organic sulfur. Recent developments have demonstrated that microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal. However, lengthy treatment times are required. Moreover, the removal of organic sulfur form coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal sample for subsequent biodesulfurization. Physical/chemical processes primarily designed for the removal of pyritic sulfur may also cause substantial increases in the porosity and surface area of the coal which may facilitate the subsequent removal of organic sulfur by microoganisms. During the current quarter, coal samples that have been chemically pretreated with methanol, ammonia, and isopropanol were examined for the removal of organic sulfur by the microbial culture IGTS8, an assay for the presence of protein in coal samples was developed, and a laboratory-scale device for the explosive comminution of coal was designed and constructed.

Srivastava, V.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hot Cell Examination of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured with weapons-grade MOX and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg. As part of the fuel qualification process, five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This is the first hot cell examination of weapons-grade MOX fuel. The rods have been examined nondestructively with the ADEPT apparatus and are currently being destructively examined. Examinations completed to date include length measurements, visual examination, gamma scanning, profilometry, eddy-current testing, gas measurement and analysis, and optical metallography. Representative results of these examinations are reviewed and found to be consistent with predictions and with prior experience with reactor-grade MOX fuel. The results will be used to support licensing of weapons-grade MOX for batch use in commercial power reactors.

Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; McCoy, Kevin [Areva NP

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials… (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Properties of Thermal Glueballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the 0++ glueball at finite temperature using SU(3) quenched lattice QCD. We find a significant thermal effects near T_c. We perform the \\chi^2 fit analyses adopting two Ansaetze for the spectral function, i.e., the conventional narrow-peak Ansatz and an advanced Breit-Wigner Ansatz. The latter is an extension of the former, taking account of the appearance of the thermal width at T>0. We also perform the MEM analysis. These analyses indicate that the thermal effect on the glueball is a significant thermal-width broadening \\Gamma(T_c) \\sim 300 MeV together with a modest reduction in the peak center \\Delta\\omega_0(T_c) \\sim 100 MeV.

Noriyoshi Ishii; Hideo Suganuma

2003-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mastery of sixth-grade mathematics expectations as measured by the seventh-grade Michigan Education Assessment Program from 2005 to 2007.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Purpose. The purpose of this study is to document sixth-grade mathematics mastery as measured by the seventh-grade Michigan Education Assessment Program (MEAP) over a… (more)

Prince, Marian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

410

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Percent) (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 1.43 1.38 1.41 1.43 1.47 1.42 1985-2013 PADD 1 0.75 0.73 0.69 0.68 0.73 0.68 1985-2013 East Coast 0.67 0.66 0.61 0.63 0.66 0.57 1985-2013 Appalachian No. 1 2.0 1.72 1.52 1.40 1.55 1.74 1985-2013 PADD 2 1.42 1.34 1.44 1.46 1.61 1.49 1985-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 1.45 1.36 1.47 1.56 1.75 1.67 1985-2013 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 2.33 2.11 2.18 2.03 2.01 1.69 1985-2013 Okla., Kans., Mo. 0.89 0.89 0.92 0.82 0.87 0.85 1985-2013 PADD 3 1.54 1.48 1.51 1.52 1.54 1.48 1985-2013

413

Low-Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal/Recovery System  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. Much raw gas is `subquality`, that is, it exceeds the pipeline specifications for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide content, and much of this low-quality natural gas cannot be produced economically with present processing technology. Against this background, a number of industry-wide trends are affecting the natural gas industry. Despite the current low price of natural gas, long-term demand is expected to outstrip supply, requiring new gas fields to be developed. Several important consequences will result. First, gas fields not being used because of low-quality products will have to be tapped. In the future, the proportion of the gas supply that must be treated to remove impurities prior to delivery to the pipeline will increase substantially. The extent of treatment required to bring the gas up to specification will also increase. Gas Research Institute studies have shown that a substantial capital investment in facilities is likely to occur over the next decade. The estimated overall investment for all gas processing facilities up to the year 2000 alone is approximates $1.2 Billion, of which acid gas removal and sulfur recovery are a significant part in terms of invested capital. This large market size and the known shortcomings of conventional processing techniques will encourage development and commercialization of newer technologies such as membrane processes. Second, much of today`s gas production is from large, readily accessible fields. As new reserves are exploited, more gas will be produced from smaller fields in remote or offshore locations. The result is an increasing need for technology able to treat small-scale gas streams.

Lokhandwala, K.A.; Ringer, M.; Wijams, H.; Baker, R.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Computational Investigation of FeS2 Surfaces and Prediction of Effects of Sulfur Environment on Stabilities  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate the (001), (210), (III), and (110) surfaces of, F~S2' The surface free ene:gies were calculated in equilibrium with a sulfur environment using firstpnnclples based thermodynamics approach. Surfaces that feature metal atoms in their outermost layer are predicted to be higher m energy. Wlthm the studied subset of (I x I) terminations, the stoichiometric (001) surface termmated by a layer of sulfur atoms is the most stable for sulfur-lean condition. For increasingly sulfur-nch enVIronment, two structures were found to have notably lower surface energies compared to others. They have (210) and (Ill) orientation, both terminated by layers of sulfur. Interestingly, these surfaces are nonstoichiometric exhibiting an excess of sulfur atoms.

Alfonso, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mitigation of Sulfur Effects on a Lean NOx Trap Catalyst by Sorbate Reapplication  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lean NOx trap catalysis has demonstrated the ability to reduce NOx emissions from lean natural gas reciprocating engines by >90%. The technology operates in a cyclic fashion where NOx is trapped on the catalyst during lean operation and released and reduced to N2 under rich exhaust conditions; the rich cleansing operation of the cycle is referred to as "regeneration" since the catalyst is reactivated for more NOx trapping. Natural gas combusted over partial oxidation catalysts in the exhaust can be used to obtain the rich exhaust conditions necessary for catalyst regeneration. Thus, the lean NOx trap technology is well suited for lean natural gas engine applications. One potential limitation of the lean NOx trap technology is sulfur poisoning. Sulfur compounds directly bond to the NOx trapping sites of the catalyst and render them ineffective; over time, the sulfur poisoning leads to degradation in overall NOx reduction performance. In order to mitigate the effects of sulfur poisoning, a process has been developed to restore catalyst activity after sulfur poisoning has occurred. The process is an aqueous-based wash process that removes the poisoned sorbate component of the catalyst. A new sorbate component is reapplied after removal of the poisoned sorbate. The process is low cost and does not involve reapplication of precious metal components of the catalyst. Experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the washing process on a lean 8.3-liter natural gas engine on a dynamometer platform. The catalyst was rapidly sulfur poisoned with bottled SO2 gas; then, the catalyst sorbate was washed and reapplied and performance was re-evaluated. Results show that the sorbate reapplication process is effective at restoring lost performance due to sulfur poisoning. Specific details relative to the implementation of the process for large stationary natural gas engines will be discussed.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Numericl modeling of graded band gap CIGS solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high efficiency reported recently by NREL for CIGS solar cells demonstrates the potential of band gap grading in producing high efficiency thin film solar cells. In order to reap the full benefits of this design strategy, a clear understanding of the fundamental device physics of these structures is needed. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role grading of the band gap plays in achieving high conversion efficiencies. To aid in this examination, a detailed numerical device simulation program, ADEPT, is used.

Gray, J.L.; Lee, Youn Jung

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermal Management ofUniversity of California, Riverside Acknowledgments First, I

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test… (more)

Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Price 2008). In addition, this scenario assumes that the share of biomassand Price 2008). Substitution of fossil fuels in cement kilns with low-sulfur biomass

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, Results of the Phase II Testing of Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International collaborative effort to construct a laboratory-scale Sulfur-Iodine process capable of producing 100-200 L/hr of hydrogen.

Benjamin Russ; G. Naranjo; R. Moore; W. Sweet; M. Hele; N. Pons

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8PR = Rate of thermal input to power plant receiver (MWt)the solar thermal inputs to the daytime power plant and theof solar thermal inputs to the daytime power plant and the

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Development of the sodium/sulfur battery technology for utility applications  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of battery energy storage systems for electric utilities. An important part of this DOE program is the engineering of the battery subsystem. Because lower costs are possible and less space is required compared with conventional battery technologies, two advanced battery systems are being developed: sodium/sulfur and zinc/bromine. A brief description of the development approach being followed along with the current status of the sodium/sulfur technology is described in this paper. Of immediate relevance, a factory integrated modular sodium/sulfur system has been designed that incorporates many of the advantages of this technology. Each module (designated as NAS-P{sub AC}) combines a 600-kWh sodium/sulfur battery, a 300 kW power converter and a control system. In addition to the potential for low life-cycle cost, other specific benefits include excellent portability and an installed system-level footprint that is about 20% of an equivalent system using lead-acid batteries. The sodium/sulfur battery is designed to deliver its rated energy for 1500 cycles or 5 years of maintenance-free operation.

Braithwaite, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, A.A. [Silent Power, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface Ni/Sb and Ni/Sb alloys were found to efficiently minimize the negative effects of sulfur on the performance of Ni/zirconia anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Prior to operating on fuel gas containing low concentrations of H2S, the nickel/zirconia anodes were briefly exposed to antimony or tin vapor, which only slightly affected the SOFC performance. During the subsequent exposures to 1 and 5 ppm H2S, increases in anodic polarization losses were minimal compared to those observed for the standard nickel/zirconia anodes. Post-test XPS analyses showed that Sb and Sn tended to segregate to the surface of Ni particles, and further confirmed a significant reduction of adsorbed sulfur on the Ni surface in Ni/Sn and Ni/Sb samples compared to the Ni. The effect may be the result of weaker sulfur adsorption on bimetallic surfaces, adsorption site competition between sulfur and Sb or Sn on Ni, or other factors. The use of dilute binary alloys of Ni-Sb or Ni-Sn in the place of Ni, or brief exposure to Sb or Sn vapor, may be effective means to counteract the effects of sulfur poisoning in SOFC anodes and Ni catalysts. Other advantages, including suppression of coking or tailoring the anode composition for the internal reforming, are also expected.

Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Pederson, Larry R.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Woman In Black AS Grade Distribution Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woman In Black AS Grade Distribution Tool Smithsonian's National Museum Of African History! For any questions, please contact: mznekleung@gmail.com #12;Black History Month By: Stephan Leung, CAN Douglass. During this Black History Month, we remember and reflect on the important people and events which

Blanco, Philip R.

430

D15: Fabrication of Functionally Graded Materials by Directional ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The present paper is aimed showing a method of graded ... by the interaction between the thermoelectric current and the applied magnetic field, ... Solubility in the CaO-SiO2-FeOt Based Welding Flux System Containing NaF.

431

Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

62.6 71.6 92.3 89.9 82.6 72.7 - 78.2 See footnotes at end of table. 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 56 Energy Information Administration ...

432

Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four-loop Westinghouse reactors such as the Vogtle power plant are capable of handling up to 45 percent weapons-grade MOX loading without any modifications. We have also designed two kinds of weapons-grade MOX assemblies with three enrichments per assembly and four enrichments total. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods were used in all the feed and some burned MOX assemblies and some LEU feed assemblies. Integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) was used in the rest of the LEU feed assemblies. The average discharge burnup of MOX assemblies was over 47,000 MWD/MTM, which is more than enough to meet the "spent fuel standard." One unit is capable of consuming 0.462 MT of weapons-grade plutonium a year. Preliminary analyses showed that important reactor physics parameters for the three transitions cycles are comparable to those of LEU cores including boron levels, reactivity coefficients, peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Further transient analyses need to be performed.

Alsaed, Abdelhalim Ali

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Young children's computer skills development from kindergarten to third grade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation explores young children's computer skills development from kindergarten to third grade using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K) dataset. The sample size of the study was 8642 children. Latent growth curve ... Keywords: Computer skills, Kindergarten, Latent growth curve modeling

Mesut Saçkes; Kathy Cabe Trundle; Randy L. Bell

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fabricating of Lithium-Battery-Grade Precursor Salt Cobaltous Carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some factors affect precursor capability, for example: raw material CoCl2 solution impurity?feeding methods of reactants?solutions’ pH value of deposition reaction?washing conditions, etc.. Cobalt chloride is chosen as raw ... Keywords: Salt Cobalt Carbonate, Cobalt Chloride, battery-grade Precursor, Shape

Jian Zhou; Li-jun Li; Gong-xiu He; Ke Chen

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Disposition of Weapons-Grade Plutonium in Westinghouse Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposition of Weapons-Grade Plutonium in Westinghouse Reactors Abdelhalim Ali Alsaed and Marvin Adams We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four-loop Westinghouse reactors such as the Vogtle power plant are capable of handling up to 45 percent weapons-grade MOX loading without any modifications. We have also designed two kinds of weapons-grade MOX assemblies with three enrichments per assembly and four total enrichments. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods were used in all the MOX feed assemblies, some burned MOX assemblies, and some LEU feed assemblies. Integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) was used in the rest of the LEU feed assemblies. The average discharge burnup of MOX assemblies was over 47,000 MWD/MTM, which is more than enough to meet the "spent fuel standard." One unit is ...

No. De-fc-al; Abdelhalim Ali Alsaed; Abdelhalim Ali Alsaed; Marvin Adams; Marvin Adams

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Solar System Presentation for SRS 5th Grade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar System Presentation for SRS 5th Grade Prof. David Cohen, Swarthmore College #12;What astronomers try to answer: ·What are the things in the solar system like? Planets, moons, comets, asteroids, the Sun... ·Are there good conditions for life anywhere in the solar system? ·How did the solar system

Cohen, David

437

Solar-thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

,"Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

443

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway, Frank R. McLarnon, and Elton J. Cairns* Energy and Environment Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA ABSTRACT Sodium/°-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cells utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, 0.332, and 1.17 at temperatures from 350 to 500°C were studied by measurement of the equilibrium cell voltages at open circuit, and the steady-state cell voltages at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. States of charge, represented by sodium atom fraction in the P-S electrode, ranged from 0 to 0.4. Open-circuit voltages up to 2.65 V were measured. Theoretical specific energies up to 825 Wh/kg were cal-

444

U.S. Coal Reserves: An Update by Heat and Sulfur Content  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 2) Distribution Category UC-98 U.S. Coal Reserves: An Update by Heat and Sulfur Content February 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Reserves: An Update by Heat and Sulfur Content ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Reserves: An Update by Heat and Sulfur Content iii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Energy

445

The cycling of sulfur in surface seawater of the northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report on measurements made on the distribution of sulfur between different compounds in surface waters in the northwest Pacific Ocean. Measurements looked at distributions of organic sulfur, low molecular weight organic sulfur, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoniopropionate, etc. The objective was to study not just the densities, but the exchanges between these compounds, and sinks, including to the atmosphere. In particular the authors want to study the source to the atmosphere of DMS from the oceans. In the region studied, which had low plankton concentration, but high nutrient concentrations, loss of DMS to the atmosphere was very minor, and indicated that under different climatic conditions, there was potential for much larger sea/air exchange.

Bates, T.S. [NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)] [NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States); [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chavez, F.P.; Buck, K.R. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Pacific Grove, CA (United States)] [and others] [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Pacific Grove, CA (United States); and others

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electrochemical separation and concentration of sulfur containing gases from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4.sup.= or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S.sup.=. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

Winnick, Jack (3805 Woodrail-on-the-Green, Columbia, MO 65201)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Cost-effective sulfur control strategies for the Great Plains gasification project  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains gasification plant in Beulah, North Dakota, uses 14 Lurgi gasifiers to produce 152x10/sup 6/ scf/d (4.1x10/sup 6/ Nm/sup 3//d) of pipeline-quality gas from lignite. Since start-up in mid-1984, the plant has provided a serious challenge to the reliable operation of the Stretford sulfur recovery system. To address this challenge, over forty options for mitigating sulfur emissions were evaluated on an economic and technical basis, beginning at the emissions source (the stack) and working back through the plant. Although this study was directed toward providing a timely solution to the sulfur dioxide emissions problem, the status and opportunities for a number of emerging technologies were brought into focus. This evaluation is detailed here by the authors.

Doctor, R.D.; Wilzbach, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy and Environmental Systems Div.)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Transformation of Sulfur Species during Steam/Air Regeneration on a Ni Biomass Conditioning Catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur K-edge XANES identified transformation of sulfides to sulfates during combined steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. This catalyst was tested over multiple reaction/regeneration/reduction cycles. Postreaction catalysts showed the presence of sulfides on H2S-poisoned sites. Although H2S was observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst, and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. Following the oxidative regeneration, the subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides, indicating the difficulty and sensitivity in achieving complete sulfur removal during regeneration for biomass-conditioning catalysts.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Kuhn, J. N.

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

449

Regeneration of Sulfur Deactivated Ni-based Biomass Syngas Cleaning Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nickel-based catalysts have been widely tested in decomposing tar and methane in hot biomass syngas cleanup researches. However these catalysts can be easily deactivated by the sulfur compounds in syngas due to the strong sulfur adsorption effect on the Ni surface. Here we report on a new regeneration process, which can effectively and efficiently regenerate the sulfur-poisoned Ni reforming catalysts. This process consists of four sequential treatments: 1) controlled oxidation at 750oC in 1% O2, 2) decomposition at 900oC in Ar, 3) reduction at 900oC in 2% H2, and 4) reaction at 900oC under reforming condition. The duration of this 4-step regeneration process is only about 8 hours, which is shorter than that of the conventional steaming regeneration treatment.

Li, Liyu; Howard, Christopher J.; King, David L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Dagle, Robert A.; Stevens, Don J.

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Development of Ni-based Sulfur Resistant Catalyst for Diesel Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order for diesel fuel to be used in a solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit, the diesel fuel must be reformed into hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. One of the major problems facing catalytic reforming is that the level of sulfur found in low sulfur diesel can poison most catalysts. This report shows that a proprietary low cost Ni-based reforming catalyst can be used to reform a 7 and 50 ppm sulfur containing diesel fuel for over 500 hours of operation. Coking, which appears to be route of catalyst deactivation due to metal stripping, can be controlled by catalyst modifications, introduction of turbulence, and/or by application of an electromagnetic field with a frequency from {approx}50 kHz to 13.56 MHz with field strength greater than about 100 V/cm and more preferably greater about 500 V/cm.

Gunther Dieckmann

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Laboratory study for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Substantial progress has been made in the development of the Gravimelt Process for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Three reactors have been fabricated for both material balance studies of the desulfurization of coal with caustic and examination of the behavior of model organic and inorganic sulfur-containing compounds with the same mixture. Model organic sulfur conpounds have been procured and samples of Kentucky No. 9 coal enriched in mineral matter and samples enriched in organic matter have been prepared by float sink techniques for use in determining mechanism and products of the desulfurization reactions. Initial experimentation has been aimed at determining the fate of sulfur removed from coal and obtaining semi-quantitative information for future material balance studies. These studies show near 90% of the sulfur content of the Kentucky No. 9 coal was removed and approximately 3/4 of this removed sulfur was found by chemical analysis to be in the caustic phase. It was further determined that approximately 1% of the coal organic matter dissolves into the caustic phase. These results indicate rough material flows and show that material balance measurements are feasible. A preliminary conceptual engineering design for a full scale Gravimelt coal desulfurization plant was prepared in order to guide future laboratory efforts toward obtaining key engineering data. The engineering study indicates that the Gravimelt Process can be designed utilizing state of the art equipment and that likely energy recovery is approximately 90%. It is estimated that coal desulfurization costs will be in the range of $20 per ton of coal produced, or $.70/10/sup 6/ Btu, in 1980 dollars.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

In-place wellbore consolidation in petroleum reservoirs using sulfur-oil polymers  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for reducing the production from an unconsolidated subterranean hydrocarbon formation penetrated by a wellbore while leaving the formation permeable to the flow of formation fluids. The method consists of injecting steam carrying droplets of elemental liquid sulfur into the formation. The next step consists of allowing the injected sulfur to react with the hydrocarbon in the formation to produce a consolidating agent which extends outward radially from the wellbore. The last step in the process follows from the radial extension of the consolidating agent in its causing the reduction in production of hydrocarbons from the formation.

Rubinstein, I.; Woodford, R.B.

1986-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Improved efficiency in the sulfur dioxide-iodine hydrogen cycle through the use of magnesium oxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of iodine with dry magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfite hexahydrate was studied experimentally as a possible means of improving the efficiency of the sulfur dioxide-iodine cycle. When no extra water was introduced, the maximum product yield was 67% obtained at 423 K. With excess water vapor, a nonporous plug was formed which prevented complete reaction. In the second case, maximum yield was 62% measured at 433 K showing that added water does not increase reaction products. This reaction gives an alternate route for producing hydrogen from water via the sulfur dioxide-iodine process.

Mason, C.F.V.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Sulfur emissions reduction at the Great Plains coal gasification facility: Technical and economic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an in-depth technical and economic review of over 40 sulfur control technologies that were considered for use at the Great Plains coal gasification facility in Beulah, North Dakota. The review was based on the production of substitute natural gas at rates of 152.5 {times} 10{sup 6} and 160 {times} 10{sup 6} scf/d from lignite containing 1.7% sulfur. The factors considered in evaluating each technology included the reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, capital and operating costs, incremental cost per unit of produced gas, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success. 21 figs., 37 tabs.

Doctor, R.D.; Wilzbach, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Joseph, T.W. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Demonstration of Pulse-Jet Fabric Filters for Utility High-Sulfur Coal Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulse-jet fabric filters (PJFF) may be an effective, low-cost alternative to particulate control as they are typically 50% smaller than conventional utility baghouses filtering the same volume of flue gas. EPRI has initiated a program to demonstrate PJFF technology for domestic use. This report describes one of several research efforts to define the operating parameters of PJFFs with high-sulfur coal at EPRI's High-Sulfur Fabric Filter Pilot Plant at Gulf Power Company's Plant Scholz near Tallahassee, Fl...

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

NO.sub.x reduction by sulfur tolerant coronal-catalytic apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents an NO.sub.x environment effective reduction apparatus comprising a sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst such as high dielectric coronal-catalysts like glass wool, ceramic-glass wool or zirconium glass wool and method of use. In one embodiment the invention comprises an NO.sub.x reduction apparatus of sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst adapted and configured for hypercritical presentation to an NO.sub.x bearing gas stream at a minimum of at least about 75 watts/cubic meter.

Mathur, Virendra K. (Durham, NH); Breault, Ronald W. (Kingston, NH); McLarnon, Christopher R. (Exeter, NH); Medros, Frank G. (Waltham, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal grade sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NO[sub x] reduction by sulfur tolerant coronal-catalytic apparatus and method  

SciTech Connect

This invention presents an NO[sub x] environment effective reduction apparatus comprising a sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst such as high dielectric coronal-catalysts like glass wool, ceramic-glass wool or zirconium glass wool and method of use. In one embodiment the invention comprises an NO[sub x] reduction apparatus of sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst adapted and configured for hypercritical presentation to an NO[sub x] bearing gas stream at a minimum of at least about 75 watts/cubic meter. 7 figs.

Mathur, V.K.; Breault, R.W.; McLarnon, C.R.; Medros, F.G.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

NOx reduction by sulfur tolerant coronal-catalytic apparatus and method  

SciTech Connect

This invention presents an NO[sub x] environment effective reduction apparatus comprising a sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst such as high dielectric coronal-catalysts like glass wool, ceramic-glass wool or zirconium glass wool and method of use. In one embodiment the invention comprises an NO[sub x] reduction apparatus of sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst adapted and configured for hypercritical presentation to an NO[sub x] bearing gas stream at a minimum of at least about 75 watts/cubic meter.

Mathur, V.K.; Breault, R.W.; McLarnon, C.R.; Medros, F.G.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

NO.sub.x reduction by sulfur tolerant coronal-catalytic apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents an NO.sub.x environment effective reduction apparatus comprising a sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst such as high dielectric coronal-catalysts like glass wool, ceramic-glass wool or zirconium glass wool and method of use. In one embodiment the invention comprises an NO.sub.x reduction apparatus of sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst adapted and configured for hypercritical presentation to an NO.sub.x bearing gas stream at a minimum of at least about 75 watts/cubic meter.

Mathur, Virendra K. (Durham, NH); Breault, Ronald W. (Kingston, NH); McLarnon, Christopher R. (Exeter, NH); Medros, Frank G. (Waltham, MA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Preliminary analysis of patent trends for sodium/sulfur battery technology  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes development trends in sodium/sulfur battery technology based on data from US patents. Purpose of the study was to use the activity, timing and ownership of 285 US patents to identify and describe broad patterns of change in sodium/sulfur battery technology. The analysis was conducted using newly developed statistical and computer graphic techniques for describing technology development trends from patent data. This analysis suggests that for some technologies trends in patent data provide useful information for public and private R and D planning.

Triplett, M.B.; Winter, C.; Ashton, W.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Sulfur determination in blood from inhabitants of Brazil using neutron activation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the NAA technique was applied to analyze sulfur in blood from inhabitants of Brazil for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering lifestyle factors (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure) of Brazilian inhabitants. The influence of gender was also investigated considering several age ranges (18-29, 30-39, 40-49, >50 years). These data are useful in clinical investigations, to identify or prevent diseases caused by inadequate sulfur ingestion and for nutritional evaluation of Brazilian population.

Oliveira, Laura C.; Zamboni, Cibele B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

466

Update on Transition to Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On November 8, 2005, the EPA Administrator signed a direct final rule that will shift the retail compliance date for offering ULSD for highway use from September 1, 2006, to October 15, 2006. The change will allow more time for retail outlets and terminals to comply with the new 15 parts per million (ppm) sulfur standard, providing time for entities in the diesel fuel distribution system to flush higher sulfur fuel out of the system during the transition. Terminals will have until September 1, 2006, to complete their transitions to ULSD. The previous deadline was July 15, 2006.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Experiments of Sulfur Removal in 1MW Poly-Generation System with Partial Gasification and Combustion Combined  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study on sulfur release and adsorption during coal partial gasification and combustion is conducted in a 1MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) poly-generation system. Limestone is added to gasifier as a sorbent of sulfur produced, where ... Keywords: partial gasification, poly-generation, recycled coal gas, limestone, desulfurization

Qin Hong; Wang Qing; Wang Qinhui; Luo Zhongyang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal contact conductance is highly important in a wide variety of applications, from the cooling of electronic chips to the thermal management of spacecraft. The demand for increased efficiency means that components need to withstand higher temperatures and heat transfer rates. Many situations call for contact heat transfer through nominally cylindrical interfaces, yet relatively few studies of contact conductance through cylindrical interfaces have been undertaken. This study presents a review of the experimental and theoretical investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of composite cylinders, presenting data available in open literature in comparison with relevant correlations. The present investigation presents a study of the thermal contact conductance of cylindrical interfaces. The experimental investigation of sixteen different material combinations offers an opportunity to develop predictive correlations of the contact conductance, in conjunction with an analysis of the interface pressure as a function of the thermal state of the individual cylindrical shells. Experimental results of the present study are compared with previously published conductance data and conductance models.

Ayers, George Harold

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS REFERENCE DESIGN AND COST ANALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a detailed study to determine the expected efficiency and product costs for producing hydrogen via water-splitting using energy from an advanced nuclear reactor. It was determined that the overall efficiency from nuclear heat to hydrogen is high, and the cost of hydrogen is competitive under a high energy cost scenario. It would require over 40% more nuclear energy to generate an equivalent amount of hydrogen using conventional water-cooled nuclear reactors combined with water electrolysis compared to the proposed plant design described herein. There is a great deal of interest worldwide in reducing dependence on fossil fuels, while also minimizing the impact of the energy sector on global climate change. One potential opportunity to contribute to this effort is to replace the use of fossil fuels for hydrogen production by the use of water-splitting powered by nuclear energy. Hydrogen production is required for fertilizer (e.g. ammonia) production, oil refining, synfuels production, and other important industrial applications. It is typically produced by reacting natural gas, naphtha or coal with steam, which consumes significant amounts of energy and produces carbon dioxide as a byproduct. In the future, hydrogen could also be used as a transportation fuel, replacing petroleum. New processes are being developed that would permit hydrogen to be produced from water using only heat or a combination of heat and electricity produced by advanced, high temperature nuclear reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing these processes under a program known as the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Republic of South Africa (RSA) also is interested in developing advanced high temperature nuclear reactors and related chemical processes that could produce hydrogen fuel via water-splitting. This report focuses on the analysis of a nuclear hydrogen production system that combines the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), under development by PBMR (Pty.) Ltd. in the RSA, with the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in the US as part of the NHI. This work was performed by SRNL, Westinghouse Electric Company, Shaw, PBMR (Pty) Ltd., and Technology Insights under a Technical Consulting Agreement (TCA). Westinghouse Electric, serving as the lead for the PBMR process heat application team, established a cost-shared TCA with SRNL to prepare an updated HyS thermochemical water-splitting process flowsheet, a nuclear hydrogen plant preconceptual design and a cost estimate, including the cost of hydrogen production. SRNL was funded by DOE under the NHI program, and the Westinghouse team was self-funded. The results of this work are presented in this Final Report. Appendices have been attached to provide a detailed source of information in order to document the work under the TCA contract.

Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.; Boltrunis, C.; Lahoda, E.; Allen, D.; Greyvenstein, R.

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Optimizing the Sintering Process of Low-Grade Ferromanganese Ores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy · Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

477

Upgrading Below Grade Spaces: A Look Inside the Remodeling Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Below Grade Spaces: Below Grade Spaces: A Look Inside the Remodeling Industry Steve Schirber Cocoon steve@cocoon-solutions.com How do we insulate a basement? How do we insulate a basement? It all starts with the consumer! What is the Consumer buying and why? What is the Consumer buying and why? 1. Square footage What is the Consumer buying and why? 1. Square footage 2. Finishes What is the Consumer buying and why? 1. Square footage 2. Finishes 3. An experience What is the Consumer buying and why? 1. Square footage 2. Finishes 3. An experience 4. Performance Who does the Consumer buy from and why? Who does the Consumer buy from and why? 1. DIY/Box store Who does the Consumer buy from and why? 1. DIY/Box store 2. Friend/Relative Who does the Consumer buy from

478

Microsoft Word - 2nd grade PRINT FINAL-katiebeth.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 nd grade Author: Kelly Larson Editors: Beverly Baker, Angelique Harshman, Rebecca Shankland, and Sue Watts Layout & Design: Claire Roybal of Claire Roybal & Associates Ltd. Pajarito Plateau Field Science Curriculum 2 nd Grade Lesson 2 Page 7 OVERVIEW OF LESSON In this activity, students will locate and observe an ant trail (a line of ants) without interfering in any way. Next they will test the responses of