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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Microviscometric studies on thermal diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HICROVISCKStTRIC STUDIES THERMAL DIFFUSION A Thesis Eddie Reyfls Submitted to the Grsducte School of the Agricultursl sfld Mechanical College of Texas in partisl fulfillment of the requireeeflts far the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... microliter samples to 1'/ reproduceability, This equipment is used to observe the thermal diffusion effects of polystyrene in toluene solutions in c 01uslus-Dickel thermal diffusion column. An inversion in the values of concentration and molecular veight...

Reyna, Eddie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Peridynamic thermal diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

Oterkus, Selda [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Madenci, Erdogan, E-mail: madenci@email.arizona.edu [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Agwai, Abigail [Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ 85226 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors,...

5

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant HIAR-PORTS-2011-08-03 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

6

Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids J. A for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol the thermal diffusivity of gases, particularly air,8,9 and vapors10 to a high degree of precision. Although

Mandelis, Andreas

7

Modelling of unidirectional thermal diffusers in shallow water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is an experimental and theoretical investigation of the temperature field and velocity field induced by a unidirectional thermal diffuser in shallow water. A multiport thermal diffuser is essentially a pipe laid ...

Lee, Joseph Hun-Wei

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal-wave cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal, and its application to the evaluation of the thermal diffusivity of liquids is described. The simplicity agreement was found with reported results in the literature. The accuracy of the thermal diffusivity

Mandelis, Andreas

9

Microscopic thermal diffusivity mapping using an infrared camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard flash thermal diffusivity measurements utilize a single-point infrared detector to measure the average temperature rise of the sample surface after a heat pulse. The averaging of infrared radiation over the sample surface could smear out the microscopic thermal diffusivity variations in some specimens, especially in fiber-reinforced composite materials. A high-speed, high-sensitivity infrared camera was employed in this study of composite materials. With a special microscope attachment, the spatial resolution of the camera can reach 5.4 {micro}m. The images can then be processed to generate microscopic thermal diffusivity maps of the material. SRM 1462 stainless steel was tested to evaluate the accuracy of the system. Thermal diffusivity micrographs of carbon-carbon composites and SCS-6/borosilicate glass were generated. Thermal diffusivity values of the carbon fiber bundles parallel to the heat flow were found to be higher than the matrix material. A thermal coupling effect between SCS-6 fiber and matrix was observed. The thermal coupling and measured thermal diffusivity value of the fiber were also dependent upon the thickness of the specimen.

Wang, H.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Thermal diffusivity mapping of 4D carbon-carbon composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High resolution, 2-D thermal diffusivity maps of carbon-carbon composites were obtained by a state-of-the-art infrared thermal imaging system. Unlike the traditional single-point IR detector used for thermal diffusivity measurements, the IR camera is capable of capturing images in its 256 x 256 pixel Focal Plane Array detector in a snap-shot mode. The camera takes up to 200 images at a rate of 120 frames/second. The temperature resolution of the Ir camera is 0.015 C and the spatial resolution is 20 {micro}m. Thermal diffusivity was calculated for each pixel. Four-direction carbon-carbon composites were used for the thermal diffusivity mapping study. The fiber bundles along the heat flow direction were found to have 25% higher diffusivity values than the surrounding matrix. The diffusivity map also showed detailed local variations in diffusivity which were impossible to measure using a single-point detector. Accurate diffusivity maps are very important to the design of composite materials.

Wang, H.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,heat transfer in solar thermal power plants utilizing phase

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Measuring the thermal diffusivity in a student laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper describes a method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of materials having a high thermal conductivity. The apparatus is rather simple and low-cost, being therefore suitable in a laboratory for undergraduate students of engineering schools, where several set-ups are often required. A recurrence numerical approach solves the thermal field in the specimen, which is depending on the thermal diffusivity of its material. The numerical method requires the temperature data from two different positions in the specimen, measured by two thermocouples connected to a temperature logger.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids by the Transient Grating Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room. The experiments give thermal diffusivities from which thermal conductivities can be determined, sound speeds not only on the sound speed but also on the thermal diffusivity and acoustic damping of the RTILs

Reid, Scott A.

14

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis (DSA) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Category 2 Non-leased Facilities: X-345 Special Nuclear Material Storage Facility;...

15

Thermal diffusivity measurements in liquids using signal common-mode-rejection demodulation in a thermal-wave cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal diffusivity measurements in liquids using signal common-mode- rejection demodulation Mandelis et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2440 2000 has been used to make direct absolute thermal diffusivity, yielding a high-resolution technique for thermal diffusivity measurements in liquids. The thermal

Mandelis, Andreas

16

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Thermal imaging measurement of lateral thermal diffusivity in continuous fiber ceramic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared thermal imaging has become a common technique for nondestructive evaluation and measurement of thermal properties in ceramic specimens. Flash thermal imaging can be used to determine two-dimensional through-thickness thermal diffusivity in a planar specimen. In this study, the authors extended the method to determine lateral, or transverse, thermal diffusivity in the specimen. During the flash thermal imaging test, pulsed heat energy is applied to a specimen's back surface, which is partially shielded, and the change of temperature distribution on the front surface is monitored by an infrared thermal imaging system. The temperature distribution represents the effect of both the normal heat transfer through the specimen's thickness and the lateral heat transfer through the interface between the shielded and unshielded back-surface regions. Those temperature distributions are then fitted with a theoretical solution of the heat transfer process to determine the lateral thermal diffusivity at the interface. This technique has been applied to measure lateral thermal diffusivity in a steel plate and a continuous fiber ceramic composite specimen.

Sun, J. G.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Bottner, Harold [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tritt, Terry M. [Clemson University; Mayolett, Alex [Corning, Inc; Senawiratne, Jayantha [Corning, Inc; Smith, Charlene [Corning, Inc; Harris, Fred [ZT-Plus; Gilbert, Partricia [Marlow Industries, Inc; Sharp, J [Marlow Industries, Inc; Lo, Jason [CANMET - Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources of Canada; Keinke, Holger [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kiss, Laszlo I. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermal Diffusivity and Viscosity of Suspensions of Disc Shaped Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we conduct a transient heat conduction experiment with an aqueous suspension of nanoparticle disks of Laponite JS, a sol forming grade, using laser light interferometry. The image sequence in time is used to measure thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the suspension. Imaging of the temperature distribution is facilitated by the dependence of refractive index of the suspension on temperature itself. We observe that with the addition of 4 volume % of nano-disks in water, thermal conductivity of the suspension increases by around 30%. A theoretical model for thermal conductivity of the suspension of anisotropic particles by Fricke as well as by Hamilton and Crosser explains the trend of data well. In turn, it estimates thermal conductivity of the Laponite nanoparticle itself, which is otherwise difficult to measure in a direct manner. We also measure viscosity of the nanoparticle suspension using a concentric cylinder rheometer. Measurements are seen to follow quite well, the theoretical relation for viscosity of suspensions of oblate particles that includes up to two particle interaction. This result rules out the presence of clusters of particles in the suspension. The effective viscosity and thermal diffusivity data show that the shape of the particle has a role in determining enhancement of thermophysical properties of the suspension.

Susheel S. Bhandari; K. Muralidhar; Yogesh M Joshi

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Self-normalized photothermal technique for accurate thermal diffusivity measurements in thin metal layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-normalized photothermal technique for accurate thermal diffusivity measurements in thin metal method for measuring thermal diffusivity of thin metal layers has been implemented using two experimental of this method, simple experimental criteria have been developed to ascertain that a purely thermal-diffusion

Mandelis, Andreas

29

Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable of vegetable oils. The thermal diffusivity of six commercial vegetable oils olive, corn, soybean, canola in terms of thermal diffusivity was shown. The high measurement precision of the TWRC highlights

Mandelis, Andreas

30

Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in manufactured inhomogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile of the thermal diffusivity of inhomogeneous solids. In the depth profile reconstruction algorithm three channels Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 98 04305-9 I. INTRODUCTION Thermal diffusivity which depends

Mandelis, Andreas

31

Oversight Reports - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah Project Office - May 2012 Assessment of the PortsmouthPaducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants...

32

Thermal imaging measurement and correlation of thermal diffusivity in continuous fiber ceramic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for a variety of high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. For such composites, knowledge of porosity distribution and presence of defects is important for optimizing mechanical and thermal behavior of the components. The assessment of porosity and its distribution is also necessary during composite processing to ensure component uniformity. To determine the thermal properties of CFCC materials, and particularly for detecting defects and nonuniformities, the authors have developed an infrared thermal imaging method to provide a single-shot full-field measurement of thermal diffusivity distributions in large components. This method requires that the back surface of a specimen receives a thermal pulse of short duration and that the temperature of the front surface is monitored as a function of time. The system has been used to measure thermal diffusivities of several CFCC materials with known porosity or density values, including SYLRAMIC{trademark} SiC/SiNC composite samples from Dow Corning and SiC/SiC and enhanced SiC/SiC samples from DuPont Lanxide Composites, to determine the relationship of thermal diffusivity to component porosity or density.

Sun, J.G.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Easler, T.E.; Szweda, A. [Dow Corning Corp., Midland, MI (United States); Craig, P.A. [DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks Pascal Richter1 introduce our tool for the optimisation of parameterised solar thermal power plants, and report the applicability of our approach. Keywords: Optimization, Solar thermal power plants, Neural networks, Genetic

Ábrahám, Erika

35

Influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion within R. S. Cai,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion within SiO2 glass D. Barba,1 R online 17 March 2014) We study the influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion of several orders of magnitudes.12,16­18 This may suggest that Si dangling bonds can affect the diffusion

36

Thermal Particle Injection in Nonlinear Diffusive Shock Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle acceleration in collisionless astrophysical shocks, i.e., diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), is the most likely mechanism for producing cosmic rays, at least below 10^{15} eV. Despite the success of this theory, several key elements, including the injection of thermal particles, remains poorly understood. We investigate injection in strongly nonlinear shocks by comparing a semi-analytic model of DSA with a Monte Carlo model. These two models treat injection quite differently and we show, for a particular set of parameters, how these differences influence the overall acceleration efficiency and the shape of the broad-band distribution function.

Donald C. Ellison; Pasquale Blasi; Stefano Gabici

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

37

Thermal and Microcanonical Rates of Unimolecular Reactions from an Energy Diffusion Theory Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal and Microcanonical Rates of Unimolecular Reactions from an Energy Diffusion Theory Approach; In Final Form: September 13, 1999 We present an energy diffusion theory approach for computing thermal compared to the thermal energy. The weak-collision limit has been extensively studied.1-9 However

Miller, William H.

38

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Thermodynamics -2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy) executes a cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics - 2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy] Determine the rate of heat addition in the steam generator. Now consider an ideal, reversible cogeneration 1 2 3 45 6 Cogeneration Plant Boundary #12;

Virginia Tech

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

Horak, C.M. [ed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

On the nonlinear thermal diffusive theory of curved flames M. L. Frankel and G. I. Sivashinsky (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E 25 On the nonlinear thermal diffusive theory of curved flames M. L. Frankel and G. I. Sivashinsky Dth is the thermal diffusivity of the gaseous mixture and Vb the propagation velocity of the plane magnitudes, these equations may be written as follows : Article published online by EDP Sciences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

45

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Monitoring large enrichment plants using thermal imagery from commercial satellites: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal imagery from commercial satellites is an interesting candidate technology for use as a verification tool for the purpose of monitoring certain types of fissile material production sites. Examples of its potential treaty applications include the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT) or a Fissile Material Production Moratorium. To help determine the capabilities and limitations of such imagery as a monitoring tool, the author has examined archived LANDSAT-5 images of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, a large US uranium-enrichment facility in Ohio. This analysis indicates that large-scale gaseous diffusion plants can very likely be recognized as operational with thermal imagery throughout most of the year in clear weather conditions. It may also be possible to identify certain other large-scale qualitative changes in operations, such as the shut-down of a single process building in a plant, by a comparison of its temperature with the temperatures of neighboring operational process buildings. However, uncertainties in the current data set prevent a definitive conclusion regarding the latter capability. This study identifies intrinsic weaknesses, including vulnerability to countermeasures, that prevent thermal imagery from satellites from being a robust standalone verification tool, even for very large enrichment plants. Nonetheless, the imagery may be useful as a trigger for an on-site inspection, to alert and train inspectors prior to an inspection, and possibly to reduce the frequency of on-site inspections required at a given site. It could have some immediate utility for monitoring the two large gaseous diffusion plants the US and the French plant at Tricastin, and possibly for determining the operational status of two gaseous diffusion plants in China as well--a total of five plants worldwide. The ease of acquisition and modest cost of thermal commercial imagery further increase its attractiveness as a verification tool. In addition to these basic results, the author considers the influence on performance of improvements in spatial resolution in the thermal band expected from new and future platforms. He also discusses the effects of external factors such as convective cooling of the roofs, solar heating, the atmosphere, emissivity changes, and deliberate countermeasures--all of which can adversely affect measurements.

Adam Bernstein

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants...

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

48

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality...

50

Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC{sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3(f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly effect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for fill-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Stuckey, J.

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Seismic issues at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic expert workshop was held at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on March 13--15, 1989. the PGDP is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). During the last twenty years the design criteria for natural phenomenon hazards has steadily become more demanding at all of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) sites. The purpose of the two-day workshop was to review the seismic vulnerability issues of the PGDP facilities. Participants to the workshop included recognized experts in the fields of seismic engineering, seismology and geosciences, and probabilistic analysis, along with engineers and other personnel from Energy Systems. A complete list of the workshop participants is included in the front of this report. 29 refs.

Fricke, K.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part environmental report is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials. 36 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bioavailability study for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this plan is to assess the bioavailability of metals in the continuous and intermittent outfalls. The results may be used to determine alternative metal limits that more appropriately measure the portion of metal present necessary for toxicity to aquatic life. These limits must remain protective of in-stream aquatic life; thus, the highest concentration of metal in the water will be determined concurrently with an assessment of acute or chronic toxicity on laboratory tests. Using the method developed by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW), biomonitoring results and chemical data will be used to recommend alternative metal limits for the outfalls of concern. The data will be used to meet the objectives of the study: (1) evaluate the toxicity of continuous outfalls and intermittent outfalls at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (2) determine the mean ratio of dissolved to Total Recoverable metal for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn in the continuous and intermittent outfalls; (3) determine whether the concentration of total recoverable metal discharged causes toxicity to fathead minnows and /or Ceriodaphnia; and (4) determine alternative metal limits for each metal of concern (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn).

Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thermal imaging measurement of lateral diffusivity and non-invasive material defect detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining lateral thermal diffusivity of a material sample using a heat pulse; a sample oriented within an orthogonal coordinate system; an infrared camera; and a computer that has a digital frame grabber, and data acquisition and processing software. The mathematical model used within the data processing software is capable of determining the lateral thermal diffusivity of a sample of finite boundaries. The system and method may also be used as a nondestructive method for detecting and locating cracks within the material sample.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL); Deemer, Chris (Downers Grove, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy… (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mixed waste storage facility CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Solid waste landfill CDR review, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of two papers reviewing the waste storage facility and the landfill projects proposed for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant complex. The first paper is a review of DOE`s conceptual design report for a mixed waste storage facility. This evaluation is to review the necessity of constructing a separate mixed waste storage facility. The structure is to be capable of receiving, weighing, sampling and the interim storage of wastes for a five year period beginning in 1996. The estimated cost is assessed at approximately $18 million. The review is to help comprehend and decide whether a new storage building is a feasible approach to the PGDP mixed waste storage problem or should some alternate approach be considered. The second paper reviews DOE`s conceptual design report for a solid waste landfill. This solid waste landfill evaluation is to compare costs and the necessity to provide a new landfill that would meet State of Kentucky regulations. The assessment considered funding for a ten year storage facility, but includes a review of other facility needs such as a radiation detection building, compactor/baler machinery, material handling equipment, along with other personnel and equipment storage buildings at a cost of approximately $4.1 million. The review is to help discern whether a landfill only or the addition of compaction equipment is prudent.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of HTGR Coupled with Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) to produce electricity and hydrogen. Although the hydrogen production processes using the nuclear energy are in an early stage of development, coupling hydrogen plant to HTGR requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion system (PCS) coupled to hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions. This paper includes a portion of thermal hydraulic results based on a direct cycle and a parallel intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) configuration option.

Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Robert Barner; Paul Pickard

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A correlation of air-coupled ultrasonic and thermal diffusivity data for CFCC materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An air-coupled (non contact) through-transmission ultrasonic investigation has been conducted on 2D multiple ply Nicalon{trademark} SiC fiber/SiNC CFCC panels as a function of number of processing cycles. Corresponding thermal diffusivity imaging was also conducted. The results of the air-coupled ultrasonic investigation correlated with thermal property variations determined via infrared methods. Areas of delaminations were detected and effects of processing cycles were also detected.

Pillai, T.A.K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, LaCrosse, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Easler, T.E.; Szweda, A. [Dow Corning Corp., Midland, MI (United States). Advanced Ceramics Program] [and others

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal boundary resistance and diffusivity measurements on thin YBa2Cu307--x films with MgO and SrTi03 substrates using the transient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O and SrTiOs substrates. The anisotropic YBazCu30,-, thermal diffusivity constants and the thermal boundary, are performed to obtain information on thermal diffusivity and to demonstrate the applicability of the technique the thermal diffusivity con- stants and boundary resistance in thin films of YBCO on MgO crystalline

Fayer, Michael D.

62

Effects of Matrix Cracks on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Matrix Cracks on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composite of Engineering Science, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9, Canada Effects of matrix cracks conductances coupled with a unit cell model for a fiber composite containing a periodic array of matrix cracks

Zok, Frank

63

Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [Verma et al., 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron’s thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of Braginskii. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity. 1 1

Mahendra K. Verma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [{\\it Verma et al.}, 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron's thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of {\\it Braginskii}. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity.

Mahendra K. Verma

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

Lateral diffusion of receptor-ligand bonds in membrane adhesion zones: Effect of thermal membrane roughness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adhesion of cells is mediated by membrane receptors that bind to complementary ligands in apposing cell membranes. It is generally assumed that the lateral diffusion of mobile receptor-ligand bonds in membrane-membrane adhesion zones is slower than the diffusion of unbound receptors and ligands. We find that this slowing down is not only caused by the larger size of the bound receptor-ligand complexes, but also by thermal fluctuations of the membrane shape. We model two adhering membranes as elastic sheets pinned together by receptor-ligand bonds and study the diffusion of the bonds using Monte Carlo simulations. In our model, the fluctuations reduce the bond diffusion constant in planar membranes by a factor close to 2 in the biologically relevant regime of small bond concentrations.

H. Krobath; G. J. Schuetz; R. Lipowsky; T. R. Weikl

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

New contactless method for thermal diffusivity measurements using modulated photothermal radiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modulated photothermal radiometry is a non-destructive and contactless technique for the characterization of materials. It has two major advantages: a good signal-to-noise ratio through a synchronous detection and a low dependence on the heating power and the optical properties of the sample surface. This paper presents a new method for characterizing the thermal diffusivity of a material when the phase shift between a modulated laser power signal and the thermal signal of a plate sample is known at different frequencies. The method is based on a three-dimensional analytical model which is used to determine the temperature amplitude and the phase in the laser heating of the plate. A new simple formula was developed through multi-parametric analysis to determine the thermal diffusivity of the plate with knowledge of the frequency at the minimum phase shift, the laser beam radius r{sub 0} and the sample thickness L. This method was developed to control the variation of the thermal diffusivity of nuclear components and it was first applied to determine the thermal diffusivity of different metals: 304 L stainless steel, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc, and iron. The experimental results were obtained with 5%–10% accuracy and corresponded well with the reference values. The present paper also demonstrates the limit of application of this method for plate with thickness r{sub 0}/100 ? L ? r{sub 0}/2. The technique is deemed interesting for the characterization of barely accessible components that require a contactless measurement.

Pham Tu Quoc, S., E-mail: sang.phamtuquoc@cea.fr; Cheymol, G.; Semerok, A. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Nuclear Energy, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LISL, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France)] [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Nuclear Energy, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LISL, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Application of subgroup decomposition in diffusion theory to gas cooled thermal reactor problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the accuracy and computational efficiency of the subgroup decomposition (SGD) method in diffusion theory is assessed in a ID benchmark problem characteristic of gas cooled thermal systems. This method can be viewed as a significant improvement in accuracy of standard coarse-group calculations used for VHTR whole core analysis in which core environmental effect and energy angle coupling are pronounced. It is shown that a 2-group SGD calculation reproduces fine-group (47) results with 1.5 to 6 times faster computational speed depending on the stabilizing schemes while it is as efficient as single standard 6-group diffusion calculation. (authors)

Yasseri, S.; Rahnema, F. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Program, George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

70

Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous- fiber ceramic composite materials and components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC {sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sub (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other ``defects`` would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistant coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

Steckenrider, J.S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rothermel, S.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal diffusivity imaging of continuous fiber ceramic composite materials and components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced turbine engines. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces between the fibers and matrix or between laminae in a two-dimensional weave lay-up are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess the interface condition and/or detect other `defects` has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and uses infrared thermal imaging to provide `single-shot` full- field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. By applying digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, shorter acquisition and analysis times have been achieved with submillimeter spatial resolution for materials with a wide range of `thermal thicknesses`. The system at ANL has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens. In addition, actual subscale CFCC components of nonplanar geometries have been inspected for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Steckenrider, J.S. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); King, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, June 19-Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, Februarythe Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. OceanSixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Carbon Diffusion and Clustering in SiGeC Layers Under Thermal Oxidation D. De Salvador1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to distinguish the pure thermal effects from those produced by the I injection under oxidationCarbon Diffusion and Clustering in SiGeC Layers Under Thermal Oxidation D. De Salvador1 , E to the formation and growth of C containing precipitates which are promoted by the I injection and act as a sink

83

Quantitative photoacoustic depth profilometry of magnetic field-induced thermal diffusivity inhomogeneity in the liquid crystal octylcyanobiphenyl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be present in these liquid crys- tals and the variation in the nematic value of the heat capacity may of the static Quantities enthalpy and heat capacity have been carried out by adiabatic scanning calorimetry-*0 namely the thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity, especially across the region

Mandelis, Andreas

84

Evaluating Equipment Performance Using SCADA/PMS Data for Thermal Utility Plants - Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equipment in cogeneration plants and thermal energy plants such as gas tubing generators, boilers, steam turbine generators, chillers and cooling towers are often critical to satisfying building needs. Their actual energy performance is very...

Deng, X.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value.

Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Castleberry, Kim N. (Harriman, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value. 6 figs.

Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

Evans, Thomas M., E-mail: evanstm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mosher, Scott W., E-mail: moshersw@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Slattery, Stuart R., E-mail: sslattery@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53716 (United States); Hamilton, Steven P., E-mail: hamiltonsp@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Temperature dependence of thermal conductivities of coupled rotator lattice and the momentum diffusion in standard map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In contrary to other 1D momentum-conserving lattices such as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam $\\beta$ (FPU-$\\beta$) lattice, the 1D coupled rotator lattice is a notable exception which conserves total momentum while exhibits normal heat conduction behavior. The temperature behavior of the thermal conductivities of 1D coupled rotator lattice had been studied in previous works trying to reveal the underlying physical mechanism for normal heat conduction. However, two different temperature behaviors of thermal conductivities have been claimed for the same coupled rotator lattice. These different temperature behaviors also intrigue the debate whether there is a phase transition of thermal conductivities as the function of temperature. In this work, we will revisit the temperature dependent thermal conductivities for the 1D coupled rotator lattice. We find that the temperature dependence follows a power law behavior which is different with the previously found temperature behaviors. Our results also support the claim that there is no phase transition for 1D coupled rotator lattice. We also give some discussion about the similarity of diffusion behaviors between the 1D coupled rotator lattice and the single kicked rotator also called the Chirikov standard map.

Yunyun Li; Nianbei Li; Baowen Li

2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Blackness coefficients, effective diffusion parameters, and control rod worths for thermal reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple diffusion theory cannot be used to evaluate control rod worths in thermal reactors because of the strongly absorbing character of the control material. However, good results can be obtained from a diffusion calculation by representing the absorber slab by means of a suitable pair of internal boundary conditions, ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.., which are ratios of neutron flux to neutron current. Methods for calculating ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. in the P/sub 1/, P/sub 3/, and P/sub 5/ approximations, with and without scattering, are presented. By appropriately weighting the fine-group blackness coefficients, broad group values, <..cap alpha..> and <..beta..>, are obtained. The technique is applied to the calculation of control rod worths of Cd, Ag-In-Cd, and Hf control elements. Results are found to compare very favorably with detailed Monte Carlo calculations. For control elements whose geometry does not permit a thin slab treatment, other methods are needed for determining the effective diffusion parameters. One such method is briefly discussed and applied to the calculation of control rod worths in the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan. Calculated and measured worths are found to be in good agreement.

Bretscher, M.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling and Simulation of Solar Chimney Power Plant with and without the Effect of Thermal Energy Storage Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A solar updraft tower power plant – sometimes also called 'solar chimney' or just ‘solar tower’ – is a solar thermal power plant utilizing a… (more)

Daba, Robera

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process configurations for solar power plants with sensible-heatsolar power plant with sensible-heat storage since the chemical~heat storage processsolar power plant with a sulfur-oxide storage process. chemical~heat

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Generalizing the flash technique in the front-face configuration to measure the thermal diffusivity of semitransparent solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we have extended the front-face flash method to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of semitransparent plates. A complete theoretical model that allows calculating the front surface temperature rise of the sample has been developed. It takes into consideration additional effects, such as multiple reflections of the heating light beam inside the sample, heat losses by convection and radiation, transparency of the sample to infrared wavelengths, and heating pulse duration. Measurements performed on calibrated solids, covering a wide range of absorption coefficients (from transparent to opaque) and thermal diffusivities, validate the proposed method.

Pech-May, Nelson Wilbur [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, CINVESTAV Unidad Mérida, carretera Antigua a Progreso km6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Mérida Yucatán 97310, México (Mexico); Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín, E-mail: agustin.salazar@ehu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonwill require higher parasitic power for gas circulation. Theefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine topping

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

On linearization and preconditioning for radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method is an effective algorithm for solving large scale nonlinear equations. One of the most important advantages of JFNK method is that there is no necessity to form and store the Jacobian matrix of the nonlinear system when JFNK method is employed. However, an approximation of the Jacobian is needed for the purpose of preconditioning. In this paper, JFNK method is employed to solve a class of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations, and two preconditioners are designed by linearizing the equations in two methods. Numerical results show that the two preconditioning methods can improve the convergence behavior and efficiency of JFNK method.

Feng, Tao, E-mail: fengtao2@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China) [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China); Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China); An, Hengbin, E-mail: an_hengbin@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yu, Xijun, E-mail: yuxj@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Qin, E-mail: liqin@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Rongpei, E-mail: zhangrongpei@163.com [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680°C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant...

104

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Experimental studies are presented that aim to utilize phase change materials (PCM's) to enhance thermal energy storage systems for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) systems.… (more)

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringthermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants by mid-1980 1 s.distributiion at potential OTEC sites. p. 7D-4/1-4/5. In

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Figure 2: Schematic of Sensible Heat Based CSP Plant[3 Figure 3: Schematic of PCM Based CSP Plant[a typical sensible heat based CSP plant. Cold molten salt is

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6Department ofGaseous Diffusion Plant Director's

110

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6Department ofGaseous Diffusion Plant

111

A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insure constant output from a solar power plant. However. aoutput from the steam turbines is maintained. Equipment design for the proposed solar power

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Rock bed thermal storage for concentrating solar power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Concentrating solar power plants are a promising means of generating electricity. However, they are dependent on the sun as a source of energy,… (more)

Allen, Kenneth Guy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design. Propofied Solar Cooling Tower Type Wet-Cooled Powerdry-cooling tower was used in the proposed solar power plantTower • Power-Generation Subsystem Summary An Overall Summary of the Proposed Solar

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mini-jet thermalization and diffusion of transverse momentum correlation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle of produced hadrons due to mini-jets are studied first within the HIJING Monte Carlo model in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Jet quenching in the early stage of thermalization is shown to lead to significant diffusion (broadening) of the correlation. Evolution of the transverse momentum density fluctuation that gives rise to such correlation in azimuthal angle in the later stage of heavy-ion collisions is further investigated within a linearized diffusion-like equation and is shown to be determined by the shear viscosity of the evolving dense matter. Such a diffusion equation for the transverse momentum fluctuation is solved with initial values given by HIJING and together with the hydrodynamic equation for the bulk medium. The final transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle is calculated along the freeze-out hyper-surface and is found further diffused for larger values of shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s \\sim 0.2-0.4$. Therefore the final transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle can be used to study the thermalization of mini-jets in the early stage of heavy-ion collisions and the viscous effect in the hydrodynamic evolution of the strongly coupled quark gluon plasma.

Long-gang Pang; Qun Wang; Xin-Nian Wang; Rong Xu

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Signal generation mechanisms, intracavity-gas thermal-diffusivity temperature dependence, and absolute infrared emissivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Canada Received 22 September 1997; accepted for publication 8 October 1997 The operating thermal power dominance of thermal-wave radiation power transfer in the phase channel of the thermal-wave signal at large produces an ac electrical signal proportional to the energy of the standing thermal-wave pattern

Mandelis, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermally Induced Chemistry of Meteoritic Complex Organic Molecules: A New Heat-Diffusion Model for the Atmospheric Entry of Meteorites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research over the past four decades has shown a rich variety of complex organic molecular content in some meteorites. This current study is an attempt to gain a better insight into the thermal conditions experienced by these molecules inside meteorites during atmospheric entry. In particular, we wish to understand possible chemical processes that can occur during entry and that might have had an effect on complex organic or prebiotic species that were delivered in this way to the early Earth. A simulation was written in Fortran to model heating by the shock generated during entry and the subsequent thermal diffusion inside the body of a meteorite. Experimental data was used for the thermal parameters of several types of meteorites, including iron-nickel and several classes of chondrites. A Sutton-Graves model of stagnation-point heating was used to calculate peak surface temperatures and an explicit difference formula was used to generate thermal diffusion profiles for both chondrites and iron-nickel type met...

Shingledecker, Christopher N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal… (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing.

Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.15 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g. 13 refs., 13 figs.

Sykora, D.W.; Haynes, M.E. (Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.); Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal power plant components  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-activeNational Solar Thermal Test

130

Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building Weijie Zhang Jinshun Wu Yiran Wei Xudong Gao... ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 room has been made and some theoretical relations between outdoor air temperature and indoor thermal load within certain region have been...

Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The approach was based on analyses of the potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (1) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to the groundwater, (2) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (3) calculations of operating limits from the dose limit and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted. The intended application of the results is to refine the radiological monitoring standards employed by the PGDP Health Physics personnel to determine what constitutes radioactive wastes, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

1994-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Volume 2, Thermal-hydraulic results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research program to develop a methodology to assess the operational performance of Babcock and Wilcox plants and to apply this methodology on a trial basis. The methodology developed for analyzing Babcock and Wilcox plants integrated methods used in both thermal-hydraulics and human factors and compared results with information used in the assessment of risk. The integrated methodology involved an evaluation of a selected plant for each pressurized water reactor vendor during a limited number of transients. A plant was selected to represent each vendor, and three transients were identified for analysis. The plants were Oconee Unit 1 for Babcock and Wilcox, H.B. Robinson Unit 2 for Westinghouse, and Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 for Combustion Engineering. The three transients were a complete loss of all feedwater, a small-break loss-of-coolant accident, and a steam-generator overfill with auxiliary feedwater. Included in the integrated methodology was an assessment of the thermal-hydraulic behavior, including event timing, of the plants during the three transients. Thermal-hydraulic results are presented in this volume (Volume 2) of the report. 26 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

Wheatley, P.D.; Davis, C.B.; Callow, R.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Dobbe, C.A.; Beelman, R.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office is preparing an EA for a proposal to convey DOE land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization and potentially other parties in furtherance of reindustrialization and reuse for economic development purposes.

136

Thermal Efficiency Optimization for Industrial Power Plants Under Load Fluctuations Using Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time monitoring, optimization and control of a hydroelectric generation complex. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, Vol 3 No.2 Nov. 1988 p 1768-1783. (2] Nakamura H., Toyota Y., Kushihashi M., Uchida M., Optimal control of Thermal Power Plants. Journal...

Steffenhagan, W.; de Sam Lazaro, A.

137

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Assessment and interpretation of cross- and down-hole seismograms at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is an assessment and interpretation of cross-and down-hole seismograms recorded at four sites in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Arrival times of shear (S-) and compressional (P-) waves are recorded on these seismograms in milliseconds. Together with known distances between energy sources and seismometers lowered into boreholes, these arrival times are used to calculate S- and P-wave velocities in unconsolidated soils and sediments that overlie bedrock approximately 320 ft beneath PGDP. The soil columns are modified after an earlier draft by ERC Environmental and Energy Services Company (ERCE), 1990. In addition to S- and P- wave velocity estimates from this paper, the soil columns contain ERCE's lithologic and other geotechnical data for unconsolidated soils and sediments from the surface to bedrock. Soil columns for Sites 1 through 4 and a site location map are in Plates 1 through 5 of Appendix 6. The velocities in the four columns are input parameters for the SHAKE computer program, a nationally recognized computer model that simulates ground response of unconsolidated materials to earthquake generated seismic waves. The results of the SHAKE simulation are combined with predicted ground responses on rock foundations (caused by a given design earthquake) to predict ground responses of facilities with foundations placed on unconsolidated materials. 3 refs.

Staub, W.P.; Wang, J.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Selfridge, R.J. (Automated Sciences Group, (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant proposed pilot pump-and-treat project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 23, 1992, R.C. Sleeman of the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office requested that a Groundwater Corrective Actions Team be assembled to evaluate the technical merit of and the need to implement a proposed groundwater pump-and-treat demonstration project for the Northwest contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. In addition to other suggestions, the Team recommended that further characterization data be obtained for the plume. In the Fall of 1993 additional, temporary well points were installed so that groundwater samples from the shallow groundwater system and the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) could be obtained to provide a three-dimensional view of groundwater contamination in the region of the plume. The results indicate that pure-phase DNAPL (trichloroethylene [TCE]) probably are present in the source area of the plume and extend in depth to the base of the RGA. Because the DNAPL likely will represent a source of a dissolved phase plume for decades it is essential that source containment take place. The Team recommends that although effective hydraulic containment can be achieved, other alternatives should be considered. For example, recent advances in emplacing low permeability barrier walls to depths of 100 to 150 ft make it possible to consider encirclement of the source of the Northwest plume.

Bodenstein, G.W.; Bonczek, R.R.; Early, T.O.; Huff, D.D.; Jones, K.S.; Nickelson, M.D.; Rightmire, C.T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Theory of Thermal Motion in Electromagnetically Induced Transparency: Diffusion, Doppler, Dicke and Ramsey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theoretical model for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in vapor, that incorporates atomic motion and velocity-changing collisions into the dynamics of the density-matrix distribution. Within a unified formalism we demonstrate various motional effects, known for EIT in vapor: Doppler-broadening of the absorption spectrum; Dicke-narrowing and time-of-flight broadening of the transmission window for a finite-sized probe; Diffusion of atomic coherence during storage of light and diffusion of the light-matter excitation during slow-light propagation; and Ramsey-narrowing of the spectrum for a probe and pump beams of finite-size.

O. Firstenberg; M. Shuker; R. Pugatch; D. R. Fredkin; N. Davidson; A. Ron

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Electrical conductivity and charge diffusion in thermal QCD from the lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a lattice QCD calculation of the charge diffusion coefficient, the electrical conductivity and various susceptibilities of conserved charges, for a range of temperatures below and above the deconfinement crossover. The calculations include the contributions from up, down and strange quarks. We find that the diffusion coefficient is of the order of 1/(2\\pi T) and has a dip around the crossover temperature. Our results are obtained with lattice simulations containing 2+1 dynamical flavours on anisotropic lattices. The Maximum Entropy Method is used to construct spectral functions from correlators of the conserved vector current.

Gert Aarts; Chris Allton; Alessandro Amato; Pietro Giudice; Simon Hands; Jon-Ivar Skullerud

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 of the ``Survey of Strong Motion Earthquake Effects on Thermal Power Plants in California with Emphasis on Piping Systems`` contains Appendices which detail the detail design and seismic response of several power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes. The particular plants considered include the Ormond Beach, Long Beach and Seal Beach, Burbank, El Centro, Glendale, Humboldt Bay, Kem Valley, Pasadena and Valley power plants. Included is a typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical piping and support installations for the plants surveyed. Detailed piping support spacing data are also included.

Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A thermal method for measuring the rate of water movement in plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L?BP A 8 V a L ?BPA8B8 op A THERMAL METHOD FOR MEASURING THE RATE OF WATER MOVEMENT IN PLANTS A Dissertation By Morris Elkins Bloodworth Vao Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial... Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May, 1958 TLX Major Subject: Soil Physics p ^i???pP ??^i?? ??? ??p?????? ^i? ?p^? ?? WATER MOVEMENT IN PLANTS A Dissertation By Morris Elkins Bloodworth Approved as to style...

Bloodworth, Morris Elkins

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Investigation of coal stockpiles of Tuncbilek thermal power plant with respect to time under atmospheric conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal power plants have delayed the coal that they will use at stockpiles mandatorily. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stockyards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started itself. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research a coal stockpile at Tuncbilek Thermal Power Plant which was formed in 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m height with a weight of 120 tons to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Later, internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over two layers in the stockpile. The parameters, such as air temperature, humidity, atmosphere pressure, wind speed and direction, which are effective on the stockpiles, were measured and used to obtain the graphs of stockpiles' internal temperature.

Ozdeniz, A.H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Tax Revenue and Job Benefits from Solar Thermal Power Plants in Nye County  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to establish a common understanding of the financial benefits that the County will receive as solar thermal power plants are developed in Amargosa Valley. Portions of the tax data and job estimates in the report were provided by developers Solar Millennium and Abengoa Solar in support of the effort. It is hoped that the resulting presented data will be accepted as factual reference points for the ensuing debates and financial decisions concerning these development projects.

Kuver, Walt

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

Carpenter, P.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doll, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phillips, B.E. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Proposed sale of radioactively contaminated nickel ingots located at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to sell 8,500 radioactively contaminated nickel ingots (9.350 short tons), currently in open storage at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), to Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG) for decontamination and resale on the international market. SEG would take ownership of the ingots when they are loaded for transport by truck to its facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. SEG would receive approximately 200 short tons per month over approximately 48 months (an average of 180 ingots per month). The nickel decontamination process specified in SEG`s technical proposal is considered the best available technology and has been demonstrated in prototype at SEG. The resultant metal for resale would have contamination levels between 0.3 and 20 becquerel per gram (Bq/g). The health hazards associated with release of the decontaminated nickel are minimal. The activity concentration of the end product would be further reduced when the nickel is combined with other metals to make stainless steel. Low-level radioactive waste from the SEG decontamination process, estimated to be approximately 382 m{sup 3} (12,730 ft), would be shipped to a licensed commercial or DOE disposal facility. If the waste were packaged in 0.23 m{sup 3}-(7.5 ft{sup 3}-) capacity drums, approximately 1,500 to 1,900 drums would be transported over the 48-month contract period. Impacts from the construction of decontamination facilities and the selected site are minimal.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modeling and analyses of postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. In the postulated accident scenario, {approximately}7900 kg (17,500 lb) of hot UF{sub 6} vapor is released over a 5 min period from the process piping into the atmosphere of a large process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. MELCOR model was first used to develop a single volume representation of a process building and its results were compared with those from past lumped parameter models specifically developed for studying UF{sub 6} release accidents. Preliminary results indicate that MELCOR predicted results (using a lumped formulation) are comparable with those from previously developed models.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, R.H. [Dyer Enterprises, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Thermal Hydraulic Analyses for Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor to Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermalhydraulic and efficiency points of view.

C.H. Oh; R. Barner; C. B. Davis; S. Sherman; P. Pickard

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in a sea bay water area used for water supply to nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consideration is given to the numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in sea water areas used for both water supply to and dissipation of low-grade heat from a nuclear power plant on the shore of a sea bay.

Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

Fry, David J. (David James)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Source term evaluation during seismic events in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 00 buildings are expected to collapse (per guidance from structure evaluation) during a seismic event in which acceleration level exceeds 0.15g. All roof beams may slip off supports, and collapse. Equipment may slip off from supports and fall onto the floor. The cell floor is also supposed to collapse due to structural instability and distortion due to excessive acceleration forces. Following structure collapse, expansion joints in the process piping and joints between the piping and equipment are expected to fail. Preliminary analysis showed that converters are likely to remain intact. The UF{sub 6} gas released from the break will rapidly interact with moisture in the air to produce UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and HF with exothermic energy released of {approximately}0.32 MJ/kg of UF{sub 6} reacted. Depending on the degree of mixing between UF{sub 6} gas, its reaction products, air and freon (R-114), there may occur a strong buoyancy force to disperse UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol particles that are subjected to the gravitational force for settling. Such a chemical reaction will also occur inside the converters. A substantial amount of UF{sub 6} must be stagnated at the bottom of the converters. At the interface between this stagnated UF{sub 6} and air, UF{sub 6} gas will diffuse into the air, undergo the chemical reaction with moisture there, and eventually be released through the break. Furthermore, lubricant oil fire in the building, if it occurs, will enhance the UF{sub 6} release into the atmosphere. The purpose of this study is to evaluate source term (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and HF) during such a seismic event. This study takes an approach using multiple steps as follows: (1) Source term evaluation at the break due to mixing between UF{sub 6} and air along with thermal buoyancy induced by chemical reaction energy, (2) Evaluation of additional source term from the converters in which a substantial UF{sub 6} vapor remains, and (3) Source term evaluation with lubricant oil fire.

Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Schmidt, R.W.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Maskless direct laser writing with visible light: Breaking through the optical resolving limit with cooperative manipulations of nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the resolving limit of maskless direct laser writing is overcome by cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion, where the nonlinear reverse saturation absorption can induce the formation of below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot, and the thermal diffusion manipulation can make the heat quantity at the central region of energy absorption spot propagate along the thin film thickness direction. The temperature at the central region of energy absorption spot transiently reaches up to melting point and realizes nanolithography. The sample “glass substrate/AgInSbTe” is prepared, where AgInSbTe is taken as nonlinear reverse saturation absorption thin film. The below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot is simulated theoretically and verified experimentally by near-field spot scanning method. The “glass substrate/Al/AgInSbTe” sample is prepared, where the Al is used as thermal conductive layer to manipulate the thermal diffusion channel because the thermal diffusivity coefficient of Al is much larger than that of AgInSbTe. The direct laser writing is conducted by a setup with a laser wavelength of 650?nm and a converging lens of NA=0.85, the lithographic marks with a size of about 100?nm are obtained, and the size is only about 1/10 the incident focused spot. The experimental results indicate that the cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion is a good method to realize nanolithography in maskless direct laser writing with visible light.

Wei, Jingsong, E-mail: weijingsong@siom.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Rui [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

Evans, Thomas M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL] [ORNL; Slattery, Stuart [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Coal thermolysis modeling: The effects of restricted diffusion on thermal reaction pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. A detailed study of the thermolysis of surface-immobilized bibenzyl showed that the rate of unimolecular C-C homolysis is similar to that in fluid phases. Recent studies have foucused on the thermally induced, free radical chain decomposition reactions for surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane and 1,4-diphenylbutane. For 1,4-diphenylbutane both the reaction rate and product composition are strongly dependent on surface coverage and, hence, the proximity of 1.4-diphenylbutane molecules and hydrogen abstracting radicals on the surface. The rates and selectivities of these key bimolecular reaction steps on the surface might also be affected by the structure of neighboring molecules. In the current study, we are beginning to probe this feature by examining the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane. 7 refs. , 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

Method for evaluating the technical state of boilers and piping in thermal power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach for evaluating the current technical state of thermal equipment in thermal power plants is discussed. A system of parameters and corresponding criteria are developed for the technical state of groups of essential components of boilers and piping. Ascale for evaluation of safety factors is proposed in terms of the relationship between state parameters and the corresponding criteria. Analytic expressions are given for an approximate evaluation of the maximum lifetime limit for operation of an object in terms of an integral safety factor and an evaluation of this type is illustrated for the case of the live steam pipeline in a 300-MW unit. An algorithm is set up for actions to be taken by equipment owners in organizing monitoring of the technical state of the equipment.

Grin', E. A. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation); Stepanov, V. V.; Sarkisyan, V. A.; Babkina, R. I. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Health risk from earthquake caused releases of UF{sub 6} at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The health risk to the public and workers from potential exposure to the toxic materials from earthquake caused releases of uranium hexafluoride from the Paducah gaseous Diffusion Plant are evaluated. The results of the study show that the health risk from earthquake caused releases is small, and probably less than risks associated with the transportation of hydrogen fluoride and other similar chemicals used by industry. The probability of more than 30 people experiencing health consequences (injuries) from earthquake damage is less than 4xlO{sup 4}/yr.

Brown, N.W; Lu, S.; Chen, J.C.; Roehnelt, R.; Lombardi, D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method and system to provide thermal power for a power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for providing thermal power to generate electricity in a power plant is described comprising: delivering substantially uncut and untrimmed whole trees into a combustion chamber; burning the substantially whole trees in the combustion chamber to generate heat; and absorbing the heat of combustion of the trees in a device for providing power to an electrical power generator. A system for providing power to an electrical generating power plant is described comprising: means for defining a combustion chamber within which substantially uncut and untrimmed whole trees are received for burning; conveyor means for delivering the substantially whole trees for combustion into the combustion chamber; and heat absorbing means for absorbing the heat of combustion of the substantially whole trees, the heat absorbing means being adapted to be operatively connected to means for converting the absorbed heat into electrical power.

Ostlie, L.D.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

An interim report to the manager of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from the Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee was formed as: (1) an outgrowth of other Environmental Advisory Committees already in existence at Oak Ridge and other Martin Marietta Energy Systems plants; (2) a result of public concern following significant nuclear incidents at Bhopal and Chernobyl; (3) a result of the new direction and commitment of the management of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant following contract acquisition by Martin Marietta Energy Systems; and (4) a means of reducing and/or preventing local and/or public concern regarding the activities of and potential risks created by PGDP. This report discusses the following issues and concerns of the Committee arrived at through a series of meetings: (1) groundwater monitoring; (2) long-range tails storage; C-404, scrap yrads, and PCB and TCE cleanup; nuclear criticality plan and alarm systems; documentation of historical data regarding hazardous waste burial grounds; dosimeter badges; and asbestos handling and removal.

Jackson, G.D.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydraulic Containment of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the progress of a groundwater remedial action at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. The X-749 southern boundary hydraulic containment system, combining a four-well extraction system with a previously constructed subsurface barrier wall, has been employed at PORTS. The hydraulic containment project has been implemented as part of containment and remediation of the X-749/X-120 area trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant. The X-749/X-120 groundwater contaminant plume is located in the south central section (Quadrant I) of the PORTS facility. The plume is associated with the former X-120 Goodyear Training Facility and a landfill known as the X-749 Contaminated Materials Disposal Facility. The principal contaminants of concern are chlorinated solvents (primarily TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A subsurface barrier wall (X-749 South Barrier Wall) was completed in 1994 at the PORTS southern reservation boundary as an interim remedial measure to slow the advancement of the leading edge of the contaminated groundwater plume or to prevent the plume from migrating off DOE property. Remedial measures identified by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) included installation of a barrier wall around the eastern and southern portions of the X-749 landfill to provide source control and installation of a phyto-remediation system to help contain groundwater flow and remove volatile organic compounds. Previous remedial measures that were implemented as elements of 'closures' on the X-749 landfill included a multimedia cap, barrier walls, and a groundwater collection system. Despite these measures, the X-749/X-120 groundwater plume has migrated beyond the southern DOE property boundary. Current TCE concentrations in off-site groundwater monitoring wells are below the preliminary remediation goal and drinking water maximum contaminant level for TCE of 5 {mu}g/kg, but continue to increase. Hydraulic containment was selected as the method for controlling the plume at the southern DOE property boundary. Recent borings and pumping tests indicate that approximately a 400-foot section of the existing subsurface barrier wall near the DOE property boundary may been improperly keyed into the Sunbury Shale bedrock which underlies the unconsolidated uppermost Gallia sand and gravel aquifer (Gallia). This gap is reported to be as much as 4 vertical feet. In addition, the X-749 groundwater plume is migrating around the western end of the X-749 South Barrier Wall. Four groundwater extraction wells were installed at the DOE property boundary to provide hydraulic control of the plume currently flowing under and around the existing subsurface barrier wall. Placement of the new extraction wells was based on groundwater modeling and data collected from pumping tests in the area. The extracted groundwater is being sent to the on-site X-622 Groundwater Treatment Facility via subsurface piping. The hydraulic containment system began operation in June 2007. The preliminary water elevations from monitoring wells in the vicinity of two of the four extraction wells demonstrate a significant decrease in groundwater potentiometric head in the southern boundary area. The current extraction rates should be adequate to contain the leading edge of the contaminant plume. Monitoring wells in the area will continue to be sampled on a quarterly basis. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Rieske, D.P.G.; Baird, D.R.P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous.

Huizinga, H.W. (Illinois State Univ., Normal (USA)); McLaughlin, G.L. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials (PCM) in solar thermal concentrating technologyeffective and efficient solar thermal electricity generatorbeen considered for solar thermal energy storages. These are

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings on thermal energy storage and energy conversion;polymer microcomposites for thermal energy storage. SAE SocLow temperature thermal energy storage: a state of the art

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

On-line vibration and analysis system at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enrichment facility in Paducah, KY uses a unique hard-wired vibration monitoring and analysis system for gaseous diffusion equipment. The axial flow and centrifugal flow compressors used in uranium enrichment range in size from 6 feet in diameter to less than one foot in diameter. These compressors must operate smoothly and safely, without breech of containment, since the working fluid of gaseous diffusion is gaseous UF/sub 6/. The condition of 1925 compressors is monitored by use of the 2500 point vibration analysis system. Since the failure mechanisms of the compressors are well known and documented, only one accelerometer per machine is needed for most machines. The system is completely automated and can generate spectra or broadband levels in either acceleration or velocity units. Levels are stored for historical review. The analyst can, via a custom telecommunications link, view and analyze data from all monitored points with an office PC. 4 figs.

Herricks, D.M.; Strunk, W.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermal plant bids and market clearing in an electricity pool minimization of costs vs. minimization of consumer payments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spanish wholesale electricity market has started on January 1, 1998. Though it is based on simple price/quantity bids, it incorporates some provisions to take thermal plant running requirements into account. This paper presents these rules and its mathematical treatment, focusing on a possible implementation of the minimum income condition, which allows thermal generators to declare minimum stable loads. It also shows another key point in the debate: whether the algorithm should minimize costs or consumer payments.

Alonso, J.; Trias, A.; Gaitan, V.; Alba, J.J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gamma radiological surveys of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, 1990-1993, and overview of data processing and analysis by the Environmental Restoration Remote Sensing Program, Fiscal Year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three gamma radiological surveys have been conducted under auspices of the ER Remote Sensing Program: (1) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (1992), (2) Clinch River (1992), and (3) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) (1993). In addition, the Remote Sensing Program has acquired the results of earlier surveys at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) (1990) and PORTS (1990). These radiological surveys provide data for characterization and long-term monitoring of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contamination areas since many of the radioactive materials processed or handled on the ORR, PGDP, and PORTS are direct gamma radiation emitters or have gamma emitting daughter radionuclides. High resolution airborne gamma radiation surveys require a helicopter outfitted with one or two detector pods, a computer-based data acquisition system, and an accurate navigational positioning system for relating collected data to ground location. Sensors measure the ground-level gamma energy spectrum in the 38 to 3,026 KeV range. Analysis can provide gamma emission strength in counts per second for either gross or total man-made gamma emissions. Gross count gamma radiation includes natural background radiation from terrestrial sources (radionuclides present in small amounts in the earth`s soil and bedrock), from radon gas, and from cosmic rays from outer space as well as radiation from man-made radionuclides. Man-made count gamma data include only the portion of the gross count that can be directly attributed to gamma rays from man-made radionuclides. Interpretation of the gamma energy spectra can make possible the determination of which specific radioisotopes contribute to the observed man-made gamma radiation, either as direct or as indirect (i.e., daughter) gamma energy from specific radionuclides (e.g., cesium-137, cobalt-60, uranium-238).

Smyre, J.L.; Moll, B.W.; King, A.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Final environmental impact assessment of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document considers: the need for uranium enrichment facilities; site location; plant description; and describes the power generating facilities in light of its existing environment. The impacts from continuing operations are compared with alternatives of shutdown, relocation, and alternative power systems. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factors including plant distance offshore, water depth, typeand entrainment by offshore 400-MW OTEC plant is small,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Type B Accident Investigation of the August 22, 2000, Injury Resulting From Violent Exothermic Chemical Reaction at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, X-701B Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On August 22, 2000, an accident occurred at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) located in Piketon, Ohio. An employee of the IT Corporation (IT) working on an Environmental Management (EM) Technology Deployment Project received serious burns from a violent chemical reaction.

190

Evaluation of annual efficiencies of high temperature central receiver concentrated solar power plants with thermal energy storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current study has examined four cases of a central receiver concentrated solar power plant with thermal energy storage using the DELSOL and SOLERGY computer codes. The current state-of-the-art base case was compared with a theoretical high temperature case which was based on the scaling of some input parameters and the estimation of other parameters based on performance targets from the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This comparison was done for both current and high temperature cases in two configurations: a surround field with an external cylindrical receiver and a north field with a single cavity receiver. There is a fairly dramatic difference between the design point and annual average performance, especially in the solar field and receiver subsystems, and also in energy losses due to the thermal energy storage being full to capacity. Additionally, there are relatively small differences (<2%) in annual average efficiencies between the Base and High Temperature cases, despite an increase in thermal to electric conversion efficiency of over 8%. This is due the increased thermal losses at higher temperature and operational losses due to subsystem start-up and shut-down. Thermal energy storage can mitigate some of these losses by utilizing larger thermal energy storage to ensure that the electric power production system does not need to stop and re-start as often, but solar energy is inherently transient. Economic and cost considerations were not considered here, but will have a significant impact on solar thermal electric power production strategy and sizing.

Ehrhart, Brian David; Gill, David Dennis

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department of Energy,aspects of the screens for OTEC intake systems. U.S. Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

Lyon, B.F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Source term evaluation for UF{sub 6} release event in feed facility at gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of UF{sub 6} release accidents was conducted for the feed facility of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP). Release rates from pig-tail connections were estimated from CYLIND code predictions, whereas, MELCOR was utilized for simulating reactions of UF{sub 6} with moisture and consequent transport of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols and HF vapor through the building and to the environment. Two wind speeds were utilized. At the high end (Case 1) a wind speed of {approximately} 1 m/s (200 fpm) was assumed to flow parallel to the building length. At the low end (Case 2) to represent stagnant conditions a corresponding wind speed of 1 cm/s (2 fpm) was utilized. A further conservative assumption was made to specify no closure of crane and train doors at either end of the building. Relaxation of this assumption should provide for additional margins. Results indicated that, for the high (200 fpm) wind speed, close to 66% of the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols and 100% of the HF gas get released to the environment over a 10-minute period. However, for the low (2 fpm) wind speed, negligible amount ({approximately} 1% UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) of aerosols get released even over a 2 hour period.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

Raiji, Ashok

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessment of environmental effects of the coal used in the Seyitomer thermal power plant (Turkey) on white willow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal power plants increase local pollution through SOx, NOx, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and oils containing primarily particulates (including heavy metals) and increase global pollution through CO{sub 2}, the greenhouse gas that causes global warming. These strong pollutants have harmful effects on living organisms and the entire ecosystem. In this study, we analysed the heavy metals iron (Fe), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and sulfur (S) induced by sulfur dioxide found in both the washed and unwashed leaves of Salix alba L. tree, grown in six distinct localities in the vicinity of the Seyitomer thermal power plant, to assess the environmental impact. All parameters were examined in the surface soils (0-30 cm), and the most intense concentration of the pollutants in both soils and leaves was observed to be in the direction of the prevailing wind.

Cicek, A.; Koparal, A.S. [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Applied Research Center for Environmental Problems

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A semi-analytical model for heat and mass transfer in geothermal reservoirs to estimate fracture surface-are-to-volume ratios and thermal breakthrough using thermally-decaying and diffusing tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model was developed to conduct rapid scoping calculations of responses of thermally degrading and diffusing tracers in multi-well tracer tests in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The model is based on an existing Laplace transform inversion model for solute transport in dual-porosity media. The heat- and mass-transfer calculations are decoupled and conducted sequentially, taking advantage of the fact that heat transfer between fractures and the rock matrix is much more rapid than mass transfer and therefore mass transfer will effectively occur in a locally isothermal system (although the system will be nonisothermal along fracture flow pathways, which is accounted for by discretizing the flow pathways into multiple segments that have different temperature histories). The model takes advantage of the analogies between heat and mass transfer, solving the same governing equations with k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub w} being substituted for {phi}D{sub m} in the equation for fracture transport and k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub m} being subsituted for D{sub m} in the equation for matrix transport; where k = thermal conductivity (cal/cm-s-K), {rho} = density (g/cm{sup 3}), C{sub p} = heat capacity (at constant pressure) (cal/g-K), {phi} = matrix porosity, and D = tracer diffusion coefficient (cm{sup 2}/s), with the subscripts w and m referring to water and matrix, respectively. A significant advantage of the model is that it executes in a fraction of second on a single-CPU personal computer, making it very amenable for parameter estimation algorithms that involve repeated runs to find global minima. The combined thermal-mass transport model was used to evaluate the ability to estimate when thermal breakthrough would occur in a multi-well EGS configuration using thermally degrading tracers. Calculations were conducted to evaluate the range of values of Arrhenius parameters, A and E{sub {alpha}} (pre-exponential factor, 1/s, and activation energy, cal/mol) required to obtain interpretable responses of thermally-degrading tracers that decay according to the rate constant k{sub d} = Ae{sup -E{sub {alpha}}/RT}, where k{sub d} = decay rate constant (1/s), R = ideal gas constant (1.987 cal/mol-K), and T = absolute temperature (K). It is shown that there are relatively narrow ranges of A and E{sub {alpha}} that will result in readily interpretable tracer responses for any given combination of ambient reservoir temperature and working fluid residence time in a reservoir. The combined model was also used to simulate the responses of conservative tracers with different diffusion coefficients as a way of estimating fracture surface-area-to-volume ratios (SA/V) in multi-well EGS systems. This method takes advantage of the fact that the differences in breakthrough curves of tracers with different matrix diffusion coefficients are a function of SA/V. The model accounts for differences in diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature so that tracer responses obtained at different times can be used to obtain consistent estimates of SA/V as the reservoir cools down. Some single-well applications of this approach are simulated with a numerical model to demonstrate the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of EGS stimulations before a second well is drilled.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cold side thermal energy storage system for improved operation of air cooled power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air cooled power plants experience significant performance fluctuations as plant cooling capacity reduces due to higher daytime temperature than nighttime temperature. The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the detailed ...

Williams, Daniel David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal energy storage for sustainable energy consumption –Sustainable Energy, Cambridge University Press, 65- Dermott A.M, Frysinger G.R, Storage

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyzed a built-in, storage-type water heater containing astorage and thermal protection that can operate with PCM technology. Among them are building insulators, water heaters,

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. population. The study found significantly lower death rates from all causes and cancer in general when compared to the overall U.S. population. However, slight increases...

204

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP)...

206

Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

Jirka, Gerhard H.

207

Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination with feedwater heating, would result in heat rate reductions of 7.43 percent for PRB coal and 10.45 percent for lignite.

Edward Levy

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analysis and System Design of a Large Chiller Plant for Korea, with or without Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% was provided by thermal storage as in the previous scheme. Electric centrifugal chillers, two (2) at 950 tons each, were still required to charge the ice tanks at night, because gas-fired absorption chillers cannot make the 28°F (-2.2"C) glycol solution... simulated. C. Electric Centrifugal Chillers with Thermal Storage: Local code requires that a maximum of 60% of the peak cooling load be satisfied "real-time" by electricity. Therefore, two (2) 1,020-ton electric centrifugal chillers provided 2,040 tons...

Levin, C.; Simmonds, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Recent Experiences with Corrosion Beneath Thermal Insulation in a Chemical Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of carbon and stainless steels under wet thermal insulation can be a serious problem and can be especially prevalent in the humid Gulf Coast area. This paper discusses an inspection program that has been in progress since late 1982 at a 10...

Long, V. C.; Crawley, P. G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR survey used a 200 megahertz (MHz) antenna to provide the maximum depth penetration and subsurface detail yielding usable signals to a depth of about 6 to 10 feet in this environment and allowed discrimination of objects that were deeper, particularly useful in the southern area of the site where shallow depth metallic debris (primarily roof flashing) complicated interpretation of the EM and magnetic data. Several geophysical anomalies were defined on the contour plots that indicated the presence of buried metal. During the first phase of the project, nine anomalies or anomalous areas were detected. The sizes, shapes, and magnitudes of the anomalies varied considerably, but given the anticipated size of the primary target of the investigation, only the most prominent anomalies were considered as potential caches of 30 to 60 buried drums. After completion of a second phase investigation, only two of the anomalies were of sufficient magnitude, not identifiable with existing known metallic objects such as monitoring wells, and in positions that corresponded to the location of alleged dumping activities and were recommended for further, intrusive investigation. Other important findings, based on the variable frequency EM method and its combination with total field magnetic and GPR data, included the confirmation of the position of the old NSDD, the ability to differentiate between ferrous and non-ferrous anomalies, and the detection of what may be plumes emanating from the landfill cell.

Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

212

Use of plasma fuel systems at thermal power plants in Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Turkey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology of plasma ignition of solid fuels is described, as well as its creation and development steps, the technoeconomic characteristics of plasma igniter systems, schemes of their installation in pulverized-coal boilers, and results of their application at pulverized coal-fired power plants.

Karpenko, E.I.; Karpenko, Y.E.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Ude (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermal Physics

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Construction of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories has the responsibility for experimental activities at the WIPP and has emplaced several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The construction of the tests relied heavily on earlier excavations at the WIPP site to provide a basis for selecting excavation, surveying, and instrumentation methods, and achievable construction tolerances. The tests were constructed within close tolerances to provide consistent room dimensions and accurate placement of gages. This accuracy has contributed to the high quality of data generated which in turn has facilitated the comparison of test results to numerical predictions. The purpose of this report is to detail the construction activities of the TSI tests.

Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship D.A. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others] [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Kinematic Stirling engine as an energy conversion subsystem for paraboloidal dish solar thermal power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of a suitably designed and economically manufactured Stirling engine as the energy conversion subsystem of a paraboloidal dish-Stirling solar thermal power module has been estimated. Results obtained by elementary cycle analyses have been shown to match quite well the performance characteristics of an advanced kinematic Stirling engine, the United Stirling P-40, as established by current prototypes of the engine and by a more sophisticated analytic model of its advanced derivative. In addition to performance, brief consideration has been given to other Stirling engine criteria such as durability, reliability, and serviceability. Production costs have not been considered here.

Bowyer, J.M.

1984-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Software/firmware design specification for 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The software and firmware employed for the operation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are completely described. The systems allow operator control of up to 2048 heliostats, and include the capability of operator-commanded control, graphic displays, status displays, alarm generation, system redundancy, and interfaces to the Operational Control System, the Data Acquisition System, and the Beam Characterization System. The requirements are decomposed into eleven software modules for execution in the Heliostat Array Controller computer, one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Field Controller microprocessor, and one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Controller microprocessor. The design of the modules to satisfy requirements, the interfaces between the computers, the software system structure, and the computers in which the software and firmware will execute are detailed. The testing sequence for validation of the software/firmware is described. (LEW)

Ladewig, T.D.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Heat Hyperbolic Diffusion in Planck Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the diffusion of the thermal pulse in Planck Gas. We show that the Fourier diffusion equation gives the speed of diffusion, v > c and breaks the causality of the thermal processes in Planck gas .For hyperbolic heat transport v

Miroslaw Kozlowski; Janina Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Source term evaluation for postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plants -- Summer ventilation mode (non-seismic cases)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. For the current study, gaseous UF{sub 6} is assumed to get released in the cell housing atmosphere through B-line break at 58.97 kg/s for 10 min and 30 min duration at the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The released UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) while it disperses throughout the process building. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. To characterize leakage flow through the cell housing wall, 3-D CFD tool (CFDS-FLOW3D) was used. About 57% of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} was predicted to be released into the environment. Since HF was treated as vapor, close to 100% was estimated to get released into the environment.

Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Wendel, M.W.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Dyer, R.H. [Dyer Enterprises, Harriman, TN (United States)

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms applicable'' and relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Receiver subsystem analysis report (RADL Item 4-1). 10-MWe Solar Thermal Central-Receiver Pilot Plant: solar-facilities design integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results are presented of those thermal hydraulic, structural, and stress analyses required to demonstrate that the Receiver design for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant will satisfy the general design and performance requirements during the plant's design life. Recommendations resulting from those analyses and supporting test programs are presented regarding operation of the receiver. The analyses are limited to receiver subsystem major structural parts (primary tower, receiver unit core support structure), pressure parts (absorber panels, feedwater, condensate and steam piping/components, flash tank, and steam mainfold) and shielding. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation.

Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Synergistic diffuser/heat-exchanger design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theoretical and numerical evaluation of synergistic diffusing heat-exchanger design is presented. Motivation for this development is based on current diffuser and heat-exchange technologies in cogeneration plants, which ...

Lazzara, David S. (David Sergio), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Assessment of the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration of technetium-99 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site in Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This short report summarizes the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration/transport of {sup 99}Tc at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site in Paducah, Kentucky. Limited data suggest that inorganic colloidal materials (e.g., aluminosilicate clay minerals) may not play a significant role in the retention and transport of Tc. Studies by size fractionation reveal that both Tc and natural organic matter (NOM) are largely present in the <3K fraction. The role of NOM on Tc retention and transport is not conclusive on the basis of this study. However, a literature review suggests that Tc is very likely associated with the groundwater organics. The presence of the organic matter could have increased the solubility and cotransport of Tc at the PGDP site. Further studies, applying such techniques as gel chromatography, size exclusion, and spectroscopy, may be useful to determine the association of organic matter with Tc. If Tc is associated with groundwater organics, appropriate protocols for removal of organic matter associated with Tc may be developed. Time and resources were limited so this study is not comprehensive with respect to the role of mobile organic and inorganic colloidal materials on Tc transport in subsurface soils. The redox conditions (DO) of groundwaters reported may not represent the true groundwater conditions, which could have influenced the association and dissociation of Tc with groundwater colloidal materials. Because Tc concentrations in the groundwater (on the order of nCi/L) at the PGDP site is much lower than the solubility of reduced Tc (IV) (on the order of {approximately}10{sup {minus}8} mol/L or parts per billion), regardless of the redox conditions, Tc will stay in solution phase as TC(IV) or Tc(VII). The mechanisms of adsorption/association vs precipitation must be understood under reduced and low Tc conditions so that strategic plans for remediation of Tc contaminated soils and groundwaters can be developed.

Gu, B.; McDonald, J.A.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clausen, J.L. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States). Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

Ireland, Melissa Kara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodríguez Buño, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant, solar-facilities design integration: plant-support subsystem procurement documentation (RADL Item 7-44D)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purchase specifications are given for the specific long lead items to be procured for the 10 MWe Solar Pilot Plant. The hardware is grouped into two categories: 480 Volt Load Center and 480 Volt Motor Control Centers; and Power, Control and Instrumentation Cable. The purchase orders for each procurement are included. Need dates for each item are identified. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The effects of storage time, storage temperature, and concentration on percent recoveries of thermally desorbed diffusive dosimeter samples contaminated with chloroform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Analabs Thermal Desorber. 4. The Programmed Thermal Desorber on the left and linear chart recorder on the far right. 5. Gas Chromatograph Peak, Integrator Counting, and GC Conditions for Chloroform. 10 17 19 21 24 6. Photograph Illustrating.... A 2 x 3 x 3 Factorial Treatment Design . 13. Analysis of Variance Table for the Experimental Data 14. Mean Percent Recovery vs. Storage Temperature for 7 Days and 14 Days Storage Time At Concentration I (5 ppm - 8 hours). 26 27 28 29 30 31...

Gallucci, Joseph Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The available evidence supports adjusting the western and northwestern Water Policy boundary. Based on the historical and modeled hydrogeological data reflecting past flow and plume attenuation, along with associated plume migration toward the northeast, the establishment of a new boundary along the westernmost margin of the earliest indication of the TCE plume is proposed and justified on hydrogeological grounds. Approximately 30% of the original area would remain within the adjusted Water Policy area west and northwest of the PGDP facility. This modification would release about 70% of the area, although individual properties would overlap the new boundary.

None

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Devitrite-based Optical Diffusers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technological use of this devitrification product in soda–lime–silica glasses, in contrast to other inorganic glasses in which controlled devitrification has given rise to the family of materials known as glass-ceramics.5 Here we present data on the inherent... , photovoltaic,9 photolithography,10 and in the health industry for producing diffused therapeutic thermal energy.11 Visual display systems also require diffusers for increasing the field of view; with the emergence of light emitting diodes (LEDs...

Butt, Haider; Knowles, Kevin M.; Montelongo, Yunuen; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

The effect of varying oven temperatures and residence times on thermal desorption of n-hexane and 1-hexene from diffusive organic vapor dosimeters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which caused a pis- ton situated on top of the thermal desorber to be pneuma- tically pulled up, causing nitrogen purge gas from the connected cylinder to be drawn up through the desorbing oven containing an empty flare tube and then into the de...M Monitor into Foil Pouch 5. Sealed Foil Pouch, Ready for Storage 6. Filter Paper in place on Draft Shield 7. Injecting 10pL Liquid Sample onto Filter Paper 8. Rolling Charcoal Wafer into a Cylinder 9, Inserting Charcoal Wafer into Flare Tube...

Steele, Kenneth Garnett

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

User's manual for DELSOL2: a computer code for calculating the optical performance and optimal system design for solar-thermal central-receiver plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DELSOL2 is a revised and substantially extended version of the DELSOL computer program for calculating collector field performance and layout, and optimal system design for solar thermal central receiver plants. The code consists of a detailed model of the optical performance, a simpler model of the non-optical performance, an algorithm for field layout, and a searching algorithm to find the best system design. The latter two features are coupled to a cost model of central receiver components and an economic model for calculating energy costs. The code can handle flat, focused and/or canted heliostats, and external cylindrical, multi-aperture cavity, and flat plate receivers. The program optimizes the tower height, receiver size, field layout, heliostat spacings, and tower position at user specified power levels subject to flux limits on the receiver and land constraints for field layout. The advantages of speed and accuracy characteristic of Version I are maintained in DELSOL2.

Dellin, T.A.; Fish, M.J.; Yang, C.L.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of a 1,000-foot thermal mixing zone on the steam electric power industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal discharge requirements for power plants using once-through cooling systems are based on state water quality standards for temperatures that must be met outside of designated mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones to no more than 1,000 feet from the discharge point. Data were collected from 79 steam electric plants. Of the plants currently using once-through cooling systems, 74% could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone. Of this total, 68% would retrofit cooling towers, and 6% would retrofit diffusers. The estimated nationwide capital cost for retrofitting plants that could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone is $21.4 billion. Conversion of a plant from once-through cooling to cooling towers or addition of diffusers would result in a lower energy output from that plant. For the affected plants, the total estimated replacement cost would be $370 to $590 million per year. Some power companies would have to construct new generating capacity to meet the increased energy demand. The estimated nationwide cost of this additional capacity would be $1.2 to $4.8 billion. In addition to the direct costs associated with compliance with a 1,000-foot mixing zone limit, other secondary environmental impacts would also occur. Generation of the additional power needed would increase carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 8.3 million tons per year. In addition, conversion from once-through cooling systems to cooling towers at affected plants would result in increased evaporation of about 2.7 million gallons of water per minute nationwide.

Veil, J.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Engineering Design Elements of a Two-Phase Thermosyphon to Trannsfer NGNP Nuclear Thermal Energy to a Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis, which uses both heat and electricity; the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur iodine process primarily using heat. Both processes require a high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of the NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100 m.

Piyush Sabharwal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of turbulent diffusion on the chemistry of diffuse clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. We probe the effect of turbulent diffusion on the chemistry at the interface between a cold neutral medium (CNM) cloudlet and the warm neutral medium (WNM). Methods. We perform moving grid, multifluid, 1D, hydrodynamical simulations with chemistry including thermal and chemical diffusion. The diffusion coefficients are enhanced to account for turbulent diffusion. We post-process the steady-states of our simulations with a crude model of radiative transfer to compute line profiles. Results. Turbulent diffusion spreads out the transition region between the CNM and the WNM. We find that the CNM slightly expands and heats up: its CH and H$_2$ content decreases due to the lower density. The change of physical conditions and diffusive transport increase the H$^+$ content in the CNM which results in increased OH and H$_2$O. Diffusion transports some CO out of the CNM. It also brings H$_2$ into contact with the warm gas with enhanced production of CH$^+$, H$_3^+$, OH and H$_2$O at the interface. O lines are sensitive to the spread of the thermal profile in the intermediate region between the CNM and the WNM. Enhanced molecular content at the interface of the cloud broadens the molecular line profiles and helps exciting transitions of intermediate energy. The relative molecular yield are found higher for bigger clouds. Conclusions. Turbulent diffusion can be the source of additional molecular production and should be included in chemical models of the interstellar medium (ISM). It also is a good candidate for the interpretation of observational problems such as warm H$_2$, CH$^+$ formation and presence of H$_3^+$.

P. Lesaffre; M. Gerin; P. Hennebelle

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

ENERGY DIFFUSION IN HARMONIC SYSTEM WITH CONSERVATIVE NOISE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems or lattice dimension d 3, where the thermal diffusivity is finite. 1. Introduction Lattice the evolution of the energy and identify the thermal diffusivity. In the harmonic chain with noise this agrees to what it is expected for deterministic anharmonic dynamics. In this article we consider the same

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

ON DIFFUSION IN HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA YOUXUE ZHANG*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, heterogeneous media, multi-mineral rocks, multi-phase media, composite materials, kinetics, porous rocks to bulk diffusion, and porous materials (such as plants, soil, rock with partial melt or fluid, sediment of air and moisture in soils, drying of paint, wood, and concrete, diffusion of gases in rubber, movement

Liu, Liping

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied thermal cutting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applied... ON THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND THERMAL CONTACT RESISTANCE IN PEM FUEL CELL GAS DIFFUSION LAYERS Ehsan... of this process requires determination of the...

251

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. a. , 2004, “Solar Thermal Collectors and Applications,”86] Schnatbaum L. , 2009, “Solar Thermal Power Plants,” Thefor Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Thermal diffusion in Ni/Al multilayer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Ni/Al multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering of nominal design [Ni(200A)/Al(100A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 and [Ni(50A)/Al(227A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 on Si substrates were annealed at 200 Degree-Sign C. As-deposited and annealed samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray reflectometry (XRR). The effort was to study the path of alloying in the above two multilayers of same elements but of opposite stoichiometric ratio. We find distinct differences in alloying of these samples.

Swain, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Singh, S.; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

100 interstitials diffuse with a low activation energy and a pre-exponential factor that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rather than loops, do not move without an applied stress. However, the size at which thermal diffusivity-exponential factors of loop diffusivity are larger than in MD simulations, and it is unclear whether the thermal diffusion of dislocation loops and impurities occurs by the same mech- anism as the stress-driven coupled

Braun, Paul

254

Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

255

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evaluation of natural attenuation processes for trichloroethylene and technetium-99 in the Northeast and Northwest plumes at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NA processes such as biodegradation, sorption, dilution dispersion, advection, and possibly sorption and diffusion are occurring in the Northeast and Northwest plumes. However, the overall biological attenuation rate for TCE within the plumes is not sufficiently rapid to utilize as remedial option. The mobility and toxicity of {sup 99}Tc is not being reduced by attenuating processes within the Northwest Plume. The current EPA position is that NA is not a viable remedial approach unless destructive processes are present or processes are active which reduce the toxicity and mobility of a contaminant. Therefore, active remediation of the dissolved phase plumes will be necessary to reduce contaminant concentrations before an NA approach could be justified at PGDP for either plume. Possible treatment methods for the reduction of dissolved phase concentrations within the plumes are pump-and-treat bioaugmentation, biostimulation, or multiple reactive barriers. Another possibility is the use of a regulatory instrument such as an Alternate Concentration Limit (ACL) petition. Biodegradation of TCE is occurring in both plumes and several hypothesis are possible to explain the apparent conflicts with some of the geochemical data. The first hypothesis is active intrinsic bioremediation is negligible or so slow to be nonmeasurable. In this scenario, the D.O., chloride, TCE, and isotopic results are indicative of past microbiological reactions. It is surmised in this scenario, that when the initial TCE release occurred, sufficient energy sources were available for microorganisms to drive aerobic reduction of TCE, but these energy sources were rapidly depleted. The initial degraded TCE has since migrated to downgradient locations. In the second scenario, TCE anaerobic degradation occurs in organic-rich micro-environments within a generally aerobic aquifer. TCE maybe strongly absorbed to organic-rich materials in the aquifer matrix and degraded by local Immunities of microbes, perhaps even under anaerobic conditions. Chloride, generated by degradation in such microenvironment is released rapidly into the water, as is CO{sub 2}, from respiration of the microorganisms. TCE and its organic degradation products are retained on the aquifer matrix by sorption, and released more slowly into the groundwater. In this process, chloride produced from the microbial reaction may become separated in the plume from the residual TCE. This may explain why the chloride isotope ratio and dissolved TCE do not correlate with the DIC isotope ratio. The relationship between the {delta}{sup 37}Cl values of TCE and dissolved inorganic chloride is consistent with what would be expected from the degradation of TCE, but is complicated by the elevated levels of background chloride, presumably due to agriculture practice, and complex behavior of TCE in the aquifer.

Clausen, J.L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Abrajano,T.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis of the Temporal Evolution of Thermal Conductivity in Alumina-Water Nanofluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both the United States Department of Energy and Texas Advanced Research Program. vi NOMENCLATURE D Thermal diffusivity Ei Exponential integral k Thermal conductivity k n Nanofluid thermal conductivity k b Base fluid thermal...?s thermal conductivity (k) and thermal diffusivity (D), are related to the temperature difference null?nullnull between the heat source and surrounding medium at a distance (r) from the source of a quantity of heat (Q) a certain time (t) after the heat...

Fortenberry, Stephen

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermal Fluids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Fluids The Thermal Fluids and Heat Transfer program works on thermal hydraulic reactor safety code development and experimental heat transferthermal hydraulics. The...

259

Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as production lines, electric power facilities, petrochemical plants and public institutions, etc. by thermal in electric power, petrochemical plant facilities G Intruder monitoring Important facilities (nuclear power, harbor, airport, dam, river, water purification plant, etc.) G Fire monitoring Important facilities, wide

Walker, D. Greg

260

Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Is Arnold diffusion relevant to global diffusion?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global diffusion of Hamiltonian dynamical systems is investigated by using a coupled standard maps. Arnold web is visualized in the frequency space, using local rotation numbers, while Arnold diffusion and resonance overlaps are distinguished by the residence time distributions at resonance layers. Global diffusion in the phase space is shown to be accelerated by diffusion across overlapped resonances generated by the coupling term, rather than Arnold diffusion along the lower-order resonances. The former plays roles of hubs for transport in the phase space, and accelerate the diffusion.

Seiichiro Honjo; Kunihiko Kaneko

2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced thermal imaging of composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite materials were studied by Scanning Thermal Conductivity Microscope (STCM) and high speed thermography. The STCM is a qualitative technique which is used to study thermal conductivity variations on a sub-micrometer scale. High speed thermography is a quantitative technique for measuring thermal diffusivity with a variable spatial resolution from centimeters down to less than 25 gm. A relative thermal conductivity contrast map was obtained from a SiC/Si3N4 continuous fiber ceramic composite using the STCM. Temperature changes of a carbon/carbon composite after a heat pulse were captured by an IR camera to generate a thermal diffusivity map of the specimen. Line profiles of the temperature distribution showed significant variations as a result of fiber orientation.

Wang, H.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) process was recently described where evaporation of mineralized water is driven by diffusion within a packed bed. The energy source to drive the process is derived from low pressure condensing steam within the main condenser of a steam power generating plant. Since waste heat is used to drive the process, the main cost of fresh water production is attributed to the energy cost of pumping air and water through the packed bed. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A combined thermodynamic and dynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3'' Hg. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower and direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. An experimental DDD facility has been fabricated, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. Direct contact condensers with and without packing have been investigated. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is significantly enhanced when packing is added to the direct contact condensers.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to use an existing glass melter thermal treatment unit (also known as a Penberthy Pyro-Converter joule-heated glass furnace) for the...

266

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

REVIEW ARTIC LE MICROSCALE THERMAL BUBBLE FORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 C a thermal diffusivity, m r s 8 C 2 F excess heat conduction shape factor e variable in the heat, and this article discusses microscale bubble formation by using polysilicon microheaters. Figure 1a shows

Lin, Liwei

269

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES, VOL. 25, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2002 615 In-Plane Effective Thermal Conductivity of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material. Thermal conductivity of second phase material. . . Heat flux. Mesh numbers along. Effective thermal resistance. Thermal diffusivity. Specific surface area. Porosity. Time. Manuscript effect, the effective thermal conductivity of these materials, is relatively small, so that much

Wirtz, Richard A.

270

Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 1, Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1982, there has been a major effort expended to evaluate the susceptibility of nuclear Power plant equipment to failure and significant damage during seismic events. This was done by making use of data on the performance of electrical and mechanical equipment in conventional power plants and other similar industrial facilities during strong motion earthquakes. This report is intended as an extension of the seismic experience data collection effort and a compilation of experience data specific to power plant piping and supports designed and constructed US power piping code requirements which have experienced strong motion earthquakes. Eight damaging (Richter Magnitude 7.7 to 5.5) California earthquakes and their effects on 8 power generating facilities in use natural gas and California were reviewed. All of these facilities were visited and evaluated. Seven fossel-fueled (dual use natural gas and oil) and one nuclear fueled plants consisting of a total of 36 individual boiler or reactor units were investigated. Peak horizontal ground accelerations that either had been recorded on site at these facilities or were considered applicable to these power plants on the basis of nearby recordings ranged between 0.20g and 0.5lg with strong motion durations which varied from 3.5 to 15 seconds. Most US nuclear power plants are designed for a safe shutdown earthquake peak ground acceleration equal to 0.20g or less with strong motion durations which vary from 10 to 15 seconds.

Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

about a variety of issues, including exposures, perceptions of risk, health concerns, health care, and receptivity to a health screening program The overall design recruitment...

272

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) PortsmouthPaducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent...

273

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Security (HSS), conducted a shadowing oversight activity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) PortsmouthPaducah Project Office (PPPO) oversight of selected aspects of the...

274

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Deactivation Services Section...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disease Prevention Program. d) Ensure adequate access to health programsambulatory care, and beryllium and radiation worker health surveillance programs. These services are...

275

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofTheDepartment of Energy 4EnergyNovember

276

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket |21, 2015 7:00AM09

277

Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction From an overall systems view, the single most, relative to that of thermal plants, are very small. There are three basic types of hydroelectric plants;2 Pump-storage This kind of hydro plant is a specialized reservoir-type plant which has capability to act

McCalley, James D.

278

7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculated above. 7-123 A Carnot heat engine cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of steam can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between transfer. Therefore, the maximum efficiency of the actual heat engine will be lower than the value

Bahrami, Majid

279

A comparison between conventional hotothermal frequency scan and the lock-in rate window method in measuring thermal diffirsivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that for thick materials with long thermal transport times across the sample where low-frequency measurements to measure thermal conductivity of materials by steady-state heat flow methods and thermal diffusivity for thermal diffusivity measurements of materials, is presented. In this comparison, a completely noncontact

Mandelis, Andreas

280

Phase-field modeling of binary alloy solidification with coupled heat and solute diffusion J. C. Ramirez,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of magnitude smaller than the thermal diffusivity. Therefore, solute diffusion is often on a length scale articles [1,2]. Its most appealing feature is that ex- plicit interface tracking is avoided

Beckermann, Christoph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microfabricated diffusion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

A study of flow in stratified reservoirs by use of the thermal analogy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Calculated and Experimental Diffusivities for Various Metal Plates. . . . . . 17 Effective Thermal Diffusivities of Bimetallic Plates. 19 The Change in Diffusivity with Time of Multilayered Linear Metal Plates. 20 Change in Diffusivity with Time... for Bimetallic Plates. 23 The Change in Diffusivity with Time for Multi- laye red Plates. 24 Effect of a Layer of Low Conductivity on Effective The rmal Diffusivity. 30 10 A and B- The Effect of Varying the Thickness of a Low Conductive Material Between...

Pickering, Charles William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

A study of post-thermal recovery of the macroinvertebrate community of Four Mile Creek, June 1985--September 1987. [Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four Mile Creek is one of several streams at the Savannah River Site which has received thermal effluents ({le}70{degrees}C water) from nuclear production operations. From 1955--mid-1985, Four Mile Creek received thermal effluent from C-Reactor as well as non-thermal discharges from F and H Separation Areas. Total discharges from all of these facilities was about ten times higher than the natural flow of the creek (Firth et al. 1986). All water being discharged into Four Mile Creek was originally pumped from the Savannah River. This study reports the results of the artificial substrate sampling of macroinvertebrate communities of Four Mile Creek from June 1985 through September 1987, when sampling was terminated. Macroinvertebrate taxa richness, densities, and biomass data from this study are compared to Four Mile data collected prior to the shutdown of C-Reactor (Kondratieff and Kondratieff 1985 and Firth et al. 1986), and to comparable macroinvertebrate data from other Savannah River Site streams. 29 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Lauritsen, D.; Starkel, W.; Specht, W.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in-

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

287

Glass diffusion source for constraining BSF region of a solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method of fabricating a solar cell comprising simultaneous diffusion of the p and n dopant materials into the solar cell substrate. The simultaneous diffusion process is preceded by deposition of a capping layer impervious to doping by thermal diffusion processes.

Lesk, I.A.; Pryor, R.A.; Coleman, M.G.

1982-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

Determination of thermal parameters of one-dimensional nanostructures through a thermal transient method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity (k), specific heat (C), and thermal diffusivity (D). Transient techniques can be exploited / Published online: 6 August 2009 Ã? The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access

Yu, Edward T.

289

FAST STATIC AND DYNAMIC GRID LEVEL THERMAL SIMULATION CONSIDERING TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SILICON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat diffusion equation has been conventionally handled by grid-grids and an approximate delta function simulating a point heatgrid size of 64×64. To obtain transient thermal mask an impulse heat

Ziabari, Amirkoushyar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

291

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant, solar facilities design integration: collector-field optimization report (RADL item 2-25)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Appropriate cost and performance models and computer codes have been developed to carry out the collector field optimization, as well as additional computer codes to define the actual heliostat locations in the optimized field and to compute in detail the performance to be expected of the defined field. The range of capabilities of the available optimization and performance codes is described. The role of the optimization code in the definition of the pilot plant is specified, and a complete description of the optimization process itself is given. The detailed cost model used by the optimizer for the commercial system optimization is presented in the form of equations relating the cost element to each of the factors that determine it. The design basis for the commercial system is presented together with the rationale for its selection. The development of the individual heliostat performance code is presented. Use of the individual heliostat code in a completed study of receiver panel power under sunrise startup conditions is described. The procedure whereby performance and heliostat spacing data from the representative commercial-scale system are converted into coefficients of use in the layout processor is described, and the actual procedure used in the layout processor is described. Numerous special studies in support of the pilot plant design are described. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal conductivity of electroless nickel-phosphorus alloy plating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of specific heat, thermal diffusivity, density, and calculated thermal conductivity have been determined for a modified acid bath electroless nickel-12.7 wt% phosphorus alloy between 298 ad 423 K. Thermal conductivity values are about half those of pure nickel.

Smith, D.D.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Systems analysis of thermal storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

Copeland, R. J.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Photothermal measurement of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water O. Benchikh, D. Fournier, A. C. Boccara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal diffusivity measurements of supercooled water have been performed between + 40 °C and - 23 °C properties of supercooled water have been measured [1 ]. However, the thermal conduc- Article published

Boyer, Edmond

298

Size dependent thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes Ajing Cao and Jianmin Qu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phys. Lett. 100, 261908 (2012) Focus shift photothermal method for thermal diffusivity mapping J. Appl Institute of Physics. Related Articles Enhanced high thermal conductivity and low permittivity of polyimide

Chen, Wei

299

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1" Bill Bottom 2 Alex Young 3 of conventional thermal (fossil fuel and nuclear), geo- thermal, wind and solar power plants. There are several be dependent on conventional thermal power plants to generate electricity. These power plants are powered

Standiford, Richard B.

300

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The effects of controlled thermal cycling on dislocation creation during semiconductor device processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commonly resulting from conventional high temperature process- ing techniques and it is shown that thermally induced dislocations can be virtually eliminated through controlled thermal cycling. The diffus' on of impurities into silicon under such thermal... the wafer at any time during the heat-cycle. Indeed, one might speculate at this point on the effect of gradually increas ng the concentration of impurities at the sur- face of a wafer during diffusion. Controlled thermal cycling, hereinafter referred...

Spaw, William James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Field Survey of Parabolic Trough Receiver Thermal Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique that uses an infrared camera to evaluate the in-situ thermal performance of parabolic trough receivers at operating solar power plants.

Price, H.; Forristall, R.; Wendelin, T.; Lewandowski, A.; Moss, T.; Gummo, C.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of candidate fluids...

304

Uranium and cesium diffusion in fuel cladding of electrogenerating channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of reactor tests of a carbonitride fuel in a single-crystal cladding from a molybdenum-based alloy can be used in substantiating the operational reliability of fuels in developing a project of a megawatt space nuclear power plant. The results of experimental studies of uranium and cesium penetration into the single-crystal cladding of fuel elements with a carbonitride fuel are interpreted. Those fuel elements passed nuclear power tests in the Ya-82 pilot plant for 8300 h at a temperature of about 1500°C. It is shown that the diffusion coefficients for uranium diffusion into the cladding are virtually coincident with the diffusion coefficients measured earlier for uranium diffusion into polycrystalline molybdenum. It is found that the penetration of uranium into the cladding is likely to occur only in the case of a direct contact between the cladding and fuel. The experimentally observed nonmonotonic uranium-concentration profiles are explained in terms of predominant uranium diffusion along grain boundaries. It is shown that a substantially nonmonotonic behavior observed in our experiment for the uranium-concentration profile may be explained by the presence of a polycrystalline structure of the cladding in the surface region from its inner side. The diffusion coefficient is estimated for the grain-boundary diffusion of uranium. The diffusion coefficients for cesium are estimated on the basis of experimental data obtained in the present study.

Vasil’ev, I. V., E-mail: fnti@mail.ru; Ivanov, A. S.; Churin, V. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tungsten diffusion in silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15}?cm{sup ?2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960?°C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B. [Aix-Marseille Université, IM2NP UMR 7334, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen - Case 142, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Portavoce, A., E-mail: alain.portavoce@im2np.fr [CNRS, IM2NP UMR 7334, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen - Case 142, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Grosjean, C. [STMicroelectronics, Rousset (France)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Camera-based reflectivity measurement for solar thermal applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the solar-weighted reflectivity of the receiver component in CSP systems. Such reflectivity measurement Tubular receivers for solar thermal power plants, specifically tower plants, are in common use, in plants to be able to do conveniently in the field, possibly at intervals throughout the life of the plant

307

Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

Hecht, R.L. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Journal of Power Sources 161 (2006) 11061115 Direct measurement of through-plane thermal conductivity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity and contact resistance in fuel cell materials Manish Khandelwal, M.M. Mench Fuel Cell Dynamics, and the thermal contact resistance between diffusion media and a metal plate as a function of temperature® membrane; Diffusion media; Thermal contact resistance 1. Introduction Detailed knowledge of the internal

Mench, Matthew M.

310

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Ronald Coifman (Yale University) Roy Lederman (Yale University) #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data How to compare images across sensors? Figure: Sokolov Mine

Hirn, Matthew

311

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department of Mathematics Yale University July 26, 2012 Bell Labs #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Joint work with Ronald Coifman and Roy Lederman. #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Overview 1 High

Hirn, Matthew

312

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department of Mathematics Yale University November 29, 2012 Kansas State University Colloquium #12;Diffusion Maps;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data How to compare images across sensors? Figure: Sokolov Mine in 2009 and 2010

Hirn, Matthew

313

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn Department in Honor of the 70th Birthday of David R. Larson #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Joint work with Ronald Coifman and Roy Lederman. #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data High Dimensional Data

Hirn, Matthew

314

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Matthew J. Hirn September 3, 2013 #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Collaborators Simon Adar, Tel Aviv University Eyal Ben Dor, Tel, Clarkson University Yoel Shkolnisky, Tel Aviv University #12;Diffusion Maps for Changing Data Heat equation

Hirn, Matthew

315

GCFR core thermal-hydralic design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach for developing the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is reviewed, and key considerations for improving the core performance at all power and flow conditions are discussed. It is shown how the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs evolve from evaluations of plant size, material limitations, safety criteria, and structural performance considerations.

Schleuter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Bennett, F.O.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal transport in boron nitride nanotorus—towards a nanoscopic thermal shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanotori, or nanorings, are topological variants of nanotubes and are conceived to have different properties from their tubular form. In this study, the toroidal arrangement of boron nitride is introduced. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal behaviour (thermal conductivity and thermal stability) of the boron nitride nanotorus and its relationship with the structural characteristics are investigated. Its circumferential thermal rectification strength displays a linear dependence on the bending coefficient of the nanostructure. Surface kinks are relatively inconsequential on its circumferential mode of conduction, as compared to its axial sense. The circumferential conductivity in the diffusive regime is calculated to be approximately 10?W/m K, while the axial conductivity is more than tenfold of this value. All nanotori with different toroidal characters show excellent thermal stability at extremely high temperatures approaching 3400?K. With consideration to its favourable properties, a thermal shield made up of a parallel row of nanotori is proposed as a nanoscale thermal insulation device.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, 16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cogenerating Photovoltaic and Thermal Solar Collector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell, 25% max ­ Steam power plant, 50% max · Data Centers in the U.S. ­ Demand increases as internet.2% of the nations electricity consumption · Load equivalent to 5 1000 MW power plants · Over 2.2 billion dollars applications #12;First Prototype Spring 2008 #12;#12;Experimental Results · Thermal power generated ­ 1.4 KW

Su, Xiao

318

Effects of carbon on phosphorus diffusion in SiGe:C and the implications on phosphorus diffusion mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of carbon (C) in SiGe base layers is an important approach to control the base layer dopant phosphorus (P) diffusion and thus enhance PNP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) performance. This work quantitatively investigated the carbon impacts on P diffusion in Si{sub 0.82}Ge{sub 0.18}:C and Si:C under rapid thermal anneal conditions. The carbon molar fraction is up to 0.32%. The results showed that the carbon retardation effect on P diffusion is less effective for Si{sub 0.82}Ge{sub 0.18}:C than for Si:C. In Si{sub 0.82}Ge{sub 0.18}:C, there is an optimum carbon content at around 0.05% to 0.1%, beyond which more carbon incorporation does not retard P diffusion any more. This behavior is different from the P diffusion behavior in Si:C and the B in Si:C and low Ge SiGe:C, which can be explained by the decreased interstitial-mediated diffusion fraction f{sub I}{sup P,?SiGe} to 95% as Ge content increases to 18%. Empirical models were established to calculate the time-averaged point defect concentrations and effective diffusivities as a function of carbon and was shown to agree with previous studies on boron, phosphorus, arsenic and antimony diffusion with carbon.

Lin, Yiheng; Xia, Guangrui [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Rd, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Yasuda, Hiroshi; Wise, Rick [Texas Instruments, 13121 TI Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75243 (United States); Schiekofer, Manfred; Benna, Bernhard [Texas Instruments Deutschland GmbH, Haggertystrasse 1, 85356 Freising (Germany)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals X June 2006 Editor: P. Deines Abstract Oxygen diffusion in natural and synthetic single-crystal titanite was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions. For the dry experiments, pre-polished titanite

Watson, E. Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

On 1D diffusion problems with a gradient-dependent diffusion coefficient S.C. Jardin a,*, G. Bateman b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

East, Bethlehem, PA 18015, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 March 2007 solution as an initial condition. Now, define a function that mimics the critical gradient thermal diffusivity model GLF23: 0021-9991/$ - see front matter Ã? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10

Hammett, Greg

322

NEW METHOD AND SOFTWARE FOR MULTI-VARIABLE TECHNO-ECONOMIC DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF CSP PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for design optimization of solar thermal power plants. Thereby, optimization potential can be discovered to a 50 MWel parabolic trough power plant using thermal oil as heat transfer fluid (HTF), a molten salt, parabolic trough 1. Motivation (Introduction) Today, designs of solar thermal power plants are developed

Ábrahám, Erika

323

Lattice Boltzmann approach to thermal transpiration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffuse reflection boundary conditions are introduced in a thermal lattice Boltzmann model to allow for variable fluid density and temperature along the walls. The capability of this model to capture the main characteristics of the thermal transpiration phenomenon in a box at nonvanishing Knudsen numbers is demonstrated. The thermal creep velocity is found to be proportional to the temperature gradient imposed at the wall, whereas the accuracy of the simulation results are found to be of first or second order, depending on the numerical scheme.

Sofonea, Victor [Center for Fundamental and Advanced Technical Research, Romanian Academy, Bd. Mihai Viteazul 24, RO - 300223 Timisoara (Romania)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A dynamic analysis of heat and mass transfer demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3 Hg. The optimum operating condition for the DDD process with a high temperature of 50 C and sink temperature of 25 C has an air mass flux of 1.5 kg/m{sup 2}-s, air to feed water mass flow ratio of 1 in the diffusion tower, and a fresh water to air mass flow ratio of 2 in the condenser. Operating at these conditions yields a fresh water production efficiency (m{sub fW}/m{sub L}) of 0.031 and electric energy consumption rate of 0.0023 kW-hr/kg{sub fW}. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data. Recently, it has been recognized that the fresh water production efficiency can be significantly enhanced with air heating. This type of configuration is well suited for power plants utilizing air-cooled condensers. The experimental DDD facility has been modified with an air heating section, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is enhanced when air is heated prior to entering the diffusion tower. Further analytical analysis is required to predict the thermal and mass transport with the air heating configuration.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight; Venugopal Jogi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (?7?min) and with similar thermal expansion (?12??strain/?°C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 ?m thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) ?m, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) ?l. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup ?3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 ?m using 57 ?l of distilled water)

Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Física, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacústica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Maringá – UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho – UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Mirage effect from thermally modulated transparent carbon nanotube sheets This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for thermal diffusivity and the temperature dependence of refractive index for both liquids and gases successfully used for thermal diffusivity measurements in gases, liquids and solids. The present goalMirage effect from thermally modulated transparent carbon nanotube sheets This article has been

O'Toole, Alice J.

327

Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of “strutlets” to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

Norris, Thomas R.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Division OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC11905 -DISCLAIMER - OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRICc o n e e n i g woroxygen self-diffusion coefficient

Kim, Kee Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurements of molecular and thermal diffusion coefficients in ternary mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a polymer and a colloid in a water-ethanol solvent, treating the ternary mixture as a pseudobinary; Gans et polymer in a water-ethanol solvent mixture. They reported a sign change in the Soret coefficient

Firoozabadi, Abbas

333

Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Conductivity in Advanced Nanostructured Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Magnetic Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viimportants of understanding materials properties typicallyY.S. Ju, Annual Review of Materials Science, 29, 261 (1999).

Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Conservation equation for the left half of cell, m 1 2 ( i;L;g + i;R;g) i 12 ;g + ;i;g hi 2 i;L;g = hi 2 s;g 4 i;L;g + hi 2 s;g 4 (?+ 12) i;L;g (?) i;L;g ; (7.34a) and for the right half of cell, m i...+ 12 ;g 1 2 ( i;L;g + i;R;g) + ;i;g hi 2 i;R;g = hi 2 s;g 4 i;R;g + hi 2 s;g 4 (?+ 12) i;R;g (?) i;R;g ; (7.34b) m 2 1 p 3 ; 1 p 3 ; (7.35a) i;L;g = +i;L;g + i;L;g 2 ; i...

Kumar, Akansha

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

CONDITIONS FOR DIFFUSIVE THERMAL TRANSPORT IN A MODEL NONLINEAR SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.K. Kaw1 , A. Sen1 , A. Das1 , and J.C. Parikh2 1 Institute for Plasma research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428

Dodla, Ramana

336

Manhattan Project: The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,LinksCP-1 GOESFJoeHiroshima,The first page

337

REVUE DE PHYSIQUE APPLIQUE A complex investigation of structure and properties of thermally sprayed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performed on the bonding mechanism between the sprayed coating and the substrate [2, 3]. The thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity and the specific heat° to Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rphysap

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

PARAMETERIZATION AND VALIDATION OF AN INTEGRATED ELECTRO-THERMAL CYLINDRICAL LFP BATTERY MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a two-state thermal model to form an electro-thermal model for cylindrical lithium ion batteries- eters. A two-state thermal model is used to approximate the core and surface temperatures of the battery to lithium diffusion in the solid phase and in the electrolyte [13]. These circuit elements depend on state

Stefanopoulou, Anna

339

A HEAVY ISOTOPE IN A SOLID DRIFTS DOWN A THERMAL ENERGY GRADIENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

183 A HEAVY ISOTOPE IN A SOLID DRIFTS DOWN A THERMAL ENERGY GRADIENT R. V. HESKETH CEGB Berkeley, and indeed, related to the second law ; to the familar statement that thermal energy diffuses from hot to cold we merely add the corollary even when the carriers of thermal energy are isotopic defects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofouling and Corrosion of OTEC Plants at Selected Sites.the Placement of a Moored OTEC Plant. Atlantic OceanographicThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Isotope Effect on Adsorbed Quantum Phases: Diffusion of H2 and D2 in Nanoporous Carbon  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Quasielastic neutron scattering of H2 and D2 in the same nanoporous carbon at 10–40 K demonstrates extreme quantum sieving, with D2 diffusing up to 76 times faster. D2 also shows liquidlike diffusion while H2 exhibits Chudley-Elliott jump diffusion, evidence of their different relationships with the local lattice of adsorption sites due to quantum effects on intermolecular interactions. The onset of diffusion occurs at 22–25 K for H2 and 10–13 K for D2. At these temperatures, H2 and D2 have identical thermal de Broglie wavelengths that correlate with the dominant pore size.

Contescu, Cristian I.; Zhang, Hongxin; Olsen, Raina J.; Mamontov, Eugene; Morris, James R.; Gallego, Nidia C.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Anisotropic thermal conduction in polymer melts in uniaxial elongation Sahil Gupta, Jay D. Schieber, and David C. Venerus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffusivity tensor as a function of strain and strain rate. The thermal diffusivity is found to increase Published by the The Society of Rheology Related Articles A thin-filament melt spinning model with radial based on forced Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the two independent components of the thermal

Schieber, Jay D.

344

Current distribution in systems with anomalous diffusion: renormalisation group approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the asymptotic properties of the large deviation function of the integrated particle current in systems, in or out of thermal equilibrium, whose dynamics exhibits anomalous diffusion. The physical systems covered by our study include mutually repelling particles with a drift, a driven lattice gas displaying a continuous nonequilibrium phase transition, and particles diffusing in a anisotropic random advective field. It is exemplified how renormalisation group techniques allow for a systematic determination of power laws in the corresponding current large deviation functions. We show that the latter are governed by known universal scaling exponents, specifically, the anomalous dimension of the noise correlators.

Vivien Lecomte; Uwe C. Tauber; Frederic van Wijland

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Integrated Thermal Analysis of the FRIB Cryomodule Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis of the FRIB cryomodule design is performed to determine the heat load to the cryogenic plant, to minimize the cryogenic plant load, to simulate thermal shield cool down as well as to determine the pressure relief sizes for failure conditions. Static and dynamic heat loads of the cryomodules are calculated and the optimal shield temperature is determined to minimize the cryogenic plant load. Integrated structural and thermal simulations of the 1100-O aluminium thermal shield are performed to determine the desired cool down rate to control the temperature profile on the thermal shield and to minimize thermal expansion displacements during the cool down. Pressure relief sizing calculations for the SRF helium containers, solenoids, helium distribution piping, and vacuum vessels are also described.

Y. Xu, M. Barrios, F. Casagrande, M.J. Johnson, M. Leitner, D. Arenius, V. Ganni, W.J. Schneider, M. Wiseman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evolution of particulate emissions from a coal-fired power plant. [Ph. D. Thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical model has been developed for the dispersal of aerosols downwind from a coal-fired power plant. The main goals were to evaluate with a mathematical simulation the evolution of the spatial extent and particle size distribution of the aerosol material and to predict settling rates affecting the surface environment in the downwind path. The hot air plume coming out of the power plant stack includes a large quantity of aerosol particles. The plume rises with initial upward emission speed until it reaches thermal and kinetic equilibria with the ambient air, then it is transported by the wind current. The plume disperses vertically and horizontally by wind turbulence. In the model particulate coagulation is mathematically described by Timiskii's equation. The relevant semi-empirical work of Smirnov is incorporated to provide the coagulation constant. Because of coagulation, the concentrations of different sizes of aerosol particles in the plume are changed. The numerical simulation studies the importance of particulate coagulation and turbulent dispersion on the downwind plume profile. The downwind transport of the aerosol particles is described by Fick's diffusion equation with the Brownian diffusion coefficient replaced by the turbulent diffusion coefficient. Particle sedimentation is incorporated into the diffusion equation as a first-order differential term. The transport equation is solved by an unconditionally stable finite difference method. At 20 miles downwind, most of the particles with diameter larger than 10 ..mu..m have settled to the ground. The size distribution is still bimodal. The distribution of larger particles remains almost unchanged, except for the departure of the super-micronic particles, because coagulation losses are approximately balanced by coagulation gains.

Buckholtz, H.T.Y.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Power Plants,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, 124 (2),Cycle Storage of Solar Energy,” Energy & Environmental

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ram Village South Chiller Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Winston Ram Village South Chiller Plant Dental Craige Campus Alumni Swain Stacy Thermal Student Planetarium Ackland Art Museum Research Chiller D 114 Chase Ave. APCF- Grounds Medical Morehead Stalling- Evans Sports Medicine Center Cobb Hall Ernie School Old Hospital Chiller Hanes Art Coker Wilson Battle

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

354

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

355

Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermal Science & Engineering Vol. 6 (1), pp. 45-51, 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dimensionless axial distance = thermal diffusivity of fluid = phase lag = Stokes number = porosity = phase Tube Refrigerator/Cryocooler P. Cheng= and T. S. Zhao= Abstract This article presents a review

Zhao, Tianshou

357

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Spin-dependent thermal and electrical transport in a spin-valve system Zheng-Chuan Wang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spin-dependent thermal and electrical transport in a spin-valve system Zheng-Chuan Wang,1 Gang Su,1 governed by thermal processes at high temperature. The so-called spin-valve phenomenon is clearly uncovered, the quantum size effect on the thermal conduc- tance and the Peltier coefficient,2 the diffusive thermopower

Gao, Song

362

DIFFUSION IN SOLIDSDIFFUSION IN SOLIDS FICK'S LAWS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion bonding To comprehend many materials related phenomenon one must understand Diffusion. The focusDIFFUSION IN SOLIDSDIFFUSION IN SOLIDS FICK'S LAWS KIRKENDALL EFFECT ATOMIC MECHANISMS Diffusion in Solids P.G. Shewmon McGraw-Hill, New York (1963) #12;Oxidation Roles of Diffusion Creep Aging

Subramaniam, Anandh

363

BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline Chitresh Bhushan #12; Quantify microstructural tissue ROI Connectivity ROI Statistics MPRAGE Diffusion #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co ROIs Custom ROIs #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co-registration Diffusion Modeling Tractography

Leahy, Richard M.

364

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

365

Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Single-Particle Model for a Lithium-Ion Cell: Thermal Godfrey Sikha,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the diffusion in the solid state. At high current densities, the concentration gradients to include an energy balance. The temperature dependence of the solid phase diffusion coefficient in the literature; for example, Newman and Pals1,2 presented cell and battery stack thermal models incorporating

367

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

William Eckroade John Boulden Thomas Staker William Miller Michael Kilpatrick George Armstrong Robert Nelson Independent Oversight Site Lead Joseph P. Drago Independent Oversight...

369

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Review Board John Boulden Thomas Staker William Miller Michael Kilpatrick George Armstrong Independent Oversight Site Lead Jimmy Coaxum Independent Oversight Reviewers Joseph...

370

Breached cylinder incident at the Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16, 1990, during an inspection of valves on partially depleted product storage cylinders, a 14-ton partially depleted product cylinder was discovered breached. The cylinder had been placed in long-term storage in 1977 on the top row of Portsmouth`s (two rows high) storage area. The breach was observed when an inspector noticed a pile of green material along side of the cylinder. The breach was estimated to be approximately 8- inches wide and 16-inches long, and ran under the first stiffening ring of the cylinder. During the continuing inspection of the storage area, a second 14-ton product cylinder was discovered breached. This cylinder was stacked on the bottom row in the storage area in 1986. This breach was also located adjacent to a stiffening ring. This paper will discuss the contributing factors of the breaching of the cylinders, the immediate response, subsequent actions in support of the investigation, and corrective actions.

Boelens, R.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Swift and Staley Team - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, May...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the radiation training and refresher courses, respiratory protection training, and lockout-tag out (LOTO) training. The American Red Cross provided first-aid training this...

372

DOE Seeks Quotes for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department of EnergyDepartment

373

DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department of EnergyDepartmentInfrastructure Support

374

Deactivation Project Begins at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. DepartmenttoJune 16,AprilFrankDavis-Bacon Compliance andofof

375

DOE Seeks Proposals for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Technical  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChiefAppropriation FYG 242.1-1of1.9MOhio and

376

DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChiefAppropriation FYG 242.1-1of1.9MOhio

377

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofTheDepartment of Energy

378

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - January  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofTheDepartment of Energy2013 | Department of

379

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Southwest Plume | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT. 1867 PUBLICPaducah

380

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Compliance Order, September 10, 1997  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT. 1867 PUBLICPaducah

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Compliance Order, September 10, 1997 Summary  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT. 1867 PUBLICPaducahAgreed Order File

382

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS CableDepartment ofDepartment2011 | Department of Energy

383

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northeast Plume | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific NorthwestFebruary 2015

384

DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance | Department of Energy

385

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Transition | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Para9 Revision:PaducahSitePaducah

386

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE:ENVIRONMENT |DepartmentNewberry

387

Senior DOE Officials Visit Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartment of EnergyApril 30, 2002Department

388

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - KY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OH 34 FUSRAPOxnard Facility

389

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co -0-19 Polytechnic

390

FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT FOR THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOEElectricalonJusticeEnergy7249 FederalandFAR27.pdfEnclosureFEDERAL

391

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 Total System12 FactofFateFederal Facility Agreement

392

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactorBatteries for Advanced P -Major DOEEnergy Northwest

393

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactorBatteriesDisease |NEPA/309 Reviewers |Decontamination

394

DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

computing, telecommunication, and cyber security; fleet management; real and personal property management; records management and document control; safeguards and security;...

395

DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

computing, telecommunication, and cyber security; fleet management; real and personal property management; records management and document control; safeguards and security;...

396

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

397

NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

398

EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost benefits are still evident. Currently, there are many solar power plants that have been announced Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because, power output from a solar field. At the right cost, a storage system can improve overall economics

399

MODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic AND BACKGROUND [2] The containment of spent fuel from nuclear power plants in a geological repositoryMODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY SATURATED FRACTURED ROCK Y. W

Jellinek, Mark

400

POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 Forschungsgemeinschaft. leads to a tremendous increase in the complex- ity of the traditional power optimization mod- els-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

Römisch, Werner

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Molecular imaging of water binding state and diffusion in breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffusion weighted MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular imaging of water binding state and diffusion inChung et al. , “In vivo water state measurements in breastby measuring tis- sue water state using diffuse optical

Chung, So Hyun; Yu, Hon; Su, Min-Ying; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

Foreman, Kenneth M. (North Bellmore, NY); Gilbert, Barry L. (Westbury, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Using a Quasipotential Transformation for Modeling Diffusion Media inPolymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a quasipotential approach along with conformal mapping is used to model the diffusion media of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. This method provides a series solution that is grid independent and only requires integration along a single boundary to solve the problem. The approach accounts for nonisothermal phenomena, two-phase flow, correct placement of the electronic potential boundary condition, and multilayer media. The method is applied to a cathode diffusion medium to explore the interplay between water and thermal management and performance, the impact of the rib-to-channel ratio, and the existence of diffusion under the rib and flooding phenomena.

Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Testing of a Hydrogen Diffusion Flame Array Injector at Gas Turbine Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-hydrogen gas turbines enable integration of carbon sequestration into coal-gasifying power plants, though NO{sub x} emissions are often high. This work explores nitrogen dilution of hydrogen diffusion flames to reduce thermal NO{sub x} emissions and avoid problems with premixing hydrogen at gas turbine pressures and temperatures. The burner design includes an array of high-velocity coaxial fuel and air injectors, which balances stability and ignition performance, combustor pressure drop, and flame residence time. Testing of this array injector at representative gas turbine conditions (16 atm and 1750 K firing temperature) yields 4.4 ppmv NO{sub x} at 15% O{sub 2} equivalent. NO{sub x} emissions are proportional to flame residence times, though these deviate from expected scaling due to active combustor cooling and merged flame behavior. The results demonstrate that nitrogen dilution in combination with high velocities can provide low NO{sub x} hydrogen combustion at gas turbine conditions, with significant potential for further NO{sub x} reductions via suggested design changes.

Weiland, Nathan T.; Sidwell, Todd G.; Strakey, Peter A.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermal characterization of submicron polyacrylonitrile fibers based on optical heating and electrical thermal sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the thermal diffusivity of single submicron ({approx}800 nm) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers is characterized using the recently developed optical heating and electrical thermal sensing technique. In the experiment, a thin Au film (approximately in the nanometer range) is coated on the surface of nonconductive PAN fibers. A periodically modulated laser beam is used to irradiate suspended individual fibers to achieve noncontact periodical heating. The periodical temperature response of the sample is monitored by measuring the electrical resistance variation of the thin Au coating. The experimental results for three different synthesized PAN fibers with varying Au coating thickness are presented and discussed.

Hou Jinbo; Wang Xinwei; Zhang Lijun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, N104 Walter Scott Engineering Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0656 (United States)

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Effect of transpiration rate on internal plant resistance to water flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models for liquid water flow in plants. because it enables one to estimate leaf water potential from known or estimated transpiration rates. The predicted leaf water potential can be used for scheduling irrigation ~ The leaf diffusion resistance... OF LITERATURE Soil Resistance Internal Plant Resistance Ohm's Law Analogy Mathematical Models of Water Transport in the Soil-Plant- Atmosphere System . ~ Poiseuille's Law . ~ ~ ~ ~ Leaf Diffusion and Aerodynamic Resistances ~ Conclusions of Literature...

Hailey, James Lester

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hot carrier diffusion in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an optical study of charge transport in graphene. Diffusion of hot carriers in epitaxial graphene and reduced graphene oxide samples are studied using an ultrafast pump-probe technique with a high spatial resolution. Spatiotemporal...

Ruzicka, Brian Andrew; Wang, Shuai; Werake, Lalani Kumari; Weintrub, Ben; Loh, Kian Ping; Zhao, Hui

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The team’s design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Investigation of Thermal Interface Materials Using Phase-Sensitive Transient Thermoreflectance Technique: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With increasing power density in electronics packages/modules, thermal resistances at multiple interfaces are a bottleneck to efficient heat removal from the package. In this work, the performance of thermal interface materials such as grease, thermoplastic adhesives and diffusion-bonded interfaces are characterized using the phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance technique. A multi-layer heat conduction model was constructed and theoretical solutions were derived to obtain the relation between phase lag and the thermal/physical properties. This technique enables simultaneous extraction of the contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity of the TIMs. With the measurements, the bulk thermal conductivity of Dow TC-5022 thermal grease (70 to 75 um bondline thickness) was 3 to 5 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 5 to 10 mm2-K/W. For the Btech thermoplastic material (45 to 80 ?m bondline thickness), the bulk thermal conductivity was 20 to 50 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 2 to 5 mm2-K/W. Measurements were also conducted to quantify the thermal performance of diffusion-bonded interface for power electronics applications. Results with the diffusion-bonded sample showed that the interfacial thermal resistance is more than one order of magnitude lower than those of traditional TIMs, suggesting potential pathways to efficient thermal management.

Feng, X.; King, C.; DeVoto, D.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Accelerating and Retarding Anomalous Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper Gaussian models of retarded and accelerated anomalous diffusion are considered. Stochastic differential equations of fractional order driven by single or multiple fractional Gaussian noise terms are introduced to describe retarding and accelerating subdiffusion and superdiffusion. Short and long time asymptotic limits of the mean squared displacement of the stochastic processes associated with the solutions of these equations are studied. Specific cases of these equations are shown to provide possible descriptions of retarding or accelerating anomalous diffusion.

Chai Hok Eab; S. C. Lim

2012-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Thermal depinning of fluxons in discrete Josephson rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the thermal depinning of single fluxons in rings made of Josephson junctions. Due to thermal fluctuations a fluxon can be excited from its energy minima and move through the array, causing a voltage across each junction. We find that for the initial depinning, the fluxon behaves as a single particle and follows a Kramers-type escape law. However, under some conditions this single-particle description breaks down. At low values of the discreteness parameter and low values of the damping, the depinning rate is larger than what the single-particle result would suggest. In addition, for some values of the parameters the fluxon can undergo low-voltage diffusion before switching to the high-voltage whirling mode. This type of diffusion is similar to phase diffusion in a single junction but occurs without frequency-dependent damping. We study the switching to the whirling state as well.

Mazo, J. J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Naranjo, F. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Segall, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York 13346 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A probabilistic model to predict the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the case of cooling systems in nuclear power plants, observations revealed the presence of thermal crazing loading even if thermal fatigue is multiaxial. However, the first simulations on a uniaxial mechanicalA probabilistic model to predict the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal fatigue

416

Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO 2 emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. Much of the literature proposes using power from the existing coal plant and thermal ...

Bashadi, Sarah (Sarah Omer)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nonlinear Data Transformation with Diffusion Map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Others: Laplacian eigenmaps, Hessian eigenmaps, LTSA We apply the diffusion map (Coifman & Lafon 2006

418

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

Spatially localized measurement of thermal conductivity using a hybrid photothermal technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A photothermal technique capable of measuring thermal conductivity with micrometer lateral resolution is presented. This technique involves measuring separately the thermal diffusivity, D, and thermal effusivity, e, to extract the thermal conductivity, k=(e2/D)1/2. To generalize this approach, sensitivity analysis was conducted for materials having a range of thermal conductivities. Experimental validation was sought using two substrate materials, SiO2 and CaF2, both coated with thin titanium films. The measured conductivities compare favorably with literature values.

David H Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Zilong Hua; Rory Kennedy; Heng Ban

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Computer application for design activity in power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Software for Design Activity in Power Plants' helps the Power Plant engineers and managers to manage the development and design activities of equipments in the field of power plants. This paper is basically concerned with the computerization of the design activity of Condenser, vital equipment in Heat Exchanger Unit of Thermal Power Plant required for condensing the steam and for further reclaimable purposes to achieve economy. This software will also provide facilities to maintain user profile and the respective work details.

Giri, Parimal Kumar; Srivastava, Sonam [Apeejay College of Engineering, Sohna, Gurgaon (India)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

On the solution of the Heaviside - Klein - Gordon thermal equation for heat transport in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report studies of the solution of the Heaviside - Klein - Gordon thermal equation. As the result it is shown that the solution consists of two components: the fast thermal wave and slow diffusion for very large (compared to relaxation time) time period. We argue that the fast thermal wave can be recognized as the indication of the ballistic heat transport. As an example we consider the ballistic heat transport in graphene.

Magdalena Pelc

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as...

423

Thermal shock behavior of fiber-reinforced composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal shock behavior of three types of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites (Nextel{trademark} or Nicalon{trademark} fiber-reinforced chemical vapor infiltrated or polymer-derived SiC matrix composites) was studied using the water quench technique. The thermal shock induced damage was characterized by both destructive and nondestructive techniques. As compared with monolithic ceramics, the continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites were capable of preventing catastrophic failure caused by thermal shock and were able to retain a significant portion of their original strength at {Delta}{Tau} = 1000{degrees}C. The nondestructive techniques involved measuring the thermal diffusivity by the flash technique and determining the Young`s modulus by the dynamic resonance method. It has been demonstrated that these nondestructive techniques can detect damage induced by thermal shock and are more sensitive in detecting damage in the early stage than the conventional destructive technique of measuring the retained strength.

Wang, H.; Singh, R.N. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer;Leuchtstoffröhre Plasma-Bildschirm Energiesparlampe #12;electrical engineering light sources textile industry

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

425

Diffusion-wave laser radiometric diagnostic quality-control technologies for materials NDE/NDT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion-wave laser radiometric diagnostic quality-control technologies for materials NDE/NDT A in two emerging NDE/NDT technologies. The solution of the ill-posed thermal- wave inverse problem has radiometric NDE metrology capable of measuring the primary photo- injected free carrier parameters

Mandelis, Andreas

426

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of candidate fluids and phase-change materials (PCM) to serve as thermal energy storage media in the temperature range of 300 C to 800 C. Knowledge of thermophysical properties such as melting point, heat of fusion, density, viscosity, thermal stability are essential for understanding how candidate materials could be deployed in CSP plants. The laboratory runs high-temperature instruments for the analysis of thermophysical properties. Small samples of candidate materials are prepared and characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and other specialized analytical methods. Instrumentation capabilities are being expanded to allow for analysis of samples up to 1,200 C. Higher temperature operation is one method to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of CSP systems.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermal and Economic Analyses of Energy Saving by Enclosing Gas Turbine Combustor Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) thermography inspection indicated a high-temperature area (500~560°F) at the combustor section of the GE Frame 5 gas turbine of Dynegy Gas Processing Plant at Venice, Louisiana. To improve the thermal efficiency and reduce energy cost, thermal... within the natural gas industry, the Venice plant is seeking various means to reduce cost. As part of the project to improve the energy efficiency of the plant and thus reduce energy costs, Dynegy contracted the Energy Conversion & Conservation...

Li, X.; Wang, T.; Day, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?, IEA Annex 20 project. The simulated results, in terms of maximum velocity, distribution of velocity and temperature in the room are validated against the experimental data. 3.1.1 Study the effect of various parameters on the CFD simulation. A study... and the walls of the room. The window is assumed to have a surface temperature of 30 0C.The diffuser used is a ?HESCO? type diffuser, which was used in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Annex 20 project (1993): ?Room air and contaminant flow, evaluation...

Gangisetti, Kavita

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

LMR thermal hydraulics calculations in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of thermal hydraulics computer codes have been developed by various organizations in the US. These codes cover an extensive range of purposes from within-assembly-wise pin temperature calculations to plant wide transient analysis. The codes are used for static analysis, for analysis of protected anticipated transients, and for analysis of a wide range of unprotected transients for the more recent inherently safe LMR designs. Some of these codes are plant-specific codes with properties of a specific plant built into them. Other codes are more general and can be applied to a number of plants or designs. These codes, and the purposes for which they have been used, are described.

Dunn, F.E.; Malloy, D.J.; Mohr, D.

1987-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Thermal Processes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Production Current Technology Thermal Processes Thermal Processes Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass,...

433

Use of remote sensing data to enhance the performance of a hydrodynamic simulation of a partially frozen power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the overall efficiency of a power plant. The ability to monitor a cooling pond using thermal remote sensing of a power plant cooling pond in the presence of ice and snow. Keywords: thermal infrared, hydrodynamic with the objective of improving our ability to understand and simulate the thermodynamics and dynamics of power plant

Salvaggio, Carl

434

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

435

Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

Moreno, G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Energy Saving in Ammonia Plant by Using Gas Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An ammonia plant, in which the IHI-SULZER Type 57 Gas Turbine is integrated in order to achieve energy saving, has started successful operation. Tile exhaust gas of the gas turbine has thermal energy of relatively high temperature, therefore...

Uji, S.; Ikeda, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Proceedings of the XVI International Conference on Thermoelectrics, Dresden, Germany, p. 641, 1997 Thermoelectric Microcoolers for Thermal Management Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microelectronics. We are pursuing a novel thermal management approach that actively cools only the key high power solutions on a variety of metallic substrates. We also report on the development of Cu diffusion barriers for Bi2Te3 and stable metallizations and diffusion barriers for diamond and AlN substrates. Introduction

440

Diffusion of CO{sub 2} on Rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) Surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusion of CO{sub 2} molecules on a reduced rutile TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1×1) surface has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The STM feature associated with a CO{sub 2} molecule at an oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) becomes increasingly streaky with increasing temperature, indicating thermally activated CO{sub 2} diffusion from the V{sub O} site. From temperature-dependent tunneling current measurements, the barrier for diffusion of CO{sub 2} from the V{sub O} site is estimated to be 3.31 ± 0.23 kcal/mol. The corresponding value from the DFT calculations is 3.80 kcal/mol. In addition, the DFT calculations give a barrier for diffusion of CO{sub 2} along Ti rows of only 1.33 kcal/mol.

Lee, Junseok; Sorescu, Dan C.; Deng, Xingyi; Jordan, Kenneth D.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Material compatibility and thermal aging of thermoelectric materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to design a thermoelectric (TE) module suitable for long-term elevated temperature use, the Department 8651 has conducted parametric experiments to study material compatibility and thermal aging of TE materials. In addition, a comprehensive material characterization has been preformed to examine thermal stability of P- and N-based alloys and their interaction with interconnect diffusion barrier(s) and solder. At present, we have completed the 7-days aging experiments for 36 tiles, from ambient to 250 C. The thermal behavior of P- and N-based alloys and their thermal interaction with both Ni and Co diffusion barriers and Au-Sn solder were examined. The preliminary results show the microstructure, texture, alloy composition, and hardness of P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} and N-Bi{sub 2}(Te,Se){sub 3} alloys are thermally stable up to 7 days annealing at 250 C. However, metallurgical reactions between the Ni-phosphor barriers and P-type base alloy were evident at temperatures {ge} 175 C. At 250 C, the depth (or distance) of the metallurgical reaction and/or Ni diffusion into P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} is approximately 10-15 {micro}m. This thermal instability makes the Ni-phosphor barrier unsuitable for use at temperatures {ge} 175 C. The Co barrier appeared to be thermally stable and compatible with P(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} at all annealing temperatures, with the exception of a minor Co diffusion into Au-Sn solder at {ge} 175 C. The effects of Co diffusion on long-term system reliability and/or the thermal stability of the Co barrier are yet to be determined. Te evaporation and its subsequent reaction with Au-Sn solder and Ni and Co barriers on the ends of the tiles at temperatures {ge} 175 C were evident. The Te loss and its effect on the long-term required stoichiometry of P-(Bi, Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} are yet to be understood. The aging experiments of 90 days and 180 days are ongoing and scheduled to be completed in 30 days and 150 days, respectively. Material characterization activities are continuing for the remaining tiles.

Gardea, Andrew D.; Nishimoto, Ryan; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Whalen, Scott A.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Beta Diffusion Trees Creighton Heaukulani  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta Diffusion Trees Creighton Heaukulani CKH28@CAM.AC.UK David A. Knowles DAVIDKNOWLES Stanford University, Department of Computer Science, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract We define the beta structures over clusters of the particles. With the beta diffu- sion tree, however, multiple copies

Edinburgh, University of

444

Fabrication and Characterization of a Conduction Cooled Thermal Neutron Filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Installation of a conduction cooled thermal (low-energy) neutron filter in an existing domestic test reactor would provide the U.S. the capability to test new reactor fuels and materials for advanced fast (high-energy) reactor concepts. A composite consisting of Al3Hf-Al has been proposed for the neutron filter due to both the neutron filtering properties of hafnium and the conducting capabilities of aluminum. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of the Al3Hf-Al composite is essential for the design of the filtering system. The present objectives are to identify a suitable fabrication technique and to measure the thermophysical properties of the Al3Hf intermetallic, which has not been done previous to this study. A centrifugal casting method was used to prepare samples of Al3Hf. X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were conducted to determine the structural make-up of each of the samples. Thermophysical properties were measured as follows: specific heat by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal diffusivity by a laser flash thermal diffusivity measuring system, thermal expansion by a dilatometer, and thermal conductivity was calculated based on the previous measurements. All measurements were acquired over a temperature range of 90°C - 375°C with some measurements outside these bounds. The average thermal conductivity of the intermetallic Al3Hf (~7 at.% Hf) was found to be ~ 41 W/m-K for the given temperature range. This information fills a knowledge gap in the thermophysical properties of the intermetallic Al3Hf with the specified percentage of hafnium. A model designed to predict composite properties was used to calculate a thermal conductivity of ~177 W/m-K for an Al3Hf-Al composite with 23 vol% Al3Hf. This calculation was based upon the average thermal conductivity of Al3Hf over the specified temperature range.

Heather Wampler; Adam Gerth; Heng Ban; Donna Post Guillen; Douglas Porter; Cynthia Papesch

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermal structure of a protostellar envelope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical hydrodynamical model for the evolution of spherically symmetric collapsing clouds, designed for the calculation of the thermal structure of these objects in both the prestellar and protostellar stages of their evolution, is presented. Distinctive features of the model include the possibility of independently describing the temperatures of the gas and dust, which is extremely important when calculating the thermal structure of prestellar and protostellar clouds, and the account of the radiation flux from the central protostar. This model is used to compare the theoretical density and temperature distributions with observations for nearby sites of star formation obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory. Application of the diffusion approximation with a flux limiter describes well the radial density and temperature distributions in protostellar clouds. However, significant differences between the model and observational density profiles were found for prestellar stages, suggesting the presence of...

Pavlyuchenkov, Ya N; Vorobyov, E I; Fateeva, A M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sandia National Laboratories: Diffusion Bonding Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bond surface is poor or only the region near this corner Diffusion 7-8-9 Diffusion Welding and Brazing, Welding Handbook, 7th ed., American Welding Society, 1980, p 311-335...

447

MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING Katarina Blagovi, Lily Y. Kim, Alison M cell differentiation. KEYWORDS: Embryonic stem cells, microfluidic perfusion, diffusible signaling; they secrete molecules to which they respond. Microfluidics offers a potential solution to this challenge

Voldman, Joel

448

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN UO2-x  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ K.C. K:i.m, "Oxygen Diffusion in Hypostoichiometricsystem for enriching uo 2 in oxygen-18 or for stoichiometry+nal of Nuclear Materials OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN U0 2 _:x K.C.

Kim, K.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hierarchical 3D diffusion wavelet shape priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a novel representation of prior knowledge for image segmentation, using diffusion wavelets that can reflect arbitrary continuous interdependencies in shape data. The application of diffusion ...

Langs, Georg

450

Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H. [Cameron, 1000 McClaren Woods Drive, Coraopolis, PA 15108 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radiation-Dominated Disks Are Thermally Stable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When the accretion rate is more than a small fraction of Eddington, the inner regions of accretion disks around black holes are expected to be radiation-dominated. However, in the alpha-model, these regions are also expected to be thermally unstable. In this paper, we report two 3-d radiation MHD simulations of a vertically-stratified shearing box in which the ratio of radiation to gas pressure is ~ 10, and yet no thermal runaway occurs over a timespan ~ 40 cooling times. Where the time-averaged dissipation rate is greater than the critical dissipation rate that creates hydrostatic equilibrium by diffusive radiation flux, the time-averaged radiation flux is held to the critical value, with the excess dissipated energy transported by radiative advection. Although the stress and total pressure are well-correlated as predicted by the alpha-model, we show that stress fluctuations precede pressure fluctuations, contrary to the usual supposition that the pressure controls the saturation level of the magnetic energy. This fact explains the thermal stability. Using a simple toy-model, we show that independently-generated magnetic fluctuations can drive radiation pressure fluctuations, creating a correlation between the two while maintaining thermal stability.

Shigenobu Hirose; Julian H. Krolik; Omer Blaes

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofBiofoul- ing and Corrosion of OTEC plants ~ Selected Sites.Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Thermal comfort during surgery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Industrial... Engineering THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Approved as to style and content by: airman of C it ee Head of Department Member Me er December 1978 ABSTRACT Thermal Comfort During Surgery (December 1978) David Harold...

Manning, David Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing #12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 and x-ray Ultraviolet Infrared Microwave and radio waves Wavelength in meters (m) Electromagnetic.77 700 red limit 30k0.041 2.48 green500 near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrare refers

455

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

Boron diffusion in nanocrystalline 3C-SiC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusion of boron in nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) films with a grain size of 4–7 nm is studied using a poly-Si boron source. Diffusion is found to be much faster than in monocrystalline SiC as it takes place within the grain boundary (GB) network. Drive-in temperatures of 900–1000°C are suitable for creating shallow boron profiles up to 100?nm deep, while 1100°C is sufficient to flood the 200?nm thick films with boron. From the resulting plateau at 1100?°C a boron segregation coefficient of 28 between nc-SiC and the Si substrate, as well as a GB boron solubility limit of 0.2?nm{sup ?2} is determined. GB diffusion in the bulk of the films is Fickian and thermally activated with D{sub GB}(T)=(3.1?5.6)×10{sup 7}exp(?5.03±0.16??eV/k{sub B}T) cm{sup 2}s{sup ?1}. The activation energy is interpreted in terms of a trapping mechanism at dangling bonds. Higher boron concentrations are present at the nc-SiC surface and are attributed to immobilized boron.

Schnabel, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.schnabel@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Weiss, Charlotte; Rachow, Thomas; Löper, Philipp; Janz, Stefan [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Canino, Mariaconcetta; Summonte, Caterina [CNR-IMM, Via Piero Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mirabella, Salvo [CNR-IMM MATIS, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Wilshaw, Peter R. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

DIFFUSION OF MAGNESIUM AND MICROSTRUCTURES IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following our previous reports [ 1- 3], further isochronal annealing (2 hrs.) of the monocrystalline 6H-SiC and polycrystalline CVD 3C-SiC was performed at 1573 and 1673 K in Ar environment. SIMS data indicate that observable Mg diffusion in 6H-SiC starts and a more rapid diffusion in CVD 3C-SiC occurs at 1573 K. The implanted Mg atoms tend to diffuse deeper into the undamaged CVD 3C-SiC. The microstructure with Mg inclusions in the as-implanted SiC has been initially examined using high-resolution STEM. The presence of Mg in the TEM specimen has been confirmed based on EDS mapping. Additional monocrystalline 3C-SiC samples have been implanted at 673 K to ion fluence 3 times higher than the previous one. RBS/C analysis has been performed before and after thermal annealing at 1573 K for 12 hrs. Isothermal annealing at 1573 K is being carried out and Mg depth profiles being measured. Microstructures in both the as-implanted and annealed samples are also being examined using STEM.

Jiang, Weilin; Edwards, Danny J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Wang, Zheming; Zhu, Zihua; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in the diffusion cascade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in plant operations..

Huffer, J.E. [Parallax, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Service Promotion -Diffusion Raphale LOMBARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Promotion - Diffusion Raphaële LOMBARD Editions L'Harmattan - 5 Rue de l'Ecole Polytechnique ­ 75005 Paris Tél 01.40.46.79.23 ­ mail : raphaele.lombard@harmattan.fr La mondialisation avance à complémentaires BON DE COMMANDE A retourner à L'HARMATTAN, 7 rue de l'�cole Polytechnique 75005 Paris Veuillez me

Pellier, Damien

460

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Thermal and Mechanical Design Aspects of the LIFE Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial confinement fusion - Fission Energy (LIFE) engine encompasses the components of a LIFE power plant responsible for converting the thermal energy of fusion and fission reactions into electricity. The design and integration of these components must satisfy a challenging set of requirements driven by nuclear, thermal, geometric, structural, and materials considerations. This paper details a self-consistent configuration for the LIFE engine along with the methods and technologies selected to meet these stringent requirements. Included is discussion of plant layout, coolant flow dynamics, fuel temperatures, expected structural stresses, power cycle efficiencies, and first wall survival threats. Further research and to understand and resolve outstanding issues is also outlined.

Abbott, R P; Gerhard, M A; Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Morris, K R; Peterson, P F; Seifried, J E

2008-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

462

Anomalous diffusion in fractal globules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal globule state is widely believed to be the best known model to describe the chromatin packing in the eucaryotic nuclei. Here we provide a scaling theory and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) computer simulation for the thermal motion of monomers in the fractal globule state. We show this motion to be subdiffusive described by $\\langle X^2 (t)\\rangle \\sim t^{\\alpha_F}$ with $\\alpha_F$ close to 0.4. We also suggest a novel way to construct a fractal globule state in computer simulation, and provide simulation evidence supporting the conjecture that different initial entanglement-free states of a polymer chain converge as they are thermally annealed.

Mikhail V. Tamm; Leonid I. Nazarov; Alexey A. Gavrilov; Alexander V. Chertovich

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures and the thermal transport prop- erties is a key point to design materials with preferred thermal properties with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity

Boyer, Edmond

464

Strategies in tower solar power plant optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for optimizing a central receiver solar thermal electric power plant is studied. We parametrize the plant design as a function of eleven design variables and reduce the problem of finding optimal designs to the numerical problem of finding the minimum of a function of several variables. This minimization problem is attacked with different algorithms both local and global in nature. We find that all algorithms find the same minimum of the objective function. The performance of each of the algorithms and the resulting designs are studied for two typical cases. We describe a method to evaluate the impact of design variables in the plant performance. This method will tell us what variables are key to the optimal plant design and which ones are less important. This information can be used to further improve the plant design and to accelerate the optimization procedure.

Ramos, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Role of Thermal Conduction in Tearing Mode Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of anisotropic thermal diffusivity on tearing mode stability is analysed in general toroidal geometry. A dispersion relation linking the growth rate to the tearing mode stability parameter, Delta, is derived. By using a resistive MHD code, modified to include such thermal transport, to calculate tearing mode growth rates, the dispersion relation is employed to determine Delta in situations with finite plasma pressure that are stabilised by favourable average curvature in a simple resistive MHD model. We also demonstrate that the same code can also be used to calculate the basis-functions [C J Ham, et al, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 (2012) 105014] needed to construct Delta.

Connor, J W; Hastie, R J; Liu, Y Q

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

468

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

Tunable thermal link  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Thermal Recovery Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal Recovery Methods describes the basic concepts of thermal recovery and explains the injection patterns used to exploit reservoir conditions. Basic reservoir engineering is reviewed with an emphasis on changes in flow characteristics caused by temperature. The authors discuss an energy balance for steam and combustion drive, and they explain in situ reactions. Heat loss, combustion drive, and steam displacement also are examined in detail, as well as cyclic steam injection, downhole ignition, well heating, and low-temperature oxidation. Contents: Thermal processes; Formation and reservoir evaluations; Well patterns and spacing; Flow and process equations; Laboratory simulation of thermal recovery; Heat loss and transmission; Displacement and production; Equipment; Basic data for field selection; Laboratory evaluation of combustion characteristics; Thermal properties of reservoirs and fluids.

White, P.D.; Moss, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Microsecond switchable thermal antenna  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

Ben-Abdallah, Philippe, E-mail: pba@institutoptique.fr; Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

Group classification of systems of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations with general diffusion matrix. II. Generalized Turing systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group classification of systems of two coupled nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation with a diagonal diffusion matrix is carried out. Symmetries of diffusion systems with singular diffusion matrix and additional first order derivative terms are described.

A. G. Nikitin

2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

Mitsubishi FGD plants for lignite fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to respond to the increasing electric energy demand for sustaining economic growth, construction of coal-fired thermal power plants worldwide is indispensable. As a countermeasure for environmental pollution which otherwise may reach a serious proportion from the operation of these plants, construction of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants is being promoted. Among these power stations where lignite fuel is burnt, the FGD plants concerned have to be designed to cope with high gas volume and SO{sub x} concentration as well as violent fluctuations in their values caused by such features of lignite as high sulfur content, low calorific volume, and unstable properties. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) has received construction awards for a total of seven (7) FGD plants for lignite-fired boilers in succession starting from that for CEZ as, Czech Republic followed by those for EGAT, Thailand in 1993. All these plants are presently operating satisfactorily since successful completion of their performance tests in 1996. Further, a construction award of three (3) more FGD plants for lignite-fired boilers was received from ENDESA (Spain) in 1995 which are now being outfitted and scheduled to start commercial operation in 1998. In this paper, the authors discuss the outline design of FGD plants for lignite-fired boilers based on experience of FGD plants constructed since 1970 for heavy oil--as well as black coal-fired boilers, together with items confirmed from the operation and design guideline hereafter.

Kotake, Shinichiro; Okazoe, Kiyoshi; Iwashita, Koichiro; Yajima, Satoru

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Bagdad Plant  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon

477

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

479

Coupled near and far field thermal plume analysis using finite element techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of the open cycle cooling process for thermal power plants requires significant effluent discharges into aquatic environments. Both engineering and environmental considerations require accurate prediction of resulting ...

Kaufman, John T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Optimization of central receiver concentrated solar thermal : site selection, heliostat layout & canting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, two new models are introduced for the purposes of (i) locating sites in hillside terrain suitable for central receiver solar thermal plants and (ii) optimization of heliostat field layouts for any terrain. ...

Noone, Corey J. (Corey James)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Thermal desalination : structural optimization and integration in clean power and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large number of resources are dedicated to seawater desalination and will only grow as world-wide water scarcity increases. In arid areas with high temperature and salinity seawater, thermal desalination and power plants ...

Zak, Gina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Solar Thermal Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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485

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A model library of solar thermal electric components for the computer code TRNSYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to modeling solar thermal electric plants using the TRNSYS simulation environment is discussed. The TRNSYS environment offers many advantages over currently used tools, including the option to more easily study the hybrid solar/fossil plant configurations that have been proposed to facilitate market penetration of solar thermal technologies. A component library developed for Rankine cycle, Brayton cycle, and solar system modeling is presented. A comparison between KPRO and TRNSYS results for a simple Rankine cycle show excellent correlation.

Pitz-Paal, R. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Solare Energietechnik; Jones, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharges can be made more economically attrac tank holding several thousand gallons of water tive by incorporating thermal energy storage in a maintained at 128-130?F. This scald tank is con heat recovery system. Thermal energy storage can stantly... the ultimate energy end use. of wasting this hot water to the plant drain, a heat A project conducted by the Georgia Tech exchanger was installed at the Gold Kist plant to Engineering Experiment Station to demonstrate preheat scald tank makeup water...

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59