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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

Dole, M.

1959-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program...

3

Manhattan Project: The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Diffusion columns, S-50 Thermal Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, 1945. THE NAVY AND THERMAL DIFFUSION Diffusion columns, S-50 Thermal Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, 1945. THE NAVY AND THERMAL DIFFUSION (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1944) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 As problems with both Y-12 and K-25 reached crisis proportions in spring and summer 1944, the Manhattan Project received help from an unexpected source: the United States Navy. President Roosevelt had instructed that the atomic bomb effort be an Army program and that the Navy be excluded from deliberations. Navy research on atomic power, conducted primarily for submarines, received no direct aid from Leslie Groves, who, in fact, was not up-to-date on the state of Navy efforts when he received a letter on the subject from Robert Oppenheimer late in April 1944.

4

Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 November 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of the emergency management program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in August and September 2006. The coordination of emergency plans and procedures among USEC and DOE contractor organizations has successfully integrated the emergency management programs into a single cohesive program for the PORTS site. Other strengths include accurate hazards surveys that identify applicable

5

Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 26, 2010 Consent...

8

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, contractors at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and selected non-leased facilities to respond to a severe natural phenomena event (NPE). The review was conducted in July and August 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this

9

Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Thermal Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

At high hot wall temperatures the gas phase thermal diffusion column acts as an atomic rather than a molecular separator. A modified theory was developed to describe the process. Equivalent transport equations were derived for the two nuclides in a binary atomic mixture. The equations are identical in form to those normally encountered in thermal diffusion column theory. Experiments to test the theory were carried out with two 3-meter columns. Experimental results with deuterium-tritium mixtures were found to be in satisfactory agreement with theory, and it was concluded that the theory was sufficiently accurate for design purposes.

Rutherford, W. M.; Lindsay, C. N.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Manhattan Project: K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > Working K-25 into the Mix, Oak Ridge:...

11

Measurement of Thermal Diffusity and Flow Resistance for TCAP Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SRS uses the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) to separate isotopes of hydrogen. The frequency of thermal cycles is a limit of the productivity of the process and that frequency is largely determined by the thermal diffusivity of the absorbent material. For a given tube diameter, a larger thermal diffusivity decreases the time required for each cycle. In 1998, the Engineering Development Laboratory measured thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity for three TCAP materials in helium.

STEIMKE, JOHN

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution

13

Design for Krypton-85 Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

Substantial quantities of krypton having a krypton-85 concentration of less than 10% will become available if nuclear fuel-processing plants are required to collect the gaseous fission products rather than releasing them into the atmosphere. A modular thermal diffusion unit was designed for the enrichment of the krypton-85 to useful concentrations of greater than 45%. The design emphasizes reliability and integrity by incorporating no moving parts within the unit. The modular design also offers flexibility in the size of the enrichment facility that need be constructed at any time.

Schwind, Roger A.; Rutherford, William M.

1973-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant [HIAR-PAD-2011-07-27] The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Argonne National Laboratory - August 2011

15

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

16

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Phase I: Needs Assessment Robert Wages Oil, Chemical and Atomic Inte national Union Steven Markowitz Mount Sinai School of Medicine Sylvia Kieding Oil, Chemical and Atomic International Union Mark Griffon University of Massachusetts Lowell Elizabeth Averill Samaras Alice Hamilton College October 1, 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number Executive Summary 1 J: OVERVIEW 1. Introduction 2-3 2. Methods 3-8 3. Principal Findings 9-16 4. Need for Medical Surveillance and Risk Communication 16-17 PART II: METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS 4. Exposure Assessment Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 5. Focus Group Results Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 6. Epidemiology and Other Health Studies EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose We report the results and analysis of a one year needs assessment study evaluating

17

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submittedConcentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey Lee Hardin

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A New Horizontal Gradient, Continuous Flow, Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow, horizontal gradient, ice thermal diffusion chamber has been developed and tested for heterogeneous ice nucleation of aerosol particles under accurately controlled supersaturations and supercooling in the absence of a substrate. ...

E. M. Tomlinson; N. Fukuta

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the...

20

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal spray applications for power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants usually are located near water and many are in salt water environments. Corrosion occurring in these environments is a problem often solved with thermal spray coatings. The use of thermal spray aluminum and zinc in three power plants for various components is reviewed. Special emphasis is on the cooling tower at the Seabrook, New Hampshire plant. A guide to selection of the coating and process also is given.

Sampson, E.R.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-specific surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference

23

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Intennech, Inc. - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Intermech, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Anchor Bolts and Pipe Supports at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to

24

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August

25

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.a central solar thermal power plant. A variety of heliostatSTORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - 026 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (026 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located in south central Ohio, approximately 20 miles north of Portsmouth, Ohio and 70 miles south of Columbus, Ohio. Construction of the PGDP began in late 1952 to expand the Federal Government¿s gaseous diffusion program already in place at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Paducah, Kentucky. The facility was built to increase the production of enriched uranium at rates substantially above the other

27

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although many solar technologies have been demonstrated, parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plant technology represents one of the major renewable energy success stories of the last two decades.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Simultaneous measurement of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of unconsolidated materials by the transient hot wire method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new design for the transient hot wire method that can obtain the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of unconsolidated materials. In this method

Greg C. Glatzmaier; W. Fred Ramirez

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

An Empirical Model of UO2 Thermal Conductivity Based on Laser Flash Measurements of Thermal Diffusivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity of irradiated fuel materials, which can be derived from measured thermal diffusivity (TD), is a key consideration in thermal performance and design of a fuel rod. However, without interpretation, the measured TD data cannot be used directly to calculate fuel temperatures during irradiation. This report provides such interpretation and presents an empirical model for the degradation of UO2 thermal conductivity with burn-up.

1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky.

31

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Gross Thermal Efficiency of a Solar Power Plant • .and Maintenance* - Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar PowerMWe Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar Power Plant,MWe-hr/

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised i n debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

Price, H. W.; Kistner, R.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Aspects of thermal power plant automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal electric power plant is a set of facilities/equipment interconnected, designed to produce electricity or heat and power, by converting chemical energy of a fuel. This paper analyze the energy production stations, both turbine and steam generator ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, the Ovation System

Marius-Constantin Popescu; Nikos Mastorakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in geophysics and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a new phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion associated with turbulent transport of aerosols in the atmosphere and in laboratory experiments. The essence of this phenomenon is the appearance of a nondiffusive mean flux of particles in the direction of the mean heat flux, which results in the formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of aerosols that accumulate in regions of minimum mean temperature of the surrounding fluid. This effect of turbulent thermal diffusion was detected experimentally. In experiments turbulence was generated by two oscillating grids in two directions of the imposed vertical mean temperature gradient. We used Particle Image Velocimetry to determine the turbulent velocity field, and an Image Processing Technique based on an analysis of the intensity of Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of aerosols. Analysis of the intensity of laser light Mie scattering by aerosols showed that aerosols accumulate in the vicinity of the minimum mean temperature due to the effect of turbulent thermal diffusion. Geophysical applications of the obtained results are discussed.

A. Eidelman; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; A. Krein; I. Rogachevskii; J. Buchholz; G. Gruenefeld

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2013 April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent Oversight review was to evaluate PPPO's conduct of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase I verification review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The contractor at PORTS is Fluor-Babcock & Wilcox Portsmouth (FBP). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations

37

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Joe Hudson 1930 North 13th Street Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

38

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Jeanne Cisco 2288 Wakefield Mound Road Piketon, OH 45661 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the Unitedsteel Workers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and

39

Seawater pump study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program. Final report. [For ocean thermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pumping power required to move cold seawater and warm seawater through an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant is a significant portion of the plant power output; therefore, seawater pump performance, sizing, and cost information are very influential inputs into any power plant system design optimizations. The analysis and evaluation of large seawater pumping systems selected specifically for the OTEC application are provided with a view toward judging the impact of pump selection on overall OTEC power plant performance. A self-contained bulb, direct drive, axial flow pump was found to have a distinct advantage in performance and arrangement flexibility. A design of a pump operating at a net total head rise of 3.5 meters and a flow capacity of 100 m/sup 3//s is presented including pump blade geometry (profiles), pump diffuser geometry, and pump/diffuser configuration and performance. Results are presented in terms of the geometric and power requirements of several related pump designs over a range of seawater capacity from 25 m/sup 3//s to 100 m/sup 3//s. Summary analysis and evaluations include pump design weights and cost estimates.

Little, T.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Electron diffraction patterns with thermal diffuse scattering maxima around Kikuchi lines  

SciTech Connect

Transmission electron diffraction patterns of silicon with thermal diffuse maxima around Kikuchi lines, which are analogs of the maxima of thermal diffuse electron scattering around point reflections, have been recorded. Diffuse maxima are observed only around Kikuchi lines with indices that are forbidden for the silicon structure. The diffraction conditions for forming these maxima are discussed.

Karakhanyan, R. K., E-mail: rkarakhanyan@yandex.ru; Karakhanyan, K. R. [Yerevan State University (Armenia)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal power (CSP) systems. Background and motivation2 Figure 2: Schematic of Sensible Heat Based CSP Plant[3 Figure 3: Schematic of PCM Based CSP Plant[

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Stable Isotope Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Exchange, and Distillation  

SciTech Connect

Applications of stable isotopes in medicine are becoming more widespread. This has resulted from the increased availability and reduced cost of these isotopes and the improved reliability and sensitivity of detection techniques such as carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Isotopes are used in compounds labeled with either the stable isotope itself, such as carbon-13 and oxygen-18, or with the radioactive isotope that can be produced by irradiating the stable isotope, such as the irradiation of xenon-124 to produce iodine-125. As the demand for stable isotopes increases, larger scale production facilities will be justifiable. The increased size of production facilities should result in yet lower unit selling prices. A large number of methods has been suggested for the separation of stable isotopes. This paper concerns itself with four methods which have proven extremely useful for the separation of the isotopes of low and medium atomic weight elements. The four processes discussed are gas phase thermal diffusion, liquid phase thermal diffusion, chemical exchange, and distillation.

Schwind, Dr. Roger A.; Rutherford, Dr. William M.

1973-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Enhancement of Diffusive Transport by Nonequilibrium Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. The steady-state diffusive flux in a finite system subject to a concentration gradient is enhanced because of long-range correlations between concentration fluctuations and fluctuations of the velocity parallel to the concentration gradient. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as \\ln(L/L_{0}) in quasi-two dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it grows as L_{0}^{-1}-L^{-1}, where L_{0} is a reference length. The predictions of a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory, closely related to second-order mode-mode coupling analysis, are compared to results from particle simulations and a finite-volume solver and excellent agreement is observed. We elucidate the direct connection to the long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function in finite systems, as well as finite-size corrections employed in molecula...

Donev, A; Bell, J B; Garcia, A L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Enhancement of Diffusive Transport by Nonequilibrium Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. The steady-state diffusive flux in a finite system subject to a concentration gradient is enhanced because of long-range correlations between concentration fluctuations and fluctuations of the velocity parallel to the concentration gradient. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as \\ln(L/L_{0}) in quasi-two dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it grows as L_{0}^{-1}-L^{-1}, where L_{0} is a reference length. The predictions of a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory, closely related to second-order mode-mode coupling analysis, are compared to results from particle simulations and a finite-volume solver and excellent agreement is observed. We elucidate the direct connection to the long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function in finite systems, as well as finite-size corrections employed in molecular dynamics calculations. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the nonlinear advective terms need to be retained in the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics when modeling transport in small-scale finite systems.

A. Donev; A. de la Fuente; J. B. Bell; A. L. Garcia

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

Horak, C.M. [ed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

47

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

48

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

49

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

50

Separation of heavy water by vapor-phase thermal diffusion coupled with distillation and condensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on the enrichment of heavy water in a vapor-phase thermal-diffusion column has been conducted. With the combination of the effects of distillation, vapor-phase thermal diffusion, and partial condensation, considerable improvement in the degree of enrichment has been achieved in a vapor-phase column rather than in a liquid-phase column. It was also found that even the part of enrichment contributed only by vapor-phase thermal-diffusion effect is much higher than that obtained by liquid-phase thermal diffusion.

Yeh, H.M. [Tamkang Univ., Taiwan (China); Chang, S.M. [Cheng Kung Univ., Taiwan (China)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Former Workers, Construction Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Ron Bush 1236 Gallia Street Portsmouth, OH 45662 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

52

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks Pascal Richter1 of solar power for energy supply is of in- creasing importance. While technical development mainly takes introduce our tool for the optimisation of parameterised solar thermal power plants, and report

Ábrahám, Erika

55

Greenhouse warming potential of candidate gaseous diffusion plant coolants  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate has been made of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) of coolants under consideration as substitutes for CFC-114 in the gaseous diffusion plants. Coolants are not at present regulated on the basis of GWP, but may well be in the future. Use of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} or n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10} is estimated to have three to four times the greenhouse impact of an equivalent use of CFC-114. Neither of the substitutes, of course, would cause any ozone depletion. HCFC-124 (a probable commercial substitute for CFC-114, but not presently under serious consideration due to its relatively high UF{sub 6} reactivity) would have much less greenhouse and ozone depletion impact than CFC-114. The GWP estimates derive from a simple model that approximately reproduces literature values for similar compounds. The major uncertainty in these estimates lies in the atmospheric lifetime, especially of the perfluorocarbon compounds, for which little reliable information exists. In addition to GWP estimates for coolants, the overall greenhouse impact of the gaseous diffusion plants is calculated, including indirect power-related CO{sub 2} emissions. This result is used to compare greenhouse impacts of nuclear- and coal-produced electricity. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE Seeks Proposals for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Technical Services Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio.

57

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

58

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant State Kentucky Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts of activities at the Site are investigated and appropriate response actions are taken. Parties U.S. DOE; Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet; U.S. EPA Date 2/01/1998 SCOPE * Ensure all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants are addressed to achieve comprehensive remediation of the site. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring response actions in accordance with CERCLA, RCRA, and Kentucky Law. * Facilitate cooperation, exchange of information, and participation of the Parties and

59

Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation  

SciTech Connect

After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE`s experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions.

Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Solar Thermal Augmentation of a Flash Geothermal Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal flash-plant output often declines over time as the supporting reservoir cools and less steam is produced from the fluid from each well. While this decline is often mitigated by makeup well drilling, another technique would be to use solar thermal energy to offset the decline and restore generation. The 2011 EPRI report 1024675, Geothermal/Solar Hybrid Applications, examined the use of solar thermal energy to augment a binary plant using a low-temperature resource: the current ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffusion approximation to the equation of transfer (Boltzmann transport equation) is usually applied to media where scattering dominates the interactions. Diffusion approximation helps in significant savings in terms of code complexity and computational time. However, this approximation often has significant error. Error due to the inherent nature of a physics model is called model error. Information about the model error associated with the diffusion approximation is clearly desirable. An indirect measure of model error is a quantity that is related in some way to the error but not equal to the error. In general, indirect measures of error are expected to be less costly than direct measures. Perhaps the most well-known indirect measure of the diffusion model error is the variable-Eddington tensor. This tensor provides a great deal of information about the angular dependence of the angular intensity solution, but it is not always simple to interpret. We define a new indirect measure of the diffusion model error called the diffusion model error source (DME source). When this DME source is added to the diffusion equation, the transport solution for the angular-integrated intensity is obtained. In contrast to the variable-Eddington tensor, our DME source is a scalar that is conceptually easy to interpret. In addition to defining the DME source analytically, we show how to generate this source numerically relative to the Sn radiative transfer equations with linear-discontinuous spatial discretization. This numerical source is computationally tested and shown to reproduce the Sn solution for a number of problems. Our radiative transfer model solves a coupled, time dependent, multi-frequency, 1-D slab equation and material heat transfer equation. We then use diffusion approximation to solve the same problem. The difference due to this approximation can be modelled by a “diffusion source”. The diffusion source is defined as an amount of inhomogeneous source that, when added to a diffusion calculation, gives a solution for the angle-integrated intensity that is equal to the transport solution.

Kumar, Akansha

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Rigorous Simulation of X-Ray Thermal Diffuse Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Crystal Plasticity Modeling of a-Uranium · In-Situ Studies of the ... Thermal Residual Stresses and Strains in Depleted Uranium.

64

Application of Combined Thermal Equivalen in Thermal Power Plant Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3.8MPa medium-pressure steam of Yuntianhua Company get low pressure steam through reducing temperature and pressure, which is used as a heat tracing, a reserve supply of heat. For this situation, the article based on the analysis of energy and chemical ... Keywords: combined thermal equivalent, turbine, economize on energy

Zhang Zhuming; Li Hu; Wang Hua; Qing Shan; Li Liangqing; He Ping; Ma Linzhuan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally ...

Mirfayzi, S R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energetics of melts from thermal diffusion studies. FY 1995 progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program characterizes mass transport by diffusion in geological fluids in response to thermal, solubility, and/or chemical gradients to obtain quantitative information on the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of multicomponent systems. Silicate liquids undergo substantial thermal diffusion (Soret) differentiation, while the response in sulfide, carbonate, and aqueous fluids to an imposed temperature gradient is varied. The experimental observations of this differentiation are used to evaluate the form and quantitative values of solution parameters, and to quantify ordinary diffusion coefficients, heats of transport, and activation energies of multicomponent liquids. The diffusion, solution, and element partition coefficients determined for these geological fluids form a data base for understanding magmatic crystallization behavior and for evaluating geothermal, ore deposit, and nuclear waste isolation potentials.

Lesher, C.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energetics of melts from thermal diffusion studies. FY 1996 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This research program characterizes mass transport by diffusion in geological fluids in response to thermal, solubility, and/or chemical gradients to obtain quantitative information on the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of multicomponent systems. Silicate liquids undergo substantial thermal diffusion (Soret) differentiation, while the response in sulfide, carbonate, and aqueous fluids to an imposed temperature gradient is varied. The experimental observations of this differentiation are used to evaluate the form and quantitative values of solution parameters, and to quantify ordinary diffusion coefficients, heats of transport, and activation energies of multicomponent liquids. The diffusion, solution, and element partition coefficients determined for these geological fluids form a data base for understanding magmatic crystallization behavior and for evaluating geothermal, ore deposit, and nuclear waste isolation potentials.

Lesher, C.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Thermal imaging measurement of lateral diffusivity and non-invasive material defect detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining lateral thermal diffusivity of a material sample using a heat pulse; a sample oriented within an orthogonal coordinate system; an infrared camera; and a computer that has a digital frame grabber, and data acquisition and processing software. The mathematical model used within the data processing software is capable of determining the lateral thermal diffusivity of a sample of finite boundaries. The system and method may also be used as a nondestructive method for detecting and locating cracks within the material sample.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL); Deemer, Chris (Downers Grove, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DOE Seeks Quotes for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Technical Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati– The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) for the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO).

72

Chemical energy storage system for SEGS solar thermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1988, a symposium was held in Helendale, California, to discuss thermal energy storage (TES) concepts applicable to medium-temperature (200 to 400{degrees}C) solar thermal electric power plants, in general, and the solar electric generating system (SEGS) plants developed by Luz International, in particular. Chemical reaction energy storage based on the reversible reaction between metal oxides and metal hydroxides was identified as a leading candidate for meeting Luz International's cost and performance requirements. The principal objectives of this study were to identify the design conditions, requirements, and potential feasibility for a chemical energy storage system applied to a SEGS solar thermal power plant. The remaining sections of this report begin by providing an overview of the chemical reaction energy storage concept and a SEGS solar thermal power plant. Subsequent sections describe the initial screening of alternative evaporation energy sources and the more detailed evaluation of design alternatives considered for the preferred evaporation energy source. The final sections summarize the results, conclusions, and recommendations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 13 tabs.

Brown, D.R.; LaMarche, J.L.; Spanner, G.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

Rutherford, W.M.

1985-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

MEASUREMENT OF THE HUMIDITY OF SOILS BY DIFFUSION OF A BEAM OF THERMAL NEUTRONS  

SciTech Connect

From earlier results on the measurement of soil humidity an apparatus was constructed and calibrated for the measurement of the humidity of soils by diffusion of a beam of thermal neutrons. The construction and calibration of this apparatus are described in detail. (J.S.R.)

Wack, B.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Determination of phonon dispersion relations by X-ray thermal diffuse scattering  

SciTech Connect

Thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) of X-rays from crystals contains information on phonons. This paper reviews the general theory of TDS and some recent experiments aimed at further developing TDS into a useful and efficient method for studying phonon dispersion relations.

Xu, R.; Chiang, T.-C. (UIUC)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks I.N. Bindeman a,n , C.C. Lundstrom b , C. Bopp b , F. Huang b,c a Department of Geological Sciences, 1272 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA b Department of Geology, University of Illinois

Bindeman, Ilya N.

77

Experimental Evidence for a Reduction in Electron Thermal Diffusion due to Trapped Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New high time resolution measurements of the electron thermal diffusion {chi}{sub e} throughout the sawtooth cycle of the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch have been made by utilizing the enhanced capabilities of the upgraded multipoint, multipulse Thomson scattering system. These measurements are compared to the {chi}{sub e} due to magnetic diffusion predicted by using information from a new high spectral resolution zero-{beta} nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation performed, for the first time, at the Lundquist number of high current Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas (S{approx_equal}4x10{sup 6}). Agreement between the measured and predicted values is found only if the reduction in thermal diffusion due to trapped particles is taken into account.

Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Schnack, D. D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Stephens, H. D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of HTGR Coupled with Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) to produce electricity and hydrogen. Although the hydrogen production processes using the nuclear energy are in an early stage of development, coupling hydrogen plant to HTGR requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion system (PCS) coupled to hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions. This paper includes a portion of thermal hydraulic results based on a direct cycle and a parallel intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) configuration option.

Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Robert Barner; Paul Pickard

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department ofOregon State University. Conversion Power Plants. Corvallis,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

2013 completions of large solar thermal power plants mark ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Several large, new solar thermal power plants are expected to begin commercial operation by the end of 2013, more than doubling the solar thermal ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy… (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN STRATIFIED SHEARING BOXES WITH PERFECT GAS EQUATION OF STATE AND FINITE THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY  

SciTech Connect

We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with zero mean magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite (constant) thermal diffusivity. The calculations begin from an isothermal state spanning three scale heights above and below the mid-plane. After a long transient the layers settle to a stationary state in which thermal losses out of the boundaries are balanced by dissipative heating. We identify two regimes. The first is a conductive regime in which the heat is transported mostly by conduction and the density decreases with height. In the limit of large thermal diffusivity this regime resembles the more familiar isothermal case. The second is the convective regime, observed at smaller values of the thermal diffusivity, in which the layer becomes unstable to overturning motions, the heat is carried mostly by advection, and the density becomes nearly constant throughout the layer. In this latter constant-density regime we observe evidence for large-scale dynamo action leading to a substantial increase in transport efficiency relative to the conductive case.

Bodo, G.; Rossi, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Cattaneo, F. [The Computation Institute, University of Chicago, 5735 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Mignone, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale, Univesita di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally the total neutron cross-section is derived using FEA in an inverse iteration form.

S. R. Mirfayzi

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advance plant severe accident/thermal hydraulic issues for ACRS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACRS has been reviewing various advance plant designs for certification. The most active reviews have been for the ABWR, AP600, and System 80+. We have completed the reviews for ABWR and System 80+ and are presently concentrating on AP600. The ACRS gave essentially unqualified certification approval for the two completed reviews, yet,,during the process of review a number of issues arose and the plant designs changed somewhat to accommodate some of the ACRS concerns. In this talk, I will describe some of the severe accident and thermal hydraulic related issues we discussed in our reviews.

Kress, T.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analyses of MTI Imagery of Power Plant Thermal Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MTI images of thermal discharge from three power plants are analyzed in this paper with the aid of a 3-D hydrodynamic code. The power plants use different methods to dissipate waste heat in the environment: a cooling lake at Comanche Peak, ocean discharge at Pilgrim and cooling canals at Turkey Point. This paper shows that it is possible to reproduce the temperature distributions captured in MTI imagery with accurate code inputs, but the key parameters change from site to site. Wind direction and speed are the most important parameters at Pilgrim, whereas air temperatures and dewpoint temperatures are most important at Comanche Peak and Turkey Point. This paper also shows how the combination of high-resolution thermal imagery and hydrodynamic simulation lead to better understanding of the mechanisms by which waste heat is dissipated in the environment.

Garrett, A.J.

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An Experimental Verification, with Krypton, of the Theory of the Thermal Diffusion Column for Multicomponent Systems  

SciTech Connect

The extended form of the Jones and Furry theory, which describes the behavior of a multicomponent heavy isotopic gas in a Clusius-Dickel thermal diffusion column, is tested. Experimental and theoretical values of the thermal diffusion column transport equation coefficients Hsub{ik},Ksub{c}, and Ksub{d}, are determined for krypton, a heavy isotopic gas with six isotopes. The experiments are carried out in a column of the hotwire type, at three wire temperatures: Tsub{H}=350 degrees C, 500 degrees C and 800 degrees C. Good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental values of the coefficients. Seven of nine of the experimentally determined values of the coefficients agree within +- 10% with the corressponding theoretical values. The remaining two experimental values agree within +- 20% with the corresponding theoretical values.

Roos, W. J.

1967-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant : Findings and Orders P.O. Box 700 : Piketon, Ohio 45661-0700 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Parties Bound III. Definitions IV. Findings of Fact V. Orders VI. Limitations of Director's Approval VII. Notice VIII. Project Managers IX. Dispute Resolution X. Funding XI. Other Applicable Laws XII. Reservation of Rights XIII. Modification XIV. Termination XV. Other Claims XVI. Signatories XVII. Waiver I. Jurisdiction These Director's Final Findings and Orders ("Orders") are issued to the United States

91

Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: K-25 Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Bruce Lawson 133 Raleigh Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Local Medical Clinics: ParkMed 110 S. Illinois Avenue Oak Ridge, TN 37380 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge,

92

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Peculiarities of parabolic-barrier penetrability and thermal decay rate with the quantum diffusion approach  

SciTech Connect

With the quantum diffusion approach, the passing probability through the parabolic barrier is examined in the limit of linear coupling in the momentum between the collective subsystem and environment. The dependencies of the penetrability on time, energy, and the coupling strength between the interacting subsystems are studied. The quasistationary thermal decay rate from a metastable state is considered in the cases of linear couplings both in the momentum and in the coordinate.

Kuzyakin, R. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Omsk State Transport University, 644046 Omsk (Russian Federation); Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Analysis of photovoltaic/thermal electric power plant systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual definition and performance evaluation of a 100 megawatt (MW) hybrid photovoltaic/thermal electric power plant has been carried out. The concept utilizes the ability of gallium arsenide photovoltaic cells to achieve high conversion efficiency at high incident fluxes and elevated temperatures. Solar energy is focused by a field of steerable mirrors (heliostats) onto a tower mounted receiver whose outer surface is covered with gallium arsenide (AlGaAs/GaAs) solar cells and whose inner surface is a water boiler. The solar cells convert a fraction of the incident radiation into electrical energy, and the remaining energy is extracted at approximately 200/sup 0/C and used to power a Rankine cycle turbine generator (bottoming cycle). Water is used as the solar cell array coolant, as the thermodynamic working fluid, and as the thermal energy storage medium. Parametric studies were conducted to select conceptual design parameters and operational characteristics which imply the lowest levelized busbar electric energy costs. Parameters varied were collector area, condenser surface area, fan power, ambient temperature, and electric and thermal energy storage capacities. The report describes the concept, outlines the design analysis method, summarizes the parametric study results, and defines the selected plant configuration. The lowest levelized busbar electric energy generation cost, 70 mills/kilowatt-hr., was achieved with a relatively small collector area, 0.8 x 10/sup 6/ square meters, and no stored energy. A rough comparison of this combined power plant with a similar photovoltaic plant, operated at lower solar cell temperature and with no bottoming cycle, showed the busbar cost of electricity (BBEC) from the combined system to be approximately 9% lower.

Gluck, D.F.; Kelley, W.A.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants were recently encountered which offered the potential for full storage. The first plant, a textile weaving operation, has over 5,000 tons of installed chiller capacity used for strict control of temperature and humidity. Measurements of peak load indicated the units were less than 50 percent loaded. Because of the excess chiller capacity, summer demand can be met by operating the units fully loaded during off-peak hours and storing unneeded chilled water in a storage tank for daytime usage. The second plant is a single shift poultry processing operation that uses large amounts of ice to preserve the product during shipping. In this case, ice making during off-peak times for use during production was analyzed. Despite the fact that both options offered significant savings, the paybacks were higher than acceptable due to the significant investment required. While the projects are not economically feasible at the present time, the analysis verifies the technical feasibility of thermal storage. Future changes in electricity cost could make the concept more attractive economically.

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

D&D of the French High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the D&D program that is being implemented at France's High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which was designed to supply France's Military with Highly Enriched Uranium. This plant was definitively shut down in June 1996, following French President Jacques Chirac's decision to end production of Highly Enriched Uranium and dismantle the corresponding facilities.

BEHAR, Christophe; GUIBERTEAU, Philippe; DUPERRET, Bernard; TAUZIN, Claude

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value.

Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Castleberry, Kim N. (Harriman, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value. 6 figs.

Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO{sub 2} emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

AlCu alloy films prepared by the thermal diffusion technique  

SciTech Connect

100-nm thick films of Al{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} alloys were prepared on glass substrates by thermal diffusion technique. The Cu atomic concentration was varied from 10% to 90%. Alloys were prepared at different temperatures into a vacuum oven with Argon atmosphere. Two thermal processes were used: i) heating the film at 400 deg. C in a single step, and ii) heating the films in sequential steps at 100, 200, 300 and 400 deg. C. Morphology, electrical resistivity, and crystalline orientation of the alloys were studied. The electrical resistivity and surface roughness of the alloys were found to depend strongly on the atomic composition and the diffusion temperature. However, we did not find differences between samples prepared under the two thermal processes. Alloys prepared with x = 0.6 and x = 0.1-0.3 as Cu at concentration exhibited values on electrical resistivity and surface roughness lower than pure Al. Different phases of the Al{sub 1} {sub -} {sub x}Cu{sub x} films were observed as a function of Cu concentration showing a good agreement with the AlCu phase diagram.

Oliva, A.I., E-mail: oliva@mda.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, CP 97310, Merida Yucatan (Mexico); Corona, J.E.; Sosa, V. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, CP 97310, Merida Yucatan (Mexico)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Local Model Networks Based Multivariable Long-Range Predictive Control Strategy for Thermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load-cycling operation of thermal power plants leads to changes in operating point right across the whole operating range. This results in non-linear variations in most of the plant variables. This paper investigates methods to account for non-linearities ... Keywords: Constrained multivariable control, local model networks, long range predictive control, thermal power plant boiler

G. PRASAD; E. SWIDENBANK; B. W. HOGG

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

TOTAL DIFFRACTION AND THERMAL DIFFUSE SCATTERING FROM A MULTI-BOUNCE CHANNEL-CUT SINGLE CRYSTAL  

SciTech Connect

We studied Bragg diffraction and Thermal Diffuse Scattering (TDS) from a Si(111) channel-cut triple-bounce crystal using the time-of-flight technique at a pulsed neutron source. Cadmium shielding restricted the detector s direct view of the first bounce surface. The channel-cut crystal dramatically suppresses TDS in the vicinity of the (111), (333) and (444) Bragg reflections; however, TDS appears and increases with the decrease of wavelength in the range of the (555), (777) and (888) orders where cadmium becomes transparent and the single-bounce reflections and TDS contaminate the triple-bounce (555), (777) and (888) reflections.

Carpenter, John M [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Remote access of electronic resources for thermal plant using mobile devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a framework that extends a typical intelligent thermal system management that enables field engineers retrieving vital resources from centralised management station using mobile devices with limited memory, such as PDAs and cell phones. ... Keywords: J2ME, PDAs, artificial intelligence, cell phones, fault diagnosis, intelligent thermal management, mobile devices, mobile phones, remote access, thermal management systems, thermal plants, thermodynamic properties

F-L. Tan; S-C. Fok

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Molecular and Thermal Diffusion Coefficients of Alkane-Alkane and Alkane-Aromatic Binary Mixtures: Effect of Shape and Size of Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular and Thermal Diffusion Coefficients of Alkane-Alkane and Alkane-Aromatic Binary Mixtures Form: October 27, 2006 New molecular and thermal diffusion coefficients of binary mixtures of normal measured in a thermogravitational column. Molecular diffusion coefficients were measured using an open

Firoozabadi, Abbas

107

Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of sintered UO2 and UO2-Gd2O3. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method on sintered uranium dioxide (O/U=2.003, density=10.48X10 kg/m, from 300 to 2773 K), and urania and gadolinia mixed fuel (2,4 and 6 Wt% Gd2O3 content, from 600 to 1850 K). An equation was suggested for near-stoichiometric uranium dioxide over the temperature range 500-3100 K: K=(1-aP)(1/(A+BT)+DTxexp(-E/kT)x(1+H(E/kT+2)(sup 2))), where K in W/(m)(K), P is the fraction of porosity, a=2.74-5.8X10(sup 4-)T, A=3.68X10(sup 2-)(m)(K)/W, B=2.25X10(sup 4-)m/W, D=5.31X10(sup 3-)W/mXK2, H=0.264, E=1.15 ev, k is the Boltzmann constant. The thermal conductivity of UO2-Gd2O3 samples as a function of temperature and Gd2O3 content, X, could be expressed by phonon conduction; K=1/(A+BT) in the temperature range from 600 to 1700 K, where A=2.50 X+0.044(m)(K)/W.

Ying, S.; Ji, Z.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

109

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Agreement between the Ohio EPA and DOE approving the STP and setting waste treatment milestones Parties DOE; Ohio Department of Environmental Protection Date 10/4/1995 SCOPE * Approve the Compliance Plan Volume of the amended PSTP submitted to Ohio EPA on October 2, 1995, hereafter referred to as "approved STP." * Set forth guidelines for storage and treatment of mixed wastes at the Facility which are not being stored in accordance with the LDR requirements of OAC rule 3745-59- 50. * Establish milestones and target dates for approved STP. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES

110

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

111

Environmental effects of the construction and operation of a gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect

The impacts upon the environment resulting from construction, stert-up, and operation of a gaseous dfffusion plant are described. Some of the impacts are typical regardless of location of the plant. Others are atypical and depend upon location; those are presented, by way of example, as they occur at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The various environmental contaminants that may be produced in the operating plant are described. The concentrations of those contaminants are stated; and the adverse biological effects of pertinent conteminants are elucidated. UF/sup 6/ may be enriched in the Portsmouth Gaseous Wffusion Plant to almost any /sup 235/U concentration desired. The environmental impact of the plant varies somewhat according to /sup 235/U concentrations. However, commercial plants are not expected to enrich /sup 235/U in concentrations greater than 4%. for this reason, environmental effects due to Portsmouth operations within that range are emphasized. The study revealed that present discharges from the plants generally have no detrimental effects upon the environment. (auth)

1973-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plant’s primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Increasing the energetic efficiency in producing of electric and thermal power in thermal power plants by using of variable speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work is presenting a theoretical analysis and an experimental application of the energetic efficiency increase by using of variable-speed AC electric drive systems in a thermal power plant that produces electric and thermal power. Are presented ... Keywords: asynchronous motor, district heating system, energetic efficiency, harmonic distorsion generated by adjustable speed drives, pumping station, static frequency converter, testing

Sorin Ioan Deaconu; Gabriel Nicolae Popa; Iosif Popa

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated SolarMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stores or releases thermal energy. This subsystem consistsGas - 436 MW Annual Thermal Energy Absorbed by the Heatof Storage Tanks, m Thermal Energy Stored per Cycle. MW -hr

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Review Report: Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, PGDP, Paducah Kentucky...

120

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

122

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant total capital cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed breakdown of the capital cost of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California is presented. The total capital requirements of the pilot plant are given in four cost breakdown structures: (1) project costs (research and development, design, factory, construction, and start-up); (2) plant system costs (land, structures and improvements, collector system, receiver system, thermal transport system, thermal storage system, turbine-generator plant system, electrical plant system, miscellaneous plant equipment, and plant level); (3) elements of work costs (sitework/earthwork, concrete work, metal work, architectural work, process equipment, piping and electrical work); and (4) recurring and non-recurring costs. For all four structures, the total capital cost is the same ($141,200,000); however, the allocation of costs within each structure is different. These cost breakdown structures have been correlated to show the interaction and the assignment of costs for specific areas.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thermal-Fluid Characterizations of ZnO and SiC Nanofluids for Advanced Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 2008 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants / Thermal Hydraulics

In Cheol Bang; Ji Hyun Kim

127

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on June, 1978 prices, AN OVERVIEW OF THE SOLAR POWER PLANTstorage for a solar power plant at a reasonable price usingsolar power plant energy storage for a reasonable price

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Simulation of thermal plant optimization and hydraulic aspects of thermal distribution loops for large campuses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following an introduction, the author describes Texas A&M University and its utilities system. After that, the author presents how to construct simulation models for chilled water and heating hot water distribution systems. The simulation model was used in a $2.3 million Ross Street chilled water pipe replacement project at Texas A&M University. A second project conducted at the University of Texas at San Antonio was used as an example to demonstrate how to identify and design an optimal distribution system by using a simulation model. The author found that the minor losses of these closed loop thermal distribution systems are significantly higher than potable water distribution systems. In the second part of the report, the author presents the latest development of software called the Plant Optimization Program, which can simulate cogeneration plant operation, estimate its operation cost and provide optimized operation suggestions. The author also developed detailed simulation models for a gas turbine and heat recovery steam generator and identified significant potential savings. Finally, the author also used a steam turbine as an example to present a multi-regression method on constructing simulation models by using basic statistics and optimization algorithms. This report presents a survey of the author??s working experience at the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University during the period of January 2002 through March 2004. The purpose of the above work was to allow the author to become familiar with the practice of engineering. The result is that the author knows how to complete a project from start to finish and understands how both technical and nontechnical aspects of a project need to be considered in order to ensure a quality deliverable and bring a project to successful completion. This report concludes that the objectives of the internship were successfully accomplished and that the requirements for the degree of Degree of Engineering have been satisfied.

Chen, Qiang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant: 1983 operational test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of the world's largest solar thermal central receiver electric power plant, the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant, ''Solar One,'' located near Barstow, California, were completed in 1982. The plant continued in the two-year experimental Test and Evaluation phase throughout 1983. Experiences during 1983 have shown that all parts of the plant, especially solar unique ones, operated as well as or better than expected. It was possible to incorporate routine power production into the Test and Evaluation phase because plant performance yielded high confidence. All operational modes were tested, and plant automation activities began in earnest. This report contains: (1) a brief description of the plant system; (2) a summary of the year's experiences; (3) topical sections covering preliminary power production, automation activities, and receiver leak repairs; (4) a monthly list of principal activities; and (5) operation and maintenance costs.

Bartel, J.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Exergetic, thermal, and externalities analyses of a cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic study of an 88.4 MW cogeneration plant located in the United States is presented in this paper. The feedstock for this actual plant is culm, the waste left from anthracite coal mining. Before combustion in circulating fluidized bed boilers, the usable carbon within the culm is separated from the indigenous rock. The rock and ash waste from the combustion process fill adjacent land previously scared by strip mining. Trees and grass are planted in these areas as part of a land reclamation program. Analyses based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics using actual operating data are first presented to acquaint the reader with the plant's components and operation. Using emission and other relevant environmental data from the plant, all externalities study is outlined that estimates the plant's effect on the local population. The results show that the plant's cycle performs with a coefficient of utilization of 29% and all approximate exergetic efficiency of 34.5%. In order to increase these values, recommended improvements to the plant are noted. In addition, the externality costs associated with the estimated SO{sub 2} and NOx discharge from the culm fed plant are lower (85-95%) than those associated with a similarly sized coal fed plant. The plant's cycle efficiencies are lower than those associated with more modern technologies; such as all integrated gas turbine combined cycle. However, given the abundant, inexpensive supply of feedstock located adjacent to the plant and the environmental benefit of removing culm banks, the plant's existing operation is unique from an economical and environmental viewpoint.

Bailey, M.B.; Curtiss, P.; Blanton, P.H.; McBrayer, T.B. [Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A pair of comparative testing rooms (one with an ordinary roof and the other with a planting roof) was established in our laboratory, and in- situ measurement (in summer) data have been collected and treated. The indoor thermal environment was analyzed and the thermal load within each room was calculated Comparative analysis of thermal loads of these two rooms was done. Reduction of thermal load by the planting roof is clearly shown from our research work. A theoretical analysis of the effect of the planting roof on the room's thermal load was done, and theoretical relations between outdoor air temperature and indoor thermal load within certain region were established. The feasibility analysis of the application of our research work to the business building was also completed. The summer cooling load reduction characteristics, the energy saving characteristics on air conditioning system, the yearly electricity consumption reduction, the yearly consumption amount reduction of “Primary Energy”, the discharge amount reduction of sensible heat to outdoor atmosphere in summer, and the yearly discharge amount reduction of greenhouse gases to the outdoor atmosphere from air conditioning system due to the planting roof are also predicted. A corresponding economic analysis is also presented in this paper. The results show the advantages of the planting roof, and also promote the widespread application of the planting roof to business buildings.

Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Using SVM based method for equipment fault detection in a thermal power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the growing demand on electricity, how to improve the efficiency of equipment in a thermal power plant has become one of the critical issues. Reports indicate that efficiency and availability are heavily dependant upon high reliability and maintainability. ... Keywords: Classification, Data mining, Maintenance, Support vector machines, Thermal power

Kai-Ying Chen; Long-Sheng Chen; Mu-Chen Chen; Chia-Lung Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and Surrounding Area, Portsmouth, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the 16 square-mile (~41 square-kilometer) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The survey was performed in August 2007 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the plant. A search for a missing radium-226 source was also performed. Implied exposure rates, man-made activity, and excess bismuth-214 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed area. Ground level and implied aerial exposure rates for nine specific locations are compared. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters. At specific plant locations described in the report, man-made activity was consistent with the operational histories of the location. There was no spectral activity that would indicate the presence of the lost source.

Namdoo Moon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Plant Engineering: Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook, Volume 1: Supersedes TR 107422-V1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the essential elements of a thermal performance program at a nuclear power station, providing guidance for plants establishing a new program or seeking to make improvements to an existing program. It focuses on the roles and responsibilities of a thermal performance engineer and how this individual interacts with other site organizations. The report looks at core tasks the thermal performance engineer performs, including development and use of performance curves and ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry-Cooling Tower • Power-Generation Subsystem Summary AnGas-Circulation Subsystem The Power-Generation Subsystem Theinsulating plant piping. power-generation heat exchangers.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the replacement of non-renewable energy production. Unlikereplacement of non-renewable energy sources. The thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Total capital cost data base: 10MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the total capital cost data base of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. This Solar One cost data base was created using the computer code ''Cost Data Management System (CDMS)''. The cost data base format was developed to be used as a common method of presentation of capital costs for power plants. The basic format is a plant system cost breakdown structure. Major accounts are land; structures and improvements; collector, receiver, thermal transport, thermal storage, and stream generation systems; turbine plant; electrical plant; miscellaneous plant systems and equipment; and plant-level indirect costs. Each major account includes subaccounts to as many as nine level of detail. The data base can be accessed to provide elements-of-work costs at any subaccount level or at the plant level. The elements-of-work include sitework/earthwork; concrete work; metal work; architectural; process equipment; piping; electrical; and miscellaneous work. Each of these elements-of-work can be or are broken into finer detail and costs can be accumulated to identify more specific needs, e.g., pipe insulation or heat exchangers. The cost data base can be accessed and various reports can be generated. These vary from a single page summary to detailed listings of costs and notes. Reported costs can be stated in dollars, dollars per kilowatt or percentage of the total plant cost. Reports or samples of reports for the pilot plant capital cost are included.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Feasibility of a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of introducing a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant is investigated with an aim to reduce water use with a minimum impact on plant performance. A number of cooling systems have been modelled including existing evaporative ... Keywords: cooling, hybrid cooling, power station, sustainable water consumption

C. R. Williams; M. G. Rasul

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme inclined for improved performance  

SciTech Connect

A separation theory for the enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme inclined for improved performance has been developed. Equations for the best angle of inclination and maximum separation have been derived. Considerable improvement in separation is obtainable if the columns are inclined at the best angle, so that the convective strength can be properly reduced and controlled, resulting in suppression of the undesirable remixing effect while still preserving the desirable cascading effect.

Ho-Ming Yeh [Tamkang Univ., Taiwan (China)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 - Future Uses of the Subtitle D Landfill 2 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 - OSDF Siting in a Brownfield Area 3 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 - Seismic Issues 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 4 - Post-Closure Public Use of the OSDF 5 6. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 5 - Public Communication Plan 7 7. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 6 - Baseline Schedule 8 8. RECOMMENDATIONS 8 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10 10. REFERENCES 10 APPENDIX 11 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Uranium enrichment facilities at PGDP are leased to and operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. In 1994, PGDP was placed

142

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Privatization of the gaseous diffusion plants and impacts on nuclear criticality safety administration  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) on July 1, 1993. The USEC is a government-owned business that leases those Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) facilities at the Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, sites from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that are required for enriching uranium. Lockheed Martin Utility Services is the operating contractor for the USEC-leased facilities. The DOE has retained use of, and regulation over, some facilities and areas at the Portsmouth and Paducah sites for managing legacy wastes and environmental restoration activities. The USEC is regulated by the DOE, but is currently changing to regulation under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The USEC is also preparing for privatization of the uranium enrichment enterprise. These changes have significantly affected the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) programs at the sites.

D`Aquila, D.M.; Holliday, R.T. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Dean, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cost analysis of power plant cooling using aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most utilities in the US experience their peak demand for electric power during periods with high ambient temperature. Unfortunately, the performance of many power plants decreases with high ambient temperature. The use of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for seasonal storage of chill can be an alternative method for heat rejection. Cold water produced during the previous winter is stored in the aquifer and can be used to provide augmented cooling during peak demand periods increasing the output of many Rankine cycle power plants. This report documents an investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage for peak cooling of power plants. 9 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Zimmerman, P.W.; Drost, M.K.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A statistical method for estimating wood thermal diffusivity and probe geometry using in situ heat response curves from sap flow measurements  

SciTech Connect

The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux through plants; it works by inferring the velocity of water through a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity, e.g., wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtain the correct transpiration flux density from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale; and consequently, to up-scale tree-level water fluxes to canopy and landscape scales. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework for estimating the wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing simutaneously from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of a heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the time traces of wood temperature following a heat pulse, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique, based on the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that repeated tests using the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable and accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it is shown to be affected by both moisture content and temperature. Empirical factors are often introduced to account for the influence of non-ideal probe geometry on the estimation of heat pulse velocity, and they are estimated in this study as well. The proposed methodology can be applied for the calibration of existing heat ratio sap flow systems at other sites. It is especially useful when an alternative transpiration calibration device, such as a lysimeter, is not available.

Chen, Xingyuan; Miller, Gretchen R.; Rubin, Yoram; Baldocchi, Dennis

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

District Energy SW 40th Street Thermal Plant Geothermal Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plant. In fact, although the geothermal system requires a higher initial investment, the energy savings results in an 8.7% total savings over a 25 year period. The energy savings...

150

Integrating gray system theory and logistic regression into case-based reasoning for safety assessment of thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety assessment of thermal power plants (TPPs) is one of the important means to guarantee the safety of production in thermal power production enterprises. Due to various technical limitations, existing assessment approaches, such as analytic hierarchy ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Gray system theory, Intelligent decision support system, Logistic regression, Management safety assessment, Thermal power plants

Changyong Liang; Dongxiao Gu; Isabelle Bichindaritz; Xingguo Li; Chunrong Zuo; Wenen Cheng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant maintenance experience, January 1982-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a description of the maintenance experience at the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California, during the period January 1982 through March 1983. The plant systems are briefly described, and statistical data on maintenance orders, labor requirements, and maintenance costs are presented. The data presented have been extracted from Southern California Edison historical maintenance records accumulated at the plant. Pilot plant systems requiring the most maintenance activity are identified so that efforts to reduce plant maintenance costs can be properly identified. The information is analyzed for the purpose of developing a data base for general use during the economic assessment, design, and staff planning of future solar central receiver plants. However, data presented here from the Pilot Plant should not be used for direct scaling of larger power production plants. The number and size of equipment items for larger plants will not scale, the designs will vary, and the Pilot Plant includes special testing and evaluation equipment which would not be necessary in plants built for the sole purpose of power production. Data taken at the Pilot Plant during the early plant startup and operational phase shows an annual maintenance cost of approximately one perent of the recurring plant capital cost. Similar costs for recent technology steam electric generating plants are estimated to range from 1.5 to 3%. The Pilot Plant maintenance cost will not appear as favorable if based on energy produced during power production due to the small plant size and equipment intensive nature of the plant. The solar-unique systems of the plant required 45% of the total plant maintenance labor and 39% of the total maintenance cost, both percentages being lower than anticipated.

Smith, J.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Segregation of Aerosols by Cloud-Nucleating Activity. Part I: Design, Construction, and Testing of A High-Flux Thermal Diffusion Cloud Chamber for Mass Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a thermal diffusion cloud chamber operated in series with an aerodynamic dichotomous separator that can segregate aerosol particles by their abilities to nucleate cloud droplets. The apparatus takes advantage of compensating gradients ...

Lee Harrison; Halstead Harrison

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

154

First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Optimum plate-spacing for the best performance of the enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal-diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme  

SciTech Connect

The effect of plate spacing on the degree of separation and production rate for the enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme with fixed operating expense has been investigated. The equations for estimating optimum plate-space for maximum separation and for maximum production rate have been developed. Considerable improvement in performance is obtainable when thermal diffusion columns with optimum plate-spacing are employed for operation.

Ho-Ming Yeh [Tamkang Univ., Taiwan (China)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

BWRVIP-196: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Assessment of Mixing Tee Thermal Fatigue Susceptibility in BWR Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, a French pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant experienced leakage due to thermal fatigue from piping immediately downstream of a residual heat removal (RHR) heat exchanger. EPRI report 1013305, Materials Reliability Program: Assessment of RHR Mixing Tee Thermal Fatigue in PWR Plants (MRP-192), December 2006, was prepared so that owners of PWR plants could determine if their RHR piping systems might be susceptible to similar thermal fatigue cracking and if additional inspection should be recomme...

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal… (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

An Equatorial Diffusive Boundary Layer and the Equatorial Stacked Jets in Thermally Driven OGCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New equatorial boundary layer solutions are found in a reduced-gravity model with large horizontal diffusivity. Analytical and semianalytical solutions are obtained and the structure of the boundary layer is discussed. The equatorial “stacked ...

Ryo Furue

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Plant Engineering: Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook, Volume 2 Subtitle: Supersedes TR-107422- V2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook provides guidance to assist the thermal performance engineer in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt electric (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. This guide provides detailed descriptions of the components in the nuclear plant heat cycle. Its use will assist thermal performance engineers. It can be used for the development or validation of data collection and use in monitoring of the major components of the heat cycle. It should be used ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, specifications, and diagrams for the thermal storage subsystem for the 10-MW pilot tower focus power plant are presented in detail. The Honeywell thermal storage subsystem design features a sensible heat storage arrangement using proven equipment and materials. The subsystem consists of a main storage containing oil and rock, two buried superheater tanks containing inorganic salts (Hitec), and the necessary piping, instrumentation, controls, and safety devices. The subsystem can provide 7 MW(e) for three hours after twenty hours of hold. It can be charged in approximately four hours. Storage for the commercial-scale plant consists of the same elements appropriately scaled up. Performance analysis and tradeoff studies are included.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Infrared absorption strengths of potential gaseous diffusion plant coolants and related reaction products  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is scheduled for production curtailment within the next few years, a search for substitutes is underway, and apparently workable alternatives have been found and are under testing. The presently favored substitutes, FC-c3l8 and FC-3110, satisfy ozone depletion and operational chemical compatibility concerns, but will be long-lived greenhouse gases, and thus may be regulated on that basis in the future. A further search is therefore underway for compounds with shorter atmospheric lifetimes which could otherwise satisfy operational physical and chemical requirements. A number of such candidates are in the process of being screened for chemical compatibility in a fluorinating environment. This document presents infrared spectral data developed and used in that study for candidates recently examined, and also for many of their fluorination reaction products. The data include gas-phase infrared spectra, quantitative peak intensities as a function of partial pressure, and integrated absorbance strength in the IR-transparent atmospheric window of interest to global warming modeling. Combining this last property with literature or estimated atmospheric lifetimes, rough estimates of global warming potential for these compounds are also presented.

Trowbridge, L.D.; Angel, E.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

IAEA Verification Experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Report on the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor (CHEM) for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant at Piketon, Ohio, and present the calibration and measurement results. The US government has offered excess fissile material that is no longer needed for defense purposes for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspection. Measurement results provided by the CHEM were used by the IAEA in a verification experiment to provide confidence that the US successfully blended excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) down to low enriched uranium (LEU). The CHEM measured the uranium enrichment in two cascade header pipes, a 20.32-cm HEU pipe and a 7.62-cm product LEU pipe. The CHEM determines the amount of {sup 235}U from the 185.7-keV gamma-ray photopeak and the amount of total uranium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) of the 98.4-keV x-ray from uranium with a {sup 57}Co XRF source. The ratio yields the enrichment. The CHEM consists of a collimator assembly, an electromechanically cooled germanium detector, and a rack-mounted personal computer running commercial and custom software. The CHEM was installed in December 1997 and was used by the IAEA inspectors for announced and unannounced inspections on the HEU and LEU header pipes through October 1998. The equipment was sealed with tamper-indicating enclosures when the inspectors were not present.

P. L. Kerr; D. A. Close; W. S. Johnson; R. M. Kandarian; C. E. Moss; C. D. Romero

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Irreversibility analysis of hydrogen separation schemes in thermochemical cycles. [Condensation, physical absorption, diffusion, physical adsorption, thermal adsorption, and electrochemical separation  

SciTech Connect

Six processes have been evaluated as regards irreversibility generation for hydrogen separation from binary gas mixtures. The results are presented as a series of plots of separation efficiency against the mol fraction hydrogen in the feed gas. Three processes, condensation, physical absorption and electrochemical separation indicate increasing efficiency with hydrogen content. The other processes, physical and thermal adsorption, and diffusion show maxima in efficiency at a hydrogen content of 50 mol percent. Choice of separation process will also depend on such parameters as condition of feed, impurity content and capital investment. For thermochemical cycles, schemes based on low temperature heat availability are preferable to those requiring a work input.

Cox, K.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

10 MWe solar thermal central receiver pilot plant control system automation test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes results of tests on the automatic features added to the control system for the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, CA. The plant, called Solar One, is a cooperative activity between the Department of Energy and the Associates: Southern California Edison, the Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power and the California Energy Commission. This report provides an overview of the automation features added to the plant control system, a description of tests performed on the system, and the results of those tests.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Theory of Thermal Motion in Electromagnetically Induced Transparency: Diffusion, Doppler, Dicke and Ramsey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical model for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in vapor, that incorporates atomic motion and velocity-changing collisions into the dynamics of the density-matrix distribution. Within a unified formalism we demonstrate various motional effects, known for EIT in vapor: Doppler-broadening of the absorption spectrum; Dicke-narrowing and time-of-flight broadening of the transmission window for a finite-sized probe; Diffusion of atomic coherence during storage of light and diffusion of the light-matter excitation during slow-light propagation; and Ramsey-narrowing of the spectrum for a probe and pump beams of finite-size.

Firstenberg, O; Pugatch, R; Fredkin, D R; Davidson, N; Ron, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Theory of Thermal Motion in Electromagnetically Induced Transparency: Diffusion, Doppler, Dicke and Ramsey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical model for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in vapor, that incorporates atomic motion and velocity-changing collisions into the dynamics of the density-matrix distribution. Within a unified formalism we demonstrate various motional effects, known for EIT in vapor: Doppler-broadening of the absorption spectrum; Dicke-narrowing and time-of-flight broadening of the transmission window for a finite-sized probe; Diffusion of atomic coherence during storage of light and diffusion of the light-matter excitation during slow-light propagation; and Ramsey-narrowing of the spectrum for a probe and pump beams of finite-size.

O. Firstenberg; M. Shuker; R. Pugatch; D. R. Fredkin; N. Davidson; A. Ron

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Problems and Solutions for Multi-coals Blending in Thermal Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-coals blending is an applicable method for energy-saving and pollutant reduction in thermal plants. However, the utilizations have been hampered by problems such as complexities of practical implements, risks against safety during operation, difficulties ... Keywords: multi-coals blending, whole process, global optimization, expert system

Peng Peng; Xia Ji; Yang Tao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

174

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution, January 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1

175

Prioritizing and scheduling Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant safeguards upgrades. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Site Safeguards and Security Plan (SSSP), facilities are required to develop a Resource Plan (RP). The Resource Plan provides documentation and justification for the facility`s planned upgrades, including the schedule, priority, and cost estimates for the safeguards and security upgrades. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) management has identified and obtained funding approval for a number of safeguards and security upgrades, including line-item construction projects. These upgrade projects were selected to address a variety of concerns identified in the PORTS vulnerability assessments and other reviews performed in support of the SSSP process. However, budgeting and scheduling constraints do not make it possible to simultaneously begin implementation of all of the upgrade projects. A formal methodology and analysis are needed to explicitly address the trade-offs between competing safeguards objectives, and to prioritize and schedule the upgrade projects to ensure that the maximum benefit can be realized in the shortest possible time frame. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology developed to support these upgrade project scheduling decisions. The report also presents the results obtained from applying the methodology to a set of the upgrade projects selected by PORTS S&S management. Data for the analysis are based on discussions with personnel familiar with the PORTS safeguards and security needs, the requirements for implementing these upgrades, and upgrade funding limitations. The analysis results presented here assume continued highly enriched uranium (HEU) operations at PORTS. However, the methodology developed is readily adaptable for the evaluation of other operational scenarios and other resource allocation issues relevant to PORTS.

Edmunds, T.; Saleh, R.; Zevanove, S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept definition study for solar Brayton power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and operating criteria to be used in the Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Study are described. The storage system operating requirements and design standards are outlined and the corresponding power plant interface requirements are given. Each of the three alternative high temperature thermal energy storage systems (phase change, thermochemical, and sensible heat) is described. The approach and criteria to be used in developing energy cost numbers are described, and the systems requirements data and the requirements perturbations to be used in the trade studies are summarized. All of the requirements data to be used are compiled. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 of the ``Survey of Strong Motion Earthquake Effects on Thermal Power Plants in California with Emphasis on Piping Systems`` contains Appendices which detail the detail design and seismic response of several power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes. The particular plants considered include the Ormond Beach, Long Beach and Seal Beach, Burbank, El Centro, Glendale, Humboldt Bay, Kem Valley, Pasadena and Valley power plants. Included is a typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical piping and support installations for the plants surveyed. Detailed piping support spacing data are also included.

Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Coal thermolysis modeling: The effects of restricted diffusion on thermal reaction pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. A detailed study of the thermolysis of surface-immobilized bibenzyl showed that the rate of unimolecular C-C homolysis is similar to that in fluid phases. Recent studies have foucused on the thermally induced, free radical chain decomposition reactions for surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane and 1,4-diphenylbutane. For 1,4-diphenylbutane both the reaction rate and product composition are strongly dependent on surface coverage and, hence, the proximity of 1.4-diphenylbutane molecules and hydrogen abstracting radicals on the surface. The rates and selectivities of these key bimolecular reaction steps on the surface might also be affected by the structure of neighboring molecules. In the current study, we are beginning to probe this feature by examining the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane. 7 refs. , 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver panel test requirements document solar thermal test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing plans for a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally, the design planned for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Testing is to include operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the panel's transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. Test hardware are described, including the pilot plant receiver, the test receiver assembly, receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and structural assembly. Requirements for the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. The safety of the system is briefly discussed, and procedures are described for assembly, installation, checkout, normal and abnormal operations, maintenance, removal and disposition. Also briefly discussed are quality assurance, contract responsibilities, and test documentation. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

Thermal Hydraulic Analyses for Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor to Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermalhydraulic and efficiency points of view.

C.H. Oh; R. Barner; C. B. Davis; S. Sherman; P. Pickard

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ESTIMATING HISTORICAL TRICHLOROETHYLENE EXPOSURE IN A URANIUM ENRICHMENT, GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous studies at two uranium enrichment plants have looked at radiation exposures, but not an extensive list of chemical exposures, limiting evaluation of potential interactions.… (more)

MOSER, ADRIANE

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

Fry, David J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downlending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA.

Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal Efficiency Optimization for Industrial Power Plants Under Load Fluctuations Using Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automation of the control to a power plant is indeed a challenge mainly because of the occurrences of random and unpredictable variations in output demands as well as because of highly non-linear behavior of the system itself. It is sometimes argued that the 'best' control for a power plant is the operators themselves. Experienced operators are capable of making decisions on the basis of incomplete and imprecise information. The extent to which these decisions are correct is a matter of speculation. Erroneous conclusions, established post facto, are chalked up to the learning process and in fact, contribute to the forming of a good, experienced control team. The need to automate the control process for a plant is even more acutely felt when considering the complexity of the plants themselves and the volume of data that would have to be processed before a control decision can be taken. Factored into this decision would also be several governing parameters such as costs, reliability, other constraints and their interdependency, as well as planned and unscheduled outages for maintenance and so on. In this paper, however, only one facet of a power plant operation is considered. It is intended to demonstrate that thermal efficiency may be improved by better techniques for automated control of throttle valves in the steam turbine of the plant. One of these options, fuzzy logic, is selected, and defended, as being the more effective than current approaches. A comparative analysis is conducted of control methods for plant operations followed by a brief overview of fuzzy control and its application to control of non-linear systems. A method of applying this 'new' computer-based technique to control of non-linear, somewhat erratic plants is presented and discussed.

Steffenhagan, W.; de Sam Lazaro, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluating Equipment Performance Using SCADA/PMS Data for Thermal Utility Plants - Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equipment in cogeneration plants and thermal energy plants such as gas tubing generators, boilers, steam turbine generators, chillers and cooling towers are often critical to satisfying building needs. Their actual energy performance is very important when implementing the continuous Commissioning (CC) process. The actual performance can be used to develop optimal operation strategies, to conduct thermo-economy analysis, to perform fault diagnostics, and so forth. Because the standard performance test such as chiller test per ARI standard and cooling tower test per CTI standard often require the equipment to be operated under specific test conditions; however, in reality the dynamics of the system load normally do not allow the equipment to be operated under such conditions. It is costly and even impossible to take such critical equipment offline for test purposes. In order to facilitate the plant processes and on-going operations, utility plants usually employ Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Plant Monitoring Systems (SCADA/PMS) or Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS) to monitor sensors, display data, control equipment, activate alarms and log information. However, the utilization and interpretation of the logged data are often at the minimum level especially in old systems without automatic operation and control optimization capabilities. Through three case studies, this paper presents methods for evaluating equipment performance using SCADA/PMS or EMSC data.

Deng, X.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver-panel test-requirements document: Solar Thermal Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for insolation testing of a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally the design planned for the 10 MWe pilot plant. Testing includes operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. A brief description of the pilot plant receiver subsystem is presented, followed by a detailed description of the receiver assembly to be tested at the Solar Thermal Test Facility. Major subassemblies are described, including the receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and the structural assembly. Requirements of the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. System safety measures are described. The tests, operating conditions, and expected results are presented. Quality assurance, task responsibilities, and test documentation are also discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Method for evaluating the technical state of boilers and piping in thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach for evaluating the current technical state of thermal equipment in thermal power plants is discussed. A system of parameters and corresponding criteria are developed for the technical state of groups of essential components of boilers and piping. Ascale for evaluation of safety factors is proposed in terms of the relationship between state parameters and the corresponding criteria. Analytic expressions are given for an approximate evaluation of the maximum lifetime limit for operation of an object in terms of an integral safety factor and an evaluation of this type is illustrated for the case of the live steam pipeline in a 300-MW unit. An algorithm is set up for actions to be taken by equipment owners in organizing monitoring of the technical state of the equipment.

Grin', E. A. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation); Stepanov, V. V.; Sarkisyan, V. A.; Babkina, R. I. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of In Situ Thermal Stabilization at a Former Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Thermal Stabilization (ISTS) is an emerging technology that has been proposed for the remediation of residual organic contamination at a former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site in the southeastern United States. As described in this report, a test program was designed to verify the effectiveness of ISTS to treat the contaminants of concern, as well as to identify any adverse impacts (e.g., ground settling) to operations on an adjacent set of railroad tracks. A further goal of the testing was to ...

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Management of the ten-megawatt solar-thermal central-receiver pilot-plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report deals with inspection (between April and May 1979) of the Ten-Megawatt Solar-Thermal Central-Receiver Pilot-Plant Project being constructed in Barstow, California by the Department of Energy (DOE) and a utility consortium. At the time of inspection the project was behind schedule and over its projected cost. The project was subsequently rescheduled for initial operation by June 1982 at an estimated cost of $139.5 million. Recommendations are included relative to: better utilization of DOE resources; modified date for initial operation; and initiation of independent management audits. Comments to the draft report are appended. (PSB)

Not Available

1980-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes in under way. One issue concerning a primary candidate, c-C4F8, is the possibility that it might produce the highly toxic perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high temperature environments. This study was commissioned to determine the likelihood and severity of decomposition under two specific high temperature thermal environments, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to formation of oxidation products (COF2, CO, CO2, and HF) rather than PFIB.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Measurement of Broadband Diffuse Solar Irradiance Using Current Commercial Instrumentation with a Correction for Thermal Offset Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffuse-sky solar irradiance is an important quantity for radiation budget research, particularly as it relates to climate. Diffuse irradiance is one component of the total downwelling solar irradiance and contains information on the amount of ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton; Joseph J. Michalsky; Thomas Stoffel; Bruce W. Forgan; John Hickey; Donald W. Nelson; Timothy L. Alberta; Ibrahim Reda

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Final environmental impact assessment of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This document considers: the need for uranium enrichment facilities; site location; plant description; and describes the power generating facilities in light of its existing environment. The impacts from continuing operations are compared with alternatives of shutdown, relocation, and alternative power systems. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Liquid Thermal Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one set of a series which has been prepared as a record of the research work done under the Manhattan Project and the Atomic Energy Commission.

Abelson, Philip H.; Rosen, Nathan; Hoover, John I.

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nuclear criticality safety controls for uranium deposits during D and D at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management has issued a challenge to complete DOE environmental cleanup within a decade. The response for Oak Ridge facilities is in accordance with the DOE ten-year plan which calls for completion of > 95% of environmental management work by the year 2006. This will result in a 99% risk reduction and in a significant savings in base line costs in waste management (legacy waste); remedial action (groundwater, soil, etc.); and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). It is assumed that there will be long-term institutional control of cascade equipment, i.e., there will be no walk away from sites, and that there will be firm radioactivity release limits by 1999 for recycle metals. An integral part of these plants is the removal of uranium deposits which pose nuclear criticality safety concerns in the shut down of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. DOE has initiated the Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program to improve nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger uranium deposits from unfavorable geometry equipment. Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements have identified the location of these deposits. The objective of the K-25 Site Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program is to remove and place uranium deposits into safe geometry storage containers to meet the double contingency principle. Each step of the removal process results in safer conditions where multiple controls are present. Upon completion of the Program, nuclear criticality risks will be greatly reduced.

Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jollay, L.J. III; Dahl, T.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mulitcomponent Multiphase Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 54 (2006) p 2431-2439. pdf file; "Hillert, Höglund, and Ågren, "Diffusion in interstitial compounds with thermal and stoichiometric defects," J. Appl. ...

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct relationship between plant transpiration, soil moisture, and groundwater flow in a phyto-remediation system. The existing monitoring program was expanded in 2004 in order to evaluate the interactions among these processes. The purpose of this monitoring program was to determine the rate of contaminant removal and to more accurately predict the amount of time needed to remediate the contaminated groundwater. Initial planting occurred in 1999 at the X-740 area, with additional replanting in 2001 and 2002. In 2003, coring of selected trees and chemical analyses illustrated the presence of TCE; however, little impact was observed in groundwater levels, analytical monitoring, and periodic tree diameter monitoring at the X-740 area. To provide better understanding of how these phyto-remediation systems work, a portable weather station was installed at the X-740 area to provide data for estimating transpiration and two different systems for measuring sap flow and sap velocity were outfitted to numerous trees. After evaluating and refining the groundwater flow and contaminant transport models, the data gathered by these two inventive methods can be used to establish a rate of contaminant removal and to better predict the time required in order to meet remediation goals for the phyto-remediation systems located at the PORTS site. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM Federal Services, P.O. Box 789, Piketon, OH 45661 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Survey of Thermal Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants; Period of Performance: September 13, 1999 - June 12, 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify and selectively review previous work done on the evaluation and use of thermal energy storage systems applied to parabolic trough power plants. Appropriate storage concepts and technical options are first discussed, followed by a review of previous work.

Pilkington Solar International GmbH

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Corrosion and biofouling on the non-heat-exchanger surfaces of an ocean thermal energy conversion power plant: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the many foreseeable problems confronting economical ocean thermal energy conversion operation, two major items are the deterioration of the structural and functional components, which prevents efficient operation, and the biofouling of the surfaces, which adds excess weight to the floating ocean platform. The techniques required for effective long-term control of deterioration and corrosion have been investigated actively for many years, and successful solutions for most situations have been developed. For the most part, these solutions can be directly transferred to the ocean thermal energy conversion plant. The majority of problems in these areas are expected to be associated with scale-up and will require some advanced development due to the immensity of the ocean thermal energy conversion platform. Current antifouling control systems are not effective for long-term fouling prevention. Commercially available antifouling coatings are limited to a 3-year service life in temperate waters, and even shorter in tropical waters. However, underwater cleaning techniques and some fouling-control systems presently being used by conventional power plants may find utility on an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. In addition, some recent major advances in long-term antifouling coatings sponsored by the Navy may be applicable to ocean thermal energy conversion. 132 references.

Castelli, V.J. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

Lyon, B.F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Investigation of Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 fault and fire, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 24, 1982  

SciTech Connect

On March 24, 1982, an electrical fault and resultant fire in the 480 volt Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant destroyed that substation. There were no personal injuries, the overall loss was limited to the Substation, and the cost of replacing the Substation with repaired and new components has been estimated at $184,000. At the time of the incident, Goodyear was involved in a project to replace the obsolete 480 volt circuit breaker of the Auxiliary Power System. This project involved the disassembly, refurishing, and reassembly of 480 volt circuit breaker carriages by Goodyear personnel. The fault occurred in a circuit breaker upgraded under this project. The investigation of this accident is reported. The evidence suggests the fault resulted from the improper assembly of an upgraded 480 volt circuit breaker. Compounding the problem and leading to the extensive damage was the failure of the transformer secondary breaker to trip open as designed and interrupt the flow of power to the substation. It is surmised that inadequate testing during preventive maintenance contributed to this condition. Additional factors which may have contributed to the accident included: no requirements for assuring the competence of the electricians who installed the circuit breakers, no specific assembly instructions to the electricians, inadequate procedure instructions, and an inadequate procedure governing operational or load testing of the breaker. (LCL)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Final report on the power production phase of the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluations of the power production testing of Solar One, the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California. The Pilot Plant, a cooperative project of the US Department of Energy and utility firms led by the Southern California Edison Company, began a three year period of power production operation in August 1984. During this period, plant performance indicators, such as capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability, were studied to assess the operational capability of the Pilot Plant to reliably supply electrical power. Also studied was the long-term performance of such key plant components as the heliostats and the receiver. During the three years of power production, the Pilot Plant showed an improvement in performance. Considerable increases in capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability were achieved. Heliostat operation was reliable, and only small amounts of mirror corrosion were observed. Receiver tube leaks did occur, however, and were the main cause of the plant's unscheduled outages. The Pilot Plant provided valuable lessons which will aid in the design of future solar central receiver plants. 53 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

Radosevich, L.G.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

implement Cold Shutdown requirements; disposition of depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders; and perform Decontamination and Decommissioning. Portsmouth D&D Project Portsmouth...

216

STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

A semi-analytical model for heat and mass transfer in geothermal reservoirs to estimate fracture surface-are-to-volume ratios and thermal breakthrough using thermally-decaying and diffusing tracers  

SciTech Connect

A semi-analytical model was developed to conduct rapid scoping calculations of responses of thermally degrading and diffusing tracers in multi-well tracer tests in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The model is based on an existing Laplace transform inversion model for solute transport in dual-porosity media. The heat- and mass-transfer calculations are decoupled and conducted sequentially, taking advantage of the fact that heat transfer between fractures and the rock matrix is much more rapid than mass transfer and therefore mass transfer will effectively occur in a locally isothermal system (although the system will be nonisothermal along fracture flow pathways, which is accounted for by discretizing the flow pathways into multiple segments that have different temperature histories). The model takes advantage of the analogies between heat and mass transfer, solving the same governing equations with k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub w} being substituted for {phi}D{sub m} in the equation for fracture transport and k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub m} being subsituted for D{sub m} in the equation for matrix transport; where k = thermal conductivity (cal/cm-s-K), {rho} = density (g/cm{sup 3}), C{sub p} = heat capacity (at constant pressure) (cal/g-K), {phi} = matrix porosity, and D = tracer diffusion coefficient (cm{sup 2}/s), with the subscripts w and m referring to water and matrix, respectively. A significant advantage of the model is that it executes in a fraction of second on a single-CPU personal computer, making it very amenable for parameter estimation algorithms that involve repeated runs to find global minima. The combined thermal-mass transport model was used to evaluate the ability to estimate when thermal breakthrough would occur in a multi-well EGS configuration using thermally degrading tracers. Calculations were conducted to evaluate the range of values of Arrhenius parameters, A and E{sub {alpha}} (pre-exponential factor, 1/s, and activation energy, cal/mol) required to obtain interpretable responses of thermally-degrading tracers that decay according to the rate constant k{sub d} = Ae{sup -E{sub {alpha}}/RT}, where k{sub d} = decay rate constant (1/s), R = ideal gas constant (1.987 cal/mol-K), and T = absolute temperature (K). It is shown that there are relatively narrow ranges of A and E{sub {alpha}} that will result in readily interpretable tracer responses for any given combination of ambient reservoir temperature and working fluid residence time in a reservoir. The combined model was also used to simulate the responses of conservative tracers with different diffusion coefficients as a way of estimating fracture surface-area-to-volume ratios (SA/V) in multi-well EGS systems. This method takes advantage of the fact that the differences in breakthrough curves of tracers with different matrix diffusion coefficients are a function of SA/V. The model accounts for differences in diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature so that tracer responses obtained at different times can be used to obtain consistent estimates of SA/V as the reservoir cools down. Some single-well applications of this approach are simulated with a numerical model to demonstrate the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of EGS stimulations before a second well is drilled.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: thermal storage subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 8 (Approved)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Storage Subsystem Research Experiment is designed to give maximum information for evaluating the design, performance, and operating parameters of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. The experiment is summarized, and the experiment components detail design and integration are described. The experiment test and operation is described which is designed to collect engineering data to allow the design, performance, and operational characteristics to be specified for the Pilot Plant. Appended are: design documentation; pressure drop calculations; materials studies for thermal energy storage; flow charts for data acquisition and control; condenser detail design; instrumentation error analysis; logic diagrams for the control system; literature survey to evaluate the two-phase forced convection heat transfer; and the vaporizer performance model. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

427 427 Rev. 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Review Report: Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, PGDP, Paducah Kentucky 15 August 2007 Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Paducah KY Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Paducah KY Prepared for: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Office of Engineering and Technology Review Report - C-400 Thermal Remediation PGDP WSRC-STI-2007-00427 rev. 1 Cover Photo: Oblique view overhead photograph of the Department of Energy Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Paducah KY. The TCE source area targeted for thermal treatment is located near the center of the photograph. .

220

MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cold side thermal energy storage system for improved operation of air cooled power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air cooled power plants experience significant performance fluctuations as plant cooling capacity reduces due to higher daytime temperature than nighttime temperature. The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the detailed ...

Williams, Daniel David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive...

224

Production and Handling Slide 25: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

225

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Effects of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Annealing on the Thermal Conductivity/ Diffusivity of Monolithic SIC and SIC/SIC Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser flash thermal diffusivity measurements were made on high-purity monolithic CVD-SiC (impurity concentration layup made by the isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process and with either a “thick” 1.0 µm or a “thin” 0.11 µm PyC fiber coating) before and after irradiation in the HFIR reactor (250 to 800°C, 4-8 dpa-SiC) and after post-irradiation annealing composite samples to 1200°C. Thermal conductivity in SiC is controlled by phonon transport. Point defects introduced into SiC during neutron irradiation are effective scattering centers for phonons, and as a consequence the thermal conductivity is sharply reduced. For irradiation temperatures below ~800°C, the accumulation of point defects (in SiC mostly single or small clusters of interstitials and isolated vacancies) saturates when the interstitial-vacancy recombination rate equals the defect production rate. For saturation conditions, the relative reduction in the SiC thermal conductivity decreases in a manner similar to its swelling reduction with increasing irradiation temperature. Examination of SiC swelling data at various irradiation temperatures and doses indicates that saturation occurs for ~2 dpa-SiC at 200°C and decreases continuously to ~0.4 dpa-SiC at 800°C. Based on a model that assumes a uniform distribution of the phonon scattering defects, the calculated defect concentration for unirradiated CVD-SiC was less than 1 appm, which is consistent with the manufacturer’s value of <5 wppm impurities. The defect concentrations estimated for the irradiated CVD-SiC samples decreased continuously from ~25,000 to 940 appm as the irradiation temperature increased from 252 to 800°C. The small intrinsic defect concentration in comparison to the rather large extrinsic irradiation-induced defect concentrations illustrates why CVD-SiC makes an ideal irradiation damage monitor.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The use of thermal energy storage for energy system based on cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of thermal energy storage together with cogeneration technology provides an attractive solution by allowing the production of electricity in the periods, when heat load is low and later consumption of heat, when load is high. The purpose of the ... Keywords: CHP, cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy system, thermal storage

Anna Volkova; Andres Siirde

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Technical and economic analysis of parabolic trough concentrating solar thermal power plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. This thesis reports on the technical and economic analysis of wet and dry cooling technologies of parabolic trough CSTP plant. This was done… (more)

Kariuki, Kibaara Samuel .

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of the Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films (DGT) technique to assess the plant availability of Mn in soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predicts copper availability to plants. EnvironmentalAttempts to assess Mn availability have been impeded due towill influence the Mn availability. Often flooding of soils

Mundus, Simon; Husted, Søren; Lombi, Enzo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

Jirka, Gerhard H.

232

Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination with feedwater heating, would result in heat rate reductions of 7.43 percent for PRB coal and 10.45 percent for lignite.

Edward Levy

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O, n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes is under way. This report summarizes studies directed at estimating the chemical and thermal stability of three candidate coolants, c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O, in a few specific environments to be found in gaseous diffusion plant operations. One issue concerning the new coolants is the possibility that they might produce the highly toxic compound perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high-temperature environments. Two specific high-temperature thermal environments are examined, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. A second issue relates to the thermal or chemical decomposition of the coolants in the gaseous diffusion process environment. The primary purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to the formation of CF{sub 4} and oxidation products (COF{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and HF) rather than PFIB.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Solar multiple optimization for a solar-only thermal power plant, using oil as heat transfer fluid in the parabolic trough collectors  

SciTech Connect

Usual size of parabolic trough solar thermal plants being built at present is approximately 50 MW{sub e}. Most of these plants do not have a thermal storage system for maintaining the power block performance at nominal conditions during long non-insolation periods. Because of that, a proper solar field size, with respect to the electric nominal power, is a fundamental choice. A too large field will be partially useless under high solar irradiance values whereas a small field will mainly make the power block to work at part-load conditions. This paper presents an economic optimization of the solar multiple for a solar-only parabolic trough plant, using neither hybridization nor thermal storage. Five parabolic trough plants have been considered, with the same parameters in the power block but different solar field sizes. Thermal performance for each solar power plant has been featured, both at nominal and part-load conditions. This characterization has been applied to perform a simulation in order to calculate the annual electricity produced by each of these plants. Once annual electric energy generation is known, levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for each plant is calculated, yielding a minimum LCOE value for a certain solar multiple value within the range considered. (author)

Montes, M.J. [E.T.S.I.Industriales - U.N.E.D., C/Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Abanades, A.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Valdes, M. [E.T.S.I.Industriales - U.P.M., C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design of cold water pipe for sea thermal power plants. Progress report, 1 May 1975--30 May 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the preliminary analysis of design conditions for a 40-ft. diameter, 4000 ft. long, cold water supply pipe for a 100 MW sea thermal power plant. The pipe is assumed to be freely suspended from a floating platform. The design is based on a circular row of tubes with spacers between to form the pipe wall. Internal pressure conditions are calculated for maximum assumed flow rates in the pipe. External pressure distribution is calculated for maximum assumed ocean current velocity. Drag and moment distributions are calculated for the pipe loaded with an assumed current velocity profile and buoyancy distribution. Collapse stability calculations are made for the pipe and for the individual tubes. Tube and spacer interaction stresses are calculated for the combined pressure, bending moment, and tensile loads imposed on the pipe. Preliminary analysis is performed on a flexible pipe support system capable of isolating the pipe from the platform during any sea state likely to be encountered by a sea thermal power plant. It is concluded that the basic design is feasible and justifies more precise analysis.

Anderson, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy-Saving Analysis on Thermal System in 600MW Supercritical Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency, energy-saving and environmentally friendly supercritical thermal power units are gradually becoming main stream in China. In this paper, an advanced energy system analysis method, specific consumption analysis, is used to examine the ... Keywords: supercritical, energy-saving, specific consumption analysis, feed-water heating system, environmentally friendly

Yongping Yang; Yu Wu; Zhiping Yang; Ningling Wang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A thermal computation program of process steam boilers obtained with reusable equipments and plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a process steam boiler dimensioned by means of two computer programs. The first computer program entitled "thermal computation of the chamber furnace of boiler" provides the utilization of the Boltzmann criterion. This computer program ... Keywords: boiler, chamber furnace, computer program, heat exchanger

Aurel Gaba; Ion-Florin Popa; Alexis-Daniel Negrea

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Conceptual design of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plants in the Philippines  

SciTech Connect

Extensive temperature readings were obtained to determine suitable OTEC power plant sites in the Philippines. An analysis of temperature profiles reveals that surface seawater is in the range of 25 to 29{degree}C throughout the year while seawater at 500 to 700 m depth remains at a low temperature of 8 to 4{degree}C, respectively. In this article, 14 suitable sites within the Philippine seas are suggested. Conceptual designs for a 5-MW onland-type and a 25-MW floating-type OTEC power plant are proposed. Optimum conditions are determined and plant specifications are computed. Cost estimates show that a floating-type 25-MW OTEC power plant can generate electricity at a busbar power cost of 5.33 to 7.57 cents/kW {times} h while an onshore type 5-MW plant can generate electricity at a busbar cost of 14.71 to 18.09 cents/kW {times} h.

Haruo Uehara; Dilao, C.O.; Tsutomu Nakaoka (Saga Univ. (Japan))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis and System Design of a Large Chiller Plant for Korea, with or without Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 625,600 ft2 (58,120 m2) office building with retail in South Korea has a total cooling load of 3,330 tons refrigeration (1 1,7 12 kW). In order to evaluate the most economical manner to provide cooling, a simulation program was used. Five different configurations of chiller plants were investigated; each configuration was carefully described so that the computer model was a good representation of the intended plants. This paper outlines the design and analysis procedure, and the results show the difference in energy consumption between the configurations.

Levin, C.; Simmonds, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant. Phase II. Planning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various considerations related to the Phase II schedules, material control and personnel training required to effectively implement the program are presented. The flow charts and schedules required to accomplish fabrication, installation, checkout, and personnel training to support the Pilot Plant schedule are identified. The planning addresses receiving, storage and shipment of raw materials, subassemblies, component, subsystems, and complete assemblies. The vendor activities and the major Martin Marietta facilities are included. These are the Mirror Assembly activities at Pueblo, Colorado and the heliostat assembly and installation activities at the Barstow-Daggett Airport and the solar plant. (LEW)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power plants, thermal power plants(fuel, nuclear),reject heat from thermal power plants can only be re-protection is the thermal electric power plant. Electric

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Use of plasma fuel systems at thermal power plants in Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Turkey  

SciTech Connect

The technology of plasma ignition of solid fuels is described, as well as its creation and development steps, the technoeconomic characteristics of plasma igniter systems, schemes of their installation in pulverized-coal boilers, and results of their application at pulverized coal-fired power plants.

Karpenko, E.I.; Karpenko, Y.E.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Ude (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermal Physics

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Neural-net based real-time economic dispatch for thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the application of artificial neural networks to real-time optimal generation dispatch of thermal units. The approach can take into account the operational requirements and network losses. The proposed economic dispatch uses an artificial neural network (ANN) for generation of penalty factors, depending on the input generator powers and identified system load change. Then, a few additional iterations are performed within an iterative computation procedure for the solution of coordination equations, by using reference-bus penalty-factors derived from the Newton-Raphson load flow. A coordination technique for environmental and economic dispatch of pure thermal systems, based on the neural-net theory for simplified solution algorithms and improved man-machine interface is introduced. Numerical results on two test examples show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently and accurately develop optimal and feasible generator output trajectories, by applying neural-net forecasts of system load patterns.

Djukanovic, M.; Milosevic, B. [Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Power Systems; Calovic, M. [Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Kinematic Stirling engine as an energy conversion subsystem for paraboloidal dish solar thermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of a suitably designed and economically manufactured Stirling engine as the energy conversion subsystem of a paraboloidal dish-Stirling solar thermal power module has been estimated. Results obtained by elementary cycle analyses have been shown to match quite well the performance characteristics of an advanced kinematic Stirling engine, the United Stirling P-40, as established by current prototypes of the engine and by a more sophisticated analytic model of its advanced derivative. In addition to performance, brief consideration has been given to other Stirling engine criteria such as durability, reliability, and serviceability. Production costs have not been considered here.

Bowyer, J.M.

1984-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jensen, R. V. Skougaard [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center-iNANO, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Larsen, A. Nylandsted [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center-iNANO, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heat Hyperbolic Diffusion in Planck Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the diffusion of the thermal pulse in Planck Gas. We show that the Fourier diffusion equation gives the speed of diffusion, v > c and breaks the causality of the thermal processes in Planck gas .For hyperbolic heat transport v

Miroslaw Kozlowski; Janina Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms applicable'' and relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Software/firmware design specification for 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The software and firmware employed for the operation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are completely described. The systems allow operator control of up to 2048 heliostats, and include the capability of operator-commanded control, graphic displays, status displays, alarm generation, system redundancy, and interfaces to the Operational Control System, the Data Acquisition System, and the Beam Characterization System. The requirements are decomposed into eleven software modules for execution in the Heliostat Array Controller computer, one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Field Controller microprocessor, and one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Controller microprocessor. The design of the modules to satisfy requirements, the interfaces between the computers, the software system structure, and the computers in which the software and firmware will execute are detailed. The testing sequence for validation of the software/firmware is described. (LEW)

Ladewig, T.D.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Particle Swarm Optimization and Gradient Descent Methods for Optimization of PI Controller for AGC of Multi-area Thermal-Wind-Hydro Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic generation control (AGC) of three unequal interconnected Thermal, Wind and Hydro power plant has been designed with PI controller. Further computational intelligent technique Particle Swarm Optimization and conventional Gradient Descent ... Keywords: Automatic generation control, Particle swarm optimization, Gradient Descent method, Generation rate constraint, Area control error, Wind energy conversion system

Naresh Kumari, A N. Jha

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Techno-economic projections for advanced small solar thermal electric power plants to years 1990--2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced technologies applicable to solar thermal electric power systems in the 1990--2000 time-frame are delineated for power applications that fulfill a wide spectrum of small power needs with primary emphasis on power ratings <10 MWe. Techno-economic projections of power system characteristics (energy and capital costs as a function of capacity factor) are made based on development of identified promising technologies. The key characteristic of advanced technology systems is an efficient low-cost solar energy collection while achieving high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. Two-axis tracking systems such as the central receiver or power tower concept and distributed parabolic dish receivers possess this characteristic. For these two basic concepts, advanced technologies including, e.g., conversion systems such as Stirling engines, Brayton/Rankine combined cycles and storage/transport concepts encompassing liquid metals, and reversible-reaction chemical systems are considered. In addition to techno-economic aspects, technologies are also judged in terms of factors such as developmental risk, relative reliability, and probability of success. Improvements accruing to projected advanced technology systems are measured with respect to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems, as represented by the central receiver pilot plant being constructed near Barstow, California. These improvements, for both central receivers and parabolic dish systems, indicate that pursuit of advanced technology across a broad front can result in post-1985 solar thermal systems having the potential of approaching the goal of competitiveness with conventional power systems; i.e., capital costs of $600 kWe and energy costs of 50 mills/kWe-hr (1977 dollars).

Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E.J.; El Gabalawi, N.; Herrera, G.; Kuo, T.J.; Chen, K.H.

1978-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermal Design of an Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor Combined Cycle Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Current work modeling high temperature compact heat exchangers may demonstrate the design feasibility of a Vapor Core Reactor (VCR) driven combined cycle power plant. For solid nuclear fuel designs, the cycle efficiency is typically limited by a metallurgical temperature limit which is dictated by fuel and structural melting points. In a vapor core, the gas/vapor phase nuclear fuel is uniformly mixed with the topping cycle working fluid. Heat is generated homogeneously throughout the working fluid thus extending the metallurgical temperature limit. Because of the high temperature, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation is employed for topping cycle power extraction. MHD rejected heat is transported via compact heat exchanger to a conventional Brayton gas turbine bottoming cycle. High bottoming cycle mass flow rates are required to remove the waste heat because of low heat capacities for the bottoming cycle gas. High mass flow is also necessary to balance the high Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) mass flow rate in the topping cycle. Heat exchanger design is critical due to the high temperatures and corrosive influence of fluoride compounds and fission products existing in VCR/MHD exhaust. Working fluid compositions for the topping cycle include variations of Uranium Tetrafluoride, Helium and various electrical conductivity seeds for the MHD. Bottoming cycle working fluid compositions include variations of Helium and Xenon. Some thought has been given to include liquid metal vapor in the bottoming cycle for a Cheng or evaporative cooled design enhancement. The NASA Glenn Lewis Research Center code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) is utilized for evaluating chemical species existing in the gas stream. Work being conducted demonstrates the compact heat exchanger design, utilization of the CEA code, and assessment of different topping and bottoming working fluid compositions. (authors)

Bays, Samuel E.; Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance preliminary design report. [150 MW commercial tower focus plant and 10 MW pilot plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the 10 MWe Pilot Plant and the 150 MWe Commercial Plant are given. The Commercial Plant consists of 15 integrated collector - receiver modules. Each module contains 1325 heliostats and an internally mounted steam-generating receiver on a steel tower with an aperture height of 90 M. The Pilot Plant consists of one full-scale collector - receiver module. The two-stage sensible heat storage system utilizes a heat transfer salt medium and a hydrocarbon oil storage medium. The electric power generation system uses a conventional steam turbine-generator. The Pilot Plant is one module of the Commercial Plant, providing for one-to-one scaling in the most critical areas. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. [Sensible heat storage using Caloria HT43 and mixture of gravel and sand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 100-MWe Commercial Plant Thermal Storage System (TSS) employs sensible heat storage using dual liquid and solid media for the heat storage in each of four tanks, with the thermocline principle applied to provide high-temperature, extractable energy independent of the total energy stored. The 10-MW Pilot Plant employs a similar system except uses only a single tank. The high-temperature organic fluid Caloria HT43 and a rock mixture of river gravel and No. 6 silica sand were selected for heat storage in both systems. The system design, installation, performance testing, safety characteristics, and specifications are described in detail. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, “Solar Thermal Power Plants,” The European PhysicalThermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants,”fuel based power plants, and most nuclear and solar thermal

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Receiver subsystem analysis report (RADL Item 4-1). 10-MWe Solar Thermal Central-Receiver Pilot Plant: solar-facilities design integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of those thermal hydraulic, structural, and stress analyses required to demonstrate that the Receiver design for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant will satisfy the general design and performance requirements during the plant's design life. Recommendations resulting from those analyses and supporting test programs are presented regarding operation of the receiver. The analyses are limited to receiver subsystem major structural parts (primary tower, receiver unit core support structure), pressure parts (absorber panels, feedwater, condensate and steam piping/components, flash tank, and steam mainfold) and shielding. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Synergistic diffuser/heat-exchanger design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theoretical and numerical evaluation of synergistic diffusing heat-exchanger design is presented. Motivation for this development is based on current diffuser and heat-exchange technologies in cogeneration plants, which ...

Lazzara, David S. (David Sergio), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 1. Collector subsystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The central receiver system consists of a field of heliostats, a central receiver, a thermal storage unit, an electrical power generation system, and balance of plant. This volume discusses the collector field geometry, requirements and configuration. The development of the collector system and subsystems are discussed and the selection rationale outlined. System safety and availability are covered. Finally, the plans for collector portion of the central receiver system are reviewed.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program, May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Oversight of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Criticality Safety Program May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

264

Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deposit Removal Project was undertaken with the support of the U. S. Department of Energy at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The project team performed the safe removal of the hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits from the K-29 Building of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The deposits had developed as a result of air leakage into UF{sub 6} gas process pipes; UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} became hydrated by moisture from the air and deposited inside the pipes. The mass, its distribution, and the hydrogen content [that is, the ratio of H to U (H/U)], were the key parameters that controlled the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Earlier gamma-ray spectrometry measurements in K-29 had identified the largest deposits in the building. The first and third largest deposits in the building were measured in this program. The first deposit, found in the Unit 2, Cell 7, B-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Hockey Stick'') was about 1,300 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.34 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-}50% uncertainty) and according to the gamma-ray spectroscopy was uniformly distributed. The second deposit (the third-largest deposit in the building), found in the Unit 2, Cell 6, A-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Tee-Pipe''), had a uranium deposit estimated to be about 240 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.4 wt % {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-} 20% uncertainty). Before deposit removal activities began, the Deposit Removal Project team needed to survey the inside of the pipes intrusively to assess the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Therefore, the spatial distribution of the deposits, the total uranium deposit mass, and the moderation level resulting from hydration of the deposits, all of which affect nuclear criticality safety were required. To perform the task safely and effectively, the Deposit Removal Project team requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) characterize the two largest deposits with the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven transmission (CFSDT) technique, an active neutron interrogation method developed for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to identify nuclear weapons components in containers. The active CFSDT measurement technique uses CFSDT time-of-flight measurements of prompt neutrons and gamma rays from an externally introduced {sup 252}Cf source.

Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Validation of the thermal effect of roof with the Spraying and green plants in an insulated building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the insulation efficiency of the RC building. Windfor an RC building with a high degree of insulation in thebuildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation

Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant solar facilities design integration: plant maintenance/training manual (RADL Item 2-37). Section 2. Stationary apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stationary apparatus for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are listed, including: heat exchangers, receiver panels, tanks, vessels, and receivers, deaerator, condenser to the turbine-generator, desuperheaters, filters and strainers, demineralizers, heaters, dryers, separators, ullage gas supply and conditioning, auxiliary boilers, sewage treatment plant, expansion joints, and orifice plates. Specifications, operation and maintenance instructions are given for the heat exchangers, receiver panels, filters and strainers, separators, and especially for the ullage gas supply and conditioning. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

269

A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The available evidence supports adjusting the western and northwestern Water Policy boundary. Based on the historical and modeled hydrogeological data reflecting past flow and plume attenuation, along with associated plume migration toward the northeast, the establishment of a new boundary along the westernmost margin of the earliest indication of the TCE plume is proposed and justified on hydrogeological grounds. Approximately 30% of the original area would remain within the adjusted Water Policy area west and northwest of the PGDP facility. This modification would release about 70% of the area, although individual properties would overlap the new boundary.

None

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Diffusion Coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Challenges in Constructing Diffusion Mobility Databases for Industrial Alloys: ... Implementation of new initiatives such as the Materials Genome ...

272

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodríguez Buño, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reduced Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Silicon Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alpha1=k1/(density1*cp1); %Thermal diffusivity of PMMA B1=Simon R. Phillpot, “Nanoscale Thermal Transport”, Journal of9] E.T. Swartz, R.O. Pohl, “Thermal Boundary Resistance”,

Yuen, Taylor S.

274

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant, solar-facilities design integration: system integration laboratory test plan (RADL item 6-4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general demonstration test plan is provided for the activities to be accomplished at the Systems Integration Laboratory. The Master Control System, Subsystem Distributed Process Control, Representative Signal Conditioning Units, and Redline Units from the Receiver Subsystem and the Thermal Storage Subsystem and other external interface operational functions will be integrated and functionally demonstrated. The Beckman Multivariable Control Unit will be tested for frequency response, static checks, configuration changes, switching transients, and input-output interfaces. Maximum System Integration Laboratory testing will demonstrate the operational readiness of Pilot Plant controls and external interfaces that are available. Minimum System Integration Laboratory testing will be accomplished with reduced set of hardware, which will provide capability for continued development and demonstration of Operational Control System plant control application software. Beam Control System Integration Laboratory testing will demonstrate the operational readiness of the Beam Control System equipment and software. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis of the impact of federal tax incentives on market diffusion for solar thermal/WECS technologies 1980-1990. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The technical appendices include: an estimate of the additional industrial energy services market from 1980-1990; data and assumptions used to develop the technology cost information, which is in turn used to devlop market penetration model and forecasts, market penetration models for space and direct heat and process heat; financial, equipment cost, and performance parameters for performing market penetration study; capital and operating and maintenance costs for conventional industrial energy systems and for solar energy systems with conventional backup; a review of market diffusion models for new industrial energy supply technologies; and financial formulae. (LEW)

1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle ocean thermal difference power plant. M.S. Thesis,ocean thermal energy conversion power plants. M.S. Thesis.comments on the thermal effects of power plants on fish eggs

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem. [10-MW Pilot Plant and 100-MW Commercial Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conception, design, and testing of the receiver subsystem proposed by the McDonnell Douglas/Rocketdyne Receiver team for the DOE 10-MW Pilot Plant and the 100-MW Commercial Plant are described. The receiver subsystem consists of the receiver unit, the tower on which the receiver unit is mounted above the collector field, and the supporting control and instrumentation equipment. The plans for implementation of the Pilot Plant are given including the anticipated schedule and production plan (procurement, installation, checkout, and maintenance). Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the Pilot Plant receiver subsystem are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant: collector subsystem foundation construction. Revision No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bid documents are provided for the construction of the collector subsystem foundation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant, including invitation to bid, bid form, representations and certifications, construction contract, and labor standards provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act. Instructions to bidders, general provisions and general conditions are included. Technical specifications are provided for the construction. (LEW)

Not Available

1979-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Diffuse Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffuse Scattering Diffuse Scattering * Anticipatory (trick) question: If you have an x-ray or neutron detector looking at a small sample volume, which will scatter more x- rays or neutrons into the detector 1 atom 100 atoms or 1000 atoms? X-ray or neutron beam Answer: Depends! Diffuse Scattering Gene E. Ice Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering ORNL/SNS June 2011 Presentation concentrates year graduate-level course into 1 hour * Skip mathematical complexities * Expose to range of applications * Develop intuition for length scales * Talk like x-ray/neutron scattering guru - Reciprocal space - Debye Temperature - Laue monotonic - Krivoglaz defects of 1st/2nd kinds! Great for cocktail parties or impressing attractive strangers-

282

User's manual for DELSOL2: a computer code for calculating the optical performance and optimal system design for solar-thermal central-receiver plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DELSOL2 is a revised and substantially extended version of the DELSOL computer program for calculating collector field performance and layout, and optimal system design for solar thermal central receiver plants. The code consists of a detailed model of the optical performance, a simpler model of the non-optical performance, an algorithm for field layout, and a searching algorithm to find the best system design. The latter two features are coupled to a cost model of central receiver components and an economic model for calculating energy costs. The code can handle flat, focused and/or canted heliostats, and external cylindrical, multi-aperture cavity, and flat plate receivers. The program optimizes the tower height, receiver size, field layout, heliostat spacings, and tower position at user specified power levels subject to flux limits on the receiver and land constraints for field layout. The advantages of speed and accuracy characteristic of Version I are maintained in DELSOL2.

Dellin, T.A.; Fish, M.J.; Yang, C.L.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

TWO-PHASE FLOW STUDIES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PRIMARY CIRCUITS USING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present recent results of the application of the thermal-hydraulic code BAGIRA to the analysis of complex two-phase flows in nuclear power plants primary loops. In particular, we performed benchmark numerical simulation of an integral LOCA experiment performed on a test facility modeling the primary circuit of VVER-1000. In addition, we have also analyzed the flow patterns in the VVER-1000 steam generator vessel for stationary and transient operation regimes. For both of these experiments we have compared the numerical results with measured data. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of BAGIRA by modeling a hypothetical severe accident for a VVER-1000 type nuclear reactor. The numerical analysis, which modeled all stages of the hypothetical severe accident up to the complete ablation of the reactor cavity bottom, shows the importance of multi-dimensional flow effects.

KOHURT, P. (BNL), KALINICHENKO, S.D.; KROSHILIN, A.E.; KROSHILIN, V.E.; SMIRNOV, A.V.

2006-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

284

Two-Phase Flow Studies in Nuclear Power Plant Primary Circuits Using the Three-Dimensional Thermal-Hydraulic Code BAGIRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

in this paper we present recent results of the application of the thermal-hydraulic code BAGIRA to the analysis of complex two-phase flows in nuclear power plants primary loops. In particular, we performed benchmark numerical simulation of an integral LOCA experiment performed on a test facility modeling the primary circuit of VVER-1000. In addition, we have also analyzed the flow patterns in the VVER-1000 steam generator vessel for stationary and transient operation regimes. For both of these experiments we have compared the numerical results with measured data. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of BAGIRA by modeling a hypothetical severe accident for a VVER-1000 type nuclear reactor. The numerical analysis, which modeled all stages of the hypothetical severe accident up to the complete ablation of the reactor cavity bottom, shows the importance of multi-dimensional flow effects. (authors)

Kalinichenko, S.D.; Kroshilin, A.E.; Kroshilin, V.E.; Smirnov, A.V. [All-Russian Research Institute for Nuclear Power Plant Operations (VNIIAES) 25 Ferganskaya St., 109507 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 475 Upton, NY 11973, (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume 1. Executive overview  

SciTech Connect

This summary introduces the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) Central Receiver System Preliminary Design and reports the results of the Subsystem Research Experiments (SRE) recently completed. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) An external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360-deg array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) Feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Relativistic diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a relativistic diffusion in the proper time in an approach of Schay and Dudley. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates.We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form.We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution.We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution.The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Juettner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

Z. Haba

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Engineering Design Elements of a Two-Phase Thermosyphon to Trannsfer NGNP Nuclear Thermal Energy to a Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis, which uses both heat and electricity; the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur iodine process primarily using heat. Both processes require a high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of the NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100 m.

Piyush Sabharwal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2,600,000 m 2 solar thermal power plant called Ivanpah SolarThermal Power? ” Proceedings of VGB Congress Power Plants,thermal uses heat from the sun to help drive a power or thermochemical plant.

Luc, Wesley Wai

289

Technical and economic evaluation of a Brayton-Rankine combined-cycle solar-thermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to conduct an assessment of gas-liquid direct-contact heat exchange and of a new storage-coupled system (the open-cycle Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycle). Both technical and economic issues are evaluated. Specifically, the storage-coupled combined cycle is compared with a molten salt system. The open Brayton cycle system is used as a topping cycle, and the reject heat powers the molten salt/Rankine system. In this study the molten salt system is left unmodified, the Brayton cycle is integrated on top of a Martin Marietta description of an existing molten salt plant. This compares a nonoptimized combined cycle with an optimized molten salt system.

Wright, J. D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Diffusion bonding  

SciTech Connect

1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

Anderson, Robert C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970's and 1980's in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat's fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ([approximately]525--600[degrees]C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970`s and 1980`s in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat`s fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ({approximately}525--600{degrees}C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE...

297

Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at PFP. Samples varied in appearance depending on the original source of material. Rocky Flats items were mostly dark olive green with clumps that crushed easily with a mortar and pestle. PRF/RMC items showed more variability. These items were mostly rust colored. One sample contained white particles that were difficult to crush, and another sample was a dark grey with a mixture of fines and large, hard fragments. The appearance and feel of the fragments indicated they might be an alloy. The color of the solution samples was indicative of the impurities in the sample. The double-pass filtrate solution was a brown color indicative of the iron impurities in the sample. The other solution sample was light gray in color. Radiochemical analyses, including thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha and gamma energy analysis (AEA and GEA), and kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA), indicate that these materials are all weapons-grade plutonium with consistent plutonium isotopics. A small amount of uranium (Rocky Flats materials was Cl-, but the PRF/RMC samples had significant quantities of all of the primary anions observed. Prompt gamma measurements provide a representative analysis of the Cl- concentration in the bulk material. The primary anions observed in the solution samples were NO3-, and PO43-. The concentration of these anions did not exceed the mixed oxide (MOX) specification limits. Cations that exceeded the MOX specification limits included Cr, Fe, Ni, Al, Cu, and Si. All of the samples exceeded at least the 75% specification limit in one element.

Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at PFP. Samples varied in appearance depending on the original source of material. Rocky Flats items were mostly dark olive green with clumps that crushed easily with a mortar and pestle. PRF/RMC items showed more variability. These items were mostly rust colored. One sample contained white particles that were difficult to crush, and another sample was a dark grey with a mixture of fines and large, hard fragments. The appearance and feel of the fragments indicated they might be an alloy. The color of the solution samples was indicative of the impurities in the sample. The double-pass filtrate solution was a brown color indicative of the iron impurities in the sample. The other solution sample was light gray in color. Radiochemical analyses, including thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha and gamma energy analysis (AEA and GEA), and kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA), indicate that these materials are all weapons-grade plutonium with consistent plutonium isotopics. A small amount of uranium (<0.14 wt%) is also present in these samples. The isotopic composition of the uranium varied widely but was consistent among each category of material. The primary water-soluble anions in these samples were Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and PO43-. The only major anion observed in the Rocky Flats materials was Cl-, but the PRF/RMC samples had significant quantities of all of the primary anions observed. Prompt gamma measurements provide a representative analysis of the Cl- concentration in the bulk material. The primary anions observed in the solution samples were NO3-, and PO43-. The concentration of these anions did not exceed the mixed oxide (MOX) specification limits. Cations that exceeded the MOX specification limits included Cr, Fe, Ni, Al, Cu, and Si. All of the samples exceeded at least the 75% specification limit in one element.

Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

OTEC thermal resource report for Caribbean Sea Plant Ship 13--15/sup 0/N 75--80/sup 0/N  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large and consistent thermal resource exists in the area between 13--15/sup 0/ North latitude and 75--80/sup 0/ West longitude, which was studied for possible use by a plant ship. The area studied is primarily in the Colombian Basin of the Caribbean Sea. The average annual ..delta..T (surface temperature minus temperature at depth) for the area at 1000 meters is 22.4/sup 0/C. At 650 meters, an adequate ..delta..T exists, with no month of the year having a mean ..delta..T less than 19/sup 0/C. The total variability of temperature at all depths in this Caribbean area is small. Below 1000 meters, the total variation is extremely small. The area has a good mixed layer at all times of the year. It is occasionally exposed to strong winds from hurricanes. Currents generally show the same general pattern throughout the year with a predominant flow toward the west or northwest at average speeds of 40--50 cm/sec.

Wolff, W. A.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ecological analysis of spatial and temporal patterns of pelagic ecosystem components potentially interacting with an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plant near Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico: physical characteristics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This hydrographic study characterizes the Punta Tuna area as a potential site for an OTEC power plant. Seven cruises were conducted at approximately two month intervals. Each cruise included at least 22 hydrocast stations, six done as serial stations in a small area to reveal temporal and small scale variability. The results of the analysis of these data so far indicate a bi-seasonality in the dynamics. Mesoscale eddies and meanders are a common feature of the circulation pattern on Puerto Rico's southern coast. The time series studies have shown their existence of a very energetic internal wave field with relatively large amplitude waves at the diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal frequencies. The results in terms of an OTEC power plant indicate the thermal resource to be at least a 20C thermal gradient in the upper 100 m year round.

Lopez, J.M.; Tilly, L.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of HLW and LAW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, such data were collected for four waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams.

303

Case Study on Thermal Energy Storage: Gemasolar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19.9-MW Gemasolar plant is the first commercial concentrating-solar thermal power plant to use a central receiver tower and a two-tank molten-salt thermal energy storage system. The initial plant operation has demonstrated the feasibility of the technology to operate under commercial conditions at utility scale and verified continuous 24-hour operation. The storage capacity makes the plant output dispatchable and improves the plant’s capacity factor and profitability. This white paper ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Residential Solar Thermal Power Plant  

Solar power is a renewable source of energy that involves no fossil fuel combustion, and releases no greenhouse gases. In the past, solar power has not been ...

306

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

2012 Diffusion Workshop Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Diffusion Studies in Mg-Al-Zn (N. Kulkarni, B. Warmack, J. Mundy, ORNL); Thermodynamics and Correlation Effects on Diffusion in Al-Ni Melts. ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8PR = Rate of thermal input to power plant receiver (MWt)the solar thermal inputs to the daytime power plant and theof solar thermal inputs to the daytime power plant and the

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation and master control subsystems and balance of plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The requirements, performance, and subsystem configuration for both the Commercial and Pilot Plant electrical power generation subsystems (EPGS) and balance of plants are presented. The EPGS for both the Commercial Plant and Pilot Plant make use of conventional, proven equipment consistent with good power plant design practices in order to minimize risk and maximize reliability. The basic EPGS cycle selected is a regenerative cycle that uses a single automatic admission, condensing, tandem-compound double-flow turbine. Specifications, performance data, drawings, and schematics are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

been identified at Oak Ridge. The risk mapping sessions highlighted the instrument mechanics as a job classification with significant mercury exposure. Solvents Solvent...

314

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CRDL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 2. Collector subsystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The methods and plans for the manufacture of the 10-MW collector heliostats and associated controls for the pilot plant are detailed. An in-depth description of the production, installation, and verification testing of heliostats for the pilot plant is presented. Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the pilot plant collector subsystem are included. Also, a heliostat location summary report is given. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fabrication and Design Aspects of High-Temperature Compact Diffusion Bonded Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

The very high temperature reactor (VHTR), using gas-cooled reactor technology, is one of the six reactor concepts selected by the Generation IV International Forum and is anticipated to be the reactor type for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP). In this type of reactor with an indirect power cycle system, a high-temperature and high integrity intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) with high effectiveness is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to secondary fluid for electricity production, process heat, or hydrogen cogeneration. The current Technology Readiness Level status issued by NGNP to all components associated with the IHX for reactor core outlet temperatures of 750-800oC is 3 on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most ready. At present, there is no proven high-temperature IHX concept for VHTRs. Amongst the various potential IHX concepts available, diffusion bonded heat exchangers (henceforth called printed circuit heat exchangers, or PCHEs) appear promising for NGNP applications. The design and fabrication of this key component of NGNP is the primary focus of this paper. In the current study, two PCHEs were fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and will be experimentally investigated for their thermal-hydraulic performance in a high-temperature helium test facility (HTHF). The HTHF was primarily designed and constructed to test the thermal-hydraulic performance of PCHEs The test facility is primarily of Alloy 800H construction and is designed to facilitate experiments at temperatures and pressures up to 800oC and 3 MPa, respectively. The PCHE fabrication related processes, i.e., photochemical machining and diffusion bonding are briefly discussed for Alloy 617 plates. Diffusion bonding of Alloy 617 plates with and without a Ni interlayer is discussed. Furthermore, preliminary microstructural and mechanical characterization studies of representative diffusion bonded Alloy 617 specimens are presented.

Mylavarapu, Sai K. [Ohio State University; Sun, Xiaodong [Ohio State University; Christensen, Richard N. [Ohio State University; Glosup, Richard E. [Ohio State University; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Addition of Diffusion Model to MELCOR and Comparison with Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chemical diffusion model was incorporated into the thermal-hydraulics package of the MELCOR Severe Accident code (Reference 1) for analyzing air ingress events for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor.

Brad Merrill; Richard Moore; Chang Oh

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An innovative Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) process was recently described where evaporation of mineralized water is driven by diffusion within a packed bed. The energy source to drive the process is derived from low pressure condensing steam within the main condenser of a steam power generating plant. Since waste heat is used to drive the process, the main cost of fresh water production is attributed to the energy cost of pumping air and water through the packed bed. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A combined thermodynamic and dynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3'' Hg. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower and direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. An experimental DDD facility has been fabricated, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. Direct contact condensers with and without packing have been investigated. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is significantly enhanced when packing is added to the direct contact condensers.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Microfabricated diffusion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Updating Applied Diffusion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, ...

J. C. Weil

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermal performance of gas-cooled divertors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A significant factor in the overall efficiency of the balance of plant for a future magnetic fusion energy (MFE) reactor is the thermal performance of… (more)

Rader, Jordan D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The parabolic trough power plants Andasol 1 to 3 The largest solar power plants in the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parabolic trough power plants Andasol 1 to 3 The largest solar power plants in the world and solar-thermal power plants The first parabolic trough power plants in Europe ­ the world's largest solar

Laughlin, Robert B.

323

Soil Thermal Resistivity and Thermal Stability Measuring Instrument: Volume 5: Abridged Manual for Use of the Statistical Weather Analysis Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is, in turn, a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties. For design purposes, these parameters should be trea...

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

325

Glass diffusion source for constraining BSF region of a solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of fabricating a solar cell comprising simultaneous diffusion of the p and n dopant materials into the solar cell substrate. The simultaneous diffusion process is preceded by deposition of a capping layer impervious to doping by thermal diffusion processes.

Lesk, I.A.; Pryor, R.A.; Coleman, M.G.

1982-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. Solar facilities design integration. Construction package No. 9 (RADL Item 7-33). Piping and mechanical equipment installation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installed, tested and operable mechanical equipment, piping and accessories are presented for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. The work also includes furnishing and installing HVAC equipment and miscellaneous steel work; performing miscellaneous earthquake; and performance testing of the installed piping and mechanical equipment.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

328

A preliminary evaluation of the thermal effects of the Ben Franklin Dam project on Columbia River temperatures below the Hanford Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned construction of the Ben Franklin project below the Hanford production reactors poses the question of determining to what extent this project will affect the Columbia River temperatures. Using the plant operations record for the year 1966, and the weather record for the same period, a series of simulation runs was made to determine the effects of the clam on the temperature regime, and the extent to which density currents could be expected to develop. This information is to be used as background for the later evaluation of the modification of the existing radionuclide discharge. The digital simulation model COL HEAT, was used. This model has been previously developed under Atomic Energy Commission sponsorship for use in the regional evaluation of the effects of the Hanford plant.

Jaske, R.T.

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

330

Evaluation of Thermal Fatigue Effects on Systems Requiring Aging Management Review for License Renewal for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the nuclear power industry has devoted significant attention to metal fatigue and its impact on the design qualification and serviceability of operating components. This study provides a pilot plant demonstration of the current industry technical position on fatigue evaluation for license renewal, specifically addressing reactor water environmental effects. It also develops a technical evaluation method for determining fatigue life adequacy in a feedwater piping system, a pressurizer sur...

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thermodynamics and Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Hume-Rothery Symposium Thermodynamics and Diffusion Coupling ... be quite fundamental and often it cannot be distinguished from “basic” ...

332

Apparatus and method for thermal power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thermal power plant and method of power generation which minimizes thermal stress and chemical impurity buildup in the vaporizing component, particularly beneficial under loss of normal feed fluid and startup conditions. The invention is particularly applicable to a liquid metal fast breeder reactor plant.

Cohen, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Redding, Arnold H. (Export, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

State of Solar Thermal Energy Storage Development 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage (TES) to concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants expands both the amount and timing of power delivered to the grid. Thermal storage associated with CSP plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity production cost and increase the solar plant capacity factor, enabling the availability of solar electricity during p...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

FAST STATIC AND DYNAMIC GRID LEVEL THERMAL SIMULATION CONSIDERING TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SILICON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat diffusion equation has been conventionally handled by grid-grids and an approximate delta function simulating a point heatgrid size of 64×64. To obtain transient thermal mask an impulse heat

Ziabari, Amirkoushyar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in- itiated in

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume III. Appendix. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the appendix to the Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design report on ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2). The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. Under this contract Stearns-Roger developed a conceptual design, which was site specific, containing the following major elements: System Requirements Analysis, Site Description, System Conceptual Design, Conceptual Test and Operating Plans, Development Plans, Procurement and Management Plans for Subsequent Phases, and Cost Estimates. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. Drawings, tables, and data sheets are included on hourly temperatures, displacement, utility rates, power conversion system, seasonal design load summary, average collector temperature optimization study, system operating temperature optimization study, power conversion system seasonal performance, thermal storage/fluid loop, system integration, and cost estimates. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Zagreb east TE-TO feasibility study for repowering of thermal power and heating plant for Hrvatska Elektroprivreda: Final report. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report assesses the feasibility of repowering or building new generating facilities at the TE-TO plant in Zagreb which generates more than half of the Zagreb area`s power and 13% of all power generated in Croatia. The contents include the following: (1) executive summary; (2) design basis; (3) screening evaluations; (4) preliminary design of preferred options; (5) detailed cost estimates and economic analysis; (6) conceptual design; (7) financial analysis; (8) environmental evaluation; (9) risk assessment; (10) conclusions. also included are tables 1 through 9, figures a through j, and exhibits 1 through 8.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant, solar facilities design integration: collector-field optimization report (RADL item 2-25)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Appropriate cost and performance models and computer codes have been developed to carry out the collector field optimization, as well as additional computer codes to define the actual heliostat locations in the optimized field and to compute in detail the performance to be expected of the defined field. The range of capabilities of the available optimization and performance codes is described. The role of the optimization code in the definition of the pilot plant is specified, and a complete description of the optimization process itself is given. The detailed cost model used by the optimizer for the commercial system optimization is presented in the form of equations relating the cost element to each of the factors that determine it. The design basis for the commercial system is presented together with the rationale for its selection. The development of the individual heliostat performance code is presented. Use of the individual heliostat code in a completed study of receiver panel power under sunrise startup conditions is described. The procedure whereby performance and heliostat spacing data from the representative commercial-scale system are converted into coefficients of use in the layout processor is described, and the actual procedure used in the layout processor is described. Numerous special studies in support of the pilot plant design are described. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Diffusion of a plasma subject to neutral beam injection  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional numerical plasma simulations have been carried out in a uniform magnetic field to study the effects of neutral beam injection on plasma diffusion. Neutral beams injected across a magnetic field are assumed to be ionized by various ionization processes in a plasma. It is found that the suprathermal convective motion of a plasma generated by the injection of neutral beams is dissipated via anomalous viscosity, leading to enhanced cross-field diffusion. The diffusion coefficient depends weakly on the magnetic field and plasma density, similar to the diffusion due to thermally excited convective cells. The magnitude of the diffusion increases with the injection energy and is much larger than the thermal diffusion because of the presence of suprathermal plasma convection. It is shown that a similar anomalous plasma diffusion may occur in a plasma subject to radio frequency (RF) wave heating where only a localized region of plasma across a magnetic field is heated to a temperature much higher than the surrounding temperature. Theoretical investigations are given on the scaling of enhanced plasma diffusion.

Okuda, H.; Hiroe, S.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building The K-25 plant, located on the southwestern end of the Oak Ridge reservation, used the gaseous diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238. Based on the well-known principle that molecules of a lighter isotope would pass through a porous barrier more readily than molecules of a heavier one, gaseous diffusion produced through myriads of repetitions a gas increasingly rich in uranium-235 as the heavier uranium-238 was separated out in a system of cascades. Although producing minute amounts of final product measured in grams, gaseous diffusion required a massive

342

Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook, Volume II: Advanced Concepts in Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume I contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the steam power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Vol...

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Steam Reheat in Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, reheating steam from a commercial nuclear power plant is explored in order to increase efficiency and power output. A thermal source in… (more)

Marotta, Paul John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nonlinear Horizontal Diffusion for GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing-length-based parameterization of horizontal diffusion, which was originally proposed by Smagorinsky, is revisited. The complete tendencies of horizontal momentum diffusion, the associated frictional heating, and horizontal diffusion of ...

Erich Becker; Ulrike Burkhardt

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Chromium diffusion in lithium niobate for active optical waveguides Jo& M. Almeida,a) Gerard Boyle,b) and Ant6nio P. Leite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromium diffusion in lithium niobate for active optical waveguides Jo& M. Almeida,a) Gerard Boyle-doped lithium niobate substrates in which the active ions are introduced by thermal diffusion from a film of chromium diffused proton-exchanged and chromium/titanium-diffused lithium niobate waveguides have been

347

VISUALS: Diffusion couple animation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This Quicktime animation of a diffusion couple shows side-by-side views of two different atomic species - red and green - diffusing across a flat ...

348

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel comes in many forms; oxide fuel is the most commonly used in current reactor systems while metal fuel is a promising fuel type for future reactors due to neutronic performance and increased thermal conductivity. As a key heat transfer parameter, thermal conductivity describes the heat transport properties of a material based upon the density, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity. A material’s ability to transport thermal energy through its structure is a measurable property known as thermal diffusivity; the units for thermal diffusivity are given in area per unit time (e.g., m2/s). Current measurement methods for thermal diffusivity include LASER (or light) Flash Analysis and the hot-wire method. This study examines an approach that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA), and it induces a radial transient across a packed sample of microspheres then monitors the temperature profile using an array of thermocouples located at different distances from the source of the thermal transient. From the thermocouple data and an accurate time log, the thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated. Results indicate that DU microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer. At 500°C, the thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was 0.431 ± 13% W/m-K compared to approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal. Characterization of the developed apparatus revealed a method that may be useful for measuring the thermal diffusivity of powders and liquids.

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean thermal power plants. Progress report, February 1, 1976--April 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer programs have been developed to define the temperature increase which would be needed to bring deep-ocean water into density equilibrium with surface water for locations where data are available. A series of continuous-flow studies on phytoplankton blooms resulting from mixtures of 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water in 2000-liter concrete culturing vessels (''reactors'') has been completed. A quantitative determination of nutrient utilization and flow through a combined primary and secondary trophic level system has been completed. This study utilized the clam Tapes semidecussata, fed from phytoplankton grown in 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water. An analysis of the fate of the deep water discharged from a floating OTEC plant indicates that horizontal containment of the resulting deep water: surface water mixture is necessary if conditions optimal for open-sea mariculture are to obtain. The design of a small open-ocean ''pool'' is in the final stages of completion. A combined mussel/oyster/clam system is in the final stages of design and will be placed in the ocean during April 1976. (WDM)

Roels, O.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean thermal power plants. Progress report, February 1, 1976--April 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Computer programs have been developed to define the temperature increase which would be needed to bring deep-ocean water into density equilibrium with surface water for locations where data are available. A series of continuous-flow studies on phytoplankton blooms resulting from mixtures of 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water in 2000-liter concrete culturing vessels (''reactors'') has been completed. A quantitative determination of nutrient utilization and flow through a combined primary and secondary trophic level system has been completed. This study utilized the clam Tapes semidecussata, fed from phytoplankton grown in 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water. An analysis of the fate of the deep water discharged from a floating OTEC plant indicates that horizontal containment of the resulting deep water: surface water mixture is necessary if conditions optimal for open-sea mariculture are to obtain. The design of a small open-ocean ''pool'' is in the final stages of completion. A combined mussel/oyster/clam system is in the final stages of design and will be placed in the ocean during April 1976. (WDM)

Roels, O.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effect of superbanana diffusion on fusion reactivity in stellarators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion reactivity is usually obtained using a Maxwellian distribution. However, energy-dependent radial diffusion can modify the energy distribution. Superbanana diffusion is energy-dependent and occurs in nonaxisymmetric magnetic confinement devices, such as stellarators, because of ripple-trapped particles which can take large steps between collisions. In this paper, the D-T fusion reactivity is calculated using a non-Maxwellian energy distribution obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically, including radial superbanana diffusion as well as energy scattering. The ions in the tail of the distribution, with energies larger than thermal, which are most needed for fusion, are depleted by superbanana diffusion. In this paper, it is shown that the D-T fusion reactivity is reduced by tail ion depletion due to superbanana diffusion, by roughly a factor of 0.5 for the parameters used in the calculation.

Hinton, Fred L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants on Facebook Tweet about...

355

Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report and Investigation, Paducah, Kentucky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, Paducah Kentucky Why DOE-EM Did This Review The groundwater underlying the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is contaminated by chlorinated solvents, principally trichloroethylene (TCE), as well as other contaminants. TCE was released as a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to the subsurface soils and groundwater as a result of operations that began in 1952. The Building C-400 area is coincident with the highest TCE concentrations in the groundwater plumes at PGDP. Based on all characterization data

356

Fabrication and Design Aspects of High-Temperature Compact Diffusion Bonded Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) using gas-cooled reactor technology is anticipated to be the reactor type for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). In this reactor concept with an indirect power cycle system, a high-temperature and high integrity Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) with high effectiveness is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to a secondary fluid for electricity generation, hydrogen production, and/or industrial process heat applications. At present, there is no proven IHX concept for VHTRs. The current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) status issued by NGNP to all components associated with the IHX for reduced nominal reactor outlet temperatures of 750–800 degrees C is 3 on a 1–10 scale, with 10 indicating omplete technological maturity. Among the various potential IHX concepts available, diffusion bonded heat exchangers (henceforth called printed circuit heat exchangers, or PCHEs) appear promising for NGNP applications. The design and fabrication of this key component of NGNP with Alloy 617, a candidate high-temperature structural material for NGNP applications, are the primary focus of this paper. In the current study, diffusion bonding of Alloy 617 has been demonstrated, although the optimum diffusion bonding process parameters to engineer a quasi interface-free joint are yet to be determined. The PCHE fabrication related processes, i.e., photochemical etching and diffusion bonding are discussed for Alloy 617 plates. In addition, the authors’ experiences with these non-conventional machining and joining techniques are discussed. Two PCHEs are fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and are being experimentally investigated for their thermal-hydraulic performance in a High-Temperature Helium Facility (HTHF). The HTHF is primarily of Alloy 800H construction and is designed to facilitate experiments at temperatures and pressures up to 800 degrees C and 3 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, some preliminary microstructural and mechanical property characterization studies of representative diffusion bonded Alloy 617 specimens are presented. The characterization studies are restricted and less severe from an NGNP perspective but provide sufficient confidence to ensure safe operation of the heat exchangers in the HTHF. The test results are used to determine the design operating conditions for the PCHEs fabricated.

Sai K. Mylavarapu; Richard N. Christensen; Raymond R. Unocic; Richard E. Glosup; Mike W. Patterson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment...

358

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Thermal Energy Storage Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage Technology One advantage of parabolic trough power plants is their potential for storing solar thermal energy to use during non-solar periods and to dispatch...

359

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage to concentrating solar thermal power plants expands both the amount of power and the timing of production. With thermal energy storage, plant power output can be firmed and shaped to better match consumer demand for electricity. Thermal storage associated with these plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity productio...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sampling Conditioned Hypoelliptic Diffusions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of recent articles introduced a method to construct stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) which are invariant with respect to the distribution of a given conditioned diffusion. These works are restricted to the case of elliptic diffusions where the drift has a gradient structure, and the resulting SPDE is of second order parabolic type. The present article extends this methodology to allow the construction of SPDEs which are invariant with respect to the distribution of a class of hypoelliptic diffusion processes, subject to a bridge conditioning. This allows the treatment of more realistic physical models, for example one can use the resulting SPDE to study transitions between meta-stable states in mechanical systems with friction and noise. In this situation the restriction of the drift being a gradient can also be lifted.

Hairer, Martin; Voss, Jochen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

Alex Lazarian

2007-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbule...

Lazarian, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Diapycnal Diffusivity Inferred from Scalar Microstructure Measurements near the New England Shelf/Slope Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conductivity microstructure was used to estimate the diapycnal thermal eddy diffusivity KT near the New England shelf/slope front in early August 1997. Two datasets were collected with a towed vehicle. One involved several horizontal tows in and ...

Chris R. Rehmann; Timothy F. Duda

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Continuous-Flow Diffusion Chamber for Airborne Measurements of Ice Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber was developed for operating in an aircraft and detecting ice nucleating aerosol particles in real time. The chamber volume is the annular space between two vertically oriented concentric ...

David C. Rogers; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; Yalei Chen

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Field Survey of Parabolic Trough Receiver Thermal Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a technique that uses an infrared camera to evaluate the in-situ thermal performance of parabolic trough receivers at operating solar power plants.

Price, H.; Forristall, R.; Wendelin, T.; Lewandowski, A.; Moss, T.; Gummo, C.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of advanced concept solar power plants. For conditions offor the operation of a solar power plant is very small.success or failure of the solar thermal power program may be

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

368

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Diffusion and Numerical Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of low-pass filters or implicit diffusion are found to be extremely beneficial in a simple model problem that contains an oven-ordered advection scheme based on a symmetric stencil. In contrast, the effects are negative when either ...

William H. Raymond

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Oscillatory thermal instability and the Bhopal disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stability analysis is presented of the hydrolysis of methyl isocyanate (MIC) using a homogeneous flow reactor paradigm. The results simulate the thermal runaway that occurred inside the storage tank of MIC at the Bhopal Union Carbide plant in December 1984. The stability properties of the model indicate that the thermal runaway may have been due to a large amplitude, hard thermal oscillation initiated at a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. This type of thermal misbehavior cannot be predicted using conventional thermal diagrams, and may be typical of liquid thermoreactive systems.

Ball, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Diffusive Transport by Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple conceptual model of the relationship between advective transport by breaking waves and diffusive transport is derived. line model postulates that the displacement of fluid parcels by a breaking wave is analogous to molecular diffusion (...

Kenneth P. Bowman

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NEW METHOD AND SOFTWARE FOR MULTI-VARIABLE TECHNO-ECONOMIC DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF CSP PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a 50 MWel parabolic trough power plant using thermal oil as heat transfer fluid (HTF), a molten salt, parabolic trough 1. Motivation (Introduction) Today, designs of solar thermal power plants are developed

Ábrahám, Erika

373

Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of “strutlets” to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

Norris, Thomas R.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Forecasting and Diagnostic Analysis of Plume Transport around a Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonreactive Lagrangian atmospheric diffusion model is used for the simulation of SO2 concentration around the As Pontes 1400-MW power plant located in northwestern Spain. This diffusion model has two kinds of input: 1) diagnostic wind fields ...

J. A. Souto; V. Pérez-Muñuzuri; M. deCastro; M. J. Souto; J. J. Casares; T. Lucas

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal power plants larger than 50 megawatts (MW) are required to obtain a California Energy Commission UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12

377

Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A dynamic analysis of heat and mass transfer demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3 Hg. The optimum operating condition for the DDD process with a high temperature of 50 C and sink temperature of 25 C has an air mass flux of 1.5 kg/m{sup 2}-s, air to feed water mass flow ratio of 1 in the diffusion tower, and a fresh water to air mass flow ratio of 2 in the condenser. Operating at these conditions yields a fresh water production efficiency (m{sub fW}/m{sub L}) of 0.031 and electric energy consumption rate of 0.0023 kW-hr/kg{sub fW}. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data. Recently, it has been recognized that the fresh water production efficiency can be significantly enhanced with air heating. This type of configuration is well suited for power plants utilizing air-cooled condensers. The experimental DDD facility has been modified with an air heating section, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is enhanced when air is heated prior to entering the diffusion tower. Further analytical analysis is required to predict the thermal and mass transport with the air heating configuration.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight; Venugopal Jogi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Microscopic Surface Mapping of the Thermal Diffusivity by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modulated pump laser heats the sample and a perfectly coaxial probe laser measures the surface ... Rietveld Refinement of an Oil Field Cement Blend.

379

CONDITIONS FOR DIFFUSIVE THERMAL TRANSPORT IN A MODEL NONLINEAR SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.K. Kaw1 , A. Sen1 , A. Das1 , and J.C. Parikh2 1 Institute for Plasma research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428

Dodla, Ramana

380

SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encapsulated Phase Change Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

382

Solar thermal power today and tomorrow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article is a look at the status of solar thermal power plant design and application. The topics of the article include US DOE involvement, trough-electric systems as a current alternative to conventional electric power production, and central receiver systems and dish/Stirling systems as alternatives to fossil-fuel power plants within the next five years.

Mancini, T.R.; Chavez, J.M.; Kolb, G.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solar Thermal Technology Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

Narayana, Supradeep; Sato, Yuki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Isotope effect on adsorbed quantum phases: Diffusion of H2 and D2 in nanoporous carbon  

SciTech Connect

Quasielastic neutron scattering of H2 and D2 in a nanoporous carbon at 10 40 K demonstrates extreme quantum sieving, with D2 diffusing up to 76 times faster. D2 also shows liquid-like diffusion, while H2 exhibits distinct solid-type diffusion. The onset of diffusion occurs at 22 25 K for H2 and 10 13 K for D2. We show this difference may be explained by different commensurability of the two adsorbed isotopes with carbon substrate. We further observe that H2 and D2 have identical thermal de Broglie wavelength at their respective onset temperatures, and correlated with the dominant pore size.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Zhang, Hongxin [ORNL; Olsen, Raina J [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Morris, James R [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

386

10.2.2013bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 Irreversible thermodynamics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Work from a saline power plant /1 #12;10.2.2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering a saline power plant /2 10.2.2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 a saline power plant /3 #12;10.2.2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500

Zevenhoven, Ron

387

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

(USC) Power Plant Development and High Temperature Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For further improvement of thermal efficiency and decreasing CO2 emission China intents to develop the advanced USC power plant with the ...

389

Capturing Carbon from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scrubbing technology (7, 8). The modifi cations are focused primarily on extensive thermal integration of the CO 2 -capture system with the power plant and develop- ment of...

390

Modelling the vertical heat exchanger in thermal basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In geographical area characterize by specific geological conformations such as the Viterbo area which comprehend active volcanic basins, it is difficult to use conventional geothermal plants. In fact the area presents at shallow depths thermal falde ... Keywords: heat, thermal aquifer, thermal energy

Maurizio Carlini; Sonia Castellucci

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Plant Operational Status Page Content Operational Status Shift 1 - Day The Pantex Plant is open for normal operations. All personnel are to report for duty according to...

392

The solar thermal report. Volume 3, Number 5  

SciTech Connect

This report is published by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the DOE Solar Thermal Technology Division to provide an account of work sponsored by the Division and to aid the community of people interested in solar thermal technology in gaining access to technical information. Contents include articles entitled the following: Solar system supplies thermal energy for producing chemicals at USS plant; Solar thermal power module designed for small community market; Roof-mounted trough system supplies process heat for Caterpillar plant; Solar thermal update -- 10 MW(e) pilot plant and 3-MW(t) total energy system; Solar steam processes crude oil; New York investigates solar ponds as a source of thermal energy; On-farm solar -- Finding new uses for the sun; and Topical index of solar thermal report articles.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to popular concept, in most cases, thermal energy is the real VALUE in cogeneration and not the electricity. The proper consideration of the thermal demands is equal to or more important than the electrical demands. High efficiency two-stage absorption chillers of the type used at Rice University Cogen Plant offer the most attractive utilization of recoverable thermal energy. With a coefficient of performance (COP) up to 1.25, the two-stage, parallel flow absorption chiller can offer over fifty (50) percent more useful thermal energy from the same waste heat source--gas turbine exhaust, I.C. engine exhaust and jacketwater, incinerator exhaust, or steam turbine extraction.

Hufford, P. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

diffuse radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Apps Datasets Browse Upload data GDR Community Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon diffuse radiation Dataset Summary...

397

Diffusion Flame Measurements: Notes B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Profiles in steady and flickering methane/air, ethylene/air, and propane/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure using an axisymmetric burner ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Tracer Diffusion Databases for ICME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a large repository of stable isotopes that can be utilized for tracer diffusion .... Lattice Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Lithium Battery Materials LiMPO4 ...

399

Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume 1 Start Page 1176 Issue 8 Pagination 1176-1180 Keywords anode, diffusion, graphene, lithium ion battery, transport Abstract Graphitic carbon is currently considered the...

400

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Detecting Ice Nuclei with a Continuous—Flow Diffusion Chamber-Some Exploratory Tests of Instrument Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few basic experiments were performed with artificial cloud condensation nuclei and ice-nucleating aerosols in a continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber to investigate the instrument's response. Brief pulses of ice nuclei were input ...

David C. Rogers

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cogeneration improves thermal EOR efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the successful completion and operation of a cogeneration plant is a prime example of the multi-faceted use of cogeneration. Through high-efficiency operation, significant energy is saved by combining the two process of steam and electrical production. The 225-megawatt (mw) cogeneration plant provides 1,215 million lb/hr of steam for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) at the Midway-Sunset oil field in south-central California. Overall pollutant emissions as well as total electric and steam production costs have been reduced. The area's biological resources also have been protected.

Western, E.R. (Oryx Energy Co., Fellows, CA (US)); Nass, D.W. (Chas. T. Main Inc., Pasadena, CA (US))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Atmospheric considerations for central receiver power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of the effects of atmospheric attenuation, turbulent scattering, and the use of cooling towers on the performance of solar thermal central receiver power plants.

Henderson, R.G.; Pitter, R.L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES OBSERVED WITH AIA/SDO: FRACTAL DIFFUSION, SUB-DIFFUSION, OR LOGISTIC GROWTH?  

SciTech Connect

We explore the spatio-temporal evolution of solar flares by fitting a radial expansion model r(t) that consists of an exponentially growing acceleration phase, followed by a deceleration phase that is parameterized by the generalized diffusion function r(t){proportional_to}{kappa}(t - t{sub 1}){sup {beta}/2}, which includes the logistic growth limit ({beta} = 0), sub-diffusion ({beta} = 0-1), classical diffusion ({beta} = 1), super-diffusion ({beta} = 1-2), and the linear expansion limit ({beta} = 2). We analyze all M- and X-class flares observed with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) during the first two years of the SDO mission, amounting to 155 events. We find that most flares operate in the sub-diffusive regime ({beta} = 0.53 {+-} 0.27), which we interpret in terms of anisotropic chain reactions of intermittent magnetic reconnection episodes in a low plasma-{beta} corona. We find a mean propagation speed of v = 15 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}, with maximum speeds of v{sub max} = 80 {+-} 85 km s{sup -1} per flare, which is substantially slower than the sonic speeds expected for thermal diffusion of flare plasmas. The diffusive characteristics established here (for the first time for solar flares) is consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model, which predicted diffusive transport merely based on cellular automaton simulations.

Aschwanden, Markus J., E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Organization ADBS, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Thermal energy from a biogas engine/generator system  

SciTech Connect

A biogas fueled engine/generator equipped with heat recovery apparatus and thermal storage is described. The thermal energy is used to fuel a liquid fuel plant. Heat recovery is quantified and the static and dynamic performance of the thermal storage is described. At 1260 rpm the engine/generator produces 21 kW of electric power and 2500 kJ/min of thermal energy.

Stahl, T.; Fischer, J.R.; Harris, F.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Solar Thermal Technology Status, Performance, and Cost Estimates -- 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal power plants use mirrors to focus solar radiation onto a solar receiver, which heats a heat transfer fluid that drives either a turbine or heat engine to generate electricity. This study provides cost and performance information for three commercial or early commercial solar thermal electric technologies: parabolic trough (with and without thermal storage), molten salt power tower with thermal energy storage, and parabolic dish engine. Capital, operations, and maintenance cost estimates are...

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Solar thermal repowering systems integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a solar repowering integration analysis which defines the balance-of-plant characteristics and costs associated with the solar thermal repowering of existing gas/oil-fired electric generating plants. Solar repowering interface requirements for water/steam and salt or sodium-cooled central receivers are defined for unit sizes ranging from 50 MWe non-reheat to 350 MWe reheat. Finally balance-of-plant cost estimates are presented for each of six combinations of plant type, receiver type and percent solar repowering.

Dubberly, L. J.; Gormely, J. E.; McKenzie, A. W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrated Thermal Analysis of the FRIB Cryomodule Design  

SciTech Connect

Thermal analysis of the FRIB cryomodule design is performed to determine the heat load to the cryogenic plant, to minimize the cryogenic plant load, to simulate thermal shield cool down as well as to determine the pressure relief sizes for failure conditions. Static and dynamic heat loads of the cryomodules are calculated and the optimal shield temperature is determined to minimize the cryogenic plant load. Integrated structural and thermal simulations of the 1100-O aluminium thermal shield are performed to determine the desired cool down rate to control the temperature profile on the thermal shield and to minimize thermal expansion displacements during the cool down. Pressure relief sizing calculations for the SRF helium containers, solenoids, helium distribution piping, and vacuum vessels are also described.

Y. Xu, M. Barrios, F. Casagrande, M.J. Johnson, M. Leitner, D. Arenius, V. Ganni, W.J. Schneider, M. Wiseman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF 6 Sampling Building, X-345 Special Nuclear Material Storage Facility, X-744G Bulk Non-Uranium Enrichment Service Activity (UESA) Storage Building and Associated Outside...

412

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Activity (UESA) Storage Building and Associated Outside Storage, and the DUF6 Conversion Facility. The tours gave the site lead the opportunity to interact with...

413

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Low-Level Waste Storage Facility (HC-2), C- 410 D&D Project Complex (HC-2), and DUF6 Conversion Project (HC-3). The tours gave the site lead the opportunity to interact...

414

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria, Review and Approach Document DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board DOE U.S. Department of Energy ESH&Q Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality FBP...

415

Ratcheted diffusion transport through crowded nanochannels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of transport through nanochannels is one of the major questions in cell biology, with a wide range of applications. Brownian ratchets are fundamental in various biochemical processes, and are roughly divided into two categories: active (usually ATP-powered) molecular motors and passive constructions with a directional bias, where the transport is driven by thermal motion. In this paper we discuss the latter process, of spontaneous translocation of molecules (Brownian particles) by ratcheted diffusion with no external energy input: a problem relevant for protein translocation along bacterial flagella or injectosome complex, or DNA translocation by bacteriophages. We use molecular dynamics simulations and statistical theory to identify two regimes of transport: at low rate of particles injection into the channel the process is controlled by the individual diffusion towards the open end (the first passage problem), while at a higher rate of injection the crowded regime sets in. In this regime the particle density in the channel reaches a constant saturation level and the resistance force increases substantially, due to the osmotic pressure build-up. To achieve a steady-state transport, the apparatus that injects new particles into a crowded channel has to operate with an increasing power consumption, proportional to the length of the channel and the required rate of transport. The analysis of resistance force, and accordingly -- the power required to inject the particles into a crowded channel to oversome its clogging, is also relevant for many microfluidics applications.

Anna Lappala; Alessio Zaccone; Eugene M. Terentjev

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermal and non-thermal emission in the Cygnus X region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio continuum observations detect non-thermal synchrotron and thermal bremsstrahlung radiation. Separation of the two different emission components is crucial to study the properties of diffuse interstellar medium. The Cygnus X region is one of the most complex areas in the radio sky which contains a number of massive stars and HII regions on the diffuse thermal and non-thermal background. More supernova remnants are expected to be discovered. We aim to develop a method which can properly separate the non-thermal and thermal radio continuum emission and apply it to the Cygnus X region. The result can be used to study the properties of different emission components and search for new supernova remnants in the complex. Multi-frequency radio continuum data from large-scale surveys are used to develop a new component separation method. Spectral analysis is done pixel by pixel for the non-thermal synchrotron emission with a realistic spectral index distribution and a fixed spectral index of beta = -2.1 for the t...

Xu, W F; Han, J L; Liu, F S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Interdiffusion between Zr Diffusion Barrier and U-Mo Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment uranium fuels under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Significant reactions have been observed between U-Mo fuels and Al or Al alloy matrix. Refractory metal Zr has been proposed as barrier material to reduce the interactions. In order to investigate the compatibility and barrier effects between U-Mo alloy and Zr, solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Zr diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 °C for various times. The microstructures and concentration profiles due to interdiffusion and reactions were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. Intermetallic phase Mo2Zr was found at the interface and its population increased when annealing temperature decreased. Diffusion paths were also plotted on the U-Mo-Zr ternary phase diagrams with good consistency. The growth rate of interdiffusion zone between U-10wt.%Mo and Zr was also calculated under the assumption of parabolic diffusion, and was determined to be about 103 times lower than the growth rate of diffusional interaction layer found in diffusion couples U-10wt.%Mo vs. Al or Al-Si alloy. Other desirable physical properties of Zr as barrier material, such as neutron adsorption rate, melting point and thermal conductivity are presented as supplementary information to demonstrate the great potential of Zr as the diffusion barrier for U-Mo fuel systems in RERTR.

K. Huang; Y. Park; Y. H. Sohn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Retrofitting Power Plants to Provide District Heating and Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case studies at five utilities documented consumer and utility benefits of retrofitting fossil steam and combined-cycle plants to provide thermal energy for district heating and cooling (DHC) for nearby loads. This cogeneration strategy helps utilities boost revenues and plant energy utilization efficiencies. It can also revitalize communities by providing inexpensive electricity and thermal energy while reducing emissions.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

Foreman, Kenneth M. (North Bellmore, NY); Gilbert, Barry L. (Westbury, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal diffusion plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tidal Diffusivity: A Mechanism for Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that tidal mixing may provide a “diffusivity” mechanism for frontogenesis. It stems from the fact that tidal diffusivity varies in the opposite sense from the water depth, so the vertically integrated diffusivity may exhibit a ...

Hsien-Wang Ou; Chang-Ming Dong; Dake Chen

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Modeling phosphorus diffusion in three dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional process simulator in which both the standard nonlinear diffusion model and a five-species kinetic model are implemented to model phosphorus diffusion in silicon is described. The reaction-diffusion equations are discretized using ...

W. B. Richardson; G. F. Carey; B. J. Mulvaney

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

BEAM DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS AT RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During a store, particles from the beam core continually diffuse outwards into the halo through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the diffusion rate as a function of particle amplitude can help discover which processes are important to halo growth. A collimator can be used to measure the amplitude growth rate as a function of the particle amplitude. In this paper we present results of diffusion measurements performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with fully stripped gold ions, deuterons, and protons. We compare these results with measurements from previous years, and simulations, and discuss any factors that relate to beam growth in RHIC.

FLILLER,R.P.,IIIDREES,A.GASSNER,D.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geothermal/Solar Thermal Hybridization Feasibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal plants often experience a slow decline in resource temperature as energy is extracted from the field, resulting in 'growth' of unused capacity. The addition of energy from solar thermal technology offers a way to restore this lost capacity, or to recover generation; especially during the hottest summer conditions when cooling systems are stressed. The objectives of this study are to outline the effects that the addition of thermal energy from a solar source has on the capital cost, performance...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Molecular cooling in the diffuse interstellar medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a simple one-zone model of the thermal and chemical evolution of interstellar gas to study whether molecular hydrogen (H2) is ever an important coolant of the warm, diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We demonstrate that at solar metallicity, H2 cooling is unimportant and the thermal evolution of the ISM is dominated by metal line cooling. At metallicities below 0.1 Z_solar, however, metal line cooling of low density gas quickly becomes unimportant and H2 can become the dominant coolant, even though its abundance in the gas remains small. We investigate the conditions required in order for H2 to dominate, and show that it provides significant cooling only when the ratio of the interstellar radiation field strength to the gas density is small. Finally, we demonstrate that our results are insensitive to changes in the initial fractional ionization of the gas or to uncertainties in the nature of the dust present in the low-metallicity ISM.

Glover, S C O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and downstream processes Risks due to power plant emissions Coal Lignite Gas CC Nuclear PV (amorph) Wind Hydro-proliferation and waste. Then BUILD one! #12;Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Thermal Power 250 MW Core Height 10.0 m Core Product Barrier · Core Physics · Safety · Balance of Plant Design · Modularity Design · Core Power

428

FLAME STRUCTURE MEASUREMENT OF POLYMER DIFFUSION FLAMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of counterflow diffusion flames above condensed fuels:of counterflow diffusion flames in the forward stagnationCA, October 15-16, 1979 FLAME STRUCTURE MEASUREMENT OF

Pitz, W. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy May 21, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis An online museum on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant went live earlier this year. An online museum on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant went live earlier this year. PIKETON, Ohio - Do you wonder what the interior of a uranium enrichment plant looks like without ever stepping foot in the facility? Now, the public can view photos, watch interviews with current and former workers who share historical accounts and browse old newsletters on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant from as far back as the early 1950s with

430

Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy May 21, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis An online museum on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant went live earlier this year. An online museum on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant went live earlier this year. PIKETON, Ohio - Do you wonder what the interior of a uranium enrichment plant looks like without ever stepping foot in the facility? Now, the public can view photos, watch interviews with current and former workers who share historical accounts and browse old newsletters on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant from as far back as the early 1950s with

431

New frontiers in diffusion modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last fifty years, diffusion researchers have sought to explain why the rate of adoption of an innovation varies over time. Some innovations are adopted quickly as compared to others, which take decades for adoption. ...

Ranganath, Naveen Chandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Diffusion of Hydrogen in Titanium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 1994 ... TMS Member price: 10.00. Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price : 10.00. Product In Stock. Description The diffusion of ...

433

Programming reaction-diffusion processors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In reaction-diffusion (RD) processors, both the data and the results of the computation are encoded as concentration profiles of the reagents. The computation is performed via the spreading and interaction of wave fronts. Most prototypes of RD computers ...

Andrew Adamatzky

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

BALDR-1: a solar thermal system simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar thermal system simulation (BALDR-1) was written in a modular fashion to facilitate expansion and modification. The flexibility of the simulation is derived, in part, from the use of three separate models to constitute the system simulation: FIELD, POWER, and ECON. Each model can be run independently, or they may be coupled and run as a set. The FIELD code models the optical and thermal performance of the collector field. It has separate optical and thermal performance routines for each generic collector type. Meteorological data is read in 15-minute or hourly increments. The POWER code models the performance of power conversion and storage components. It calculates the total thermal and/or electrical energy produced during the year for a set of plant configurations comprised of different collector field sizes, thermal storage sizes, and electrical storage sizes. The POWER code allows the selection of one of several control strategies in the dispatch of thermal and electrical storage. The ECON code calculates the initial capital cost of each power plant configuration modelled in POWER. This capital cost is combined with operations and maintenance costs to calculate a life-cycle busbar energy cost and simple payback period for each plant.

Finegold, J.G.; Herlevich, F.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Frozen plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

437

Thermal Integration of CO2 Compression Processes with Coal-Fired...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Integration of CO 2 Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture Background Increased attention is being placed on research into...

438

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Using a Quasipotential Transformation for Modeling Diffusion Media inPolymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a quasipotential approach along with conformal mapping is used to model the diffusion media of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. This method provides a series solution that is grid independent and only requires integration along a single boundary to solve the problem. The approach accounts for nonisothermal phenomena, two-phase flow, correct placement of the electronic potential boundary condition, and multilayer media. The method is applied to a cathode diffusion medium to explore the interplay between water and thermal management and performance, the impact of the rib-to-channel ratio, and the existence of diffusion under the rib and flooding phenomena.

Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Prediction of Air Mixing From High Sidewall Diffusers in Cooling Mode: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply in cooling mode. The research focused on the design, placement, and operation of air supply diffusers located high on a sidewall and return grilles located near the floor on the same sidewall. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions and room dimensions. Thermal loads characteristic of high performance homes were applied at the walls and room temperature was controlled via a thermostat. The results are intended to provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to provide proper room mixing for cooling of high performance homes.

Ridouane, E. H.; Gawlik, K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Temperature-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients from ab initio Computations: Hydrogen in Nickel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The temperature-dependent mass diffusion coefficient is computed using transition state theory. Ab initio supercell phonon calculations of the entire system provide the attempt frequency, the activation enthalpy, and the activation entropy as a function of temperature. Effects due to thermal lattice expansion are included and found to be significant. Numerical results for the case of hydrogen in nickel demonstrate a strong temperature dependence of the migration enthalpy and entropy. Trapping in local minima along the diffusion path has a pronounced effect especially at low temperatures. The computed diffusion coefficients with and without trapping bracket the available experimental values over the entire temperature range between 0 and 1400 K.

E Wimmer; W Wolf; J Sticht; P Saxe; C Geller; R Najafabadi; G Young

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Carnivorous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

444

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING A SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of advanced concept solar power plants. For conditions offor the operation of a solar power plant is very small.success of the solar thermal electric power program rests on

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials Speaker(s): Ravi Prasher Date: August 25, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil World energy demand is expected to reach ~30 TW by 2050 from the current demand of ~13 TW. This requires substantial technological innovation. Thermal energy transport and conversion play a very significant role in more than 90% of energy technologies. All four modes of thermal energy transport, conduction, convection, radiation, and phase change (e.g. evaporation/boiling) are important in various energy technologies such as vapor compression power plants, refrigeration, internal combustion engines and building heating/cooling. Similarly thermal transport play a critical role in electronics cooling as the performance and reliability of

446

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanofluids, a new class of fluids engineered by suspending nanometer-sized particles in a host liquid, are offered as a new strategy in order to improve heat and mass transfer efficiency. My research was motivated by previous exciting studies on enhanced mass diffusion and the possibility of tailoring mass transport by direct manipulation of molecular diffusion. Therefore, a microfluidic approach capable of directly probing tracer diffusion between nanoparticle-laden fluid streams was developed. Under conditions matching previously reported studies, strong complexation interactions between the dye and nanoparticles at the interface between fluid streams was observed. When the tracer dye and surfactant were carefully chosen to minimize the collective effects of the interactions, no significant change in tracer dye diffusivity was observed in the presence of nanoparticles. Next, adapting tracer dyes for studies involving colloidal nanomaterials was explored. Addition of these charged tracers poses a myriad of challenges because of their propensity to disrupt the delicate balance among physicochemical interactions governing suspension stability. Here it was shown how important it is to select the compatible combinations of dye, nanoparticle, and stabilizing surfactant to overcome these limitations in low volume fraction (< 1 vol%) aqueous suspensions of Al2O3 nanoparticles. A microfluidic system was applied as a stability probe that unexpectedly revealed how rapid aggregation could be readily triggered in the presence of local chemical gradients. Suspension stability was also assessed in conjunction with coordinated measurements of zeta potential, steady shear viscosity and bulk thermal conductivity. These studies also guided our efforts to prepare new refrigerant formulations containing dispersed nanomaterials, including graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and metal oxide and nitride. The influence of key parameters such as particle type, size and volume fraction on the suspension's thermal conductivity was investigated using a standard protocol. Our findings showed that thermal conductivity values of carbon nanotube and graphene nanosheet suspensions were higher than TiO2 nanoparticles, despite some nanoparticles with large particle sizes provided noticeable thermal conductivity enhancements. Significantly, the graphene containing suspensions uniquely matched the thermal conductivity enhancements attained in nanotube suspensions without accompanying viscosity, thus making them an attractive new coolant for demanding applications such as electronics and reactor cooling.

Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fractional reaction-diffusion equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a series of papers, Saxena, Mathai, and Haubold (2002, 2004a, 2004b) derived solutions of a number of fractional kinetic equations in terms of generalized Mittag-Leffler functions which provide the extension of the work of Haubold and Mathai (1995, 2000). The subject of the present paper is to investigate the solution of a fractional reaction-diffusion equation. The results derived are of general nature and include the results reported earlier by many authors, notably by Jespersen, Metzler, and Fogedby (1999) for anomalous diffusion and del-Castillo-Negrete, Carreras, and Lynch (2003) for reaction-diffusion systems with L\\'evy flights. The solution has been developed in terms of the H-function in a compact form with the help of Laplace and Fourier transforms. Most of the results obtained are in a form suitable for numerical computation.

R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z