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1

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

2

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

3

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

4

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Padture, Nitin

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Nitin Padture

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition of YSZ for Use in Thermal Barrier Coatings - Faraday Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition of YSZ for Use in Thermal Barrier Coatings-Faraday Technology Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are employed to protect gas turbine engine components. These coating systems provide thermal, oxidation, and mechanical protection; reduce thermal gradients; and lower the metal substrate surface temperature, extending the life of the engine components. Faraday Technology, Inc. (Faraday) is developing a new manufacturing process, the

9

Evolution of Turbine Blade Deposits in an Accelerated Deposition Facility: Roughness and Thermal Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the operation of a gas turbine, ingested contaminants present in the air form deposits on the surfaces of the turbine blades. These deposits grow… (more)

Wammack, James Edward 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Effect of gas feeding methods on optical properties of GaN grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Ga vacancies, GaN growth, gas feeding method, optical property, rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD), yellow luminescence

Sun Jung Kim; Young Hun Seo; Kee Suk Nahm; Yun Bong Hahn; Hyun Wook Shim; Eun-Kyung Suh; Kee Young Lim; Hyung Jae Lee

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Direct Measurement of EGR Cooler Deposit Thermal Properties for Improved Understanding of Cooler Fouling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has become a significant issue for compliance with NOX emissions standards. This paper reports results of a study of fundamental aspects of EGR cooler fouling. An apparatus and procedure were developed to allow surrogate EGR cooler tubes to be exposed to diesel engine exhaust under controlled conditions. The resulting fouled tubes were removed and analyzed. Volatile and non-volatile deposit mass was measured for each tube. Thermal diffusivity of the deposited soot cake was measured by milling a window into the tube and using the Xenon flash lamp method. The heat capacity of the deposit was measured at temperatures up to 430 C and was slightly higher than graphite, presumably due to the presence of hydrocarbons. These measurements were combined to allow calculation of the deposit thermal conductivity, which was determined to be 0.041 W/mK, only ~1.5 times that of air and much lower than the 304 stainless steel tube (14.7 W/mK). The main determinant of the deposit thermal conductivity is density, which was measured to be just 2% that of the density of the primary soot particles (or 98% porous). The deposit layer thermal resistance was calculated and compared with estimates of the thermal resistance calculated from gas temperature data during the experiment. The deposit properties were also used to further analyze the temperature data collected during the experiment.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermal deposition and electron beam patterning techniques for biopolymer thin films: dna complex and proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties and effects of deposition and patterning of bio-organic materials have been studied in this work. Thermal deposition of DNA:CTMA, DNA:CTMA/PEDOT, DNA:Eu complexes, bacteriorhodipsin, and Bombix mori silk thin films from ...

Robert Andrew Jones / Andrew J. Steckl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thermal Response of Tritiated Co-deposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits.

C.H. Skinner; N. Bekrisl; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein; R. Reiswig; S. Willms

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Silicon nucleation and film evolution on silicon dioxide using disilane: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of very smooth silicon at high deposition rates  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2} for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of silicon on SiO{sub 2} has been performed at temperatures ranging from 590 to 900 C and pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 Torr. Deposition at 590 C yields amorphous silicon films with the corresponding ultrasmooth surface with a deposition rate of 68 nm/min. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of a sample deposited at 625 C and 1 Torr reveals a bilayer structure which is amorphous at the growth surface and crystallized at the oxide interface. Higher temperatures yield polycrystalline films where the surface roughness depends strongly on both deposition pressure and temperature. Silane-based amorphous silicon deposition in conventional systems yields the expected ultrasmooth surfaces, but at greatly reduced deposition rates unsuitable for single-wafer processing. However, disilane, over the process window considered here, yields growth rates high enough to be appropriate for single-wafer manufacturing, thus providing a viable means for deposition of very smooth silicon films on SiO{sub 2} in a single-wafer environment.

Violette, K.E.; Oeztuerk, M.C.; Christensen, K.N.; Maher, D.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Silica Deposition in Field and Laboratory Thermal Tests of Yucca Mountain Tuff  

SciTech Connect

A field thermal test was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to observe changes in the Topopah Spring Tuff middle nonlithophysal zone geohydrologic system due to thermal loading. A laboratory-scale crushed-tuff hydrothermal column test was used to investigate the tuff as a potential construction material within a nuclear-waste repository. Results of similar column tests have been cited as indications that silica deposition would plug the rock fractures above a repository and create unfavorable drainage conditions. Data from field and laboratory tests are used here to predict the magnitude of fracture sealing. For the crushed-tuff column test, a one-meter-high column was packed with crushed tuff to a porosity of about 50%. Water filling the lowermost 10 cm of the column was boiled and the vapor condensed at the top of the column, percolating down to the boiling zone. After 100 days, intergranular pore space in the saturated portion of the column was almost filled with amorphous silica. The Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain is a heating test in the unsaturated zone. It consists of a four-year heating phase, now complete, followed by a four-year cooling phase. Heaters in a 60-m-long drift and in the adjacent rock have heated the drift walls to 200 C. As the rock was heated, fluids naturally present in the rock migrated away from the heat sources. A boiling zone now separates an inner dry-out zone from an outer condensation zone. A heat-pipe region exists in the outer margin of the boiling zone above the heated drift. Amorphous silica coatings up to a few micrometers thick were deposited in this region. Deposits were observed in less than 10% of the fractures in the heat pipe region. Drift-scale test results yield a silica deposition rate of about 250 {micro}m/1000 years in 10% of the fractures in the heat-pipe region. We did not calculate deposition rates from our column test, but a rate of 9.1 mm/1000 years in all fractures of the heat-pipe region is predicted by Sun and Rimstidt (2002) from the results of a similar test. We believe the rate based on field-test observations is a better prediction because the field test more closely resembles the expected environment in a repository. Rates based on column-test results may be reasonable for local zones of preferred fluid flow.

S.S. Levy; S.J. Chipera; M.G. Snow

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

COMPARISON OF THERMAL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING DEPOSITED ON IN738 USING STANDARD AIR PLASMA SPRAY WITH 100HE PLASMA SPRAY SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A typical blade material is made of Nickel super alloy and can bear temperatures up to 950°C. But the operating temperature of a gas turbine is above the melting point of super alloy nearly at 1500°C. This could lead to hot corrosions, high temperature oxidation, creep, thermal fatigue may takes place on the blade material. Though the turbine has an internal cooling system, the cooling is not adequate to reduce the temperature of the blade substrate. Therefore to protect the blade material as well as increase the efficiency of the turbine, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be used. A TBC coating of 250 ?m thick can reduce the temperature by up to 200° C. Air Plasma Spray Process (APS) and High Enthalpy Plasma Spray Process (100HE) were the processes used for coating the blades with the TBCs. Because thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperature, it is desired that these processes yield very low thermal conductivities at high temperatures in order not to damage the blade. An experiment was carried out using Flash line 5000 apparatus to compare the thermal conductivity of both processes.The apparatus could also be used to determine the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of the TBCs. 75 to 2800 K was the temperature range used in the experimentation. It was found out that though 100HE has high deposition efficiency, the thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperatures whiles APS yielded low thermal conductivities.

Uppu, N.; Mensah, P.F.; Ofori, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

F3, A Comparative Study of Thermal and Deposited Gate Oxides on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal oxidation processes consisted of dry oxidation at 1175°C followed by an .... Microstructure and Properties of Colloidal ITO Films and Cold-Sputtered ITO Films .... Graphene Produced from Ion Implanted Semi-Insulating Silicon Carbide.

19

In-situ post-deposition thermal annealing of co-evaporated Cu(InGa)Se2 thin films deposited at low temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

equivalent to devices made from films grown at 550°C. Films originally deposited at 300°C yielded devices after post-deposition annealing with VOC close to that of devices made from films grown at 550°C, despite smaller grain size.

Wilson, James D.; McCandless, Brian E.; Birkmire, Robert W.; Shafarman, William N.

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Thermal Stability and Substitutional Carbon Incorporation far above Solid-Solubility in Si1-xCx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition using Disilane M. S. Carroll*, J. C. Sturm on (100) silicon substrates by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) with disilane source gas and disilane is known to produce higher silicon epitaxial growth rates for similar partial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Use of Optical Microscopy to Examine Crystallite Nucleation and Growth in Thermally Annealed Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a simple method to investigate crystallite nucleation and growth in stepwise, thermally annealed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot wire chemical vapor deposition a-Si:H films. By confining film thicknesses to the range 500-4000 {angstrom}, optical microscopy in the reflection mode can be used to readily detect crystallites in the thermally annealed a-Si:H lattice. Measurements of the crystallite density versus annealing time for identically prepared films of different thickness show that the crystallite nucleation rate is smaller for thinner films, suggesting that crystallite nucleation is homogeneous, in agreement with previous results. A comparison of film nucleation rates with those obtained by other methods on identically prepared films shows excellent agreement, thus establishing the validity of the current technique. The potential effect of impurity (oxygen) incorporation during the stepwise annealing in air is shown not to affect crystallite nucleation and growth, in that SIMS oxygen profiles for stepwise versus continuous annealing show not only similar impurity profiles but also similar bulk impurity densities.

Mahan, A. H.; Dabney, M. S.; Reedy, Jr R. C.; Molina, D.; Ginley, D. S.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Thermodynamic simulation of transfer of lead, cadmium, and zinc to the gas phase during oxidative and reductive thermal treatment of coals from some coal deposits of the Russian federation  

SciTech Connect

The results of thermodynamic study of the distribution of Pb, Cd, and Zn during the thermal processing of coals from the Kuznetsk and Moscow basins and the Berezovskoe coal deposit of the Kansk-Achinsk basin at different excess oxidant (air) factors and in an inert (argon) medium are presented. The equilibrium forms of compounds were revealed, and their concentrations in the gas and condensed phase were calculated. Trace elements get into the gas phase during the heat treatment of coals in both oxidizing and reducing media. Their most intense transfer to the gas phase takes place at a = 0.4. An increase in temperature enhances this process, and an increase in the ash content of coal decreased the extent of transfer. 9 refs., 10 tabs.

L.N. Lebedeva; L.A. Kost; E.G. Gorlov; E.V. Samuilov [FGUP Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Magnetron-sputter deposition of Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} thin films and their conversion into pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) by thermal sulfurization for photovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the fabrication of FeS{sub 2} (pyrite) thin films by sulfurizing Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} that were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Under the selected sputtering conditions, Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} nanocrystal films are obtained and the nanocrystals tend to locally cluster and closely pack into ricelike nanoparticles with an increase in film thickness. Meanwhile, the film tends to crack when the film thickness is increased over {approx}1.3 {mu}m. The film cracking can be effectively suppressed by an introduction of a 3-nm Cu intermediate layer prior to Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} deposition. However, an introduction of a 3-nm Al intermediate layer tends to enhance the film cracking. By post-growth thermal sulfurization of the Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4} thin films in a tube-furnace, FeS{sub 2} with high phase purity, as determined by using x ray diffraction, is obtained. Optical absorption spectroscopy was employed to characterize the resultant FeS{sub 2} thin films, which revealed two absorption edges at 0.9 and 1.2 eV, respectively. These two absorption edges are assigned to the direct bandgap (0.9 eV) and the indirect allowed transitions (1.2 eV) of FeS{sub 2}, respectively.

Liu Hongfei; Chi Dongzhi [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Deposition Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pulsed Plasma Processing Pulsed Plasma Processing NEW: Downloadable: Invited Talk "Pulsed Metal Plasmas," presented at the 2006 AVS Meeting, San Francisco, California, November 15, 2006. (PDF, file size 8 MB). Plasma Sources for Window Coatings Deposition processes for low-emittance and solar control coatings can be improved through the use of advanced plasma technology developed at LBNL. A new type of constricted glow-discharge plasma source was selected for the 1997 R&D 100 Award. Invented by LBNL researchers Andre Anders, Mike Rubin, and Mike Dickinson, the source was designed to be compatible with industrial vacuum deposition equipment and practice. Construction is simple, rugged and inexpensive. It can operate indefinitely over a wide range of chamber pressure without any consumable parts such as filaments or grids. Several different gases including Argon, Oxygen and Nitrogen have been tested successfully.

25

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available This data set, prepared by Elizabeth Holland and colleagues, contains data for wet and dry nitrogen-species deposition for the United States and...

28

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested ...

29

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Biodiesel Deposits Formed on a Hot Metal Surface.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis aims to investigate the formation of deposits from thermally degraded biodiesel on a hot metal surface under the influence of sodium or… (more)

Westberg, Emilie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Rapid thermal cycling of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vacuum infiltration deposition. Thermal expansion of 8YSZLSCF cathode before and after thermal cycling at 900°C. AIR+6AT 8YSZ Temperature, 0 C Fig. 3. Thermal expansion of 8YSZ

Matus, Yuriy B.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

32

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

33

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

Lowden, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

May 28-29, 2008/ARR Thermal Effect of Off-Normal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 28-29, 2008/ARR 1 Thermal Effect of Off-Normal Energy Deposition on Bare Ferritic Steel First #12;May 28-29, 2008/ARR 2 Power Plant FW Under Energy Deposition from Off- Normal Conditions · Thermal Meeting) · Disruptions: ­ Parallel energy density for thermal quench = 28-45 MJ/m2 near X

Raffray, A. René

35

direct_deposit_111609  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: DO NOT complete this form until you are ready to submit it to the Payroll Department. DIRECT DEPOSIT REQUEST Directions: 1. Provide required information neatly, legibly; 2. If Checking Account Direct Deposit, include a voided check. a. DO NOT submit a deposit slip! 3. If Savings Account Direct Deposit, include a copy of savings card. 4. Sign this form; 5. Inter-office mail it to Craft Payroll at "P238." DIRECT DEPOSITION AUTHORIZATION I hereby authorize Los Alamos National Laboratory, hereinafter called The Laboratory, to initiate credit entries and, if necessary, debit entries and adjustments for any credit entries in error to my account listed on this form. If deposit is for:

36

Plasma-enhanced and thermal atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using dimethylaluminum isopropoxide, [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}({mu}-O{sup i}Pr)]{sub 2}, as an alternative aluminum precursor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have been investigating the use of [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}({mu}-O{sup i}Pr)]{sub 2} (DMAI) as an alternative Al precursor to [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] (TMA) for remote plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD over wide temperature ranges of 25-400 and 100-400 deg. C, respectively. The growth per cycle (GPC) obtained using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for plasma-enhanced ALD was 0.7-0.9 A/cycle, generally lower than the >0.9 A/cycle afforded by TMA. In contrast, the thermal process gave a higher GPC than TMA above 250 deg. C, but below this temperature, the GPC decreased rapidly with decreasing temperature. Quadrupole mass spectrometry data confirmed that both CH{sub 4} and HO{sup i}Pr were formed during the DMAI dose for both the plasma-enhanced and thermal processes. CH{sub 4} and HO{sup i}Pr were also formed during the H{sub 2}O dose but combustion-like products (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) were observed during the O{sub 2} plasma dose. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry showed that, for temperatures >100 deg. C and >200 deg. C for plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD, respectively, films from DMAI had an O/Al ratio of 1.5-1.6, a H content of {approx}5 at. % and mass densities of 2.7-3.0 g cm{sup -3}. The film compositions afforded from DMAI were comparable to those from TMA at deposition temperatures {>=}150 deg. C At lower temperatures, there were differences in O, H, and C incorporation. 30 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films from the plasma-enhanced ALD of DMAI were found to passivate n- and p-type Si floatzone wafers ({approx}3.5 and {approx}2 {Omega} cm, respectively) with effective carrier lifetimes comparable to those obtained using TMA. Surface recombination velocities of < 3 and < 6 cm s{sup -1} were obtained for the n- and p-type Si, respectively. Using these results, the film properties obtained using DMAI and TMA are compared and the mechanisms for the plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD using DMAI are discussed.

Potts, Stephen E.; Dingemans, Gijs; Lachaud, Christophe; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Air Liquide Research and Development, 1 Chemin de la Porte des Loges, BP 126, 78345 Jouy-en-Josas (France); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Supplemental heating of deposition tooling shields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing particle generation from the thin coating deposited on the internal surfaces of a deposition chamber which undergoes temperature variation greater than 100.degree. C. comprising maintaining the temperature variation of the internal surfaces low enough during the process cycle to keep thermal expansion stresses between the coating and the surfaces under 500 MPa. For titanium nitride deposited on stainless steel, this means keeping temperature variations under approximately 70.degree. C. in a chamber that may be heated to over 350.degree. C. during a typical processing operation. Preferably, a supplemental heater is mounted behind the upper shield and controlled by a temperature sensitive element which provides feedback control based on the temperature of the upper shield.

Ohlhausen, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peebles, Diane E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hunter, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Eckelmeyer, Kenneth H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Radionuclide deposition control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA); McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nanoscale Properties of In-Situ Formed Tribofilms and Thermal Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal films were also deposited on surfaces and the role of additive chemistry on growth kinetics ... Microscale Sliding Contacts on Solid Lubricant Coatings.

40

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Airborne Visible/IR Image Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used to characterize hot spring deposits in the Lower, Midway, and Upper Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field observations of these basins provided the critical ground-truth for comparison with the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Perspectives on Deposition Velocity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deposition Deposition Velocity ... Going down the rabbit hole to explain that sinking feeling Brian DiNunno, Ph.D. Project Enhancement Corporation June 6 th , 2012 Discussion Framework ď‚— Development of the HSS Deposition Velocity Safety Bulletin ď‚— Broader discussion of appropriate conservatism within dispersion modeling and DOE-STD-3009 DOE-STD-3009 Dose Comparison "General discussion is provided for source term calculation and dose estimation, as well as prescriptive guidance for the latter. The intent is that calculations be based on reasonably conservative estimates of the various input parameters." - DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A.3 DOE-STD-3009 Dispersion

43

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

Lowden, R.A.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Conceptual and Scaling Evaluation of Vehicle Traffic Thermal Effects on Snow/Ice-Covered Roads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential thermal effects of traffic on road surface thermal energy balance under frost/snow cover conditions have been largely ignored in meteorological evaluations of road ice deposit conditions. Preliminary exploration of these effects, ...

Joseph M. Prusa; Moti Segal; Bradley R. Temeyer; William A. Gallus Jr.; Eugene S. Takle

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

BWR Fuel Deposit Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With zinc injection to BWR feedwater for plant radiation dose reduction, fuel deposits often contain significant amounts of zinc and the inner layers of deposits become more adherent to the cladding. Fuel surveillance programs have revealed thick tenacious crud with surface spallation at several plants. This project determined the chemical composition and morphological features of crud flake samples from Duane Arnold Cycle 17 and Browns Ferry 2 Cycle 12 and compared the data with those obtained from othe...

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

48

Physical vapor deposition and patterning of calcium fluoride films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical vapor deposition of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) thin films was performed via electron beam evaporation, resistive/thermal evaporation, and nonreactive radio frequency sputtering. Patterning of the resultant ''usable'' thin films was then also attempted in several ways, including by shadow mask deposition, liftoff, and direct chemical etching. Resistive evaporation produced the most stable films, having polycrystalline morphology with a moderately strong preference to the 331 orientation. The cleanest patterning results were obtained via a polymer/metal liftoff. The results and implications of each of the various deposition and patterning techniques are discussed.

Pinol, L.; Rebello, K.; Caruso, K.; Francomacaro, A. S.; Coles, G. L. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland 20723 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

Schobert, H.H.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nagaraj, B.A. [General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Aircraft Engine Group

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Instrument Series: Deposition and Microfabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Sputter Deposition System Only available at EMSL, the Discovery ® Deposition System has been customized to be a fully automated multi-functional "hybrid" instrument with several modes for thin film processing, including multi-target sputtering, effusion cell deposition, electron beam deposition, and in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) materials characterization. Unlike most systems, the Discovery ® Deposition System's unique configuration offers operational flexibility, efficiency, and control, allowing a range of applications and materials to be processed simultaneously. Because it is software controlled, users can provide their own "recipes" and have a complete log of what happens throughout the

52

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

53

Laboratory and In Situ Observation of Deposition Growth of Frozen Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor deposition growth of frozen drops with diameter greater than 100 ?m has been studied in a thermal diffusion chamber. For varying periods of time, it was found that frozen drops experience spherical growth. The characteristic time ...

Alexei V. Korolev; Matthew P. Bailey; John Hallett; George A. Isaac

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Improved process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

Lackey, W.J. Jr.; Caputo, A.J.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

56

Thermal Modeling of Direct Digital Melt Deposition Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Research on Controlling the Pre-Bending Deformation before Straightening and the Residual Stresses after Straightening of 100-Meter Rail.

57

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energy Deposition Using EGS4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are used to model the energy deposition in 0.4 r.l. Ti due to photons produced by the Tesla TRD undulator driven by the 250 GeV Tesla primary electron beam. 1 Energy Deposition...

60

Oil shale deposits of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Oil-shale deposits occur in several areas of Thailand. Perhaps the most important deposit occurs at Mae Sod in Tak Province, West Thailand. Other well-known deposits are Li in Lamphum Province, Ko Kha District, Lampang Province, and Krabi in the southern peninsular region. The geological age of all these deposits is late Tertiary, as demonstrated by the presence of the fossils from the oil shale of the Mae Sod series, e.g., fish of the Ostariophysian family Cyprinidae.

Chakrabarti, A.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thin Film Deposition and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Applications: Tube 1 (T1), open for future upgrade. Silicon Nitride Deposition (Tube 2): Low Stress recipe. Stoichiometric recipe. ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Multi-chamber deposition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

63

Multi-chamber deposition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented of preparing uranium metal of high purity consisting contacting impure U metal with halogen vapor at between 450 and 550 C to form uranium halide vapor, contacting the uranium halide vapor in the presence of H/sub 2/ with a refractory surface at about 1400 C to thermally decompose the uranium halides and deposit molten U on the refractory surface and collecting the molten U dripping from the surface. The entire operation is carried on at a sub-atmospheric pressure of below 1 mm mercury.

Magel, T.T.; Brewer, L.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes further developments to the crud chemistry model developed in 2003. This model calculates the thermal and chemical conditions within fuel crud deposits. The model was developed to understand fuel crud scrape observations and help alleviate AOA in plants suffering this problem. The model predicts the main form of boron in thick crud (30µm) is precipitated LiBO2. This precipitates because Li and boric acid concentrate in the bottom of the deposit due to evaporation. The rise in temper...

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

Meier, T. C., LLNL

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films produced by chemical vapor deposition: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a technologically important semiconductor, well-suited for solar photovoltaic energy conversion and thin film device applications. While the glow discharge technique is widely used for the deposition of a-Si:H films, this work is focused on the use of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique, i.e., the thermal decomposition of disilane and higher silanes, for the deposition of a-Si:H films. A simple technique for the preparation of disilane and higher silanes by using an electric discharge in monosilane under atmospheric pressure has been developed, and the discharge product can be used directly for the deposition process. The important parameters of the CVD process including the substrate temperature, the composition and flow rate of the reaction mixture, and the nature of the diluent gas for disilane, have also been investigated. The deposition rate of a-Si:H films in a helium atmosphere is considerably higher than that in a hydrogen atmosphere, and the CVD process in a helium atmosphere is well-suited for the deposition of thick a-Si:H films. The a-Si:H films deposited under various conditions have been characterized by the photoconductivity, dissolution rate, optical absorption, mechanical stress, gap state density, minority carrier diffusion length, and stability measurements. On the basis of these measurements, a-Si:H films deposited by the thermal decomposition of disilane in a helium atmosphere exhibit better structural and electronic properties than those deposited in a hydrogen atmosphere.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Film deposition and surface modification using intense pulsed ion beams  

SciTech Connect

High-power pulsed ion beams have been used to ablate material for ultrahigh-rate film deposition and to treat the surfaces of alloys. Pulsed ion beams were provided by the high-power-density Gamble II facility at the Naval Research Laboratory [high voltage ({similar_to}900 keV), short pulse (60 ns)] and the lower-power-density Anaconda facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory [lower voltage ({similar_to}300 keV), longer pulse (400 ns)]. Peak film deposition rates after target ablation reached 1 mm/s. Films of pure Al, pure Ta, YBCO, and Ni--Zn ferrite were deposited on glass and single-crystal substrates, in some cases heated. The film deposition process was studied with framing photography, a bolometer, and other diagnostics to gain an understanding of the ablation, transport, and deposition steps. Stoichiometric deposition of multicomponent targets has been demonstrated. Film morphology remains poor, but has steadily improved, and our present understanding points the way to further improvement. Lower fluences ({similar_to}5 J/cm{sup 2}) were used to investigate rapid thermal processing of metal surfaces for the enhancement of corrosion resistance. The results in this area have been negative, but here again the knowledge gained through these experiments allows us to propose directions for improvement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

Meli, C.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Stephanakis, S.J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

(Acidic deposition and the environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

1990-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Abstract In the Great Basin of the western United States, geothermal fluids are sometimes associated with surface crusts of borate evaporite minerals. These borates can therefore potentially serve as a geothermal exploration tool if they can be efficiently identified and mapped in the field. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec® spectroradiometer, and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals

73

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Particle Deposition in Granular Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

Tien, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces - with similar geometry and combusting similar coal. The method is potentially applicable to completely different boiler furnaces combusting different coal, and the authors recommend running the tests with new deposit samples. The data will then be applicable to the thermal design of a whole new class of furnaces, having similar geometry and combusting similar coal. This is expected to greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of thermal calculation as well as the efficiency of thermal design of steam boilers. (author)

Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan [Department of Thermomechanics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS); Vucicevic, Biljana [Laboratory for Thermal Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (RS); Goricanec, Darko [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, Maribor 2000 (Slovenia); Stevanovic, Zoran [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Dusina 7, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Self-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition method for the growth of device-quality metal thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of metals and alloys was demonstrated using thermal chemical vapor deposition starting from commercially available precursors in the absence of molecular hydrogen. The adopted chemical strategy relies solely on the selective reactivity of ... Keywords: CVD of metals, Chemical reduction, Direct liquid injection, Pulsed spray evaporation

N. Bahlawane; P. Antony Premkumar; K. Onwuka; G. Reiss; K. Kohse-Höinghaus

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hydrothermal Deposition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Deposition Hydrothermal Deposition Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Deposition Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Deposition: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Quartz veins indicate ancient fluid flow, possibly the result of a hydrothermal system (reference: http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/dc_rocks/) Tufa mounds indicate the location of extinct hot springs. In this photo they show the ancient extent of the surface manifestations at Mono Lake, CA (reference: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/climatechange/page.aspx?id=170704)(photo by Scott Stine) Hydrothermal water carries minerals as it travels through the crust. These minerals are often deposited as pressure decreases as the fluid approaches

79

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two-Phase Studies, with a focus on heat transfer and paraffin deposition at various pipe inclinations, which will be used to enhance the paraffin deposition code for gas-liquid flow in pipes. (3) Deposition Physics and Water Impact Studies, which will address the aging process, improve our ability to characterize paraffin deposits and enhance our understanding of the role water plays in paraffin deposition in deepwater pipelines. As in the previous two studies, knowledge gained in this suite of studies will be integrated into a state-of-the-art three-phase paraffin deposition computer program.

Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS JA Siegel 1,3 * and WWof fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leadsparticle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a

Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silano (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700.degree.-2300.degree. C., and preferably in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-8 to 10.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseous mixture onto a substrate outside said source of thermal decomposition to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Ghosh, Arup K. (Rocky Point, NY); Wiesmann, Harold J. (Wantagh, NY); Rock, Edward B. (Oxford, GB); Lutz, III, Harry A. (Midlothian, VA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Seasonalepisodic control of acid deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report contains the climatological, technical and economic factors for episodic and seasonal control of emissions in existing power plants. Analyzing a large data set of acid deposition for the years 1982-85, we find ...

Fay, James A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

85

Particle Velocity and Deposition Efficiency in the Cold Spray Process  

SciTech Connect

Copper powder was sprayed by the cold-gas dynamic method. In-flight particle velocities were measured with a laser-two-focus system as a function of process parameters such as gas temperature, gas pressure, and powder feed rate. Particle velocities were uniform in a relatively large volume within the plume and agreed with theoretical predictions. The presence of the substrate was found to have no significant effect on particle velocities. Cold-spray deposition efficiencies were measured on aluminum substrates as a function of particle velocity and incident angle of the plume. Deposition efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved. The critical velocity for deposition was determined to be about 640 meters per second. This work investigates both the in-flight characteristics of copper particles in a supersonic cold-spray plume and the build-up of the subsequent coating on aluminum substrates. Velocities were found to be relatively constant within a large volume of the plume. Particle counts dropped off sharply away from the central axis. The presence of a substrate was found to have no effect on the velocity of the particles. A substantial mass-loading effect on the particle velocity was observed; particle velocities begin to drop as the mass ratio of powder to gas flow rates exceeds 3%. The measured variation of velocity with gas pressure and pre-heat temperature was in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions. Helium may be used as the driving gas instead of air in order to achieve higher particle velocities for a given temperature and pressure. Coating deposition efficiencies were found to increase with particle velocity and decrease with gun- substrate angle. There did not appear to be any dependence of the deposition efficiency on coating thickness. A critical velocity for deposition of about 640 mk appears to fit the data well. The cold-spray technique shows promise as a method for the deposition of materials which are thermally sensitive or may experience rapid oxidation under typical thermal spray conditions. High deposition efficiencies are achievable for certain coating-substrate conditions. Work remains to determine the material and microstructural properties which govern the coating process.

Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.; Smith, M.F.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River Bend Nuclear Power Station, a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, experienced fuel defects during Cycle 11. The failed fuel pins were identified during the subsequent refueling outage. To assist analysis of the fuel failure root cause, crud flake deposit samples were collected for analyses. Results on the morphology and distribution of chemical elements in four tenacious crud flakes that are associated with the fuel failures are reported in EPRI report 1009733, BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation–Riv...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

Vapor deposition of hardened niobium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Title Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2002 Authors Berdahl, Paul, Hashem...

91

Quick, Efficient Film Deposition for Nanomaterials - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... • Films can be deposited uniformly in a one-step deposition of nanoparticles with optimized drop distri ...

92

Rocky Mountain carbonate spring deposit development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British… (more)

Rainey, Dustin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Radon Progeny Deposition Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Westerdale, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

A radon progeny deposition model  

SciTech Connect

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiseppe, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Westerdale, S. [MIT

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

96

Chemical vapor deposition of ZrC in small bore carbon-composite tubes  

SciTech Connect

Process conditions are described for the chemical vapor deposition of ZrC from ZrCl/sub 4/--CH/sub 4/--HCl--H/sub 2/--Ar vapor over the temperature range 1320 to 1775 deg K. From an analysis of the process conditions (initial composition of coating gas, axial temperature profile along the tubes, total pressure, and length of deposition time), the subsequent ZrC coat thickness profiles and thermodynamic data, an equation expressing the variation of the axial rate of ZrC deposition is derived. This expression can be used for the estimation of process conditions required to yield a specified ZrC coat profile. Variations of the chlorine and oxygen contents, lattice pararmeter, microstructure of the ZrC deposit and thermal expansion coefficient as a function of deposition temperature are described. (11 figures, 3 tables) (auth)

Wallace, T.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

Jervis, T.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Thermal analysis and characterization of Elephant grass ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Here, ashes from incineration of elephant grass are characterized and its incorporation into clay to produce ... Moreover, thermal analysis was performed including gas emission ... Differential characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron sandstone deposit.

100

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

103

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INL’s Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

104

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

105

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

106

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author S.C. Smith Conference IGES; Dublin, CA; 2003/09/01 Published IGES, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Citation S.C. Smith. 2003. Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration. In: Programs & Abstracts: Soil and Regolith Geochemistry in the Search for Mineral Deposits. IGES; 2003/09/01; Dublin, CA. Dublin, CA: IGES; p. 78 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermally_Speciated_Mercury_in_Mineral_Exploration&oldid=681717" Categories: References Geothermal References

110

Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Erosion At Perseverance, Western Australia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Erosion At Perseverance, Western Australia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We have applied a thermal-fluid dynamic-geochemical model to investigate the emplacement and erosional potential of Archean komatiite flows at Perseverance, Western Australia. Perseverance has been proposed as a site of large-scale thermal erosion by large-volume komatiite eruption(s), resulting in a 100-150-m-deep lava channel containing one of the world's largest komatiite-hosted Fe-Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide deposits. Using

111

Method of chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride using polymeric cyanoborane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymeric cyanoborane is volatilized, decomposed by thermal or microwave plasma energy, and deposited on a substrate as an amorphous film containing boron, nitrogen and carbon. Residual carbon present in the film is removed by ammonia treatment at an increased temperature, producing an adherent, essentially stoichiometric boron nitride film.

Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Method of deposition of silicon carbide layers on substrates and product  

SciTech Connect

A method for direct chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide to substrates, especially nuclear waste particles, is provided by the thermal decomposition of methylsilane at about 800.degree. C. to 1050.degree. C. when the substrates have been confined within a suitable coating environment.

Angelini, Peter (Oak Ridge, TN); DeVore, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blanco, Raymond E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Method of chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride using polymeric cyanoborane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymeric cyanoborane is volatilized, decomposed by thermal or microwave plasma energy, and deposited on a substrate as an amorphous film containing boron, nitrogen and carbon. Residual carbon present in the film is removed by ammonia treatment at an increased temperature, producing an adherent, essentially stoichiometric boron nitride film. 11 figs.

Maya, L.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

115

Codeposition on hot CVD surfaces: Particle dynamics and deposit roughness interactions  

SciTech Connect

To capture in a tractable manner essential coupling effects in CVD systems when particles generated in thermal boundary layers also deposit, a film theory was developed that predicts simultaneous vapor and particle deposition rates at a hot deposition surface. The codeposition rate prediction method also calculates for the first time the corresponding solid deposit roughness using recently published results of particle-level simulations. For the numerical illustrations, the growth of TiO{sub 2}(s) films by the codeposition of titanium tetra-isopropoxide vapor and film-nucleated/grown TiO{sub 2} particles (generated in the thermal boundary layer) was considered. Experimental rate data for this system are available. The continuum and particle-level simulation methods provide: the interplay of vapor precursor kinetics, particle nucleation, growth, coagulation and diffusion in determining the complex ``structure`` of such multiphase chemically reacting boundary layers; wall deposition rates of both surviving vapors and film-nucleated particles; and the ``self-consistent`` microstructure (surface roughness) of the resulting solid deposit. Timely and tractable generalizations are discussed in the light of recent results for the transport properties and stability of ``fractal-like`` aggregated particles.

Tandon, P.; Rosner, D.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Deposition  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

as far 4 as nuclear power, the vast majority of those items that 5 are in a nuclear power plant that Commerce controls 6 have very limited licensing requirements. 7 Commerce also...

118

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Chemical vapor depositing of metal fluorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Purity BeF2 and BeF2–AlF3glasses have been deposited by the chemical vapor deposition technique using beryllium and aluminum 1

A. Sarhangi; J. M. Power

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

Olsson, Ylva Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

123

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

124

LOW PRESSURE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF POLYSILICON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THEORY The mass transport processes in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) are similar to those occuring in catalytic reactors

Gieske, R.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Guidelines for Turbine Deposit Collection and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam impurities can deposit throughout the steam path, causing a variety of performance issues. Deposits can result in efficiency losses and component failures through stress corrosion cracking (SCC) or corrosion fatigue (CF) initiated by corrosive deposits. The potential for each of these mechanisms can be exacerbated by the reduced frequency of turbine overhauls or opportunities to conduct an inspection. Sampling and deposit analysis is an integral part of a steam path audit, as well as a reflection o...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Texture of atomic layer deposited ruthenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruthenium films were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(100) and ALD TiN. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the as-deposited films on Si(100) were polycrystalline, on TiN they were (002) oriented. After annealing at 800^oC ... Keywords: Ammonia plasma, Atomic layer deposition, Ruthenium, Silicide, Texture

J. Musschoot; Q. Xie; D. Deduytsche; K. De Keyser; D. Longrie; J. Haemers; S. Van den Berghe; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; J. D'Haen; C. Detavernier

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivering DOE's Vision for the Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Safely Delivering the Department of Energy's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission DOE Workshop Deposition Velocity Status Mike Hitchler, Manager Nuclear Facility Safety June 5, 2012 Safely Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Existing UCOR Analyses * UCOR facilities at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) use various plume models depending on when they were developed and by whom. - Some use MACCS or MACCS2 for dispersion evaluation. (~5 locations) - LLLW uses ingestion modeling (multiple locations)

137

Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

Guidotti, Ronald Armand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations ...

140

Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.4 Thermal Modeling . . . . . . . .63 Table 4.3: Thermal Hot Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Performance-Efficient Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . .

Co?kun, Ay?e K?v?lc?m

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

147

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials… (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Properties of Thermal Glueballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the 0++ glueball at finite temperature using SU(3) quenched lattice QCD. We find a significant thermal effects near T_c. We perform the \\chi^2 fit analyses adopting two Ansaetze for the spectral function, i.e., the conventional narrow-peak Ansatz and an advanced Breit-Wigner Ansatz. The latter is an extension of the former, taking account of the appearance of the thermal width at T>0. We also perform the MEM analysis. These analyses indicate that the thermal effect on the glueball is a significant thermal-width broadening \\Gamma(T_c) \\sim 300 MeV together with a modest reduction in the peak center \\Delta\\omega_0(T_c) \\sim 100 MeV.

Noriyoshi Ishii; Hideo Suganuma

2003-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

155

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

DETERMINATION OF DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All calculations of deposition rates were made after ... the in- duct electrostatic precipitator increased the ... (1985) measured the performance of several ...

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Available Technologies: Super High Rate Sputter Deposition  

Andre’ Anders of Berkeley Lab has developed a very high deposition rate magnetron sputtering wherein the surface of a target and the race track zone area of the ...

159

Fundamentals of Electrochemical Deposition, Second Edition - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 25, 2007 ... Fundamentals of Electrochemical Deposition, 2nd Edition by Milan Paunovic and Mordechay Schlesinger provides a ... This is not a handbook.

160

Predicting particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas-side of finned tube heat- exchangers. Journal of Heatsurface interactions in heat exchanger fouling. Journal ofParticle Deposition on Heat Exchangers Epstein, N. , 1988.

Siegel, J A; Nazaroff, William W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

"Invisible" Archaeological Deposits at Small Milling Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deposits at Small Milling Sites ROBERT E. PARR and MARK Q.architechire, bedrock milling features, soil colorlithic scatters or bedrock milling stations), it appears

Parr, Robert E.; Sutton, Mark Q.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chemically Deposited Zinc Selenide Thin Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase Change Materials for Enhancing Heat Transfer in Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) · Phase Field Simulation of ...

163

Electrophoretic Deposition of Silica on Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

164

Thermal regimes of Malaysian sedimentary basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly corrected and calibrated thermal data are important in estimating source-rock maturation, diagenetics, evolution of reservoirs, pressure regimes, and hydrodynamics. Geothermal gradient, thermal conductivity, and heat flow have been determined for the sedimentary succession penetrated by exploratory wells in Malaysia. Geothermal gradient and heat-flow maps show that the highest average values are in the Malay Basin. The values in the Sarawak basin are intermediate between those of the Malay basin and the Sabah Basin, which contains the lowest average values. Temperature data were analyzed from more than 400 wells. An important parameter that was studied in detail is the circulation time. The correct circulation time is essential in determining the correct geothermal gradient of a well. It was found that the most suitable circulation time for the Sabah Basin is 20 hr, 30 hr for the Sarawak Basin and 40 hr for the Malay Basin. Values of thermal conductivity, determined from measurement and calibrated calculations, were grouped according to depositional units and cycles in each basin.

Abdul Halim, M.F. (Petronas Research and Scientific Services, Selangor (Malaysia))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Raman spectroscopic study of carbon nanotubes prepared using Fe/ZnO-palm olein-chemical vapour deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using Fe/ZnO catalyst by a dual-furnace thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method at 800-1000°C using nitrogen gas with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min as a gas carrier. Palm olein ...

Syazwan Afif Mohd Zobir; Suriani Abu Bakar; Saifollah Abdullah; Zulkarnain Zainal; Siti Halimah Sarijo; Mohamad Rusop

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermal Management ofUniversity of California, Riverside Acknowledgments First, I

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Solar-thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electron beam physical vapor deposition of thin ruby films for remote temperature sensing  

SciTech Connect

Thermographic phosphors (TGPs) possessing temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties have a wide range of uses in thermometry due to their remote access and large temperature sensitivity range. However, in most cases, phosphors are synthesized in powder form, which prevents their use in high resolution micro and nanoscale thermal microscopy. In the present study, we investigate the use of electron beam physical vapor deposition to fabricate thin films of chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ruby) thermographic phosphors. Although as-deposited films were amorphous and exhibited weak photoluminescence, the films regained the stoichiometry and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal structure of the combustion synthesized source powder after thermal annealing. As a consequence, the annealed films exhibit both strong photoluminescence and a temperature-dependent lifetime that decreases from 2.9 ms at 298 K to 2.1 ms at 370 K. Ruby films were also deposited on multiple substrates. To ensure a continuous film with smooth surface morphology and strong photoluminescence, we use a sapphire substrate, which is thermal expansion coefficient and lattice matched to the film. These thin ruby films can potentially be used as remote temperature sensors for probing the local temperatures of micro and nanoscale structures.

Li Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Greg Walker, D.; Valentine, Jason G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37212 (United States)

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Spray Deposition of High Quality CuInSe2 and CdTe Films: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of different ink and deposition approaches have been used for the deposition of CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and CdTe films. For CIS and CIGS, soluble precursors containing Cu, In, and Ga have been developed and used in two ways to produce CIS films. In the first, In-containing precursor films were sprayed on Mo-coated glass substrates and converted by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to In2Se3. Then a Cu-containing film was sprayed down on top of the In2Se3 and the stacked films were again thermally processed to give CIS. In the second approach, the Cu-, In-, and Ga-containing inks were combined in the proper ratio to produce a mixed Cu-In-Ga ink that was sprayed on substrates and thermally processed to give CIGS films directly. For CdTe deposition, ink consisting of CdTe nanoparticles dispersed in methanol was prepared and used to spray precursor films. Annealing these precursor films in the presence of CdCl2 produced large-grained CdTe films. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Optimized spray and processing conditions are crucial to obtain dense, crystalline films.

Curtis, C. J.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Leisch, J.; Hersh, P.; Nekuda, J.; Ginley, D. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet engine fuels has five components: development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer-sized and micrometer particles suspended in fuels during thermal stresses; characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct coal liquefaction. Progress is described.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

176

Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Particle Deposition in Granular Media. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

Tien, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Focused helium ion beam milling and deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a helium ion microscope with an integrated gas injection system for nanofabrication is explored by demonstrating the milling of fine features into single layered graphene and the controlled deposition of tungsten and platinum wires from gaseous ... Keywords: Beam-induced deposition, Focused ion beam, Gas injection system, Graphene, Helium ion microscope

S. A. Boden; Z. Moktadir; D. M. Bagnall; H. Mizuta; H. N. Rutt

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on identifying ash deposit materials and mounting them to a heat transfer surface for further study. A group of synthetic slag of various compositions was also produced using a sodium silicate binder, Powder River Basin (PRB) bottom ash, and ash cenospheres for porosity to test the effects of pulse detonation techniques on the removal of ash deposits.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

Plasma deposited rider rings for hot displacer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hot cylinder for a cryogenic refrigerator having two plasma spray deposited rider rings of a corrosion and abrasion resistant material provided in the rider ring grooves, wherein the rider rings are machined to the desired diameter and width after deposition. The rider rings have gas flow flats machined on their outer surface.

Kroebig, Helmut L. (Rolling Hills, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

Bogaert, R.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Thermal-sprayed, thin-film pyrite cathodes for thermal batteries -- Discharge-rate and temperature studies in single cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using an optimized thermal-spray process, coherent, dense deposits of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) with good adhesion were formed on 304 stainless steel substrates (current collectors). After leaching with CS{sub 2} to remove residual free sulfur, these served as cathodes in Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells. The cells were tested over a temperature range of 450 C to 550 C under baseline loads of 125 and 250 mA/cm{sup 2}, to simulate conditions found in a thermal battery. Cells built with such cathodes outperformed standard cells made with pressed-powder parts. They showed lower interracial resistance and polarization throughout discharge, with higher capacities per mass of pyrite. Post-treatment of the cathodes with Li{sub 2}O coatings at levels of >7% by weight of the pyrite was found to eliminate the voltage transient normally observed for these materials. Results equivalent to those of standard lithiated catholytes were obtained in this manner. The use of plasma-sprayed cathodes allows the use of much thinner cells for thermal batteries since only enough material needs to be deposited as the capacity requirements of a given application demand.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; DAI,JINXIANG; XIAO,T. DANNY; REISNER,DAVID

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Quantification of particle deposition in asymmetrical tracheobronchial model geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to quantify the local inspiratory and expiratory aerosol deposition in a highly asymmetric five-generation tracheobronchial tree. User-enhanced commercial codes and self-developed software was used to compute the ... Keywords: Airflow, Central airways, Computational fluid and particle dynamics, Deposition efficiency, Deposition enhancement factor, Deposition fraction, Particle deposition patterns

Árpád Farkas; Imre Balásházy

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal contact conductance is highly important in a wide variety of applications, from the cooling of electronic chips to the thermal management of spacecraft. The demand for increased efficiency means that components need to withstand higher temperatures and heat transfer rates. Many situations call for contact heat transfer through nominally cylindrical interfaces, yet relatively few studies of contact conductance through cylindrical interfaces have been undertaken. This study presents a review of the experimental and theoretical investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of composite cylinders, presenting data available in open literature in comparison with relevant correlations. The present investigation presents a study of the thermal contact conductance of cylindrical interfaces. The experimental investigation of sixteen different material combinations offers an opportunity to develop predictive correlations of the contact conductance, in conjunction with an analysis of the interface pressure as a function of the thermal state of the individual cylindrical shells. Experimental results of the present study are compared with previously published conductance data and conductance models.

Ayers, George Harold

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices prepared by chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of higher order silanes. Technical progress report, 1 September 1984-28 February 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and photovoltaic devices by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes, and the properties of such films and devices. The research is directed at exploring new, improved deposition techniques to produce a-Si:H. The improvement could stem from ease of deposition (lower cost and/or better reproducibility), from material improvement (higher efficiency and/or better stability under illumination), or from innovative materials that improve device performance. Research efforts have focused, therefore, on photo-CVD techniques; thermal CVD has been emphasized. This report summarizes the properties of the experimental thermal CVD films and the reasons for terminating the research in this area. In addition, the results for deposition by mercury-sensitized decomposition of disilane are presented. These results indicate that this technique is a very promising alternative to the glow-discharge method.

Delahoy, A.E.; Ellis, F.B. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Depletion effects of silicon deposition from methyltrichlorosilane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deposition rate of SiC on carbon-coated Nicalon fibers from methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen was measured as a function of temperature, pressure, total flow rate, and simulated reactant depletion. The results, which are included in this paper together with kinetic information on the stability of methyltrichlorosilane, led to two conclusions: two different mechanisms of deposition can occur depending on whether the methyltrichlorosilane has an opportunity to dissociate into separate silicon- and carbon-containing precursors, and the deposition rate is strongly reduced by the generation of byproduct HCl. The data were fitted to a simple etch model to obtain a kinetic expression that accounts for the significant effect of HCl.

Besmann, T.M.; Sheldon, B.W.; Moss, T.S. III; Kaster, M.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thermally Evaporated Iron (Oxide) on an Alumina Barrier Layer, by XPS  

SciTech Connect

We report the XPS characterization of a thermally evaporated iron thin film (6 nm) deposited on an Si/SiO_2/Al_2O_3 substrate using Al Ka X-rays. An XPS survey spectrum, narrow Fe 2p scan, narrow O 1s, and valence band scan are shown.

Madaan, Nitesh; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Jensen, David S.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

Fan, John C. C. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Tsaur, Bor-Yeu (Arlington, MA); Gale, Ronald P. (Bedford, MA); Davis, Frances M. (Framingham, MA)

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

Fan, John C. C. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Tsaur, Bor-Yeu (Arlington, MA); Gale, Ronald P. (Bedford, MA); Davis, Frances M. (Framingham, MA)

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous solid water (ASW) is a metastable form of water created by vapor deposition onto a cold substrate (typically less than 130 K). Since this unusual form of water only exists on earth in laboratories with highly specialized equipment, it is fair to ask why there is any interest in studying this esoteric material. Much of the scientific interest involves using ASW as a model system to explore the physical and reactive properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions. Other researchers are interested in ASW because it is believed to be the predominate form of water in the extreme cold temperatures found in many astrophysical and planetary environments. In addition, ASW is a convenient model system for studying the stability of metastable systems (glasses) and the properties of highly porous materials. A fundamental understanding of such properties has applications in a diverse range of disciplines including cryobiology, food science, pharmaceuticals, astrophysics and nuclear waste storage among others.There exist several excellent reviews on the properties of ASW and supercooled liquid water and a new comprehensive review is beyond the scope of this Account. Instead, we focus on our research over the past 15 years using molecular beams and surface science techniques to probe the thermal and non thermal properties of nanoscale films of ASW. We use molecular beams to precisely control the deposition conditions (flux, incident, energy, incident angle) to create compositionally-tailored, nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition temperatures, Tg, at which time they transform into deeply supercooled liquids prior to crystallization. The advantage of this approach is that at temperatures near Tg the viscosity is approximately 15 orders of magnitude larger than a normal liquid, and therefore the crystallization kinetics are dramatically slowed, increasing the time available for experiments. For example, near Tg, on a typical laboratory time scale (e.g. {approx}1000 s), a water molecule moves less than a molecular distance. For this reason, nanoscale films help to probe the behavior and reactions of supercooled liquid at these low temperatures. ASW films can be used for investigating the non-thermal reactions relevant to radiolysis. In this account we will present a survey of our research on the thermal and non thermal properties of ASW using this approach.

Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is large and growing interest in making a wide variety of materials and surfaces antimicrobial. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers ...

Martin, Tyler Philip, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Thin Film Deposition Method for Sensor Manufacturing  

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed an innovative method for gas sensor manufacturing using a thin film deposition. The thin film requires very little material and can be applied in high throughput applications.

210

Small Business Linked Deposit Program (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Small Business Linked Deposit Program provides below-market interest rates for qualified small businesses and certified industrial parks through local financing sources. Loans are for a two...

211

Linked Deposit Loan Program (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Linked Deposit Loan Program is targeted at small, private firms with 50 or fewer employees and gross annual revenues of $5 million or less comes. This loan offered through the West Virginia...

212

Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) by Laser Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Laser metal deposition is a layered manufacturing process which ... using a computer simulated model and relate a few metallurgical systems as ... of Square Plate and Poisson's Ratio Measurement at Cryogenic Temperatures.

213

THERMAL INSULATION MATERIALS TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 01/W01 CAN/CGSB-51.2-M88 Thermal Insulation, Calcium Silicate, for Piping, Machinery and Boilers _____ ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

NVLAP Thermal Insulation Materials LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for thermal insulation materials. The final report for Round 31 was released in February 2010. Proficiency testing is on hold ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of several boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but also lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Deposits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under-deposit corrosion represents the second leading mechanism of chemistry-influenced heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures (HTFs) and third leading cause of major availability losses. This report was prepared, in recognition of the lack of information, to assemble the state of knowledge on deposition in HRSG high-pressure (HP) evaporator tubing and to identify the major deficiencies in that knowledge. Findings of this effort can be used to establish immediate remediation and correction of...

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of a number of boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time.

Chalmers, Scott A. (Albuquerque, NM); Killeen, Kevin P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphene’s thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

Subrina, Samia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arens E. , and Wang D. 2004. "Thermal sensation and comfortin transient non-uniform thermal environments", European7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments – Determination of

Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

Ghosh, Suchismita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Standard 55-2004: Thermal environmental conditionsA behavioural approach to thermal comfort assessment inBerger, X. , 1998. Human thermal comfort at Nimes in summer

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Holographic Thermal Helicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal helicity, defined in arXiv:1211.3850, of a conformal field theory with anomalies in the context of AdS$_{2n+1}$/CFT$_{2n}$. To do so, we consider large charged rotating AdS black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant using fluid/gravity expansion. We compute the anomaly-induced current and stress tensor of the dual CFT in leading order of the fluid/gravity derivative expansion and show their agreement with the field theoretical replacement rule for the thermal helicity. Such replacement rule is reflected in the bulk by new replacement rules obeyed by the Hall currents around the black hole.

Tatsuo Azeyanagi; R. Loganayagam; Gim Seng Ng; Maria J. Rodriguez

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

230

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

234

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

239

Heat transfer characteristics of porous sludge deposits and their impact on the performance of commercial steam generators  

SciTech Connect

Steam generator (SG) fouling, in the form of corrosion deposits on the secondary sides of SG tubes, has been known to occur in almost all commercial US nuclear PWR (pressurized water reactor) plants. The level of fouling, as measured by the quantity of corrosion products that form, varies widely from plant to plant. In addition, the effect of SG fouling, as measured by a decrease in effective heat-transfer coefficient, has also varied substantially among commercial US plants. While some have observed large decreases in heat transfer, others have noted little change in performance despite the presence of significant quantities of secondary corrosion layers on their SG tubes. This observation has led to considerable confusion about what role secondary deposits play in causing heat-transfer degradation in SGs. As will become clear later in this report, secondary deposits can have a wide range of effects on heat transfer, from highly resistive to slightly enhancing (reflected by negative fouling). These different behaviors are the result of differences in deposit thickness, composition, and morphology. The main focus of this report is an investigation of the effects of secondary deposits on SG thermal performance. This investigation includes compilation of detailed information on the properties of tube scale at five commercial US nuclear plants and corresponding information characterizing SG thermal performance at these plants.

Kreider, M.A.; White, G.A.; Varrin, R.D.; Ouzts, P.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Title Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Huang, Zhuo, Michael G. Apte, and Lara A. Gundel Journal U.S. Department of Energy Journal of Undergraduate Research Volume 7 Pagination 37-42 Abstract The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25µm in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Melanie J. Hellman, Michael S. Ramsey (2004) Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Yellowstone_Region_(Hellman_%26_Ramsey,_2004)&oldid=401329" Category: Exploration Activities

242

Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemical characteristics of some major uranium deposits in western USA  

SciTech Connect

Multi-element chemical analyses of several thousand samples were retrieved from the US Geological Survey's computerized Rock Analysis Storage System and used to estimate the average abundances of various elements in each of several types of uranium deposits, in altered rocks associated with some of these deposits, and in unmineralized parts of the various host rocks. Deposits for which results are presented include the tabular deposits in the Morrison Formation, Ambrosia Lake district, New Mexico; secondary deposits in the Ambrosia Lake district; tabular deposits in the Morrison Formation of the Henry Mountains, Utah; tabular deposits in the Chinle Formation in Utah and Colorado; roll-type deposits in Tertiary rocks from the Texas Gulf district; roll-type deposits in the Tertiary basins of Wyoming; tabular deposits in the Entrada Sandstone in Colorado; and a vein-type deposit in crystalline rocks of the Front Range of Colorado. Statistical treatment of the data identified elements that were notably more or less abundant in the deposits and altered rocks than in the unmineralized parts of the host rocks. Comparisons of the mean abundances of elements in the deposits show that the chemical composition of roll-type deposits varies greatly even among deposits in the same district. By contrast, the chemical characteristics of tabular deposits display little variation; the Ambrosia Lake tabular deposits and those of the Henry Mountains district are particularly similar. The data place some constraints on the geochemical aspects of genetic models and suggest certain elements as potential prospecting guides.

Spirakis, C.S.; Pierson, C.T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program...........................................................................................................................11 #12;Table of Contents California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook ii 2.5 Surface

245

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, August 1992--October 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five borad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and miocrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Pyrolysis of four isomers of butylbenzene was investigated in static microautoclave reactors at 450{degrees}C under 0.69 MPa of UHP N{sub 2}. Thee rates of disappearance of substrates were found to depend upon the bonding energy of C{alpha}-C{beta} bond in the side chain in the initial period of pyrolysis reactions. Possible catalytic effects of metal surfaces on thermal degradation and deposit formation at temperatures >400{degrees}C have been studied. Carbon deposition depends on the composition of the metal surfaces, and also depends on the chemical compositions of the reactants. Thermal stressing of JP-8 was conducted in the presence of alumina, carbonaceous deposits recovered from earlier stressing experiments, activated carbon, carbon black, and graphite. The addition of different solid carbons during thermal stressing leads to different reaction mechanisms. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, along with {sup 13}C-labeling techniques, have been used to examine the thermal stability of a jet fuel sample mixed with 5% benzyl alcohol. Several heterometallic complexes consisting of two transition metals and sulfur in a single molecule were synthesized and tested as precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous and Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coals.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Bortiatynski, J.; Burgess, C.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Lai, W.C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Parfitt, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Yoon, E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

METAL-ORGANIC CHEMICALLY VAPOR DEPOSITED YTTRIA-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (YSZ) FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Rene-N5 during engine operation. The current method for YSZ fabrication for TBC applications is by air. The solution was delivered continuously by a syringe pump through a poppet-seal relief valve

249

High-rate chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films by radio frequency thermal plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by liquid spray injection of disilanes into an argon­hydrogen RF plasma operat- ing at 20­40 kPa [4]. Here

Zachariah, Michael R.

250

Electrodeposition of Technetium on Platinum for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel device has been fabricated for the electrodeposition of technetium metal onto platinum filaments for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) measurements. The ability of the device to focus the deposition to diameters of hundreds of micrometers on pre-mounted TIMS filaments coupled with the ease of use and simplicity of design permit for an extremely sensitive yet economical TIMS filament loading technique. Electrodeposition parameters were varied in order to maximize deposition efficiency. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to confirm and characterize the technetium deposit. The technetium is deposited in the metallic state, although surface oxides in the 4+ and 7+ state form readily. Initial TIMS measurements of the electrodeposited technetium in the presence of a barium sulfate ionization enhancer show potential for excellent sensitivity.

Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Delmore, James E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ballou, Nathan E.

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus.

Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Thermal spray coatings: New materials, processes and applications; Proceedings of the Second National Conference on Thermal Spray, Long Beach, CA, October 31-November 2, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-spray-coating techniques and their applications are discussed in reviews and reports of laboratory experiments and industrial experience. Topics explored include the future of thermal spraying, plasma-sprayed bonding coats for plastic substrates, plasma-spray deposition of hollow-particle ceramic powders, volumetric-feed-back powder-feed controllers, metal sprayed coating systems onboard U.S. Navy ships, high-performance plasma-sprayed coatings, and arc-coating technology and equipment. Consideration is given to cavitation-erosion of plasma-sprayed alloys, statistical methods of plasma-spray parameter testing, NDE of surface coatings by photothermal imaging, NDE of thermal-spray-coating bonds, and diamond-wheel grinding of thermal-spray materials.

Longo, F.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Thermal transient anemometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Multispectral thermal imaging  

SciTech Connect

Many remote sensing applications rely on imaging spectrometry. Here the authors use imaging spectrometry for thermal and multispectral signatures measured from a satellite platform enhanced with a combination of accurate calibrations and on-board data for correcting atmospheric distortions. The approach is supported by physics-based end-to-end modeling and analysis, which permits a cost-effective balance between various hardware and software aspects. The goal is to develop and demonstrate advanced technologies and analysis tools toward meeting the needs of the customer; at the same time, the attributes of this system can address other applications in such areas as environmental change, agriculture, and volcanology.

Weber, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Smith, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group; Garrett, A.; Pendergast, M.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Corp., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Kay, R.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Monitoring Systems and Technology Center

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing materials that can conduct electricity easily, but block the motion of phonons is necessary in the applications of thermoelectric devices, which can generate electricity from temperature differences. In converse, a key requirement as chips get faster is to obtain better ways to dissipate heat. Controlling heat transfer in these crystalline materials devices — such as silicon — is important. The heat is actually the motion or vibration of atoms known as phonons. Finding ways to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials — phononic crystals — might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many fields of physical sciences and engineering, acoustic wave propagation in solids attracts many researchers. Wave propagation phenomena can be analyzed by mathematically solving the acoustic wave equation. However, wave propagation in inhomogeneous media with various geometric structures is too complex to find an exact solution. Hence, the Finite Difference Time Domain method is developed to investigate these complicated problems. In this work, the Finite-Difference Time-Domain formula is derived from acoustic wave equations based on the Taylor’s expansion. The numerical dispersion and stability problems are analyzed. In addition, the convergence conditions of numerical acoustic wave are stated. Based on the periodicity of phononic crystal, the Bloch’s theorem is applied to fulfill the periodic boundary condition of the FDTD method. Then a wide-band input signal is used to excite various acoustic waves with different frequencies. In the beginning of the calculation process, the wave vector is chosen and fixed. By means of recording the displacement field and taking the Fourier transformation, we can obtain the eigenmodes from the resonance peaks of the spectrum and draw the dispersion relation curve of acoustic waves. With the large investment in silicon nanofabrication techniques, this makes tungsten/silicon phononic crystal a particularly attractive platform for manipulating thermal phonons. Phononic crystal makes use of the fundamental properties of waves to create band gap over which there can be no propagation of acoustic waves in the crystal. This crystal can be applied to deterministically manipulate the phonon dispersion curve affected by different crystal structures and to modify the phonon thermal conductivity accordingly. We can expect this unique metamaterial is a promising route to creating unprecedented thermal properties for highly-efficient energy harvesting and thermoelectric cooling.

Hsu, Chung-Hao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Plan was written to identify items stored outside of the 213 MBA that will be moved into the MBA for thermal stabilization processing. Product quality oxide items stored in our vaults are found in Appendix A. A table is included in Appendix A which details the isotopic values for the oxide items and calculates the amount of material of any specific run that can be placed in a product can and maintain the 15 watt limit to meet storage vault specifications. This Revision of the Blend Plan adds items of lesser dose rate to lower the exposure of the workers until additional shielding can be added to the gloveboxes.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Advanced solar thermal technology  

SciTech Connect

The application of dish solar collectors to industrial process heat (IPH) has been reviewed. IPH represents a market for displacement of fossil fuels (10 quads/y). A 10% market penetration would indicate a substantial market for solar thermal systems. Apparently, parabolic dish systems can produce IPH at a lower cost than that of troughs or compound parabolic concentrators, even though dish fabrication costs per unit area are more expensive. Successful tests of point-focusing collectors indicate that these systems can meet the energy requirements for process heat applications. Continued efforts in concentrator and transport technology development are needed. 7 figures.

Leibowitz, L.P.; Hanseth, E.; Liu, T.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Role of Ash Deposits in the High Temperature Corrosion of Boiler Tubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ash deposits cause accelerated corrosion of waterwall boiler tubes in waste to energy (WTE) incinerators. To study this effect, a series of experiments were planned to determine the mechanism of corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes under ash deposits. Results reported here were for carbon steel tubes exposed to an environment consisting of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and water vapor. Future experiments will include HCl and SO{sub 2}. Test procedures included both isothermal and thermal gradient tests. Temperatures ranged from 300 C to 510 C for the isothermal tests and a metal/gas temperature of 450/670 C for the thermal gradient test. Initial results indicated that increasing temperature caused the isothermal corrosion rates of ash-covered samples to increase. A shakedown test of a thermal gradient test apparatus was conducted at a metal/gas temperature of 450/670 C, a more severe environment than normally encountered in WTE waterwalls. Results showed that the corrosion rate under those conditions exceeds the isothermal corrosion rates at the same metal temperature by a factor of 2 or more.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Russell, J.H.; Cramer, S.D.; Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.; White, M.L.

2003-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hard thermal effective action in QCD through the thermal operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the application of the thermal operator to the zero temperature retarded Green's functions, we derive in a simple way the well known hard thermal effective action in QCD. By relating these functions to forward scattering amplitudes for on-shell particles, this derivation also clarifies the origin of important properties of the hard thermal effective action, such as the manifest Lorentz and gauge invariance of its integrand.

Ashok Das; J. Frenkel

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

2 Technology Description: Solar Thermal Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

– Parabolic troughs track sun, concentrate incident light onto a centralized, tubular receiver that runs length of each trough – Thermal fluid circulates through all receivers in solar field – Thermal fluid brought to one or more centralized power production facilities – Heat transferred to a steam cycle, drives a steam turbine to generate power – Cooled thermal fluid is then recirculated th through h solar fi field ld – Wet cooling is common, dry cooling possible

Timothy J. Skone; Risks Of Implementation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, A. Wayne (Albuquerque, NM); Omstead, Thomas R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Worldwide deposition of strontium-90 through 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strontium-90 results from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Global Fallout Program (GFP) are presented for the years 1987 through 1990. Quarterly {sup 90}Sr deposition results for the 66 sampling locations of EML`s GFP were generally low, indicating that there was no significant release of fission products into the atmosphere during this period. The global {sup 90}Sr deposition during these 4 years was lower than it has been for any similar period since this program began in 1958. Since there was no major atmospheric source of {sup 90}Sr during this period, the global cumulative deposit of {sup 90}Sr continued to decrease by radioactive decay to a 27 year low of 311.4 Pbq.

Monetti, M.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Line-of-sight deposition method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line-of-sight method of depositing a film having substantially 100% of theoretical density on a substrate. A pressure vessel contains a target source having a surface thereof capable of emitting particles therefrom and a substrate with the source surface and the substrate surface positioned such that the source surface is substantially parallel to the direction of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface, the distance between the most remote portion of the substrate surface receiving the particles and the source surface emitting the particles in a direction parallel to the substrate surface being relatively small. The pressure in the vessel is maintained less than about 5 microns to prevent scattering and permit line-of-sight deposition. By this method the angles of incidence of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface are in the range of from about 45/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/ even when the target surface area is greatly expanded to increase the deposition rate.

Patten, J.W.; McClanahan, E.D.; Bayne, M.A.

1980-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Line-of-sight deposition method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line-of-sight method of depositing a film having substantially 100% of theoretical density on a substrate. A pressure vessel contains a target source having a surface thereof capable of emitting particles therefrom and a substrate with the source surface and the substrate surface positioned such that the source surface is substantially parallel to the direction of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface, the distance between the most remote portion of the substrate surface receiving the particles and the source surface emitting the particles in a direction parallel to the substrate surface being relatively small. The pressure in the vessel is maintained less than about 5 microns to prevent scattering and permit line-of-sight deposition. By this method the angles of incidence of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface are in the range of from about 45.degree. to 90.degree. even when the target surface area is greatly expanded to increase the deposition rate.

Patten, James W. (Richland, WA); McClanahan, Edwin D. (Richland, WA); Bayne, Michael A. (West Richland, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Morphology effects on polydispersed aerosol deposition rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the analysis of severe nuclear accidents, accurate prediction of aerosol deposition is important since, among other things, this influences the distribution of radioactive decay heat within the primary system and containment compartments. The fact that the aerosol cloud is not comprised of dense isolated spherical particles of only one size inevitably complicates such calculations but must be taken into account. Some particle deposition mechanisms are more sensitive to particle size and morphology than others so that simplifying assumptions valid for one mechanism [such as particle thermophoresis (notoriously size and morphology insensitive)] may be seriously in error for others (e.g., convective Brownian diffusion or eddy impaction). This paper deals with aggregate aerosol deposition.

Rosner, D.E.; Tandon, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Khalil, Y.F. [Northeast Utilities Service Co., Berlin, CT (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Apparatus and method for laser deposition of durable coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are method and apparatus for depositing durable coatings onto the surface of a substrate without heating the entire substrate to high temperatures by using lasers to heat the substrate and dissociate a deposition gas. The apparatus comprises a deposition chamber for enclosing the substrate upon which a coating is to be deposited, gas delivery means for directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate, a first laser for heating the substrate, and a second laser for irradiating the deposition gas to dissociate the gas. The method includes placing a substrate within a vacuum deposition chamber and directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate. Then the substrate is heated with a first laser while the deposition gas is irradiated with a second laser to dissociate the deposition gas.

Veligdan, J.T.; Vanier, P.; Barletta, R.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermal and Structural Equilibrium Studies of Organic Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These organic materials undergo a solid-solid state phase transition before melting which will store large amounts of thermal energy. The binary system of ...

270

Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method of blasting a subterranean deposit  

SciTech Connect

A blasting method is described for mining of a subterranean oil-shale deposit. A raise is driven upward into a designated block of a subterranean oil-shale deposit from the roof of an undercutting cavity. A number of blasting holes are driven horizontally into the block from the raise in a fan-shaped pattern at each of a number of vertically spaced levels and are at least partially loaded with explosives. The charges are detonated sequentially in an upward progression to effect fragmentation and expansion of the overlaying block into the undercutting cavity. (11 claims)

Janssen, A.T.

1975-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

276

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

277

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ultra-low loading Pt nanocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition on carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Using atomic layer deposition (ALD), we show that Pt nanoparticles can be deposited on the inner surfaces of carbon aerogels (CA). The resultant Pt-loaded materials exhibit high catalytic activity for the oxidation of CO even at loading levels as low as {approx}0.05 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}. We observe a conversion efficiency of nearly 100% in the temperatures range 150-250 C, and the total conversion rate seems to be only limited by the thermal stability of our CA support in ambient oxygen. Our ALD approach described here is universal in nature, and can be applied to the design of new catalytic materials for a variety of applications, including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, pollution control, green chemistry, and liquid fuel production.

King, J S; Wittstock, A; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; Baumann, T F; Giri, S; Hamza, A V; Baeumer, M; Bent, S F

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thermal Flipping of Interstellar Grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interstellar dust grains, internal processes dissipate rotational kinetic energy. The dissipation is accompanied by thermal fluctuations, which transfer energy from the vibrational modes to rotation. Together, these processes are known as internal relaxation. For the past several years, internal relaxation has been thought to give rise to thermal flipping, with profound consequences for grain alignment theory. I show that thermal flipping is not possible in the limit that the inertia tensor does not vary with time.

Joseph C. Weingartner

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Shock waves in thermal lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review experimental investigation on spatial shock waves formed by the self-defocusing action of a laser beam propagation in a disordered thermal nonlinear media.

Gentilini, S; DeRe, E; Conti, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Thermal Barrier Coating Systems II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 26, 2009... on the application requirements and not on substrate physical properties such as thermal expansion rate Esp. within the same class of alloys.

283

Thermal Oxidation of Titanium Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and Thermal Study of Al2O3 Produced by Oxidation of Al-Powders Mixed with Corn Starch · Study of Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Composite ...

284

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test… (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ni-YSZ films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering for SOFC applications E. Rezugina(*), A.L. Thomann, H. Hidalgo, P. Brault(*), V. Dolique, Y. Tessier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Ni-YSZ films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering for SOFC applications E. Rezugina(*), A and fuel. At present, conventionally designed SOFCs operate at a relatively high temperature, between 800°C and 1000°C [2], which limits their field of application (problem of material thermal stability). SOFCs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inhomogeneous holographic thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sudden injection of energy in a strongly coupled conformal field theory and its subsequent thermalization can be holographically modeled by a shell falling into anti-de Sitter space and forming a black brane. For a homogeneous shell, Bhattacharyya and Minwalla were able to study this process analytically using a weak field approximation. Motivated by event-by-event fluctuations in heavy ion collisions, we include inhomogeneities in this model, obtaining analytic results in a long wavelength expansion. In the early-time window in which our approximations can be trusted, the resulting evolution matches well with that of a simple free streaming model. Near the end of this time window, we find that the stress tensor approaches that of second-order viscous hydrodynamics. We comment on possible lessons for heavy ion phenomenology.

V. Balasubramanian; A. Bernamonti; J. de Boer; B. Craps; L. Franti; F. Galli; E. Keski-Vakkuri; B. Müller; A. Schäfer

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. A plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

Bennett, G.A.; Moore, T.K.

1986-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

Chang, C.C.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?˘ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?˘ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?˘ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?˘ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Plan was written to identify items stored outside of the 213 MBA that will be moved into the MBA for thermal stabilization processing. Product quality oxide items stored in our vaults are found in Appendix B. A table is included in Appendix B which details the isotopic values for the oxide items and calculates the amount of material of any specific run that can be placed in a product can and maintain the 15 watt limit to meet storage vault specifications. There is no chance of exceeding the 15 watt limit with items starting with the designations ''LAO'' or ''PBO.'' All items starting with the designations ''BO,'' ''BLO,'' and ''DZ0'' are at risk of exceeding the 15 watt specification if the can were to be filled.

RISENMAY, H.R.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thermally stabilized heliostat  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement being characterized by an internal support structure within each mirror module and front and back sheets attached to the internal support structure, the front and back sheets having the same coefficient of thermal expansion such that no curvature is induced by temperature change, and a layer of adhesive adhering the mirror to the front sheet. The adhesive is water repellent and has adequate set strength to support the mirror but has sufficient shear tolerance to permit the differential expansion of the mirror and the front sheet without inducing stresses or currature effect. The adhesive also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and to protect the mirror backside against the adverse effects of weather. Also disclosed are specific details of the preferred embodiment.

Anderson, Alfred J. (Littleton, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Review of US Nanocorp - SNL Joint Development of Thermal-Sprayed Thin-Film Cathodes for Thermal Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of plasma spray to deposit thin metal-sulfide cathode films is described in this paper. Conventional electroactive stack components in thermal batteries are constructed from pressed-powder parts that are difficult to fabricate in large diameters in thicknesses <0.010. Plasma-sprayed electrodes do not steer from this difficulty, allowing greater energy densities and specific energies to be realized. Various co-spraying agents have been found suitable for improving the mechanical as well as electrochemical properties of plasma-sprayed cathodes for thermal batteries. These electrodes generally show equal or improved performance over conventional pressed-powder electrodes. A number of areas for future growth and development of plasma-spray technology is discussed.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; DAI,JINXIANG; XIAO,T. DANNY; REISNER,DAVID E.

2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate the pyrolysis of n-butylbenzene in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. A number of similarities to trends previously observed in high-pressure static reactions were identified. The product distribution from pyrolysis of n-tetradecane at 400{degrees}C and 425{degrees}C was investigated. The critical temperatures of a suite of petroleum- and coal-derived jet fuels were measured by a rapidly heating sealed tube method. Work has continued on refining the measurements of deposit growth for stressing mixtures of coal-derived JP-8C with tetradecane. Current work has given emphasis to the initial stages of fuel decomposition and the onset of deposition. Pretreatment of JPTS fuel with PX-21 activated carbon (50 mg of PX-21 in 15 mL JPTS) delayed degradation and prevented carbon deposition during thermal stressing at 425{degrees}C for 5 h in nitrogen and air atmospheres. Clear indications of initial and subsequent deposit formation on different metal surfaces have been identified for thermal stressing of dodecane. Seven additives were tested for their ability to retard decomposition of dodecane at 450{degrees}C under nitrogen. Nuclear magnetic resonance data for Dammar resin indicates that structures proposed in the literature are not entirely correct.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nanoscale thermal transport and the thermal conductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption depends on temperature of the nanotube · Assume heat capacity is comparable to graphite · Cooling conductance · Pump probe apparatus · Transient absorption ­ Carbon nanotubes and thermal transport at hard optical absorption of nanoparticles and nanotubes in liquid suspensions. ­ Measure the thermal relaxation

Braun, Paul

297

Selective Area ALD Deposition with Nanolithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-defined nano-patterned surfaces after metal-oxide deposition will be ... Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Processing of Titanium Using Equal ... of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-Trifluoroethylene) Copolymer Films ... Sonochemistry as a Tool for Synthesis of Ion-Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles.

298

Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

Fitch, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Deposition Diagnostics for Next-step Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scale-up of deposition in next-step devices such as ITER will pose new diagnostic challenges. Codeposition of hydrogen with carbon needs to be characterized and understood in the initial hydrogen phase in order to mitigate tritium retention and qualify carbon plasma facing components for DT operations. Plasma facing diagnostic mirrors will experience deposition that is expected to rapidly degrade their reflectivity, posing a new challenge to diagnostic design. Some eroded particles will collect as dust on interior surfaces and the quantity of dust will be strictly regulated for safety reasons - however diagnostics of in-vessel dust are lacking. We report results from two diagnostics that relate to these issues. Measurements of deposition on NSTX with 4 Hz time resolution have been made using a quartz microbalance in a configuration that mimics that of a typical diagnostic mirror. Often deposition was observed immediately following the discharge suggesting that diagnostic shutters should be closed as soon as possible after the time period of interest. Material loss was observed following a few discharges. A novel diagnostic to detect surface particles on remote surfaces was commissioned on NSTX.

C.H. Skinner; A.L. Roquemore; the NSTX team; A. Bader; W.R. Wampler

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Simulation of surface roughness during the formation of thermal spray coatings  

SciTech Connect

The formation of a thermal spray coating was analyzed to identify methods to reduce the surface roughness of the coating. A new methodology was developed which uses a string of equally spaced node points to define the shape of the coating surface and to track the shape change as the thermal spray mass is deposited. This allows the calculation of arbitrary shapes for the coating surface which may be very complex. The model simulates the stochastic deposition of a large number of thermal spray droplets, where experimental data is used for the mass flux distribution on the target surface. This data shows that when the thermal spray mass impinges on the target surface, a large fraction of it (over-spray) splashes off the target and is re-deposited with a small spray angle, resulting in a large coating roughness. This analysis was used in a parameter study to identify methods for reducing the coating roughness. Effect of the shape of the profile for the pre-roughened substrate was found to be small. Decreasing the droplet size by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 13%. Increasing the spray angle for the over-spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 50%, and decreasing the amount of over- spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 51%.

Kanouff, M.P.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

In situ high temperature crystallization study of sputter deposited amorphous W-Fe-C films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural behavior of amorphous W[sub 46]Fe[sub 13]C[sub 41] and W[sub 36]Fe[sub 31]C[sub 33] films produced by sputtering have been studied in situ during annealing up to [approximately] 950 C by means of hot stage transmission electron microscopy. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction were used as complementary experimental techniques. The results are presented and correlated with the equilibrium phases anticipated from the W-Fe-C ternary phase diagram and with previous studied on similar films deposited and annealed onto substrates.

Trindade, B.; Vieira, M.T. (Univ. de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica); Grosse, E.B. (National Superieure des Mines de Nancy (France). Lab. de Sciences et Genie des Surfaces)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermal sensation and comfort in transient non-uniform thermal environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling applied cooling removed Thermal Sensation Skincooling = 14°C cooling removed Thermal Sensation We measureda hand cooling test Models to predict thermal sensation and

Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie; Arens, Edward; Wang, Danni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermal sensation and comfort in transient non-uniform thermal environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments. and evaluating thermal 6.0 References AttiaM, Engel P (1981) Thermal alliesthesial response in man isof vehicle climate with a thermal manikin - the relationship

Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie; Arens, Edward; Wang, Danni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Determination of thermal parameters of one-dimensional nanostructures through a thermal transient method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements bythe heat pulse method for thermal transport measurements ofG. Speci?c heat and thermal conductivity measurements on

Arriagada, A.; Yu, E. T.; Bandaru, P. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submittedConcentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey Lee Hardin

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated SolarMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Ivanov, Ilya N. (Knoxville, TN); Puretzky,; Alexander A. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal conductivity Measurements of Kaolite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was performed to determine the thermal conductivity of Kaolite 1600, which primarily consists of Portland cement and vermiculite. The material was made by Thermal Ceramics for refractory applications. Its combination of light weight, low density, low cost, and noncombustibility made it an attractive alternative to the materials currently used in ES-2 container for radioactive materials. Mechanical properties and energy absorption tests of the Kaolite have been conducted at the Y-12 complex. Heat transfer is also an important factor for the application of the material. The Kaolite samples are porous and trap moisture after extended storage. Thermal conductivity changes as a function of moisture content below 100 C. Thermal conductivity of the Kaolite at high temperatures (up to 700 C) are not available in the literature. There are no standard thermal conductivity values for Kaolite because each sample is somewhat different. Therefore, it is necessary to measure thermal conductivity of each type of Kaolite. Thermal conductivity measurements will help the modeling and calculation of temperatures of the ES-2 containers. This report focuses on the thermal conductivity testing effort at ORNL.

Wang, H

2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermal conductivity of aqueous foam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity plays an important part in the response of aqueous foams used as geothermal drilling fluids. The thermal conductivity of these foams was measured at ambient conditions using the thermal conductivity probe technique. Foam densities studied were from 0.03 to 0.2 g/cm/sup 3/, corresponding to liquid volume fractions of the same magnitude. Microscopy of the foams indicated bubble sizes in the range 50 to 300 ..mu..m for nitrogen foams, and 30 to 150 ..mu..m for helium foams. Bubble shapes were observed to be polyhedral at low foam densities and spherical at the higher densities. The measured conductivity values ranged from 0.05 to 0.12 W/m-K for the foams studied. The predicted behavior in foam conductivity caused by a change in the conductivity of the discontinuous gas phase was observed using nitrogen or helium gas in the foams. Analysis of the probe response data required an interpretation using the full intergral solution to the heat conduction equation, since the thermal capacity of the foam was small relative to the thermal mass of the probe. The measurements of the thermal conductivity of the foams were influenced by experimental effects such as the probe input power, foam drainage, and the orientation of the probe and test cell. For nitrogen foams, the thermal conductivity vs liquid volume fraction was observed to fall between predictions based on the parallel ordering and Russell models for thermal conduction in heterogeneous materials.

Drotning, W.D.; Ortega, A.; Havey, P.E.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2009. It addresses relevant policies in the United States and internationally, technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2008. It addresses technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by EPRI and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Near-field thermal transistor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a block of three separated solid elements, a thermal source and drain together with a gate made of an insulator-metal transition material exchanging near-field thermal radiation, we introduce a nanoscale analog of a field-effect transistor which is able to control the flow of heat exchanged by evanescent thermal photons between two bodies. By changing the gate temperature around its critical value, the heat flux exchanged between the hot body (source) and the cold body (drain) can be reversibly switched, amplified, and modulated by a tiny action on the gate. Such a device could find important applications in the domain of nanoscale thermal management and it opens up new perspectives concerning the development of contactless thermal circuits intended for information processing using the photon current rather than the electric current.

Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

State-of-Knowledge on Deposition, Part 2: Assessment of Deposition Activity in Fossil Plant Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 20 years, substantial advances have been made in the understanding and control of fossil plant cycle chemistry. In spite of these advances, deposition activity, most notably in boilers and steam turbines, remains an issue of concern to many organizations that operate fossil units. The underlying science of deposition in fossil unit components has not, with the exception of steam turbines, been studied extensively under the EPRI Boiler and Turbine Steam and Cycle Chemistry Program. This repo...

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes  

SciTech Connect

Accidents involving release of large (multi-ton) quantities of toxic industrial chemicals often yield far fewer fatalities and causalities than standard, widely-used assessment and emergency response models predict. While recent work has suggested that models should incorporate the protection provided by buildings, more refined health effect methodologies, and more detailed consideration of the release process; investigations into the role of deposition onto outdoor surfaces has been lacking. In this paper, we examine the conditions under which dry deposition may significantly reduce the extent of the downwind hazard zone. We provide theoretical arguments that in congested environments (e.g. suburbs, forests), deposition to vertical surfaces (such as building walls) may play a significant role in reducing the hazard zone extent--particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. Our analysis suggests that in these urban or suburban environments, the amount of toxic chemicals lost to earth's surface is typically a small fraction of overall depositional losses. For isothermal gases such as chlorine, the degree to which the chemicals stick to (or react with) surfaces (i.e. surface resistance) is demonstrated to be a key parameter controlling hazard extent (the maximum distance from the release at which hazards to human health are expected). This analysis does not consider the depositional effects associated with particulate matter or gases that undergo significant thermal change in the atmosphere. While no controlled experiments were available to validate our hypothesis, our analysis results are qualitatively consistent with the observed downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine accidents.

Dillon, M B

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Solar Thermal Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with â??Kalwallâ?? building panels. An added feature of the â??Kalwallâ?ť system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cesium capsule thermal analysis  

SciTech Connect

Double-walled stainless steel capsules, produced by the Hanford Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF), were designed to facilitate storage of radioactive cesium chloride (CsCl). The capsules were later determined to be a useful resource for irradiation facilities (IFs), and are currently being used at several commercial IFs. A capsule at one of these facilities recently failed, resulting in a release of the CsCl. A thermal analysis of a WESF capsule was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. In this analysis, parametric calculations demonstrates the impact that various parameters have on the temperature distribution within a capsule in a commercial irradiation facility. Specifically, the effect of varying the gas gap conductivity, the exterior heat sink temperatures, the exterior heat transfer distribution, the stainless steel emissivity, and the gamma heating rate were addressed. In addition, a calculation was performed to estimate the highest temperatures likely to have been encountered in one of these capsules. 8 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

Eyler, L.L.; Dodge, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermally activated heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

This article describes research to develop efficient gas-fired heat pumps heat and cool buildings without CFCs. Space heating and cooling use 46% of all energy consumed in US buildings. Air-conditioning is the single leading cause of peak demand for electricity and is a major user of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Advanced energy conversion technology can save 50% of this energy and eliminate CFCs completely. Besides saving energy, advanced systems substantially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas), sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides, which contribute to smog and acid rain. These emissions result from the burning of fossil fuels used to generate electricity. The Office of Building Technologies (OBT) of the US Department of Energy supports private industry`s efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in buildings. To help industry, OBT, through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is currently working on thermally activated heat pumps. OBT has selected the following absorption heat pump systems to develop: generator-absorber heat-exchange (GAX) cycle for heating-dominated applications in residential and light commercial buildings; double-condenser-coupled (DCC) cycle for commercial buildings. In addition, OBT is developing computer-aided design software for investigating the absorption cycle.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fabrication of nano-hole array patterns on transparent conducting oxide layer using thermally curable nanoimprint lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, periodic array of nano-sized holes was fabricated in an indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, deposited onto a glass substrate with nanoimprint lithography. As a result of a thermally curing imprint process, hole array patterns with a diameter ... Keywords: Indium tin oxide (ITO), Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), Patterned transparent electrode, Photonic crystals, Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer

Kyeong-Jae Byeon; Seon-Yong Hwang; Heon Lee

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices prepared by chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of higher order silanes. Annual subcontract progress report, 1 September 1984-31 August 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and photovoltaic devices by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes and the properties of such films and devices. The research explored new deposition techniques that could produce a-Si:H superior to that achieved by the glow-discharge method. For example, the improvement could stem from ease of deposition (lower cost and/or better reproducibility), from material improvement (higher efficiency and/or better stability under illumination), or from innovative materials that improve device performance. Research focused on photo-CVD techniques; thermal CVD deemphasized. This report presents results for deposition by mercury-sensitized decomposition of disilane. These results indicate that this technique is a very promising alternative to the glow-discharge method.

Delahoy, A.E.; Ellis, F.B. Jr.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs remain cooler than absorptive roofs and thus conserve electricity otherwise needed for air conditioning. A currently controversial aspect of solar-reflective cool roofing is the extent to which an initially high solar reflectance decreases with time. We present experimental data on the spectral absorption of deposits that accumulate on roofs, and we attribute most of the absorption to carbon soot originally produced by combustion. The deposits absorb more at short wavelengths (e.g., in the blue) than in the red and infrared, imparting a slightly yellow tinge to formerly white surfaces. The initial rate of reflectance reduction by soot accumulation is consistent with known emission rates that are due to combustion. The long-term reflectance change appears to be determined by the ability of the soot to adhere to the roof, resisting washout by rain.

Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Rose, Leanna S.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Apparatus and method for photochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical vapor deposition apparatus includes a reactor housing having a window in one wall above a reaction chamber in the housing. A transparent curtain divides the reaction chamber into a reaction zone and a flush zone. At least one substrate is mounted in the reaction zone in light communication with the window so that ultraviolet radiation may penetrate through the window into the reaction zone. The window is kept clear by a gas flowing through the flush zone.

Jackson, Scott C. (Wilmington, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Electrostatic force assisted deposition of graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An embodiment of a method of depositing graphene includes bringing a stamp into contact with a substrate over a contact area. The stamp has at least a few layers of the graphene covering the contact area. An electric field is developed over the contact area. The stamp is removed from the vicinity of the substrate which leaves at least a layer of the graphene substantially covering the contact area.

Liang, Xiaogan (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite CPt thin-films Title Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite CPt thin-films Publication Type Journal...

329

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Title Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Publication Type...

330

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advancd thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding them formation of vcarbonaceous solids; and, (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A molecular view of vapor deposited glasses  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel organic glassy materials that exhibit remarkable stability have been prepared by vapor deposition. The thermophysical properties of these new ''stable'' glasses are equivalent to those that common glasses would exhibit after aging over periods lasting thousands of years. The origin of such enhanced stability has been elusive; in the absence of detailed models, past studies have discussed the formation of new polyamorphs or that of nanocrystals to explain the observed behavior. In this work, an atomistic molecular model of trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is used to examine the properties of vapor-deposited stable glasses. Consistent with experiment, the model predicts the formation of stable glasses having a higher density, a lower enthalpy, and higher onset temperatures than those of the corresponding ''ordinary'' glass formed by quenching the bulk liquid. Simulations reveal that newly formed layers of the growing vapor-deposited film exhibit greater mobility than the remainder of the material, thereby enabling a reorganization of the film as it is grown. They also reveal that ''stable'' glasses exhibit a distinct layered structure in the direction normal to the substrate that is responsible for their unusual properties.

Singh, Sadanand; Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Advanced nanofabrication of thermal emission devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanofabricated thermal emission devices can be used to modify and modulate blackbody thermal radiation. There are many areas in which altering thermal radiation is extremely useful, especially in static power conversion, ...

Hurley, Fergus (Fergus Gerard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in...

335

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersA. 1957. Steady State Free Thermal Convection of Liquid in a1958. An Experiment on Free Thermal Convection of Water in

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Development of Thermals from Rest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional techniques for releasing a thermal in laboratory experiments induce enough initial motion to affect seriously the thermal's subsequent evolution. We have invented a mechanism for releasing thermals from very close to a state of rest. ...

Odňn Sŕnchez; David J. Raymond; Larry Libersky; Albert G. Petschek

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reduced Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Silicon Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alpha1=k1/(density1*cp1); %Thermal diffusivity of PMMA B1=Simon R. Phillpot, “Nanoscale Thermal Transport”, Journal of9] E.T. Swartz, R.O. Pohl, “Thermal Boundary Resistance”,

Yuen, Taylor S.

338

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power plants, thermal power plants(fuel, nuclear),reject heat from thermal power plants can only be re-protection is the thermal electric power plant. Electric

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electrochemical deposition of high purity silicon from molten fluoride ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Electrochemical deposition of high purity ...

342

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

343

Rapid thermal processing by stamping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rapid thermal processing device and methods are provided for thermal processing of samples such as semiconductor wafers. The device has components including a stamp (35) having a stamping surface and a heater or cooler (40) to bring it to a selected processing temperature, a sample holder (20) for holding a sample (10) in position for intimate contact with the stamping surface; and positioning components (25) for moving the stamping surface and the stamp (35) in and away from intimate, substantially non-pressured contact. Methods for using and making such devices are also provided. These devices and methods allow inexpensive, efficient, easily controllable thermal processing.

Stradins, Pauls; Wang, Qi

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) studies oil recovery mechanisms relevant to thermal and heavy-oil production. The scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. In August of 2000 we received funding from the U. S. DOE under Award No. DE-FC26-00BC15311 that completed December 1, 2003. The project was cost shared with industry. Heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o} API) is an underutilized energy resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods. Heating reduces oil viscosity dramatically. Hence, thermal recovery is especially important because adding heat, usually via steam injection generally improves displacement efficiency. The objectives of this work were to improve our understanding of the production mechanisms of heavy oil under both primary and enhanced modes of operation. The research described spanned a spectrum of topics related to heavy and thermal oil recovery and is categorized into: (1) multiphase flow and rock properties, (2) hot fluid injection, (3) improved primary heavy-oil recovery, (4) in-situ combustion, and (5) reservoir definition. Technology transfer efforts and industrial outreach were also important to project effort. The research tools and techniques used were quite varied. In the area of experiments, we developed a novel apparatus that improved imaging with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and high-pressure micromodels etched with realistic sandstone roughness and pore networks that improved visualization of oil-recovery mechanisms. The CT-compatible apparatus was invaluable for investigating primary heavy-oil production, multiphase flow in fractured and unfractured media, as well as imbibition. Imbibition and the flow of condensed steam are important parts of the thermal recovery process. The high-pressure micromodels were used to develop a conceptual and mechanistic picture of primary heavy-oil production by solution gas drive. They allowed for direct visualization of gas bubble formation, bubble growth, and oil displacement. Companion experiments in representative sands and sandstones were also conducted to understand the mechanisms of cold production. The evolution of in-situ gas and oil saturation was monitored with CT scanning and pressure drop data. These experiments highlighted the importance of depletion rate, overburden pressure, and oil-phase chemistry on the cold production process. From the information provided by the experiments, a conceptual and numerical model was formulated and validated for the heavy-oil solution gas drive recovery process. Also in the area of mechanisms, steamdrive for fractured, low permeability porous media was studied. Field tests have shown that heat injected in the form of steam is effective at unlocking oil from such reservoir media. The research reported here elucidated how the basic mechanisms differ from conventional steamdrive and how these differences are used to an advantage. Using simulations of single and multiple matrix blocks that account for details of heat transfer, capillarity, and fluid exchange between matrix and fracture, the importance of factors such as permeability contrast between matrix and fracture and oil composition were quantified. Experimentally, we examined the speed and extent to which steam injection alters the permeability and wettability of low permeability, siliceous rocks during thermal recovery. Rock dissolution tends to increase permeability moderately aiding in heat delivery, whereas downstream the cooled fluid deposits silica reducing permeability. Permeability reduction is not catastrophic. With respect to wettability, heat shifts rock wettability toward more water wet conditions. This effect is beneficial for the production of heavy and medium gravity oils as it improves displacement efficiency. A combination of analytical and numerical studies was used to examine the efficiency of reservoir heating using nonconventional wells such as horizontal and multi

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during pulse excimer laser interaction with materials Title Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...

349

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Title Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Publication Type...

350

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Thermal Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Field Tests Joseph H. Klems, LBNL DOE PEER Review San Francisco, CA April 20, 1999 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Current Work l Skylight Thermal Performance *...

351

Definition: Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Gradient Holes "A hole logged by a temperature probe to determine the thermal gradient. Usually involves a hole...

352

Stewart Thermal Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stewart Thermal Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Stewart Thermal Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product Provides specialist advice in the field of biomass energy....

353

Solar Thermal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalElectric&o...

354

Development of Low Thermal Expansion Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For heat resistant alloys it is useful to decrease the thermal expansion for improved adherance of low thermal expansion ceramic coatings like silicon nitride,.

355

Solar Thermal Process Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalPr...

356

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Place North Carolina Zip 27709-3981 Product String representation "Manufactures ad...

357

Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atxix List of Tables Phonon transport regimes – Length scaleRIVERSIDE Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and

Subrina, Samia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

359

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family...

360

Electrospun Polymer Nanofiber Composite as Thermal Neutron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium-6 isotope has a significant thermal neutron cross-section and produces high energy charged particles on thermal neutron absorption. In this research ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a source of photovoltaic energy is rapidly increasingphotovoltaic cells under concentrated illumination: a critical review," Solar Energyphotovoltaic/thermal collector, PV/T, and it utilizes both electrical and heat energies

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Thermal insulation of window glass  

SciTech Connect

The thermal insulation of window glass can be increased by a factor of two using spray-on semiconductive SnO/sub 2/: Sb or IN/sub 2/O/sub 3/: Sn coatings. (auth)

Sievers, A.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Research Article Building Thermal, Lighting,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Article Building Thermal, Lighting, and Acoustics Modeling E-mail: yanda@tsinghua.edu.cn A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST...

364

Thermal Equilibration of Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibration of planetary waves toward free-mode forms, steady solutions of the unforced, undamped equations of motion, is studied in a three-level quasi-geostrophic model on the hemisphere. A thermal mechanism is invoked, parameterized as a ...

John Marshall; Damon W. K. So

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

366

Solar thermal electric hybridization issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric systems have an advantage over many other renewable energy technologies because the former use heat as an intermediate energy carrier. This is an advantage as it allows for a relatively simple method of hybridization by using heat from fossil-fuel. Hybridization of solar thermal electric systems is a topic that has recently generated significant interest and controversy and has led to many diverse opinions. This paper discusses many of the issues associated with hybridization of solar thermal electric systems such as what role hybridization should play; how it should be implemented; what are the efficiency, environmental, and cost implications; what solar fraction is appropriate; how hybrid systems compete with solar-only systems; and how hybridization can impact commercialization efforts for solar thermal electric systems.

Williams, T A; Bohn, M S; Price, H W

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermal spray and cold spray analysis of density, porosity, and tensile Specimens for use with LIGA applications  

SciTech Connect

This analysis provides a preliminary investigation into using Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray and Cold Spray as material deposition processes for LIGA applications. These spray material processes were studied to make an initial determination of their potential as alternatives to producing mechanical parts via the electroplating process. Three materials, UltraMachinable{reg_sign} Stainless Steel, BondArc{reg_sign}, and aluminum, were sprayed using Thermal Spray. Only aluminum was sprayed using the Cold Spray process. Following the spray procedure, the test specimens were released from a copper mold and then tested. Three tests, density, tensile strength, and porosity, were performed on the specimens to determine the spray effect on material properties. Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray did not demonstrate adequate deposition properties and does not appear to be a good process candidate for LIGA. However, Cold Spray yielded better density results and warrants further investigation to analyze the minimum feature size produced by the process.

DECKER,MERLIN K.; SMITH,MARK F.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

CHLORIDE DEPOSITION FROM STEAM ONTO SUPERHEATER FUEL CLAD MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

Experimemts using Cl/sup 36/ in a steam test loop were conducted to study the deposition behavior of chlorides on BONUS superheater fuel assembly materials. The moisture content of the steam was varied between 0 and 0.5 wt%, and superheat was added up to 15 deg F before the steam passed over the test cartridge heater. The effects of vaiiables on the chloride deposition on the heater were studied in detail. Chloride deposition from moist steam was found to result in heavy, adherent deposits which are conducive to severe chloride stress corrosion of austenitic steels, while removal of all moisture from the incoming steam reduces the chloride deposition and minimizes the chloride stress corrosion. The heater surface condition was found to be a very important variable; deposition is increased by surface defects and pits. Neither the temperature of steam or heater nor the amount of superheat had an appreciable effect on the deposition, when no moisture existed in the steam. However, low steam velocities and spacer protoberances increase the deposition. Different clad materials (Inconel and Type 304 and 347 stainless steel) with similar surface conditions did not affect the deposition, although subsequent corrosion effects do modify the deposition behavior. Recommendations are given for the control of chloride deposition in nuclear superheater reactor systems. (D.L.C.)

Bevilacqua, F.; Brown, G.M.

1963-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Thermal Photoacoustic Characterization of Polymeric Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit · Direct Precipitation of ... High Temperature Exposure of Oil Well Cements.

373

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

near-term means to dramatica?yl-y increase gas turbine inZet temperatures beyond those .... in rapid response furnaces, natural gas torch rigs, and Mach 1 burner rigs (5). Figure 3, adapted from .... under which liquid deposits are stable are.

375

The Nature of Thermal Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was shown recently that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character, and it is quite possible that thermal black body radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. The induced origin of thermal black body emission leads to important astrophysical consequences, such as the existence of laser type sources and thermal harmonics in stellar spectra.

F. V. Prigara

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Thermal Modeling of Hybrid Storage Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lack of thermal models for storage clusters; most existing thermal models do not take into account the utilization of hard drives (HDDs) and solid state disks (SSDs). To address this problem, we build a thermal model for hybrid storage clusters ... Keywords: Cluster, Hybrid, Model, Storage, Thermal

Xunfei Jiang; Maen M. Al Assaf; Ji Zhang; Mohammed I. Alghamdi; Xiaojun Ruan; Tausif Muzaffar; Xiao Qin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents the objectives and motivations for a battery thermal management vehicle system design study.

Kim, G-H.; Pesaran, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Solar thermal power systems. Program summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each of DOE's solar Thermal Power Systems projects funded and/or in existence during FY 1978 is described and the status as of September 30, 1978 is reflected. These projects are divided as follows: small thermal power applications, large thermal power applications, and advanced thermal technology. Also included are: 1978 project summary tables, bibliography, and an alphabetical index of contractors. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Device for thermal transfer and power generation  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided. The system includes a device that includes top and bottom thermally conductive substrates positioned opposite to one another, wherein a top surface of the bottom thermally conductive substrate is substantially atomically flat and a thermal blocking layer disposed between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates. The device also includes top and bottom electrodes separated from one another between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates to define a tunneling path, wherein the top electrode is disposed on the thermal blocking layer and the bottom electrode is disposed on the bottom thermally conductive substrate.

Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Arik, Mehmet (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dynamics of nucleation in chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the evolution of layer morphology during the early stages of metal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto Si(100) via pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} below 250{degrees}C. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that nuclei formation is limited by precursor dissociation which occurs on terraces, not at step sites. Also, the average size of clusters formed during CVD is larger than for Fe growth by evaporation (a random deposition process). Based on STM data and Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that the CVD-growth morphology is affected by preferential dissociation of Fe(CO){sub 5} molecules at existing Fe clusters -- an autocatalytic effect. We demonstrate that nucleation kinetics can be used to control formation of metal nanostructures on chemically tailored surfaces. Reactive sites on Si (001) are first passivated by hydrogen. H atoms are locally removed by electron stimulated desorption using electrons emitted from the STM tip. Subsequent pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} leads to selective nucleation and growth of Fe films in the areas where H has been removed.

Mayer, T.M.; Adams, D.P.; Swartzentruber, B.S.; Chason, E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

Milleron, N.

1962-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Second thermal storage applications workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Validation of ATR Fission Power Deposition Fraction in HEU and LEU Fuel Plates  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power (250 MW), high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. Because of its high power and large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR full core model has been developed and validated for the low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion feasibility study. Using this model, an analysis has been performed to determine the LEU density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and LEU cores. This model has also been used to optimize U-235 content of the LEU core, minimizing the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU cores at 115 MW total core power for 125 EFPDs. The LEU core conversion feasibility study evaluated foil type (U-10Mo) fuel with the LEU reference design of 19.7 wt% U-235 enrichment. The LEU reference design has a fixed fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm and can sustain the same operating cycle length as the HEU fuel. Heat flux and fission power density are parameters that are proportional to the fraction of fission power deposited in fuel. Thus, the accurate determination of the fraction of fission power deposited in the fuel is important to ATR nuclear safety. In this work, a new approach was developed and validated, the Tally Fuel Cells Only (TFCO) method. This method calculates and compares the fission power deposition fraction between HEU and LEU fuel plates. Due to the high density of the U-10Mo LEU fuel, the fission ?-energy deposition fraction is 37.12%, which is larger than the HEU’s ?-energy deposition fraction of 19.7%. As a result, the fuel decay heat cooling will need to be improved. During the power operation, the total fission energy (200 MeV per fission) deposition fraction of LEU and HEU are 90.9% and 89.1%, respectively.

G. S. Chang

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, July 1994--September 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 3 subtasks which are described: Pyrolysis of n-alkylbenzenes; Thermal decomposition of n-tetradecane in near-critical region; and Re-examining the effects of reactant and inert gas pressure on tetradecane pyrolysis--Effect of cold volume in batch reactor. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, is subtask, Effects of high surface area activated carbon and decalin on thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Screening potential jet fuel stabilizers using the model compound dodecane; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, is subtask, Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels. 25 refs., 64 figs., 22 tabs.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A global fouling factor methodology for analyzing steam generator thermal performance degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past few years, steam generator (SG) thermal performance degradation has led to decreased plant efficiency and power output at numerous PWR nuclear power plants with recirculating-type SGs. The authors have developed and implemented methodologies for quantitatively evaluating the various sources of SG performance degradation, both internal and external to the SG pressure boundary. These methodologies include computation of the global fouling factor history, evaluation of secondary deposit thermal resistance using deposit characterization data, and consideration of pressure loss causes unrelated to the tube bundle, such as hot-leg temperature streaming and SG moisture separator fouling. In order to evaluate the utility of the global fouling factor methodology, the authors performed case studies for a number of PWR SG designs. Key results from two of these studies are presented here. In tandem with the fouling-factor analyses, a study evaluated for each plant the potential causes of pressure loss. The combined results of the global fouling factor calculations and the pressure-loss evaluations demonstrated two key points: (1) that the available thermal margin against fouling, which can vary substantially from plant to plant, has an important bearing on whether a given plant exhibits losses in electrical generating capacity, and (2) that a wide variety of causes can result in SG thermal performance degradation.

Kreider, M.A.; White, G.A.; Varrin, R.D. Jr. [Dominion Engineering, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Cornell University Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort Thermal comfort in the CUSD home is a top priority for our team. Accordingly, we designed a redundant HVAC system that would carefully manage the comfort of our decathletes and guests throughout the competition and the life of the house. The CUSD home's HVAC system was optimized for Washington, DC, with the cold Ithaca climate in mind. Our design tools included a schematic energy-modeling interface called TREAT, which was built off of the SuNREL platform. TREAT was used to passively condition the space. Our schematic energy modeling helped us properly size window areas, overhangs, and building mass distribution. We used a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) package called AirPak, to refine our design. The home was modeled in both

389

solar thermal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal thermal Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world solar energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU solar solar PV solar thermal world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Excel spreadsheet, summary solar energy data on multiple tabs (xls, 145.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited"

390

Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m {center_dot} K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations.

M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in LMXBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in x-rays (outbursts) has been monitored. The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust and envelope composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. We perform numerical simulations of the neutron star crust thermal evolution and compare them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, EXO 0748-676, XTE J1701-462 and IGR J17480-2446. We also present stationary envelope models to be used as a boundary condition for the crustal cooling models. We obtain a relation between the mass accretion rate and the temperature reached at the crust-envelope interface at the end of the active phase that accounts for early observations and reduces the number of free parameters of the problem. With this relation we are also able to set constraints to the envelope composition depending on the accretion mass rate. We find that the evolution of MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260 and EXO 0748-676 can be well described within a deep crustal cooling scenario. Conversely, we find that other two sources can only be explained with models beyond crustal cooling. For the peculiar emission of XTE J1701-462 we propose alternative scenarios like residual accretion during quiescence, additional heat sources in the outer crust and/or thermal isolation of the inner crust due to a buried magnetic field. We also explain the very recent reported temperature of IGR J17480-2446 with an extra heat deposition in the outer crust coming from shallow sources.

Anabela Turlione; Deborah N. Aguilera; José A. Pons

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76 Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600 km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~ 290 MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40 MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~ 80 cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most

393

Thermal reclaimer apparatus for a thermal sand reclamation system  

SciTech Connect

A thermal reclaimer apparatus is disclosed for thermally removing from the used foundry sand the organic matter that is present therein. The subject thermal reclaimer apparatus includes chamber means in which the used foundry sand is heated to a predetermined temperature for a preestablished period in order to accomplish the burning away of the organic matter that the used foundry sand contains. The chamber means includes inlet means provided at one end thereof and outlet means provided at the other end thereof. Feed means are cooperatively associated with the pipe means and thereby with the inlet means for feeding the used foundry sand through the inlet means into the chamber means. The subject thermal reclaimer apparatus further includes rotating means operative for effecting the rotation of the chamber means as the used foundry sand is being heated therein. The chamber means has cooperatively associated therewith burner means located at the same end thereof as the outlet means. The burner means is operative to effect the heating of the used foundry sand to the desired temperature within the chamber means. Tumbling means are provided inside the chamber means to ensure that the used foundry sand is constantly turned over, i.e., tumbled, and that the lumps therein are broken up as the chamber means rotates. Lastly, the used foundry sand from which the organic matter has been removed leaves the chamber means through the outlet means.

Deve, V.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Application of Combined Thermal Equivalen in Thermal Power Plant Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3.8MPa medium-pressure steam of Yuntianhua Company get low pressure steam through reducing temperature and pressure, which is used as a heat tracing, a reserve supply of heat. For this situation, the article based on the analysis of energy and chemical ... Keywords: combined thermal equivalent, turbine, economize on energy

Zhang Zhuming; Li Hu; Wang Hua; Qing Shan; Li Liangqing; He Ping; Ma Linzhuan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CPC thermal collector test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of test procedures has evolved at Argonne National Laboratory for establishing the performance of compound parabolic and related concentrating thermal collectors with large angular fields of view. The procedures range from separate thermal and optical tests, to overall performance tests. A calorimetric ratio technique has been developed to determine the heat output of a collector without knowledge of the heat transfer fluid's mass flow rate and heat capacity. Sepcial attention is paid to the problem of defining and measuring the incident solar flux with respect to which the collector efficiency is to be calculated.

Reed, K A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Effects of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic carbon deposited in a fluidized bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-density, isotropic pyrolytic carbon layer beneath the silicon carbide (IPyC) plays a key role in the irradiation performance of coated particle fuel. The IPyC layer protects the kernel from reactions with chlorine during deposition of the SiC layer, provides structural support for the SiC layer, and protects the SiC from fission products and carbon monoxide. The process conditions used by the Germans to deposit the IPyC coating produced a highly isotropic, but somewhat permeable IPyC coating. The permeability of the IPyC coating was acceptable for use with the dense German UO{sub 2} kernels, but may not be suitable when coating UCO kernels. The UCO kernels are typically more porous and thus have a larger surface area than UO{sub 2} kernels. The lower density and the higher surface area of UCO kernels could make them more susceptible to attack by HCl gas during the silicon carbide (SiC) coating process, which could result in heavy metal dispersion into the buffer and IPyC coatings and a higher level of as-manufactured SiC defects. The relationship between IPyC deposition conditions, permeability, and anisotropy must be understood and the appropriate combination of anisotropy and permeability for particle fuel containing UCO kernels selected. A reference set of processing conditions have been determined from review of historical information and results of earlier coating experiments employing 350 and 500 {micro}m UO{sub 2} kernels. It was decided that a limited study would be conducted, in which only coating gas fraction (CGF) and temperature would be varied. Coatings would be deposited at different rates and with a range of microstructures. Thickness, density, porosity and anisotropy would be measured and permeability evaluated using a chlorine leach test. The results would be used to select the best IPyC coating conditions for use with the available natural enrichment uranium carbide/uranium oxide (NUCO) kernels. The response plots from the investigation of the deposition of pyrolytic carbon in a fluidized bed graphically depict the relationships between processing parameters and coating properties. The additional figures present optical, scanning electron microscopy, and other images to highlight microstructural details. For the study, only two parameters (factors), coating gas fraction and deposition temperature, were varied. The plots reveal obvious trends and links between factors and responses. The dominant relationships determined by this study for this range of coating conditions are: (1) rate is dependent upon coating gas fraction or in other terms, reactant concentration; (2) density is controlled by deposition temperature; (3) efficiency is influenced by both CGF and temperature; (4) anisotropy is affect by CGF and temperature, however, the relationship is more complex than for other properties; (5) permeability is dependent upon deposition temperature (thus density); and (6) open porosity is affect by CGF thus is influenced by coating rate. The response plots can be used as 'maps' for the deposition process and are thus valuable for selecting coating conditions necessary to produce desired combinations of properties. The information is useful in predicting the effects of changes to processing on properties and is beneficial in optimizing the process and product properties. Although the study was limited to only two parameters, the information provides a foundation from which other aspects of the coating process can be more easily investigated.

Lowden, Richard Andrew [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Price, Jeffery R [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Jackpile-Paguate deposit: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium mineralization occurs in the Jackpile sandstone, the uppermost unit in the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic), north of Laguna, New Mexico. Mineralization ranges from discontinuous, spotty disseminations to lenses up to 30 ft (10 m) thick and 100 ft (30 m) long. The lenses are elongate subparallel to the northeast trend of the Jackpile sandstone. Since 1952, observations during mining have indicated that varied forms of mineralization occur within lenses, such as rodlike features, irregular and diffused masses, and discontinuous seams or wisps crosscutting channel boundaries. The positive correlation between uranium content and organic carbon for samples greater than 0.04 percent U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ suggests that organic carbonaceous material is a major large-scale controlling factor for the deposition of uranium. No other significant geochemical control on mineralization can be postulated from the limited data presented.

Beck, R.G.; Cherrywell, C.H.; Earnest, D.F.; Feirn, W.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the commercial steam and power generation industry, deposits on heat transfer surfaces of the steam-water cycle equipment in fossil plant units have been a challenge. Deposits form at nearly all locations within the steam-water cycle, particularly in boiler tubes where failures can have substantial negative impacts on unit availability and reliability. Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-wat...

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) drove industry to conduct crud scrape campaigns at a number of units to characterize and better understand the material being deposited on the fuel clad surface. This report describes the first phase of a program to develop models that describe the crud deposition and growth process, including the many phenomena that influence not only the deposit mass, but the composition. The models will be benchmarked against published crud...

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Boiler Water Deposition Model, Part 1: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many sources of availability and performance losses in fossil units involve deposition on water- and steam-touched surfaces, with the most acute effects occurring in boilers and turbines. Earlier deposition state-of-knowledge assessments sponsored by EPRI established three broad classifications of deposition phenomena (EPRI reports 1004194 and 1004930). However, within these classifications are many processes and influencing factors that need to be considered in order to make meaningful improvements in d...

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

University of Colorado Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A Warmboard sub-floor with tubing and wood Image Courtsey of Warmboard Image Thermal Comfort "That Condition of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment" (ASHRAE Standard 55) Design Criteria Design Criteria Design Criteria Design Criteria 1. Thermally comfortable conditions achieved by integrating technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies: a. Temperatures between 72 o F and 76 o F b. Humidity between 40.0% and 55.0% 2. Minimal distractions to the occupant 3. Easy control of thermal comfort system 4. Uniform thermal conditions exist throughout the house Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features

403

What can Recycling in Thermal Reactors Accomplish?  

SciTech Connect

Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives.

Steven Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

REPORT: Direct Laser Powder Deposition – “State of the Art”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2007 ... This report describes the Direct Laser Powder Deposition (DLPD) process known by various names, including Directed Light Fabrication ...

405

Anisotropic Finite Element Modeling of the Fused Deposition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit · Direct Precipitation of Sr-doped LaP3O9 Thin Film Electrolytes for ...

406

Study of Electroless-Deposited Nano-Silver on Medical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the sodium hypophosphite, dextrose and potassium sodium tartrate were selected as reducers for electroless-deposited nano-silver. The influences ...

407

Concept for lightweight spaced-based deposition technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based deposition technology for solar power and astronomicalmirrors and space solar power reflectors. In addition, thelow voltage bus of a solar panel power system of a satellite

Fulton, Michael; Anders, Andre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geochemistry of the Yutangba Se deposit in western Hubei, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Se ores and abandoned stone coal pile at the Yutangba Se deposit there ... of Se minerals due to secondary enrichment of selenium in the stone coal ...

409

Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings on ... of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions.

410

USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition with Carbide Filaments ...  

Many of the current industry cells in production have come through NREL, ... One deposition technology utilized at NREL deals with hot wire chemical ...

412

Application of Vacuum Deposition Methods to Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of vacuum deposition techniques to the fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell materials and structures are reviewed, focusing on magnetron sputtering, vacuum plasma methods, laser ablation, and electrochemical vapor deposition. A description of each method and examples of use to produce electrolyte, electrode, and/or electrical interconnects are given. Generally high equipment costs and relatively low deposition rates have limited the use of vacuum deposition methods in solid oxide fuel cell manufacture, with a few notable exceptions. Vacuum methods are particularly promising in the fabrication of micro fuel cells, where thin films of high quality and unusual configuration are desired.

Pederson, Larry R.; Singh, Prabhakar; Zhou, Xiao Dong

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Heteroepitaxial Si Thin Films Deposited on Flexible Copper ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Heteroepitaxial Si Thin Films Deposited on Flexible Copper Substrates for Solar Photovoltaics. Author(s), Daniela Florentina Bogorin, Lee ...

414

Dense Deposition of Nanocomposites by a Compact YAG Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2002 ... Dense Deposition of Nanocomposites by a Compact YAG Laser by M. Senna and K. Hamada. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: PDF. Pages ...

415

Formation and Quantification of Corrosion Deposits in the Power Industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of deposits on the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator systems is one of the main contributors to the high… (more)

Namduri, Haritha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Plasma implantation and deposition for advanced materials surface modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research work described in this thesis focuses on the physics of plasma implantation and deposition as well as the application of the technology to… (more)

Fu, King Yu (???)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Characteristics of Polymer Films Deposited via Microwave Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of ...

418

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

419

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy ...  

Researchers at ORNL developed a down-well heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract ...

420

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes has been studied for fabricating amorphous hydrogenated silicon thin-film solar cells. Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited in a reduced-pressure, tubular-flow reactor, using disilane feed-gas. Conditions for depositing intrinsic films at growth rates up to 10 A/s were identified. Electrical and optical properties, including dark conductivity, photoconductivity, activation energy, optical absorption, band-gap and sub-band-gap absorption properties of CVD intrinsic material were characterized. Parameter space for depositing intrinsic and doped films, suitable for device analysis, was identified.

Rocheleau, R.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Aerosol Jet® Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Aerosol Jet printing, is finding wide use in a number of ... The Aerosol Jet systems deposit a wide variety of functional materials onto a wide ...

422

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Active solar thermal design manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual is aimed at systems design engineers, architects, system supplier/installers, and contractor/builders. Practical information for both skilled and inexperienced designers. Solar thermal applications focuses on residential and commercial space heating, potable hot water heating, process water heating, and space cooling.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermally insulated windows and doors  

SciTech Connect

Complete thermal insulation of metal rails and stiles in vertically or horizontally sliding or rolling windows or doors is provided by including in the frame thereof centered rigid plastic shapes which extend between panels of the windows or doors. All rails and stiles of each panel are thereby exposed only to either interior or exterior ambient temperatures.

Schmidt, D.F.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE THERMAL LANDSLIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The large Thermal Landslide overlies the initial area of geothermal development at The Geysers. The landslide is waterbearing while the underlying Franciscan formation bedrock units are essentially non-waterbearing except where affected by hydrothermal alteration. Perched ground water moving through the landslide is heated prior to discharge as spring flow.

Vantine, J.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Solar energy thermalization and storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Experimental investigation of size effect on thermal conductivity for ultra-thin amorphous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to determine whether a “size effect” phenomenon for one particular thermophysical property, thermal conductivity, actually exists for amorphous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films with thicknesses ranging from 40 nm to 2 ?m. This was done by using a non-contact, non-invasive, in-situ Transient Thermo-Reflectance (TTR) laser based technique. The results demonstrated that the intrinsic thermal conductivity of a 40 nm PMMA film deposited on native oxide of silicon increases by a factor of three over bulk PMMA values, and a distinct increase in the thermal conductivity of PMMA film was observed in ultra-thin (sub 100 nm) films. This confirmed the importance of film thickness for the through-plane thermal conductivity value of PMMA film on native oxide of silicon.

Kim, Ick Chan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

TEOS-based SiO{sub 2} chemical vapor deposition: Reaction kinetics and related surface chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a comprehensive understanding of thermal TEOS (tetracthylorthosificate, Si(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) surface chemistry at CVD (chemical vapor deposition) temperatures and pressures. This was accomplished by examining how TEOS reaction rate are influenced by factors critical to the heterogeneous reaction. This includes determining the TEOS pressure dependence, testing if reaction by-products inhibit TEOS decomposition, identifying reaction sites on the surface, and establishing the reaction sites coverage dependencies. We evaluated the pressure dependencies and by-product inhibition with GCMS. The experiments in a cold-wall research reactor revealed that the TEOS surface reaction at 1000K (1) was first-order with respect to TEOS pressure (0.10 to 1.50Torr) and (2) was not inhibited by surface reaction by-products (ethylene, ethanol, and water). Reactivities of surface sites and their coverage dependencies were compared with FTIR. Our experiments demonstrated that two-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 2}) rings on the SiO{sub 2} surface were consumed almost instantaneously when exposed to TEOS. Our FTIR experiments also revealed that TEOS decomposition was zero-order with respect to coverages of hydroxyl groups and (by indirect evidence) three-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 3}) rings. This type of site-independent reactivity is consistent with TEOS reacting with hydroxyl groups and (Si-O){sub 3} rings via a common rate-determining step at 1000K. With respect to deposition uniformity, our results predict that deposition rates will be insensitive to the relative coverages of (Si-O){sub 3} rings and hydroxyls on SiO{sub 2} as well as the re-adsorbed by-products of the surface reaction. Therefore, it is likely that nonuniform SiO{sub 2} depositions from TEOS reactions are due to depletion of TEOS in the gas-phase and/or thermal gradients.

Bartram, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Minimization of Pressurized Water Reactor Radiation Fields through Fuel Deposit Engineering: Deposit Property Evaluation and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an initial assessment of the options for modification of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary side corrosion product deposits (crud) to minimize the incorporation of activated crud into out-of-core surfaces, thus reducing the intensity of out-of-core radiation fields. This report summarizes the current knowledge of PWR fuel crud characteristics, including crystallographic structure (crystal habits), and buildup mechanisms. The report also reviews the ...

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal via placement in 3D ICs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As thermal problems become more evident, new physical design paradigms and tools are needed to alleviate them. Incorporating thermal vias into integrated circuits (ICs) is a promising way of mitigating thermal issues by lowering the thermal resistance of the chip itself. However, thermal vias take up valuable routing space, and therefore, algorithms are needed to minimize their usage while placing them in areas where they would make the greatest impact. With the developing technology of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs), thermal problems are expected to be more prominent, and thermal vias can have a larger impact on them than in traditional 2D ICs. In this paper, thermal vias are assigned to specific areas of a 3D IC and used to adjust their effective thermal conductivities. The thermal via placement method makes iterative adjustments to these thermal conductivities in order to achieve a desired maximum temperature objective. Finite element analysis (FEA) is used in formulating the method and in calculating temperatures quickly during each iteration. As a result, the method efficiently achieves its thermal objective while minimizing the thermal via utilization.

Brent Goplen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Analytical and experimental studies for thermal plasma processing of materials  

SciTech Connect

Work continued on thermal plasma processing of materials. This quarter, ceramic powders of carbides, aluminium nitride, oxides, solids solutions, magnetic and non magnetic spinels, superconductors, and composites have been successfully synthesized in a Triple DC Torch Plasma Jet Reactor (TTPR) and in a single DC Plasma Jet Reactor. All the ceramic powders with the exception of AIN were synthesized using a novel injection method developed to overcome the problems associated with solid injection, in particular for the single DC plasma jet reactor, and to realize the benefits of gas phase reactions. Also, initial experiments have been performed for the deposition of diamond coatings on Si wafers using the TTPR with methane as the carbon source. Well faceted diamond crystallites were deposited on the surface of the wafers, forming a continuous one particle thick coating. For measuring temperature and velocity fields in plasma systems, enthalpy probes have been developed and tested. The validity has been checked by performing energy and mass flux balances in an argon plasma jet operated in argon atmosphere. Total Gibbs free energy minimization calculations using a quasi-equilibrium modification have been applied to simulate several chemical reactions. Plasma reactor modelling has been performed for the counter-flow liquid injection plasma synthesis experiment. Plasma diagnostics has been initiated to determine the pressure gradient in the coalesced part of the plasma jet. The pressure gradient drives the diffusion of chemical species which ultimately controls the chemical reactions. 4 figs.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Low emissivity Ag/Ta/glass multilayer thin films deposited by sputtering  

SciTech Connect

Ta is deposited on a glass substrate as an interlayer for the two-dimensional growth of Ag thin films because Ta has good thermal stability and can induce a negative surface-energy change in Ag/glass. From the transmission electron microscopy results, we concluded that the Ag crystals in the bottom layer (seemingly on Ag/Ta) were flattened; this was rarely observed in the three-dimensional growth mode. Comparing Ag/Ta/glass with Ag/glass, we found that the Ta interlayer was effective in reducing both the resistance and the emissivity, accompanied by the relatively high transmittance in the visible region. In particular, Ag(9 nm)/Ta(1 nm)/glass film showed 0.08 of the emissivity, including {approx}61% of the transmittance in the visible region (wavelength: 550 nm).

Park, Sun Ho [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kongju National University, Budaedong, Cheonan City (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee Sun [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kongju National University, Budaedong, Cheonan City (Korea, Republic of); Green Home Energy Technology Center, Cheonan City (Korea, Republic of); Sivasankar Reddy, A. [Green Home Energy Technology Center, Cheonan City (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiography used to image thermal explosions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. October 9, 2012 Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. Proton radiography (pRad) at LANSCE imaged thermal explosions at high speeds to provide a real-time look at how an explosion unfolds and releases its energy. Specifically, it is important to know the range of temperature over which ignition may occur and the subsequent power of the explosion.

437

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-EPA Working Group on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion,Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversion

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Vortex Formation in Ellipsoidal Thermal Bubbles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of an isolated dry thermal bubble in a quiescent unstratified environment is a prototypical natural convective flow. This study considers the rise of an isolated dry thermal bubble of ellipsoidal shape (elliptical in both horizontal and ...

Alan Shapiro; Katharine M. Kanak

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Thermal pumping of light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work presented here is a study of thermally enhanced injection in light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This effect, which we refer to as "thermal pumping", results from Peltier energy exchange from the lattice to charge ...

Gray, Dodd (Dodd J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams.

Krauss, Alan R. (Plainfield, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Cary, NC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

442

Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

Ruddy, Francis H. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

NON-THERMAL PLASMA PROCESSING AND CHEMICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... has been deposited a nickel grid that serves ... is supplied by a sinusoidal power supply whose ... Figure 2. Simplified block diagram of Silent Discharge ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electrical, Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication and Evaluation of Glass-Ceramic Composite Seals for SOFC · Fabrication of LSGMC-Based IT-SOFC Cells Using Aerosol Deposition.

445

Thermal Scout Software - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Analysis Thermal ... Technology Marketing Summary. ... The software uses GPS data to automate infrared camera image capture and temperature ana ...

446

Thermoelectrics and Thermal Transport - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Energy Nanomaterials: Thermoelectrics and Thermal Transport Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, TMS Materials ...

447

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers Begins. The Net-Zero house features a geothermal heat pump ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

Solar Thermal Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

Solar Thermal Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research institutions have ...

449

Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Window performance for human thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gender, acclimation state, the opportunity to adjust clothing and physical disability on requirements for thermal comfort”. Energy

Huizenga, C; Zhang, H.; Mattelaer, P.; Yu, T.; Arens, Edward A; Lyons, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Quantum thermal waves in quantum corrals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the possibility of the generation of the thermal waves in 2D electron gas is investigated. In the frame of the quantum heat transport theory the 2D quantum hyperbolic heat transfer equation is formulated and numerically solved. The obtained solutions are the thermal waves in electron 2D gases. As an exapmle the thermal waves in quantum corrals are described. Key words: 2D electron gas, quantum corrals, thermal waves.

J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Kozlowski

2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL battery thermal modeling and testing work for the DOE Annual Merit Review, May 9, 2011.

Smith, K.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage can be interfaced with a variety of high temperature heat generating systems, e.g. nuclear

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 193 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables

455

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Looks at the impact of cooling strategies with air and both direct and indirect liquid cooling for battery thermal management.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

MEMS BASED PYROELECTRIC THERMAL ENERGY HARVESTER - Energy ...  

A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending ...

457

Solar Thermal Test Facility experiment manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on administrative procedures, capabilities, and requirements of experimenters using the Solar Thermal Test Facility. (MHR)

Darsey, D. M.; Holmes, J. T.; Seamons, L. O.; Kuehl, D. J.; Davis, D. B.; Stomp, J. M.; Matthews, L. K.; Otts, J. V.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft Programmatic Environ-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistant Secre-

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum: Part I. Thermal Behavior Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article, the thermal history and cooling rate experienced byalloys, knowledge of the thermal history and cooling rate isarticle, the thermal history and cooling rate experienced by

Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal deposition cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,thermal energy conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean Systems

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor Fluctuating Low-GradeThermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Name NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion AgencyCompany Organization...

465

Thermal Conductivity of Cubic and Hexagonal Mesoporous Silica Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K.L. Fang, “Anisotropic thermal conductivity of nanoporousmesoporous silica as a thermal isolation layer”, Ceramicsand V. Wittwer, “Some thermal and optical properties of a

Coquil, Thomas; Richman, Eric K.; Hutchinson, Neal J.; Tolbert, S H; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Thermal dependence of electrical characteristics of micromachined silica microchannel plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal dependence of electrical characteristics ofresults of our studies on the thermal properties of silicatemperature with a negative thermal coefficient of -0.036

Tremsin, A S; Vallerga, J V; Siegmund, OHW; Beetz, C P; Boerstler, R W

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Thermal-Aware CAD for Modern Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Background 3.1 HeatExperiments 9.1 Thermal-Floorplanning9.1.1 Fast Thermal Floorplanning . . . . . . . . . . .

Logan, Sheldon Logan Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Title Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in...

469

Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. and McEuen, P. L. , “Thermal Transport Measurements ofTomanek, D. , “Unusually High Thermal Conductivity of Carbonand Lau, C. N. , “Superior thermal conductivity of single-

Goyal, Vivek Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device”,M, and Ferrari V. , “Thermal energy harvesting throughand G. P. Carman, “Thermal energy harvesting device using

He, Hong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

THE MOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (MoWiTT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 3-5, 1979 THE MOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (Orlando, Florida. The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility (Press, 197 . THE NOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (

Klems, J. H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information Data Set: Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe Effective Date of Revision: May 2, 2005 Data Set Citation: Holland, E. A., B. H. Braswell, J. M. Sulzman, and J. -F. Lamarque. 2005. Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Revision Summary: The investigator advised us that data in two of the deposition files were a factor of 100 too large and the order of the records was reversed from the description in the documentation. NADP_wet_deposition_no3_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt NADP_wet_deposition_nh4_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt Data File Changes:

476

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Abstract Iridium-192 radiography has been successfully tested as a technique for externally monitoring geothermal scale deposits in piping at the Brawley, CA geothermal field. This technique is applied to piping that handles flowing brine to provide in situ scale deposition observations without the disadvantage of dismantling piping for visual scale inspection. Exposure times and film orientations have been optimized to yield excellent agreement between radiographically detected scale thicknesses and actual

477

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

478

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

ENERGY AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM DEPOSITION DURING COMMON ENVELOPE EVOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I consider three processes which enhance mass loss rate from a common envelope of a giant star with a main sequence or a white dwarf companion spiraling-in inside its envelope. I consider deposition of orbital energy and orbital angular momentum to the giant’s envelope, and in more detail the formation of jets by an accreting companion and their propagation in the envelope. I find that in many cases the deposition of orbital angular momentum to the envelope may be more important to the mass loss process than the deposition of orbital energy. Jets blown by an accreting companion, in particular a white dwarf, orbiting inside the outer regions of the giant’s envelope may also dominate over orbital energy deposition at early stage of the common envelope evolution. These imply that studies which ignore the deposition of angular momentum to the envelope and the effects of the accreting companion may reach wrong conclusions.

Noam Soker

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Validation of Geant4 simulation of electron energy deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geant4-based simulations of the energy deposited by electrons in various materials are quantitatively compared to high precision calorimetric measurements taken at Sandia Laboratories. The experimental data concern electron beams of energy between a few tens of keV and 1 MeV at various incidence angles. Two experimental scenarios are evaluated: the longitudinal energy deposition pattern in a finely segmented detector, and the total energy deposited in a larger size calorimeter. The simulations are produced with Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 9.6; they involve models of electron-photon interactions in the standard and low energy electromagnetic packages, and various implementations of electron multiple scattering. Significant differences in compatibility with experimental data are observed in the longitudinal energy deposition patterns produced by the examined Geant4 versions, while the total deposited energy exhibits smaller variations across the various Geant4 versions, with the exception Geant4 9.4. The valida...

Batic, Matej; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Metal oxide morphology in argon-assisted glancing angle deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is a thin film deposition technique capable of fabricating columnar architectures such as posts, helices, and chevrons with control over nanoscale film features. Argon bombardment during deposition modifies the GLAD process, producing films with new morphologies which have shown promise for sensing and photonic devices. The authors report modification of column tilt angle, film density, and specific surface area for 12 different metal oxide and fluoride film materials deposited using Ar-assisted GLAD. For the vapor flux/ion beam geometry and materials studied here, with increasing argon flux, the column tilt increases, film density increases, and specific surface area decreases. With a better understanding of the nature of property modification and the mechanisms responsible, the Ar-assisted deposition process can be more effectively targeted towards specific applications, including birefringent thin films or photonic crystal square spirals.

Sorge, J. B.; Taschuk, M. T.; Wakefield, N. G.; Sit, J. C.; Brett, M. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada) and NRC National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles With a modest effort, many of the energy-efficient technologies developed for buildings can be transferred to the transportation sector. The goal of vehicle thermal management research at LBL is to save the energy equivalent of one to two billion gallons of gasoline per year, and improve the marketability of next-generation vehicles using advanced solar control glazings and insulating shell components to reduce accessory loads. Spectrally selective and electrochromic window glass and lightweight insulating materials improve the fuel efficiency of conventional and hybrid vehicles and extend the range of electric vehicles by reducing the need for air conditioning and heating, and by allowing the downsizing of equipment.

483

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

484

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the pressing need for the United States to reduce our dependence upon fossil fuels, it has become a national priority to develop technologies that allow practical use of renewable energy sources. One such energy source is sunlight. It has the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical success. The primary reason for these disappointments is a misunderstanding of solar energy dynamics by air conditioning designers; combined with a similar misunderstanding by solar engineers of how thermally driven chillers react to the loads and energy sources applied to them. With this in mind, a modeling tool has been developed which provides the flexibility to apply a strategy which can be termed, Optimization by Design.

Leavell, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Thermally stable, plastic-bonded explosives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By use of an appropriate thermoplastic rubber as the binder, the thermal stability and thermal stress characteristics of plastic-bonded explosives may be greatly improved. In particular, an HMX-based explosive composition using an oil-extended styrene-ethylenebutylene-styrene block copolymer as the binder exhibits high explosive energy and thermal stability and good handling safety and physical properties.

Benziger, Theodore M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Hard thermal loops in static background fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the high temperature behavior of retarded thermal loops in static external fields. We employ an analytic continuation of the imaginary time formalism and use a spectral representation of the thermal amplitudes. We show that, to all orders, the leading contributions of static hard thermal loops can be directly obtained by evaluating them at zero external energies and momenta.

Brandt, F T; Siqueira, J B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES Lab VI - 1 The change of the internal energy of a system temperature by sweating to cool down. Running seems to be the conversion of chemical energy to thermal energy energy into thermal energy, you decide to make some measurements in the laboratory. To make

Minnesota, University of

490

Practical 1P6 Thermal Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and loaded into the tube furnace. The computer software `RS Recorder' logs the data from two furnacesPractical 1P6 Thermal Analysis 1 1P6 ­ Thermal Analysis 1. What you should learn from-tin (electrical solder) by thermal analysis. The results will show that whereas pure metals freeze at one

Paxton, Anthony T.

491

Heat Exchanger Thermal Performance Margin Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utility engineers with guidance on how to identify the thermal performance margin that is available in a given heat exchanger by comparing the thermal performance requirement at design limiting conditions to the thermal performance capability of the heat exchanger under those same conditions.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

492

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Solar Thermal Generation Technologies: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is experiencing renewed activity and investment. The shift is partly due to new interest in large-scale centralized electricity generation, for which STE is well suited and offers the lowest cost for solar-specific renewable portfolio standards. With policymaking and public interest driven by concerns such as global climate change, atmospheric emissions, and traditional fossil fuel price and supply volatility, STE is increasing...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

498

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

Geohegan, D.B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z