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1

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

2

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA...

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed.

OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass Facility JumpvolcanicPhase 1 JumpExplorationinfracture

5

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Beatriz L´opez-Wallea,1 and analytical calculations. Key words: Micro-actuators, Thermal modelling, Electrical analogy, Thermal network 1 and MicroMechatronic Systems Department (AS2M), 24 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besan¸con, France Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

A comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Cuddihy. Predictions fr'om bai. h models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that wau'ld be cleared to blood irom the pu lraana ry region i'o'i)owing an i nba !at i cn exposure were compared . It was f:urd ti... to oxidized depleted uranium (DU) aerosol. The ob, ject. ive of th. is i:hesis was three fold: (1) to determine the dissolution rates for two respirable DU samples, (2) to determine the specific pulmonary clearance characteristics of oxidized DU, (3) Co...

Crist, Kevin Craig

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been declining since then. Hubbert used a logistic curve to approximate the rate of oil production. Deffeyes [2

Stark, Dudley

8

OXYGEN DEPLETION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR GRAIN MODELS AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEMENTAL OXYGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper assesses the implications of a recent discovery that atomic oxygen is being depleted from diffuse interstellar gas at a rate that cannot be accounted for by its presence in silicate and metallic oxide particles. To place this discovery in context, the uptake of elemental O into dust is considered over a wide range of environments, from the tenuous intercloud gas and diffuse clouds sampled by the depletion observations to dense clouds where ice mantles and gaseous CO become important reservoirs of O. The distribution of O in these contrasting regions is quantified in terms of a common parameter, the mean number density of hydrogen (n{sub H}). At the interface between diffuse and dense phases (just before the onset of ice-mantle growth) as much as {approx}160 ppm of the O abundance is unaccounted for. If this reservoir of depleted oxygen persists to higher densities it has implications for the oxygen budget in molecular clouds, where a shortfall of the same order is observed. Of various potential carriers, the most plausible appears to be a form of O-bearing carbonaceous matter similar to the organics found in cometary particles returned by the Stardust mission. The 'organic refractory' model for interstellar dust is re-examined in the light of these findings, and it is concluded that further observations and laboratory work are needed to determine whether this class of material is present in quantities sufficient to account for a significant fraction of the unidentified depleted oxygen.

Whittet, D. C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology, and Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

9

Use of soil moisture depletion models and rainfall probability in predicting the irrigation requirements of crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of precipitation events in estimating the probable success of his venture as related to the avail nb! lity of sufficient water resources precipitation is governed by chance phenomena, that is, there are so many causes at work that the influence of each cannot... depletion equations under optimum soil moisture conditions Recession constants Application of soil mcisture accounring model Irrigation requirements Retention relations Irrigation requirements distributions Raini'all probabilities Neekly rainfall...

David, Wilfredo P

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL battery thermal modeling and testing work for the DOE Annual Merit Review, May 9, 2011.

Smith, K.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

W-320 Project thermal modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest status and plans are presented.

Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Modeling | Argonne Leadership...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Modeling PI Name: Paul Fischer PI Email: fischer@mcs.anl.gov Institution: Argonne National Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours...

14

Advanced Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Modeling | Argonne Leadership...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fischer (ANL), Aleks Obabko (ANL), and Hank Childs (LBNL) Advanced Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Modeling PI Name: Paul Fischer PI Email: fischer@mcs.anl.gov Institution: Argonne...

15

Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline silicon test structures, as well as uncontrolled nonuniform changes in this quantity over time and during operation.

Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

IDENTIFICATION OF AN {sup 84}Sr-DEPLETED CARRIER IN PRIMITIVE METEORITES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THERMAL PROCESSING IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of correlated nucleosynthetic heterogeneities in solar system reservoirs is now well demonstrated for numerous nuclides. However, it has proven difficult to discriminate between the two disparate processes that can explain such correlated variability: incomplete mixing of presolar material or secondary processing of a well-mixed disk. Using stepwise acid-leaching of the Ivuna CI-chondrite, we show that unlike other nuclides such as {sup 54}Cr and {sup 50}Ti, Sr-isotope variability is the result of a carrier depleted in {sup 84}Sr. The carrier is most likely presolar SiC, which is known to have both high Sr-concentrations relative to solar abundances and extremely depleted {sup 84}Sr compositions. Thus, variability in {sup 84}Sr in meteorites and their components can be attributed to varying contributions from presolar SiC. The observed {sup 84}Sr excesses in calcium-aluminum refractory inclusions (CAIs) suggest their formation from an SiC-free gaseous reservoir, whereas the {sup 84}Sr depletions present in differentiated meteorites require their formation from material with an increased concentration of SiC relative to CI chondrites. The presence of a positive correlation between {sup 84}Sr and {sup 54}Cr, despite being hosted in carriers of negative and positive anomalies, respectively, is not compatible with incomplete mixing of presolar material but instead suggests that the solar system's nucleosynthetic heterogeneity reflects selective thermal processing of dust. Based on vaporization experiments of SiC under nebular conditions, the lack of SiC material in the CAI-forming gas inferred from our data requires that the duration of thermal processing of dust resulting in the vaporization of CAI precursors was extremely short-lived, possibly lasting only hours to days.

Paton, Chad; Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin, E-mail: chadpaton@gmail.com, E-mail: schiller@snm.ku.dk, E-mail: bizzarro@snm.ku.dk [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-1350 (Denmark)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

Mercure, J -F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modeling exposure to depleted uranium in support of decommissioning at Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jefferson Proving Ground was used by the US Army Test and Evaluation Command for testing of depleted uranium munitions and closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This paper integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Oxenburg, T.P. [Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2010 DOE...

20

Parametric down conversion with a depleted pump as a model for classical information transmission capacity of quantum black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we extend the investigation of Adami and Ver Steeg [Class. Quantum Grav. \\textbf{31}, 075015 (2014)] to treat the process of black hole particle emission effectively as the analogous quantum optical process of parametric down conversion (PDC) with a dynamical (depleted vs. non-depleted) `pump' source mode which models the evaporating black hole (BH) energy degree of freedom. We investigate both the short time (non-depleted pump) and long time (depleted pump) regimes of the quantum state and its impact on the Holevo channel capacity for communicating information from the far past to the far future in the presence of Hawking radiation. The new feature introduced in this work is the coupling of the emitted Hawking radiation modes through the common black hole `source pump' mode which phenomenologically represents a quantized energy degree of freedom of the gravitational field. This (zero-dimensional) model serves as a simplified arena to explore BH particle production/evaporation and back-action effects under an explicitly unitary evolution which enforces quantized energy/particle conservation. Within our analogous quantum optical model we examine the entanglement between two emitted particle/anti-particle and anti-particle/particle pairs coupled via the black hole (BH) evaporating `pump' source. We also analytically and dynamically verify the `Page information time' for our model which refers to the conventionally held belief that the information in the BH radiation becomes significant after the black hole has evaporated half its initial energy into the outgoing radiation. Lastly, we investigate the effect of BH particle production/evaporation on two modes in the exterior region of the BH event horizon that are initially maximally entangled, when one mode falls inward and interacts with the black hole, and the other remains forever outside and non-interacting.

Paul M. Alsing

2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Econometric Modelling of World Oil Supplies: Terminal Price and the Time to Depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops a novel approach by which to identify the price of oil at the time of depletion; the so-called terminal price of oil. It is shown that while the terminal price is independent of both GDP growth and the price elasticity of energy...

Mohaddes, Kamiar

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines the modeling of thermal fatigue in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) assemblies.

Bosco, N.; Panchagade, D.; Kurtz, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

24

The Need for a Full-Chip and Package Thermal Model for Thermally Optimized IC Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ceramic ball-grid array (CBGA) pack- age consisting of the chip (die), thermal interface material, heatThe Need for a Full-Chip and Package Thermal Model for Thermally Optimized IC Designs Wei Huang detailed die temperature with a full-chip thermal model at early design stages is important to discover

Skadron, Kevin

25

Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model for freezing and thawing soils" Yao Zhang Date & Environmental Engineering Frost susceptible soils are vulnerable to frost action in seasonal freezing as well and strengthening occurs as the soils freeze, whereas settlement and thaw weakening is expected during the melting

Kamat, Vineet R.

26

Mountain building in the Nepal Himalaya: Thermal and kinematic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mountain building in the Nepal Himalaya: Thermal and kinematic model L. Bollinger a,, P. Henry b. Courtillot Abstract We model crustal deformation and the resulting thermal structure across the Nepal: thermal model; temperature-time paths; inverted metamorphism; underplating; Himalayan orogen; Nepal

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

27

Thermal Modeling and Management of DRAM Memory , Hongzhong Zheng2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the given thermal envelope. Our simulation results show that adaptive core gating improves performance by up- tuating. Intuitively, the program execution is far away from optimal for a given thermal envelope: ThermalThermal Modeling and Management of DRAM Memory Systems Jiang Lin1 , Hongzhong Zheng2 , Zhichun Zhu2

Zhang, Zhao

28

Numerical Modeling of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Modeling of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model of Thermal Fluid.renard@ifpen.fr * Corresponding author Résumé -- Modélisation numérique d'EOR thermique : couplage complet entre un modèle d of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model of Thermal Fluid Flow and Geomechanics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Looks at the impact of cooling strategies with air and both direct and indirect liquid cooling for battery thermal management.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modelling the stratospheric polar vortex and its changes for GHGs increase and ozone depletion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

general circulation model (Manzini et al JGR 1997). Top: 0.01 hPa (80 km) Parameterization of a gravity boundary conditions, specified SSTs and ICE. 20 (or 30)-year simulations. The focus is on the Arctic. #12-HadGISS-HadGISS-HadSST & ICE 3.7 ppbv3.4 ppbv0.8 ppbvOrg. CL m. r. 372 ppmv353 ppmv317 ppmvCO2 m. r. 320 ppbv310 ppbv295 ppbvN2

Greatbatch, Richard

31

Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aleks Obabko, Paul Fischer, and Tim Tautges, Argonne National Laboratory Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and Co-design PI Name: Paul F. Fischer PI...

32

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Forrest...

33

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the...

34

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Energy Management Strategies for Fast Battery Temperature Rise and Engine...

35

Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences Modeling Atmospheric Escape Workshop - Spring 2012 University are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al

Johnson, Robert E.

36

ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of Thermal-Assisted Dislocation Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of Thermal-Assisted Dislocation Friction Y. Liao · L. D. Marks Received: 25+Business Media, LLC 2009 Abstract We generalize a model for friction at a sliding interface involving the motion of thermally activated friction. Going further, we suggest a plausible method for generalizing the fric- tional

Marks, Laurence D.

37

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation Washington, DC 20460 EPA-402-R-06-011 December 2006 #12;#12;Depleted Uranium Technical Brief EPA of Radiation and Indoor Air Radiation Protection Division ii #12;iii #12;FOREWARD The Depleted Uranium

39

Modeling the thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of models for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of uni-directional fiber-reinforced composites will be presented. The ability of these models to give an accurate prediction of the composite thermal conductivity depends on the amount of information known about the constituent phase properties under the assumption that these properties do not change as a result of processing. Also presented are models that take into account the effects of fiber coatings.

Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management : United States (2008)" #12;2 I. Introduction One of the main issues of the development of scramjet, an air to the endothermicity of its thermal decomposition. Because of the large heat load found in a scramjet, engine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic AND BACKGROUND [2] The containment of spent fuel from nuclear power plants in a geological repositoryMODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY SATURATED FRACTURED ROCK Y. W

Jellinek, Mark

42

Transformer Thermal Modeling: Improving Reliability Using Data Quality Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Transformer Thermal Modeling: Improving Reliability Using Data Quality Control Daniel J. Tylavsky--Eventually all large transformers will be dynamically loaded using models updated regularly from field measured data. Models obtained from measured data give more accurate results than models based on transformer

43

Electrical, Frequency and Thermal Measurement and Modelling of Supercapacitor Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical, Frequency and Thermal Measurement and Modelling of Supercapacitor Performance Yasser--This paper presents an evaluation of commercial supercapacitors performance (ESR, C, self-discharge, Pmax, Emax, coulumbic efficiency, etc), under different conditions. Characterization of supercapacitor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geothermal...

45

Statistical Thermal Models in High-Energy Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An examination of thermal models leads to the important signature of the expected critical behavior of the hadronic matter. A presentation is mainly devoted to the final volume effects. Canonical suppression factor are calculated.

Ludwik Turko

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Interfacing BIM with Building Thermal and Daylighting Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERFACING BIM WITH BUILDING THERMAL AND DAYLIGHTING MODELING Wei Yan, Mark Clayton, Jeff Haberl, WoonSeong Jeong, Jong Bum Kim, Sandeep Kota, Jose Luis Bermudez Alcocer, and Manish Dixit Texas A&M University, College Station, USA... the BIM authoring tools Application Programming Interface (API) to translate BIM into Object-Oriented Physical Models (in Modelica) for building thermal simulation, and input files of ray-tracing software (Radiance) for daylighting simulation. Based...

Yan, Wei; Clayton, Mark; Haberl, Jeff; WoonSeong, Jeong; Bun Kim, Jong; Sandeep, Kota; Bermudez, Jose; Dixit, Manish

47

Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979... ABSTRACT Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Groundwater Aquifers. (December 1979) David Bryan Reed, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald L. Reddell Solar energy is a promising alternate energy source for space heat...

Reed, David Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Rotational Mixing and Lithium Depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review basic observational features in Population I stars which strongly implicate rotation as a mixing agent; these include dispersion at fixed temperature in coeval populations and main sequence lithium depletion for a range of masses at a rate which decays with time. New developments related to the possible suppression of mixing at late ages, close binary mergers and their lithium signature, and an alternate origin for dispersion in young cool stars tied to radius anomalies observed in active young stars are discussed. I highlight uncertainties in models of Population II lithium depletion and dispersion related to the treatment of angular momentum loss. Finally, the origins of rotation are tied to conditions in the pre-main sequence, and there is thus some evidence that enviroment and planet formation could impact stellar rotational properties. This may be related to recent observational evidence for cluster to cluster variations in lithium depletion and a connection between the presence of planets and s...

Pinsonneault, M H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of work in section F.

Pannala, S; D'Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

50

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

Wilkes, K.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Gravitational collapse and thermalization in the hard wall model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a simple example of holographic thermalization in a confining field theory: the homogeneous injection of energy in the hard wall model. Working in an amplitude expansion, we find black brane formation for sufficiently fast energy injection and a scattering wave solution for sufficiently slow injection. We comment on our expectations for more sophisticated holographic QCD models.

Ben Craps; Elias Kiritsis; Christopher Rosen; Anastasios Taliotis; Joris Vanhoof; Hongbao Zhang

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

54

Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling X. Mao, D.J. Tylavsky and G.A. McCulla Abstract: Improving the utilisation of transformers requires that the hot-spot and top. An alternative method for assessing transformer model reliability is provided. 1 Introduction The maximally

55

Detailed modeling of the evaporation and thermal decomposition of urea-water-solution in SCR systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the UWS evaporation is taken into account using a NRTL activity model. The thermal decomposition model

Boyer, Edmond

56

Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite element model has been created to quantify the thermal fatigue damage of the CPV die attach. Simulations are used to compare to results of empirical thermal fatigue equations originally developed for accelerated chamber cycling. While the empirical equations show promise when extrapolated to the lower temperature cycles characteristic of weather-induced temperature changes in the CPV die attach, it is demonstrated that their damage does not accumulate linearly: the damage a particular cycle contributes depends on the preceding cycles. Simulations of modeled CPV cell temperature histories provided for direct comparison of the FEM and empirical methods, and for calculation of equivalent times provided by standard accelerated test sequences.

Bosco, N.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The last years saw a renewal of interest for hypersonic research in general and regenerative cooling specifically, with a large increase of the number of dedicated facilities and technical studies. In order to quantify the heat transfer in the cooled structures and the composition of the cracked fuel entering the combustor, an accurate model of the thermal decomposition of the fuel is required. This model should be able to predict the fuel chemical composition and physical properties for a broad range of pressures, temperatures and cooling geometries. For this purpose, an experimental and modeling study of the thermal decomposition of generic molecules (long-chain or polycyclic alkanes) that could be good surrogates of real fuels, has been started at the DCPR laboratory located in Nancy (France). This successful effort leads to several versions of a complete kinetic model. These models do not assume any effect from the material that constitutes the cooling channel. A specific experimental study was performed ...

Bouchez, Marc; Visez, Nicolas; Herbinet, Olivier; Fournet, Ren; Marquaire, Paul-Marie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Magnus Hindsberger Kgs. Lyngby 2003 IMM-PHD-2003-112 Interconnected hydro-thermalsystems #12;Technical University of Denmark 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-PHD-2003-112 ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Interconnected hydro

60

Thermal And Thermo-Mechanical Modelling of Polymer Overmoulded Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electronics for use in the demanding automotive environment. A two shot moulding technology will protect of electronics within polymer materials is of great interest to the automotive industry as a means to protectThermal And Thermo-Mechanical Modelling of Polymer Overmoulded Electronics F. Sarvar1 , D. C

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

62

Adaptive Thermal Modeling Architecture for Small Satellite Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USAF Colonel John Keesee, USAF Retired May 2010 SSL # 4-10 #12;#12;Adaptive Thermal Modeling May 2010 SSL # 4-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by 2Lt. John Anger Richmond

63

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith Department of Computer Science HVAC systems account for 38% of building energy usage. Studies have indicated at least 5-15% waste due to unoccu- pied spaces being conditioned. Our goal is to minimize this waste by retrofitting HVAC systems

Whitehouse, Kamin

64

Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energys Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuels cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISONs results. BISONs models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

Bradley K. Heath

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Thermalization at lowest energies? A view from a transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model we analyzed the production of pions and kaons in the energy range of 1-2 AGeV in order to study the question why thermal models could achieve a successful description. For this purpose we study the variation of pion and kaon yields using different elementary cross sections. We show that several ratios appear to be rather robust versus their variations.

C Hartnack; H Oeschler; J Aichelin

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before.

Lin, E.I. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Thermal modeling of Bakken Formation of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic geochemical analyses provide a quantitative basis on which conceptual models of thermal maturation may be built. Contour maps of maturation indices of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin show anomalous patterns that are not dependent on burial depth. One such area is on the western side of the Nesson anticline. One-dimensional modeling incorporating a uniform, constant heat flow, lithology-dependent thermal conductivities, and decompaction factors indicates that these areas are less mature than surrounding regions. This is due primarily to decreasing burial depth and thinning of low-thermal-conductivity Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. Additional heat transfer to these regions may be due in part to heat transfer by fluid movement through aquifers or vertical fractures. The influence of these fluid systems is simulated through the use of a two-dimensional finite difference program. Basic assumptions are made concerning heat flow, thermal properties, and ground-water flow rates through time. Modeling of the time-temperature history is simplified by restricting the study to the time of greatest maturation, the post-Jurassic.

Anderson, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

Wray, Craig P.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Novel Model for Fracture Acidizing with Important Thermal Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NOVEL MODEL FOR FRACTURE ACIDIZING WITH IMPORTANT THERMAL EFFECTS A Thesis by JOHN BRENDAN LYONS Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... benefit to my research. I would like to acknowledge the Qatar National Research Fund, NPRP 09-828-2-316, for supporting this research. The facilities and resources provided by the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering of Texas A&M University...

Lyons, John

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

73

PARAMETERIZATION AND VALIDATION OF AN INTEGRATED ELECTRO-THERMAL CYLINDRICAL LFP BATTERY MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a two-state thermal model to form an electro-thermal model for cylindrical lithium ion batteries- eters. A two-state thermal model is used to approximate the core and surface temperatures of the battery to lithium diffusion in the solid phase and in the electrolyte [13]. These circuit elements depend on state

Stefanopoulou, Anna

74

Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid-BasicHardware inThermal Modeling

76

Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune explains the transition from a prograde to a retrograde equatorial jet, while the broader jets are due to the deformation radius being a larger fraction of the planetary radius.

Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thermal Expansion Models of Viscous Fluids Based on Limits of Free Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Expansion Models of Viscous Fluids Based on Limits of Free Energy S.E. Bechtel Department March 25, 2002 Abstract Many viscous uid ows are mechanically incompressible, yet thermally expand associated with sound waves. The Boussi- nesq model for laboratory-scale, buoyancy-driven thermal convection

Aluffi, Paolo

78

A multi-scale iterative approach for finite element modeling of thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface topography has long been considered a key factor in the performance of many contact applications including thermal contact resistance. However, essentially all analytical and numerical models of thermal contact ...

Thompson, Mary Kathryn, 1980-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The creation of a courtyard microclimate thermal model for the analysis of courtyard houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the air change rates, solar absorptivity, and ambient air (rooftop) temperatures. The courtyard microclimate model was then used in combination with thermal simulation software (DOE-2) to analyze the thermal performance of the case study house, which...

Bagneid, Amr

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

Pesaran, A. A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Model equations in rarefied gas dynamics: Viscous-slip and thermal-slip coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model equations in rarefied gas dynamics: Viscous-slip and thermal-slip coefficients C. E. Siewert-slip and the thermal-slip coefficients in rarefied gas dynamics. More specifically, the BGK model, the S model In reviewing numerous papers devoted to model equa- tions in rarefied gas dynamics, we have found no definitive

Siewert, Charles E.

83

Abstract--Eventually, prediction of transformer thermal performance for dynamic loading will be made using models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract--Eventually, prediction of transformer thermal performance for dynamic loading will be made using models distilled from measure data, rather than models derived from transformer heat for measuring the acceptability of transformer thermal models. For a model to be acceptable, it must have

84

Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics Lida Jauregui transformer top-oil thermal models are examined vis-à-vis training with measured data. Acceptability is unacceptable for model identification purposes. The linear top-oil model is acceptable for FOFA transformers

85

Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Improved Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Model for Pressurized Thermal Shock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of an improved probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model used for calculating the conditional probabilities of fracture and failure of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. The updated PFM model incorporates several new features: expanded databases for the fracture toughness properties of RPV steels; statistical representations of the fracture toughness databases developed through application of rigorous mathematical procedures; and capability of generating probability distributions for RPV fracture and failure. The updated PFM model was implemented into the FAVOR fracture mechanics program, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as an applications tool for RPV integrity assessment; an example application of that implementation is discussed herein. Applications of the new PFM model are providing essential input to a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) process that will establish an improved technical basis for re-assessment of current PTS regulations by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The methodology described herein should be considered preliminary and subject to revision in the PTS re-evaluation process.

Dickson, T.L.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modelling of unidirectional thermal diffusers in shallow water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is an experimental and theoretical investigation of the temperature field and velocity field induced by a unidirectional thermal diffuser in shallow water. A multiport thermal diffuser is essentially a pipe laid ...

Lee, Joseph Hun-Wei

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development and evaluation of a thermal model for haptic interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal interaction between the skin and an object is influenced by the thermal properties and initial temperatures of the skin and object, and by the contact force and surface roughness of the contact surfaces. This ...

Ho, Hsin-Ni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A probabilistic model to predict the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the case of cooling systems in nuclear power plants, observations revealed the presence of thermal crazing loading even if thermal fatigue is multiaxial. However, the first simulations on a uniaxial mechanicalA probabilistic model to predict the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal fatigue

91

NONLINEAR ANALYSIS OF RUBBER-BASED POLYMERIC MATERIALS WITH THERMAL RELAXATION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NONLINEAR ANALYSIS OF RUBBER-BASED POLYMERIC MATERIALS WITH THERMAL RELAXATION MODELS R. V. N of the material and their close connection with the effect of thermal relaxation time can be best appreciated (phonons). A relaxation time appears naturally as the characteristic of thermal resistance in the solid

Melnik, Roderick

92

Discrete thermal element modelling of heat conduction in particle systems: Basic formulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methodology, termed the discrete thermal element method (DTEM), for the effec- tive modelling of heat rights reserved. Keywords: Discrete thermal element method; Circular particle; Thermal contact; Heat conduction; Boundary (integral) equation/element 1. Introduction Heat transfer in particle systems can

Martin, Ralph R.

93

Spatial confinement and thermal deconfinement in the Gross-Neveu model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the occurrence of spatial confinement and thermal deconfinement in the massive, D-dimensional, Gross-Neveu model with compactified spatial dimensions.

Malbouisson, J. M. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Khanna, F. C. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Malbouisson, A. P. C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas/MCT, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santana, A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Rapid Modeling of Power Electronics Thermal Management Technologies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes a method of rapidly evaluating trade-offs associated with alternative packaging configurations and thermal management technologies for power electronics packaging.

Bennion, K.; Kelly, K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media By Daniel E.A. van with the formulation and numerical solution of equations for modelling multicomponent, two-phase, thermal fluid flow typical flow behaviour that occurs during fluid injection into a reservoir. Keywords: porous media flow

97

Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications simulation System modeling and control PEMFC a b s t r a c t Temperature changes in PEM fuel cell stacks. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially

Berning, Torsten

98

Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcoupled with thermal energy storage," Applied Energy, vol.N. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

Steen, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcogeneration coupled with thermal energy storage," AppliedN. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

Steen, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Improving the Fanger model's thermal comfort predictions for naturally ventilated spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Fanger model is the official thermal comfort model in U.S. and international standards and is based on the heat balance of the human body with the environment. This investigation focuses on re-specifying the parameters ...

Truong, Phan Hue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below 100 C. In addition, the calculation results demonstrate that the cooling tube system external to an air-filled column is not highly effective at reducing the maximum temperature, but the baseline design using a central cooling tube inside the column provides sufficient cooling to maintain the maximum temperature near the assumed safety limit.

Lee, S.; King, W.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal properties of nanowires and nanotubes : modeling and experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanowires and nanotubes have drawn a great deal of recent attention for such potential applications as lasers, transistors, biosensors, and thermoelectric energy converters. Although the thermal properties of nanowires can ...

Dames, Christopher Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The economics of fuel depletion in fast breeder reactor blankets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fast breeder reactor fuel depletion-economics model was developed and applied to a number of 1000 MWe UMBR case studies, involving radial blanket-radial reflector design, radial blanket fuel management, and sensitivity ...

Brewer, Shelby Templeton

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Uranio impoverito: perch? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of understanding the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

Germano D'Abramo

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

107

Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

108

A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR. F of climate. This software #12;has already been used for the validation of prescriptions concerning low energy; E.Mail : lucas@iremia.univ-reunion.fr ABSTRACT: Simulation codes of thermal behaviour could

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE. J. The essential role of water-ice clouds in shaping the thermal structure of the martian atmosphere has been long presumed [1] but neglected in GCMs because of the lack of observations and difficulty to predict

Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

110

Cu-Bi as a Model System For Liquid Phase Sintered Thermal Interface Management Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relates electrical resistivity to thermal conductivity for materials where electrons are principleCu-Bi as a Model System For Liquid Phase Sintered Thermal Interface Management Materials P to produce composite materials. A high melting phase (HMP) and low melting phase (LMP) are mixed

Collins, Gary S.

111

IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics (2002) 67, 419439 Modelling thermal front dynamics in microwave heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an electric field is applied to materials with high resistivity, the dipole moments of the molecules alignIMA Journal of Applied Mathematics (2002) 67, 419­439 Modelling thermal front dynamics in microwave July 2000; revised on 6 December 2001] The formation and propagation of thermal fronts in a cylindrical

Xin, Jack

112

Thermal Abuse Modeling of Li-Ion Cells and Propagation in Modules (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are: (1) continue to explore thermal abuse behaviors of Li-ion cells and modules that are affected by local conditions of heat and materials; (2) use the 3D Li-ion battery thermal abuse 'reaction' model developed for cells to explore the impact of the location of internal short, its heating rate, and thermal properties of the cell; (3) continue to understand the mechanisms and interactions between heat transfer and chemical reactions during thermal runaway for Li-ion cells and modules; and (4) explore the use of the developed methodology to support the design of abuse-tolerant Li-ion battery systems.

Kim, G.-H.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The relative abundances (alphas) for the first...

Stone, Joseph C.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Model-based Thermal Anomaly Detection in Cloud Datacenters Eun Kyung Lee, Hariharasudhan Viswanathan, and Dario Pompili  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-based Thermal Anomaly Detection in Cloud Datacenters Eun Kyung Lee, Hariharasudhan datacenters make them prone to strategic attacks, misconfigurations, and failures (cooling as well) and observed thermal maps (obtained using thermal cameras) of datacenters is proposed. In addition, a Thermal

Pompili, Dario

115

Multiscale micromechanical modeling of the thermal/mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced thermal/mechanical properties at low weight fractions (We) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly ...

Sheng, Nuo, 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Beryllium Impregnation of Uranium Fuel: Thermal Modeling of Cylindrical Objects for Efficiency Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With active research projects related to nuclear waste immobilization and high conductivity nuclear fuels, a thermal model has been developed to simulate the temperature profile within a heat generating cylinder in order to imitate the behavior...

Lynn, Nicholas

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

Modeling the solar thermal receiver for the CSPonD Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective was to create an accurate steady state thermal model of a molten salt receiver prototype with a horizontal divider plate in the molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power on Demand (CSPonD). The purpose of the ...

Rees, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Anne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermal mass performance in residential construction : an energy analysis using a cube model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given the pervasiveness of energy efficiency concerns in the built environment, this research aims to answer key questions regarding the performance of thermal mass construction. The work presents the Cube Model, a simplified ...

Ledwith, Alison C. (Alison Catherine)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A model library of solar thermal electric components for the computer code TRNSYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to modeling solar thermal electric plants using the TRNSYS simulation environment is discussed. The TRNSYS environment offers many advantages over currently used tools, including the option to more easily study the hybrid solar/fossil plant configurations that have been proposed to facilitate market penetration of solar thermal technologies. A component library developed for Rankine cycle, Brayton cycle, and solar system modeling is presented. A comparison between KPRO and TRNSYS results for a simple Rankine cycle show excellent correlation.

Pitz-Paal, R. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Solare Energietechnik; Jones, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fully depleted back illuminated CCD  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

Holland, Stephen Edward (Hercules, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Integrated thermal-microstructure model to predict the property gradients in resistance spot steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated model approach was proposed for relating resistance welding parameters to weldment properties. An existing microstructure model was used to determine the microstructural and property gradients in resistance spot welds of plain carbon steel. The effect of these gradients on the weld integrity was evaluated with finite element analysis. Further modifications to this integrated thermal-microstructure model are discussed.

Babu, S.S.; Riemer, B.W.; Santella, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Feng, Z. [Edison Welding Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A model of the thermal processing of particles in solar nebula shocks: Application to the cooling rates of chondrules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of the thermal processing of particles in solar nebula shocks: Application to the cooling for the thermal processing of particles in shock waves typical of the solar nebula. This shock model improves are accounted for in their ef fects on the mass, momentum and energy fluxes. Also, besides thermal exchange

Connolly Jr, Harold C.

123

Modelling of the thermal behaviour of 48 inch cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the current state of the analytical models being developed by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) to improve the understanding of the response of Uranium Hexafluoride containers engulfed in a fire. Details are given of the modeling methods used and physical processes simulated, together with some predictions from the models. Explanations for the differences between the predictions are presented as well as an outline for future development of the models.

Clayton, D.G.; Hayes, T.J.; Livesey, E.; Lomas, J.; Price, M. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley Warrington Cheshire (United Kingdom)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Investigations on Repository Near-Field Thermal Modeling - Repository Science/Thermal Load Management & Design Concepts (M41UF033302)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various layers of material from the waste package (such as components of the engineered barrier system and the host rock surface) to a given distance within the rock wall at a given distance can be described as concentric circles with varying thermal properties (see Figure 5.1-1). The selected model approach examines the contributions of the waste package, axial waste package neighbors and lateral neighboring emplacement drifts (see Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 2). In clay and deep borehole media, the peak temperature is driven by the central waste package whereas, in granite and salt, the contribution to the temperature rise by adjacent (lateral) waste packages in drift or emplacement borehole lines is dominant at the time of the peak temperature. Mathematical models generated using Mathcad software provide insight into the effects of changing waste package spacing for six waste forms, namely UOX, MOX, co-extraction, new extraction, E-Chem ceramic and E-Chem metal in four different geologic media (granite, clay, salt and deep borehole). Each scenario includes thermal conductivity and diffusivity for each layer between the waste package and the host rock, dimensions of representative repository designs (such as waste package spacing, drift or emplacement borehole spacing, waste package dimensions and layer thickness), and decay heat curves generated from knowledge of the contents of a given waste form after 10, 50, 100 and 200 years of surface storage. Key results generated for each scenario include rock temperature at a given time calculated at a given radius from the central waste package (Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 3), the corresponding temperature at the interface of the waste package and EBS material, and at each EBS layer in between (Section 5.2.2 and Appendix H, Section 4). This information is vital to understand the implications of repository design (waste package capacity, surface storage time, waste package spacing, and emplacement drift or borehole spacing) by comparing the peak temperature to the thermal limits of the concentric layers surrounding the waste package; specifically 100 C for the bentonite buffer in granite and clay repositories, 100 C for rock wall in a clay repository and 200 C at the rock wall for a salt repository. These thermal limits are both preliminary and approximate, and serve as a means to evaluate design options rather than determining compliance for licensing situations. The thermal behavior of a salt repository is more difficult to model because it is not a concentric geometry and because the crushed salt backfill initially has a much higher thermal resistance than intact salt. Three models were investigated, namely a waste package in complete contact with crushed salt, secondly a waste package in contact with intact salt, and thirdly a waste package in contact with 75% intact and 25% crushed salt. The latter model best depicts emplacement of a waste package in the corner of an intact salt alcove and subsequently covered with crushed salt backfill to the angle of repose. The most conservative model (crushed salt) had temperatures much higher than the other models and although bounding, is too conservative to use. The most realistic model (75/25) had only a small temperature difference from the simplest (non-conservative, intact salt) model, and is the one chosen in this report (see Section 5.2.3). A trade-study investigating three key variables (surface storage time, waste package capacity and waste package spacing) is important to understand and design a repository. Waste package heat can be reduced by storing for longer periods prior to emplacement, or by reducing the number of assemblies or canisters within that waste package. Waste package spacing can be altered to optimize the thermal load without exceeding the thermal limits of the host rock or EBS components. By examining each of these variables, repository footprint (and therefore cost) can be optimized. For this report, the layout was fixed for each geologic medium based on prior published designs in

Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Fratoni, M; Greenberg, H R; Ross, A D

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

be generalized to other temperatures - Methodology uses response surface and empirical data-fitting techniques - Techniques result in simplified general models Cold Ambient...

128

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of mechanistic crack growth and grain contact models for chemically induced subcritical crack growth and pressure solution, with porosity-permeability changes * Conduct...

129

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of mechanistic crack growth and grain contact models for chemically induced subcritical crack growth and pressure solution, with porosity-permeability changes * Conduct...

130

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hybrid Model of Existing Buildings for Transient Thermal Performance Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building level energy models are important to provide accurate prediction of energy consumption for building performance diagnosis and energy efficiency assessment of retrofitting alternatives for building performance upgrading. Simplified...

Xu, X.; Wang, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modeling of the Thermal Field in Dissimilar Alloy Ultrasonic Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a finite element model for predicting the temperature field in high power ultrasonic welding aluminum AA6111 to two dissimilar alloys, magnesium AZ31, and low carbon steel DC04. Experimental thermocouple and other evidence...

Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Prangnell, P.; Robson, J.

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modeling the chemical, diffusional, and thermal processes of a microreactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis seeks to create a high fidelity model of the multiphysics present in a typical microreactor using propane combustion as a fuel source. The system is fully described by energy, momentum, and mass equations, all ...

Silva, James Emanuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 144305 (2013) Two-channel model for nonequilibrium thermal transport in pump-probe experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

150 nm of the Al/Si0.99Ge0.01 interface. The extra thermal resistance in this region is a result. INTRODUCTION The magnitude of a material's thermal conductivity and spe- cific heat is determinedPHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 144305 (2013) Two-channel model for nonequilibrium thermal transport in pump

Cahill, David G.

137

Magnetotelluric models of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs (RHS) thermal area, which includes a hotwater-dominated fracture zone prospect, near the eastern margin of the Basin-Range tectonic province, conceivably possesses a whole family of resistivity structures that includes the following: deep hot brine reservoirs, deep-seated partially molten heat sources in the crust or upper mantle that drive the convective system, near-surface hydrothermal alteration zones, wet sedimentary fill in valleys, and a regional, apparently one-dimensional resistivity profile of the crust and upper mantle. This complex resistivity makeup, particular to RHS but probably similar to that at other geothermal areas in the Great Basin, must be treated as being fully three-dimensional (3-D). In an attempt to understand these structures, broadband (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ Hz) tensor magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained including apparent resistivities (rho/sub a/), impedance phases (phi) and vertical magnetic field transfer functions for 93 sites in the vicinity of this resource area.

Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is considered for application to the combined problem of thermal conduction and enclosure radiation. The main objective is to develop a procedure that can be implemented in an existing thermal analysis code. The main analysis objective is to allow thermal controller software to be used in the design of a control system for a large optical system that resides with a complex radiation dominated enclosure. In the remainder of this section a brief outline of ROM methods is provided. The following chapter describes the fully coupled conduction/radiation method that is required prior to considering a ROM approach. Considerable effort was expended to implement and test the combined solution method; the ROM project ended shortly after the completion of this milestone and thus the ROM results are incomplete. The report concludes with some observations and recommendations.

Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department1 Prepared by:DTE Energy VideoDarkof Energy Modeling

140

Duct Thermal Performance Models for Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department) for his assistance in defining the duct surface heat transfer models described in the body of this report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A sensitivity investigation of mathematical models for thermal effluent analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It was found that the model was most sensitive to errors in the power plant input calcu- lations, depth determinations, and air temperature; it was moderately sensitive to solar radiation and relative humidity parameters; and it was somewhat insensitive...-SITE DATA COLLECTION Site Descrir&tion The Monitorinz Station THE ENERGy BUDGET CALCULATION Mechanisms of Heat Exchange Solar Radiation Atmospheric Radiation Evaporation Conduction Power Plant Input The Heat Balance Equation The Numerical Solution...

Lopez, Frank

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling and Strategy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department1 Prepared by:DTE Energy VideoDark

144

Lithium Depletion of Nearby Young Stellar Associations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate cluster ages from lithium depletion in five pre-main-sequence groups found within 100 pc of the Sun: TW Hydrae Association, Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster, Beta Pictoris Moving Group, Tucanae-Horologium Association and AB Doradus Moving Group. We determine surface gravities, effective temperatures and lithium abundances for over 900 spectra through least squares fitting to model-atmosphere spectra. For each group, we compare the dependence of lithium abundance on temperature with isochrones from pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to obtain model dependent ages. We find that the Eta Chamaelontis Cluster and the TW Hydrae Association are the youngest, with ages of 12+/-6 Myr and 12+/-8 Myr, respectively, followed by the Beta Pictoris Moving Group at 21+/-9 Myr, the Tucanae-Horologium Association at 27+/-11 Myr, and the AB Doradus Moving Group at an age of at least 45 Myr (where we can only set a lower limit since the models -- unlike real stars -- do not show much lithium depletion beyond this age). Here, the ordering is robust, but the precise ages depend on our choice of both atmospheric and evolutionary models. As a result, while our ages are consistent with estimates based on Hertzsprung-Russell isochrone fitting and dynamical expansion, they are not yet more precise. Our observations do show that with improved models, much stronger constraints should be feasible: the intrinsic uncertainties, as measured from the scatter between measurements from different spectra of the same star, are very low: around 10 K in effective temperature, 0.05 dex in surface gravity, and 0.03 dex in lithium abundance.

Erin Mentuch; Alexis Brandeker; Marten H. van Kerkwijk; Ray Jayawardhana; Peter H. Hauschildt

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Single-Particle Model for a Lithium-Ion Cell: Thermal Godfrey Sikha,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the diffusion in the solid state. At high current densities, the concentration gradients to include an energy balance. The temperature dependence of the solid phase diffusion coefficient in the literature; for example, Newman and Pals1,2 presented cell and battery stack thermal models incorporating

146

Flamelet-based modeling of auto-ignition with thermal inhomogeneities for application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flamelet-based modeling of auto-ignition with thermal inhomogeneities for application to HCCI National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551, USA Abstract Homogeneous-charge compression ignition (HCCI ignition engines. However, HCCI engines expe- rience very large heat release rates which can cause too

Pitsch, Heinz

147

Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

value energy conversions such as heat engine cycles or chemical process to be carried outModelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove, Canberra AUSTRALIA E-mail: u3370739@anu.edu.au The natural convective flow inside a concentrating solar

148

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Virginia Smith, Tamim Sookoor, and Kamin Whitehouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith, Tamim Sookoor, and Kamin,sookoor,whitehouse}@virginia.edu Abstract. HVAC systems account for 38% of building energy usage. Studies have indicated at least 5 HVAC systems to enable room-level zoning where each room is conditioned in- dividually based on its

Whitehouse, Kamin

149

Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ? A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ? The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ? The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 ?{sup 3} for bulk to 57 ?{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Detailed numerical modeling of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium in hypersonic flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in hypersonic flows has created a large demand for physicochemical models for air flow computations around reentry bodies. Detailed physicochemical models for air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium are needed for a realistic prediction of hypersonic flowfields. In this paper we develop a model, based on elementary physicochemical processes, for a detailed description of chemical nonequilibrium together with the excitation of internal DOFs. This model is implemented in a 2D Navier-Stokes code in order to show the strong influence of thermal nonequilibrium on the flowfields. The algorithm presented here is based on a fully conservative discretization of the inviscid fluxes in the conservation equations and uses the chain rule conservation law form for the viscous fluxes. The large system of ordinary differential and algebraic equations resulting from the spatial discretization is solved by a time-accurate semiimplicit extrapolation method. 34 refs.

Riedel, U.; Maas, U.; Warnatz, J. (Stuttgart Univ. (Germany))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4- Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model of LiFePO4-graphite based Li-ion batteries is developed : 10.1149/2.064209jes #12;Over the past 15 years, Li-ion batteries have received much attention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

MODEL FOR DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PARTICLE BEDS WITH HIGH SOLID-TO-GAS THERMAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-TO-GAS THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY RATIO A.R. Raffray, Z. Gorbis, A. Badawi, M.S. Tillack, A.Y. Ying, and M. A. Abdou

Abdou, Mohamed

154

Copper-triazole interaction and coolant inhibitor depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To a large extent, the depletion of tolyltriazole (TTZ) observed in several field tests may be attributed to the formation of a protective copper-triazole layer. Laboratory aging studies, shown to correlate with field experience, reveal that copper-TTZ layer formation depletes coolant TTZ levels in a fashion analogous to changes observed in the field. XPS and TPD-MS characterization of the complex formed indicates a strong chemical bond between copper and the adsorbed TTZ which can be desorbed thermally only at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical polarization experiments indicate that the layer provides good copper protection even when TTZ is absent from the coolant phase. Examination of copper cooling system components obtained after extensive field use reveals the presence of a similar protective layer.

Bartley, L.S.; Fritz, P.O.; Pellet, R.J.; Taylor, S.A.; Van de Ven, P. [Texaco Fuels and Lubricants Technology Dept., Beacon, NY (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hypolimnetic Oxygen Depletion in Eutrophic Lakes Beat Muller,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypolimnetic Oxygen Depletion in Eutrophic Lakes Beat Muller,*, Lee D. Bryant,, Andreas Matzinger obtained from 11 eutrophic lakes and suggests a model describing the consumption of dissolved oxygen (O2) in the hypolimnia of eutrophic lakes as a result of only two fundamental processes: O2 is consumed (i) by settled

Wehrli, Bernhard

156

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Model Studies of Pore Stability and Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. Katz, Advanced Ceramics: Thermal Barrier Coatings BeatConductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier CoatingsFatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings, NASA/

Glaeser, A M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear Systems Modeling & Simulation | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling and Simulation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion model for the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Empirical validation of the thermal model of a passive solar cell test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper deals with an empirical validation of a building thermal model. We put the emphasis on sensitivity analysis and on research of inputs/residual correlation to improve our model. In this article, we apply a sensitivity analysis technique in the frequency domain to point out the more important parameters of the model. Then, we compare measured and predicted data of indoor dry-air temperature. When the model is not accurate enough, recourse to time-frequency analysis is of great help to identify the inputs responsible for the major part of error. In our approach, two samples of experimental data are required. The first one is used to calibrate our model the second one to really validate the optimized model

Mara, T A; Boyer, H; Mamode, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sizing Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS): A Brief Literature Review and Model Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

m 2 /W Thermal resistance of the building envelope, K-m 2 /Wtemperature, envelope, slab and tubing thermal resistance,

Basu, Chandrayee; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

TWIST: a transient two-dimensional intra-subassembly thermal hydraulics model for LMFBRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mathematical models and numerical methods for a two-dimensional porous body simulation of steady state and transient thermal-hydraulics conditions in LMFBR subassemblies resulting in the TWIST computer code are presented. Comparison of calculated results to steady state and transient out-of-pile sodium experiments show good agreement for cross-assembly temperature distributions for a wide range of heat transfer and flow conditions.

Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Cazzoli, E.G.

1984-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

An evaluation of thermal modeling techniques utilized for nuclear fuel rods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like to thank my graduate advisor, Dr. K. L. Peddicord, for his technical advice and guidance throughout this project and my studies in Nuclear Engineering at Texas AgiM University. Thanks are also extended to Dr. Hassan and Dr. Caton for reviewing...AN EVALUATION OF THERMAL MODELING TECHNIQUES UTILIZED FOR NUCLEAR FUEL RODS A Thesis by JEFFREY WARREN SIMMONS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Asr M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Simmons, Jeffrey Warren

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240C to 150C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Kruger, Paul

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

Wayne Briner

167

Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Subchannel thermal-hydraulic modeling of an APT tungsten target rod bundle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planned target for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) neutron source consists of an array of tungsten rod bundles through which D{sub 2}O coolant flows axially. Here, a scoping analysis of flow through an APT target rod bundle was conducted to demonstrate that lateral cross-flows are important, and therefore subchannel modeling is necessary to accurately predict thermal-hydraulic behavior under boiling conditions. A local reactor assembly code, FLOWTRAN, was modified to model axial flow along the rod bundle as flow through three concentric heated annular passages.

Hamm, L.L.; Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Thermal and mechanical denaturation properties of a DNA model with three sites per nucleotide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we show that the coarse grain model for DNA, which has been proposed recently by Knotts, Rathore, Schwartz and de Pablo (J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084901 (2007)), can be adapted to describe the thermal and mechanical denaturation of long DNA sequences by adjusting slightly the base pairing contribution. The adjusted model leads to (i) critical temperatures for long homogeneous sequences that are in good agreement with both experimental ones and those obtained from statistical models, (ii) a realistic step-like denaturation behaviour for long inhomogeneous sequences, and (iii) critical forces at ambient temperature of the order of 10 pN, close to measured values. The adjusted model furthermore supports the conclusion that the thermal denaturation of long homogeneous sequences corresponds to a first-order phase transition and yields a critical exponent for the critical force equal to sigma=0.70. This model is both geometrically and energetically realistic, in the sense that the helical structure and th...

Florescu, Ana-Maria; 10.1063/1.3626870

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Methods Note/ NAPL Source Zone Depletion Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to evaluate groundwater contamination and cleanup times for four complex mixtures of concern in the railroad industry. Among the petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures considered, the cleanup time of diesel fuel was much LNAPLs adequately represent the economic risk of chemical spills. To assess the environmental risk

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

171

Massive planets in FU Orionis discs: implications for thermal instability models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FU Orionis are young stellar objects undergoing episodes of enhanced luminosity, which are generally ascribed to a sudden increase of mass accretion rate in the surrounding protostellar disc. Models invoking a thermal instability in the disc are able to reproduce many features of the outburst, but cannot explain the rapid rise time-scale observed in many cases. Here we explore the possibility (originally suggested by Clarke & Syer 1996) that the thermal instability is triggered away from the disc inner edge (at a distance of $\\approx 10R_{\\odot}$ from the central protostar) due to the presence of a massive planet embedded in the disc. We have constructed simple, one-dimensional, time-dependent models of the disc evolution, taking into account both the interaction between the disc and the planet, and the thermal evolution of the disc. We are indeed able to reproduce rapid rise outbursts (with rise time-scale $\\approx 1$ yr), with a planet mass $M_{\\mathrm{s}}=10-15M_{\\mathrm{Jupiter}}$. We show that the luminosity and the duration of the outbursts are increasing functions of planet mass. We also show that the inward migration of the planet is significantly slowed once it reaches the radius where it is able to trigger FU Orionis outbursts, thus suggesting that a single planet may be involved in triggering several outbursts.

G. Lodato; C. J. Clarke

2004-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials' (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U[sub o]-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for group R'' residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub o}-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for ``group R`` residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Transient Model of Induced Natural Circulation Thermal Cycling for Hydrogen Isotope Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The property of selective temperature dependence of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes by palladium is used for isotope separation. A proposal to use natural circulation of nitrogen to alternately heat and cool a packed bed of palladium coated beads is under active investigation, and a device consisting of two interlocking natural convection loops is being designed. A transient numerical model of the device has been developed to aid the design process. It is a one-dimensional finite-difference model, using the Boussinesq approximation. The thermal inertia of the pipe walls and other heat structures as well as the heater control logic is included in the model. Two system configurations were modeled and results are compared.

SHADDAY, MARTIN

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

MODELING THE TRANSVERSE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF 2D-SICF/SIC COMPOSITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hierarchical model was developed to describe the effective transverse thermal conductivity, K effective, of a 2D-SiC/SiC composite made from stacked and infiltrated woven fabric layers in terms of constituent properties and microstructural and architectural variables. The model includes the expected effects of fiber-matrix interfacial conductance as well as the effects of high fiber packing fractions within individual tows and the non-uniform nature of 2D-fabric layers that include a significant amount of interlayer porosity. Model predictions were obtained for two versions of DuPont 2D-Hi Nicalon(Trademark)/PyC/ICVI-SiC composite, one with a thin (0.110 micron) and the other with a thick (1.040 micron) PyC fiber coating. The model predicts that the matrix porosity content and porosity shape factor have a major influence on K effective(T) for such a composite.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modelization of helio-thermal converters : application to the greenhouse effect P. Gallet, F. Papini and A. Ropke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

169 Modelization of helio-thermal converters : application to the greenhouse effect P. Gallet, F surface - greenhouse effect association is discussed as an example. Revue Phys. Appl. 18 (1983) 169

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation and Validation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion...

178

Lithium depletion and the rotational history of exoplanet host stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Israelian et al. (2004) reported that exoplanet host stars are lithium depleted compared to solar-type stars without detected massive planets, a result recently confirmed by Gonzalez (2008). We investigate whether enhanced lithium depletion in exoplanet host stars may result from their rotational history. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow and fast solar-type rotators from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to the age of the Sun and compare them to the distribution of rotational periods observed for solar-type stars between 1 Myr and 5 Gyr. We show that slow rotators develop a high degree of differential rotation between the radiative core and the convective envelope, while fast rotators evolve with little core-envelope decoupling. We suggest that strong differential rotation at the base of the convective envelope is responsible for enhanced lithium depletion in slow rotators. We conclude that lithium-depleted exoplanet host stars were slow rotators on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) and argue that slow rotation results from a long lasting star-disk interaction during the PMS. Altogether, this suggests that long-lived disks (> 5 Myr) may be a necessary condition for massive planet formation/migration.

Jerome Bouvier

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

179

CRDIAC: Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When modeling the behavior of a nuclear reactor over time, it is important to understand how the isotopes in the reactor will change, or transmute, over that time. This is especially important in the reactor fuel itself. Many nuclear physics modeling codes model how particles interact in the system, but do not model this over time. Thus, another code is used in conjunction with the nuclear physics code to accomplish this. In our code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) codes and the Multi Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU) were chosen as the codes to use. In this way, MCNP would produce the reaction rates in the different isotopes present and MRTAU would use cross sections generated from these reaction rates to determine how the mass of each isotope is lost or gained. Between these two codes, the information must be altered and edited for use. For this, a Python 2.7 script was developed to aid the user in getting the information in the correct forms. This newly developed methodology was called the Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Controls (CRDIAC). As is the case in any newly developed methodology for modeling of physical phenomena, CRDIAC needed to be verified against similar methodology and validated against data taken from an experiment, in our case AFIP-3. AFIP-3 was a reduced enrichment plate type fuel tested in the ATR. We verified our methodology against the MCNP Coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) method and validated our work against the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) data. When compared to MCWO, the difference in concentration of U-235 throughout Cycle 144A was about 1%. When compared to the PIE data, the average bias for end of life U-235 concentration was about 2%. These results from CRDIAC therefore agree with the MCWO and PIE data, validating and verifying CRDIAC. CRDIAC provides an alternative to using ORIGEN-based methodology, which is useful because CRDIAC's depletion code, MRTAU, uses every available isotope in its depletion, unlike ORIGEN, which only depletes the isotopes specified by the user. This means that depletions done by MRTAU more accurately reflect reality. MRTAU also allows the user to build new isotope data sets, which means any isotope with nuclear data could be depleted, something that would help predict the outcomes of nuclear reaction testing in materials other than fuel, like beryllium or gold.

Steven K. Logan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Warman, J.c. , "Thermal energy storage in a confinedProceedings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop,c.F. , ~Aquifer thermal energy storage- parameter study,~

Doughty, Christine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

Attainable Burnup in a LIFE Engine Loaded with Depleted Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) system uses a laser-based fusion source for electricity production. The (D,T) reaction, beside a pure fusion system, allows the option to drive a sub-critical fission blanket in order to increase the total energy gain. In a typical fusion-fission LIFE engine the fission blanket is a spherical shell around the fusion source, preceded by a beryllium shell for neutron multiplications by means of (n,2n) reactions. The fuel is in the form of TRISO particles dispersed in carbon pebbles, cooled by flibe. The optimal design features 80 cm thick blanket, 16 cm multiplier, and 20% TRISO packing factor. A blanket loaded with depleted uranium and depleted in a single batch with continuous mixing can achieve burnup as high as {approx}85% FIMA while generating 2,000 MW of total thermal power and producing enough tritium to be used for fusion. A multi-segment blanket with a central promotion shuffling scheme enhances burnup to {approx}90% FIMA, whereas a blanket that is operated with continuous refueling achieves only 82% FIMA under the same constraints of thermal power and tritium self-sufficiency. Both, multi-segment and continuous refueling eliminate the need for a fissile breeding phase.

Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this works calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the CIPS Validation Data Plan at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energys Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs programs VUQ Focus Area.

Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the coupled model is illustrated for geotechnical applications in energy-resource related areas. Examples in the areas of nuclear waste isolation and cut-and-fill mining are cited.

Hart, R.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal characterization and model free kinetics of aged epoxies and foams using TGA and DSC methods.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two classes of materials, poly(methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) or PMDI foam, and cross-linked epoxy resins, were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to help understand the effects of aging and %E2%80%9Cbake-out%E2%80%9D. The materials were evaluated for mass loss and the onset of decomposition. In some experiments, volatile materials released during heating were analyzed via mass spectroscopy. In all, over twenty materials were evaluated to compare the mass loss and onset temperature for decomposition. Model free kinetic (MFK) measurements, acquired using variable heating rate TGA experiments, were used to calculate the apparent activation energy of thermal decomposition. From these compiled data the effects of aging, bake-out, and sample history on the thermal stability of materials were compared. No significant differences between aged and unaged materials were detected. Bake-out did slightly affect the onset temperature of decomposition but only at the highest bake-out temperatures. Finally, some recommendations for future handling are made.

Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Nissen, April

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Compact Modeling and Analysis for Electronic and Thermal Effects of Nanometer Integrated and Packaged Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in terms of equivalent resistances and sources will be addedin terms of equivalent thermal resistance and independentand equivalent thermal capacitance and resistance to its

WANG, HAI

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the hard X-ray continuum above $\\sim 50$ keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft $\\gamma$-ray telescopes, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

James Chiang

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

Becker, G.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Uranio impoverito: perch'e? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of the author of understanding the reasons of the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

D'Abramo, G

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production...

193

acute tryptophan depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Psychopharmacology ISSN 0269-8811 SAGE Publications Ltd 12 Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging...

194

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Sites Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...

195

Prediction of Thermal Conductivity for Irradiated SiC/SiC Composites by Informing Continuum Models with Molecular Dynamics Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article proposes a new method to estimate the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation. The modeling method bridges different scales from the atomic scale to the scale of a 2D SiC/SiC composite. First, it studies the irradiation-induced point defects in perfect crystalline SiC using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to compute the defect thermal resistance as a function of vacancy concentration and irradiation dose. The concept of defect thermal resistance is explored explicitly in the MD data using vacancy concentrations and thermal conductivity decrements due to phonon scattering. Point defect-induced swelling for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC as a function of irradiation dose is approximated by scaling the corresponding MD results for perfect crystal ?-SiC to experimental data for CVD-SiC at various temperatures. The computed thermal defect resistance, thermal conductivity as a function of grain size, and definition of defect thermal resistance are used to compute the thermal conductivities of CVD-SiC, isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated (ICVI) SiC and nearly-stoichiometric SiC fibers. The computed fiber and ICVI-SiC matrix thermal conductivities are then used as input for an Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach to compute the thermal conductivities of 2D SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation within the same irradiation doses. Predicted thermal conductivities for an irradiated Tyranno-SA/ICVI-SiC composite are found to be comparable to available experimental data for a similar composite ICVI-processed with these fibers.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Gao, Fei; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 2: Rotary-mode sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds. The waste can produce undesired violent exothermic reactions when heated locally during the rotary-mode sampling. Experiments are performed varying the downward force at a maximum rotational speed of 55 rpm and minimum nitrogen purge flow of 30 scfm. The rotary drill bit teeth-face temperatures are measured. The waste is simulated with a low thermal conductivity hard material, pumice blocks. A torque meter is used to determine the energy provided to the drill string. The exhaust air-chip temperature as well as drill string and drill bit temperatures and other key operating parameters were recorded. A two-dimensional thermal model is developed. The safe operating conditions were determined for normal operating conditions. A downward force of 750 at 55 rpm and 30 scfm nitrogen purge flow was found to yield acceptable substrate temperatures. The model predicted experimental results reasonably well. Therefore, it could be used to simulate abnormal conditions to develop procedures for safe operations.

Unal, C.; Poston, D.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group; Witwer, K.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Engineering Testing Lab.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Discrete Element Model for Simulations of Early-Life Thermal Fracturing Behaviors in Ceramic Nuclear Fuel Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discrete element Model (DEM) representation of coupled solid mechanics/fracturing and heat conduction processes has been developed and applied to explicitly simulate the random initiations and subsequent propagations of interacting thermal cracks in a ceramic nuclear fuel pellet during initial rise to power and during power cycles. The DEM model clearly predicts realistic early-life crack patterns including both radial cracks and circumferential cracks. Simulation results clearly demonstrate the formation of radial cracks during the initial power rise, and formation of circumferential cracks as the power is ramped down. In these simulations, additional early-life power cycles do not lead to the formation of new thermal cracks. They do, however clearly indicate changes in the apertures of thermal cracks during later power cycles due to thermal expansion and shrinkage. The number of radial cracks increases with increasing power, which is consistent with the experimental observations.

Hai Huang; Ben Spencer; Jason Hales

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for validation. Comparisons between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data are discussed in detail.

Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

King, D.B. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Marshall, A.C. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I and C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models.

King, Donald B.; Marshall, Albert C. [DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); DSWA/FC, Thermionic Evaluation Facility 801 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Stations Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Dynamic Thermal Model of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Budi Hadisujoto, Rehan Refai, Dongmei Chen, Tess J. Moon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Thermal Model of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Budi Hadisujoto, Rehan Refai to improve the performance of a PEM fuel cell Simulation Results Advanced Power Systems and Controls (GDL) to reduce water saturation · Model water transport in PEM fuel cell Contribution: · Dynamic

Ben-Yakar, Adela

205

Thermal-mechanical modeling of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 C and 180 C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient isotropic stress of 100 MPa) at the borehole wall for the disposal of fuel assemblies and by about 90 MPa for vitrified waste. Simulated peak volumetric strain at the borehole wall is about 420 and 2600 microstrain for the disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Stress and volumetric strain decline rapidly with distance from the borehole and with time. Simulated peak stress at and parallel to the borehole wall for the disposal of vitrified waste with anisotropic ambient horizontal stress is about 440 MPa, which likely exceeds the compressive strength of granite if unconfined by fluid pressure within the borehole. The relatively small simulated displacements and volumetric strain near the borehole suggest that software codes using a nondeforming grid provide an adequate approximation of mechanical deformation in the coupled thermal-mechanical model. Additional modeling is planned to incorporate the effects of hydrologic processes coupled to thermal transport and mechanical deformation in the host rock near the heated borehole.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Hadgu, Teklu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops.

Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Rd., Ste. 170, San Diego, CA 92121-2910 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Mok, Yung, E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com, E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov, E-mail: ymok@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Coal thermolysis modeling: The effects of restricted diffusion on thermal reaction pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. A detailed study of the thermolysis of surface-immobilized bibenzyl showed that the rate of unimolecular C-C homolysis is similar to that in fluid phases. Recent studies have foucused on the thermally induced, free radical chain decomposition reactions for surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane and 1,4-diphenylbutane. For 1,4-diphenylbutane both the reaction rate and product composition are strongly dependent on surface coverage and, hence, the proximity of 1.4-diphenylbutane molecules and hydrogen abstracting radicals on the surface. The rates and selectivities of these key bimolecular reaction steps on the surface might also be affected by the structure of neighboring molecules. In the current study, we are beginning to probe this feature by examining the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane. 7 refs. , 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Combined Neutronic-Thermal Hydraulic Model of CERMET NTR Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract. Two different CERMET fueled Nuclear Thermal Propulsion reactors were modeled to determine the optimum coolant channel surface area to volume ratio required to cool a 25,000 lbf rocket engine operating at a specific impulse of 940 seconds. Both reactor concepts were computationally fueled with hexagonal cross section fuel elements having a flat-to-flat distance of 3.51 cm and containing 60 vol.% UO2 enriched to 93wt.%U235 and 40 vol.% tungsten. Coolant channel configuration consisted of a 37 coolant channel fuel element and a 61 coolant channel model representing 0.3 and 0.6 surface area to volume ratios respectively. The energy deposition from decelerating fission products and scattered neutrons and photons was determined using the MCNP monte carlo code and then imported into the STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics code. The 37 coolant channel case was shown to be insufficient in cooling the core to a peak temperature of 3000 K; however, the 61 coolant channel model shows promise for maintaining a peak core temperature of 3000 K, with no more refinements to the surface area to volume ratio. The core was modeled to have a power density of 9.34 GW/m3 with a thrust to weight ratio of 5.7.

Jonathan A. Webb; Brian Gross; William T. Taitano

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup ?3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 ?s. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electrical and Thermal Experimental Characterization and Modeling of Carbon Nanotube/Epoxy Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work investigates the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) inclusions on the electrical and thermal conductivity of a thermoset epoxy resin. The characterization of electrical and thermal conductivity of CNT/epoxy composites is presented...

Gardea, Frank

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermal Modeling and Device Noise Properties of Three-Dimensional-SOI Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal test structures and ring oscillators (ROs) are fabricated in 0.18-mum three-dimensional (3-D)-SOI technology. Measurements and electrothermal simulations show that thermal and parasitic effects due to 3-D packaging ...

Chen, Tze Wee

213

AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.; Moffat, H.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Laser assisted crystallization of ferromagnetic amorphous ribbons: A multimodal characterization and thermal model study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on laser-based de-vitrification of amorphous soft magnetic Fe-Si-B ribbons and its consequent influence on the magnetic properties. Laser processing resulted in a finer scale of crystallites due to rapid heating and cooling during laser annealing compared to conventional furnace annealing process. A significant increase in saturation magnetization is observed for laser-annealed ribbons compared to both as-received and furnace annealed samples coupled with an increase in coercivity compared to the as received samples. The combined effect of thermal histories and stresses developed during laser annealing results in the formation of nano-crystalline phase along the laser track. The phase evolution is studied by micro-XRD and TEM analysis. Solute partitioning and compositional variation within the phases are obtained by Local Electrode Atom probe analysis. The evolution of microstructure is rationalized using a Finite Element based heat transfer multi-physics model.

Katakam, Shravana; Santhanakrishnan, S.; Smith, Casey; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Synthesis Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76207 (United States); Devaraj, Arun; Bowden, Mark; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Ramanujan, R. V. [Schhol of Materials Science and Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Laser Assisted Crystallization of Ferromagnetic Amorphous Ribbons: A Multimodal Characterization and Thermal Model Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on laser-based de-vitrification of amorphous soft magnetic Fe-Si-B ribbons and its consequent influence on the magnetic properties. Laser processing resulted in a finer scale of crystallites due to rapid heating and cooling during laser annealing compared to conventional furnace annealing process. A significant increase in saturation magnetization is observed for laser-annealed ribbons compared to both as-received and furnace annealed samples coupled with an increase in coercivity compared to as received sample. The combined effect of thermal histories and stresses developed during laser annealing results in the formation of nano-crystalline phase along the laser track. The phase evolution is traced with the aid of micro-XRD and TEM analysis. The solute partitioning and compositional variation within the phases are obtained by Local Electrode Atom probe analysis. The evolution of microstructure is rationalized using a Finite Element based heat transfer multi-physics model.

Katakam, Shravana K.; Devaraj, Arun; Bowden, Mark E.; Santhanakrishnan, S.; Smith, Casey; Ramanujan, Raju; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B.

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermal Modeling Studies for Active Storage Modules in the Calvert Cliffs ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements obtained for two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Stations Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE) were used to perform validation and sensitivity studies on detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the concrete storage modules, including the dry storage canister within the modules. The storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Stations ISFSI are a site-specific version of the standard NUHOMS HSM. The two modules inspected each contained a 24P DSC loaded with 24 CE 14x14 spent fuel assemblies. The thermal analysis was performed using the STAR-CCM+ package, and the models developed for the specific ISFSI modules yielded temperature predictions in actual storage conditions for the concrete structure, the DSC and its contents, including preliminary estimates of fuel cladding temperatures for the used nuclear fuel. The results of this work demonstrate that existing CFD modeling tools can be used to obtain reasonable and accurate detailed representations of spent fuel storage systems with realistic decay heat loadings when the model omits specific conservatisms and bounding assumptions normally used in design-basis and safety-basis calculations. This paper presents sensitivity studies on modeling detail (for the storage module and the DSC), boundary conditions, and decay heat load, to evaluate the effect of the modeling approach on predicted temperatures and temperature distributions. Because nearly all degradation mechanisms for materials and structures comprising dry storage and transportation systems are dependent on temperature, accurate characterization of local temperatures and temperature gradients that the various components of these systems will experience over the entire storage period has been identified as a primary requirement for evaluation of very long term storage of used nuclear fuel.

Adkins, Harold E.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to solid materials like metals. Keywords: SWNT, Random Walk, Thermal Conductivity, Composites 1 at the interface between the matrix material and the SWNT plays a very important role on the effective thermal conductivity. This thermal resistance is known as the Kapitza resistance [8]. According to the acoustic theory

Maruyama, Shigeo

219

Generalized model of thermal boundary conductance between SWNT and surrounding supercritical Lennard-Jones fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the promising applications is to use SWNTs as additives to enhance thermal conductivity of composite materials of the composite can be strongly influenced by thermal boundary resistance (TBR) between carbon nanotubes, it is essential to understand TBR. Thermal boundary resistance, with its importance in small scale, has been

Maruyama, Shigeo

220

A Bulk Tungsten Tile for JET: Derivation of Power-Handling Performance and Validation of the Thermal Model, in the MARION Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Bulk Tungsten Tile for JET: Derivation of Power-Handling Performance and Validation of the Thermal Model, in the MARION Facility

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221

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

MODELING THE TRANSVERSE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF 3D-SICF/SIC COMPOSITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our previously developed hierarchical two-layer (H2L) model was modified to describe the effective transverse thermal conductivity (Keff) of a three-dimensional (3D) SiC/SiC composite plate made with cross-layered and Z-stitched X:Y:Z uniaxial fiber tow sub-units. As before, the model describes Keff in terms of constituent, microstructural and architectural properties that include the expected effects of fiber-matrix interfacial conductance, of high fiber packing fractions within individual tow sub-units and of the non-uniform porosity contents, shapes and orientations within these sub-units. Model predictions were obtained for two versions of a 3D-Tyranno SA?/PyC/ICVI-SiC composite that had similar fiber/matrix pyrocarbon (PyC) interfaces, relatively high bulk densities (~2.88 g/cc), and an X:Y configuration with fiber content ratios 1:1. The only major difference between the two versions was their Z-stitch fiber content where the relative fiber ratios were 0.1 and 1.2 in the Z sub-units.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Jones, Russell H.; Yamada, Reiji

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K. [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE RIMINI PROTOCOL Oil Depletion Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soaring oil prices have drawn attention to the issue of the relative supply and demand for crude oil1 THE RIMINI PROTOCOL an Oil Depletion Protocol ~ Heading Off Economic Chaos and Political Conflict During the Second Half of the Age of Oil As proposed at the 2003 Pio Manzu Conference

Keeling, Stephen L.

227

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary o Regional nuclear war could cause global which traps pollutants o Nuclear weapons cause explosions, which then causes things around the vicinity to start burning, which in turn releases black carbon; it is not the nuclear material or fallout causing

Toohey, Darin W.

228

Commonness, population depletion and conservation biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and alleviate significant depletion events. Priority species Judgements about extinction risk are key drivers to be targets for conservation invest- ment. Indeed, high extinction risk typifies the most iconic species, flagship or indicator species [24]), the use of extinction risk to set conservation priorities has

Queensland, University of

229

Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

230

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. Abstract The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro

Boyer, Edmond

231

Non-destructive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Encapsulated Miniature SMD Ceramic Chip Capacitors under Thermal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-destructive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Encapsulated Miniature SMD Ceramic Chip Capacitors under Thermal and Mechanical Loading B. Wunderle1 , T. Braun1 , D. May1 , A. Mazloum1 , M. Bouazza1 , H-layer ceramic chip ca- pacitors as integrated passive in e. g. system in package applications needs methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Monte Carlo Simulation-based Sensitivity Analysis of the Model of a Thermal-Hydraulic Passive System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Monte Carlo Simulation-based Sensitivity Analysis of the Model of a Thermal-Hydraulic Passive, and for this reason are expected to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. However, uncertainties are present Engineering and System Safety 107 (2012) 90-106" DOI : 10.1016/j.ress.2011.08.006 #12;2 power plants because

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

We Didn't Start the Fire: Using Agent-Directed Thermal Modeler to Keep Servers Cool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model; thermal-aware I. INTRODUCTION The energy usage of datacenters has been a growing prob- lem Email: hamilton@research.msstate.edu Abstract--As energy use by datacenters has risen over the years graphs and images. There are very few parameters, making setup much easier - one simply has to configure

Qin, Xiao

234

A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries: Power of a commercial LiFePO4-graphite Li-ion battery. Compared to the isothermal reference, the mechanism of porosity;2 Due to their high power and energy densities, Li-ion technologies are the leading battery systems

235

Submission of manuscript to Energy and Buildings A thermal model for Phase Change Materials in a building roof for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submission of manuscript to Energy and Buildings A thermal model for Phase Change Materials: Stéphane GUICHARD Physics and Mathematical Engineering Laboratory for Energy and Environment (PIMENT in "Energy and Buildings 70 (2014) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/ S0378778813007962" DOI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

Microstructure of depleted uranium under uniaxial strain conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium samples of two different purities were used for spall strength measurements. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material (38 ppM carbon) and from material containing 280 ppM C. Experimental conditions were chosen to effectively arrest the microstructural damage at two places in the development to full spall separation. Samples were soft recovered and characterized with respect to the microstructure and the form of damage. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level, stress state, and sample purity. This information is used in developing a model to predict the mode of fracture.

Zurek, A.K.; Embury, J.D.; Kelly, A.; Thissell, W.R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Hixson, R.H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vs. Fuzzy Logic: Simple Tools to Predict and Control Complexfuzzy logic (Ref 73, 74). For the HVOF thermal spray process, a feedback control

Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Research and Development program for Next Generation High Temperature Reactors (HTR), a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. The data representing the crucial test fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) while impossible to obtain from direct measurements are calculated by physics and thermal models. The irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) experimental data are used in model calibration effort to reduce the inherent uncertainty of simulation results. This paper is focused on fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS codes finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for improving qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. The present work exercises the idea that the abnormal trends of measured data observed from statistical analysis may be caused by either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 revealed by the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps justify the reduction in TC readings instead of TC drift. This in turn prompts modification of thermal model to better fit with experimental data, thus help increase confidence, and in other word reduce model uncertainties in thermal simulation results of the AGR-1 test.

Dr. Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Inclusion of Building Envelope Thermal Lag Effects in Linear Regression Models of Daily Basis Building Energy Use Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inclusion?of?Building?Envelope?Thermal?Lag? Effects?in?Linear?Regression?Models?of?Daily? Basis?Building?Energy?Use?Data The?12th International?Conference?for?Enhanced?Building?Operations October?22nd?26th,?2012 Manchester,?UK Hiroko...?for?simple?energy?performance?analysis ? 24?hour?cycle?variations?are?averaged?out?in?daily?data. ? The?dominant?driving?terms?of?most?buildings?follow?a?24?h?cycle.?(Rabl,?1992)? solar?irradiance,?OA?temperature,?ventilation,?occupancy?level,?lights?and?equipment?loads,? delayed?loads?due?to?thermal...

Masuda, H.; Claridge, D. E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

PHOTOPHORETIC SEPARATION OF METALS AND SILICATES: THE FORMATION OF MERCURY-LIKE PLANETS AND METAL DEPLETION IN CHONDRITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury's high uncompressed mass density suggests that the planet is largely composed of iron, either bound within metal (mainly Fe-Ni) or iron sulfide. Recent results from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury imply a low temperature history of the planet which questions the standard formation models of impact mantle stripping or evaporation to explain the high metal content. Like Mercury, the two smallest extrasolar rocky planets with mass and size determination, CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b, were found to be of high density. As they orbit close to their host stars, this indicates that iron-rich inner planets might not be a nuisance of the solar system but be part of a general scheme of planet formation. From undifferentiated chondrites, it is also known that the metal to silicate ratio is highly variable, which must be ascribed to preplanetary fractionation processes. Due to this fractionation, most chondritic parent bodies-most of them originated in the asteroid belt-are depleted in iron relative to average solar system abundances. The astrophysical processes leading to metal silicate fractionation in the solar nebula are essentially unknown. Here, we consider photophoretic forces. As these forces particularly act on irradiated solids, they might play a significant role in the composition of planetesimals forming at the inner edge of protoplanetary disks. Photophoresis can separate high thermal conductivity materials (iron) from lower thermal conductivity solids (silicate). We suggest that the silicates are preferentially pushed into the optically thick disk. Subsequent planetesimal formation at the edge moving outward leads to metal-rich planetesimals close to the star and metal depleted planetesimals farther out in the nebula.

Wurm, Gerhard [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany); Trieloff, Mario [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 234-236, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rauer, Heike, E-mail: gerhard.wurm@uni-due.de [Institut fuer Planetenforschung, Extrasolare Planeten und Atmosphaeren, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Rutherfordstrasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

The Lithium Depletion Boundary as a Clock and Thermometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We take a critical look at the lithium depletion boundary (LDB) technique that has recently been used to derive the ages of open clusters. We identify the sources of experimental and systematic error and show that the probable errors are larger by approximately a factor two than presently claimed in the literature. We then use the Pleiades LDB age and photometry in combination with evolutionary models to define empirical colour-T_eff relations that can be applied to younger clusters. We find that these relationships DO NOT produce model isochrones that match the younger cluster data. We propose that this is due either to systematic problems in the evolutionary models or an age (gravity) sensitivity in the colour-T_eff relation which is not present in published atmospheric models.

R. D. Jeffries; T. Naylor

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

242

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

Lee, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Adaptive multi-domain thermal modeling and analysis for integrated circuit synthesis and design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-package thermal analysis is necessary for the de- sign and synthesis of reliable, high-performance, low-power responsible for a substantial proportion of overall power consumption in commercial designs and increases with temperature [3]. To enable reliable and low-power IC design, run-time thermal profiles must be predicted

Dick, Robert

248

Computationally efficient algorithms for modelling thermal degradation and spiking phenomena in polymeric materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistance are the key factors that determine a wide spread success of these materials (Flipsen et al., 1996. These phenomena may contribute substantially to the overall thermal degrada- tion of the material at the stage of material applications. To predict the onset of thermal spiking is not an easy task, and in order

Melnik, Roderick

249

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fighting Fire with Fire: Modeling the Datacenter-Scale Effects of Targeted Superlattice Thermal Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local thermal hot-spots in microprocessors lead to worst case provisioning of global cooling resources, especially in large-scale systems. However, efficiency of cooling solutions degrade non-linearly with supply temperature, resulting in high power consumption and cost in cooling - 50 {approx} 100% of IT power. Recent advances in active cooling techniques have shown on-chip thermoelectric coolers (TECs) to be very efficient at selectively eliminating small hot-spots, where applying current to a superlattice film deposited between silicon and the heat spreader results in a Peltier effect that spreads the heat and lowers the temperature of the hot-spot significantly to improve chip reliability. In this paper, we propose that hot-spot mitigation using thermoelectric coolers can be used as a power management mechanism to allow global coolers to be provisioned for a better worst case temperature leading to substantial savings in cooling power. In order to quantify the potential power savings from using TECs in data center servers, we present a detailed power model that integrates on-chip dynamic and leakage power sources, heat diffusion through the entire chip, TEC and global cooler efficiencies, and all their mutual interactions. Our multiscale analysis shows that, for a typical data center, TECs allow global coolers to operate at higher temperatures without degrading chip lifetime, and thus save {approx}27% cooling power on average while providing the same processor reliability as a data center running at 288K.

Biswas, S; Tiwari, M; Theogarajan, L; Sherwood, T P; Chong, F T

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

acute catecholamine depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about NM biosynthesis, and it is not known where Sulzer, David 9 Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging...

254

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Advanced Mixed-Oxide Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depletion and core reshuffling, and fuel material thermal-physical properties. Additionally, a text-based coupling method is developed to facilitate the exchange of information between the neutronic code DRAGON and thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The new...

Bingham, Adam R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

255

A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance assessment of a geological repository for radioactive waste requires quantifying the geochemical evolution of the bentonite engineered barrier. This barrier will be exposed to coupled thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. This paper presents a coupled THC model of the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test which accounts for bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis. Model results attest the relevance of thermal osmosis and bentonite swelling for the geochemical evolution of the bentonite barrier while chemical osmosis is found to be almost irrelevant. The model has been tested with data collected after the dismantling of heater 1 of the in situ test. The model reproduces reasonably well the measured temperature, relative humidity, water content and inferred geochemical data. However, it fails to mimic the solute concentrations at the heater-bentonite and bentonite-granite interfaces because the model does not account for the volume change of bentonite, the CO{sub 2}(g) degassing and the transport of vapor from the bentonite into the granite. The inferred HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and pH data cannot be explained solely by solute transport, calcite dissolution and protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation, suggesting that such data may be affected also by other reactions.

Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

257

Depleted Uranium in Kosovo Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1 UNEPs role in post-conflict environmental assessment................................................9 2.2 Depleted uranium............................................................10

Unep Scientific; Mission Kosovo

258

SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data

RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

A phenomenological model of thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After completion of the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, the authors performed developmental assessment calculation of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The overall interfacial drag model predicted reasonable drag coefficients for both the nucleate boiling and the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The predicted pressure drops agreed reasonably well with the measured data of two transient experiments, CCTF Run 14 and a Lehigh reflood test. The thermal-hydraulic model for post-CHF convective heat transfer predicted the rewetting velocities reasonably well for both experiments. The predicted average slope of the wall temperature traces for these tests showed reasonable agreement with the measured data, indicating that the transient-calculated precursory cooling rates agreed with measured data. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly underpredict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor temperatures was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall temperatures were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%.

Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Susceptibility to ATP depletion of primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Susceptibility to ATP depletion of primary proximal tubular cell subjected to ATP depletion using antimycin A. Results: Surprisingly, there was no difference in the amount, Viability, Survival, Apoptosis knockout mice, shRNA, ATP depletion, Metabolic stress, Antimycin Background

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermally Induced Chemistry of Meteoritic Complex Organic Molecules: A New Heat-Diffusion Model for the Atmospheric Entry of Meteorites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research over the past four decades has shown a rich variety of complex organic molecular content in some meteorites. This current study is an attempt to gain a better insight into the thermal conditions experienced by these molecules inside meteorites during atmospheric entry. In particular, we wish to understand possible chemical processes that can occur during entry and that might have had an effect on complex organic or prebiotic species that were delivered in this way to the early Earth. A simulation was written in Fortran to model heating by the shock generated during entry and the subsequent thermal diffusion inside the body of a meteorite. Experimental data was used for the thermal parameters of several types of meteorites, including iron-nickel and several classes of chondrites. A Sutton-Graves model of stagnation-point heating was used to calculate peak surface temperatures and an explicit difference formula was used to generate thermal diffusion profiles for both chondrites and iron-nickel type met...

Shingledecker, Christopher N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum bounding cesium loading considered possible based on current knowledge regarding CST media and the anticipated feed compositions. Since this cesium loading was considerably higher than the nominal loading conditions in SRS waste, cases with lower loading were also evaluated. Modeling parameters were the same as those used previously unless otherwise indicated. The current model does not capture multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. This feature is conservative in the sense that it does not account for the large cooling effects associated with phase transfer. However, the potential transfer of heat to the plenum region associated with vertical bubble ascension through the column during boiling is also neglected. Thermal modeling calculations were also performed for the entire waste storage tank for the case where loaded and ground CST was transferred to the tank. The modeling domain used for the in-tank calculations is provided in Figure 2. The in-tank domain is based on SRS Tank 41, which is a Type-IIIA tank. Temperature distributions were evaluated for cylindrical, ground CST mounds located on the tank floor. Media grinding is required prior to vitrification processing of the CST in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The location of the heat source region on the tank floor due to the accumulation of CST material was assumed to be just under the grinder. The shape of the CST mound was assumed to be cylindrical. This shape is believed to be most representative of the actual mound shape formed in the tank, given that submersible mixing pumps will be available for media dispersion. Alternative configurations involving other geometrical shapes for the CST mound were evaluated in the previous work. Sensitivity analysis for the in-tank region was performed for different amounts of CST media. As was the case for the in-column model, the in-tank model does not include multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. The in-column and the in-tank evaluations incorporated recently updated maximum cesi

Lee, S.; King, W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2700 (Sulzer Metco, Westbury, NY) and the Praxair-TafaJP-5000 (Praxair Surface Technolo- gies, Indianapolis, IN)),pro- cessing using a Praxair-TAFA JP-5000 HVOF thermal spray

Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Interim Report on Thermal Cycling Model Development for Representative Unisolable Piping Configurations (MRP-81)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal fatigue can lead to cracking in dead-ended branch lines attached to PWR primary coolant piping. This interim report describes the results of on-going research to provide an improved screening tool for identification of susceptible piping.

J. Keller, A. Bilanin

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Framework of an Optimization Model for the Thermal Design of Building Envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Careful long term decisions in the design and operation of buildings can significantly improve the thermal performance and thus reduce the consumption of energy. The availability and ease of use of today's computers can be a sigruficant benefit...

Al-Homoud, M. S.; Degelman, L. O.; Boyer, L. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A finite element model for transient thermal/structural analysis of large composite space structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on approximate 6 analysis techniques based on finite elements has begun. Such techniques as reduced basis techniques and generalized transform methods offer hope of solving the finite element 8 equations more efficiently. An integrated thermal/structural... integrated analysis codes. However, Mahaney, Thornton, and Dechaumphai have identified require 5 ments for such thermal/structural programs. They concluded that such analysis methods should have the following five characteristics. First, a common finite...

Lutz, James Delmar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Three-Dimensional Thermal-Electrochemical Coupled Model for Spirally Wound Large-Format Lithium-Ion Batteries (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the behavior of spirally wound large-format Li-ion batteries with respect to their design. The objectives of the study include developing thermal and electrochemical models resolving 3-dimensional spirally wound structures of cylindrical cells, understanding the mechanisms and interactions between local electrochemical reactions and macroscopic heat and electron transfers, and developing a tool and methodology to support macroscopic designs of cylindrical Li-ion battery cells.

Lee, K. J.; Smith K.; Kim, G. H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, aged to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs Ambient conditions of still air at 50F (10C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70F (21C), 60F (16C), and 40F (4C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80F (27C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

To cite this document: Bennani , Lokman and Villedieu, Philippe and Salan, Michel Two Dimensional Model of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System. (2013) In: 5th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System. (2013) In: 5th AIAA Atmospheric and Space of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System L. Bennani Airbus Operations SAS, Toulouse, 31000, France P shall focus on the main governing equations and building blocks of the M.A.D (Anti-icing Deicing

Mailhes, Corinne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modeling of the Effective Elastic and Thermal Properties of Glass-Ceramic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effective elastic properties and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of a glass-ceramic were predicted using homogenization techniques. Using G18, a glass-ceramic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealant as an initial reference material, the effectiveness of different homogenization models was investigated for a two-phase glass-ceramic. The elastic properties and CTEs of the G18 amorphous phase are currently unknown. Thus, estimated values were used as an input to the models. The predictive model offers accurate macroscopic values on both the elastic modulus and the CTE of glass-ceramic materials, providing the estimated amorphous values are reasonable. This model can be used in designing glass-ceramic SOFC seal materials for its specific operation conditions.

Milhans, Jacqueline; Ahzi, Said; Garmestani, Hamid; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sensitivity study of the assembly averaged thermal-hydraulic models of the MEKIN computer code in power transients / by Thomas Rodack [and] Lothar Wolf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal-hydraulic (T-H) models and solution schemes employed by the MEKIN computer code have been examined. The effects of T-H input parameters on- predicted fuel temperatures and coolant densities were determined in ...

Rodack, Thomas

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Building design and thermal renovation measures proposal by means of regression models issued from dynamic simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison between different energy reduction strategies, like improving the insulation levels or increasing the thermal inertia. An example of their use and a data comparison with a dynamic simulation is shown in last;Nowadays, the most reliable solutions to calculate the energy demand are the simulation energy tools

Boyer, Edmond

277

Proceedings of ASHRAE-DOE-BTECC Conference on Building Thermal Envelopes Simplified Modeling for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-31305 Proceedings of ASHRAE-DOE-BTECC Conference on Building Thermal Envelopes Simplified in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism to pro- vide ventilation to those buildings and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it

278

The Influence of Thermal Pressure on Equilibrium Models of Hypermassive Neutron Star Merger Remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The merger of two neutron stars leaves behind a rapidly spinning hypermassive object whose survival is believed to depend on the maximum mass supported by the nuclear equation of state, angular momentum redistribution by (magneto-)rotational instabilities, and spindown by gravitational waves. The high temperatures (~5-40 MeV) prevailing in the merger remnant may provide thermal pressure support that could increase its maximum mass and, thus, its life on a neutrino-cooling timescale. We investigate the role of thermal pressure support in hypermassive merger remnants by computing sequences of spherically-symmetric and axisymmetric uniformly and differentially rotating equilibrium solutions to the general-relativistic stellar structure equations. Using a set of finite-temperature nuclear equations of state, we find that hot maximum-mass critically spinning configurations generally do not support larger baryonic masses than their cold counterparts. However, subcritically spinning configurations with mean density of less than a few times nuclear saturation density yield a significantly thermally enhanced mass. Even without decreasing the maximum mass, cooling and other forms of energy loss can drive the remnant to an unstable state. We infer secular instability by identifying approximate energy turning points in equilibrium sequences of constant baryonic mass parametrized by maximum density. Energy loss carries the remnant along the direction of decreasing gravitational mass and higher density until instability triggers collapse. Since configurations with more thermal pressure support are less compact and thus begin their evolution at a lower maximum density, they remain stable for longer periods after merger.

J. D. Kaplan; C. D. Ott; E. P. O'Connor; K. Kiuchi; L. Roberts; M. Duez

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A sintering model for thermal barrier coatings R.G. Hutchinson a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbine blades in the high-pressure, high-temperature stages of gas turbines are manufactured from creep-resistant nickel or cobalt alloys. The blades are internally air-cooled and are commonly thermally insulated-PVD coatings comprise a 100­200 lm thick layer of columnar yttria-stabilised zirconia (typically, 7YSZ

Fleck, Norman A.

280

Thermal Modeling, Analysis and Management in VLSI Circuits: Principles and Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an active method that requires design overhead. With component packages becoming more compact and having have made thermal effects one of the most important concerns of VLSI designers. The increasing of the substrate and metal line temperatures on the reliability and performance of the devices and interconnections

Pedram, Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spray Technology Volume 18(5-6) Mid-December 2009765 Oxygenoxygen and fuel are available, a previously developed approach (Ref 11) can Journal of Thermal Spray TechnologyTechnology Peer Reviewed Substrate properties Gas mass flow rate Fuel/oxygen

Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Zero discounting and optimal paths of depletion of an exhaustible resource with an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...le of the optimal paths. We show that, in the Cobb-Douglas case, the ratio of the values of the resource and capitalZero discounting and optimal paths of depletion of an exhaustible resource with an amenity value DasguptaHealSolow model when the stock of natural capital is a direct argument of well-being, besides

Boyer, Edmond

283

Parametric Analysis of PWR Spent Fuel Depletion Parameters for Long-Term-Disposal Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of burnup credit in criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel allows improved design efficiency and reduced cost due to the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup-credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents (in terms of criticality potential), followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k(sub)eff) for the a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models.

DeHart, M.D.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

Thermal Fluids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Fluids The Thermal Fluids and Heat Transfer program works on thermal hydraulic reactor safety code development and experimental heat transferthermal hydraulics. The...

286

Processing depleted uranium quad alloy penetrator rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two depleted uranium (DU) quad alloys were cast, extruded and rolled to produce penetrator rods. The two alloy combinations were (1) 1 wt % molybdenum (Mo), 1 wt % niobium (Nb), and 0.75 wt % titanium (Ti); and (2) 1 wt % tantalum (Ta), 1 wt % Nb, and 0.75 wt % Ti. This report covers the processing and results with limited metallographic information available. The two alloys were each vacuum induction melted (VIM) into an 8-in. log, extruded into a 3-in. log, then cut into 4 logs and extruded at 4 different temperatures into 0.8-in. bars. From the 8 conditions (2 alloys, 4 extrusion temperatures each), 10 to 13 16-in. rods were cut for rolling and swaging. Due to cracking problems, the final processing changed from rolling and swaging to limited rolling and heat treating. The contracted work was completed with the delivery of 88 rods to Dr. Zabielski. 28 figs.

Bokan, S.L.

1987-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 1, BIPV/T system and house energy concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is the first of two papers that describe the modeling, design, and performance assessment based on monitored data of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house. This house, with a design goal of near net-zero annual energy consumption, was constructed in 2007 in Eastman, Quebec, Canada - a cold climate area. Several novel solar technologies are integrated into the house and with passive solar design to reach this goal. An air-based open-loop BIPV/T system produces electricity and collects heat simultaneously. Building-integrated thermal mass is utilized both in passive and active forms. Distributed thermal mass in the direct gain area and relatively large south facing triple-glazed windows (about 9% of floor area) are employed to collect and store passive solar gains. An active thermal energy storage system (TES) stores part of the collected thermal energy from the BIPV/T system, thus reducing the energy consumption of the house ground source heat pump heating system. This paper focuses on the BIPV/T system and the integrated energy concept of the house. Monitored data indicate that the BIPV/T system has a typical efficiency of about 20% for thermal energy collection, and the annual space heating energy consumption of the house is about 5% of the national average. A thermal model of the BIPV/T system suitable for preliminary design and control of the airflow is developed and verified with monitored data. (author)

Chen, Yuxiang; Athienitis, A.K.; Galal, Khaled [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Deuterium depletion and magnesium enhancement in the local disc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The local disc deuter is known to be depleted in comparison to the local bubble. We show, that the same lines of sight that are depleted in deuter, are enhanced in magnesium. Heavier elements - Si and Fe do not show any difference in the abundance between the local disc and the local bubble. This observation implicates that astration is responsible for both deuter depletion and magnesium enhancement.

Piotr Gnacinski

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity...

290

Microscale Depletion of High Abundance Proteins in Human Biofluids...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides...

291

atp depletion precedes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

evolves, because new precedents are generated by the form... Smolin, Lee 2012-01-01 15 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

292

analogues deplete androgen: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with androgens has been shown to increase growth rate in fishes (Ron et al., 1995 13 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

293

antioxidant defence depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and defence reactions. Priya Roy; Ramamurthy Dhandapani Department Of Microbiology 15 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

294

administration depletes mitochondrial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recombination is widespread in plant mtDNA. Recombinant molecules have Nicolas Galtier 6 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

295

approaching waterflood depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are shown in Table 5 of the Appendix. Figure... Pettitt, Bobby Eugene 1963-01-01 19 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

296

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and...

297

aerosol depletion test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address... Chen, Guoqiang 2002-01-01 10 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

298

Measurement and modeling of thermal properties of sorghum and soy flours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelvin. Figure 1 shows the OSC conventions for presentation of thermal analysis data. When a transition such as melting, boiling, gelatinization or crystallization occurs in the sample material, an endothermic or exothermic reaction takes place... important than the second scan values. The second scan values, however, can tell us whether endothermic or exothermic transitions occurred in the first scan and 1f these transitions are irreversible. The bas1c methodology for determining specific heat...

Gonzalez Palacios, Lazaro

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19 Figure 3.1 Sketchup model of the simulated officemodel simulated. Figure 3.1 Sketchup model of the simulated

Basu, Chandrayee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) #12;eld distributions as well as the grain scale #12;eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local #12;elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

The detection and modelling of surface thermal structures and ground water discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana and northern Idaho. The infrared imagery was collected in the 8. 5 to 11, 7 um region and recorded on film negative and magnetic tape. Sections of the film record were digitized using a vidicon camera to facilitate its digital image processing... over a water body for influx of 'thermal poilu . ants', such as ground water or power plant effluents, which are at a different temperature than the receiving body. In fact, the data collected by the sensor displays a nearly instantaneous record...

Roberts, Douglas Vincent

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky Vitaly A. Zlotnik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky aquifers Vitaly A. Zlotnik Department Maximum Stream Depletion Rate, which is defined as a maximum fraction of the pumping rate supplied focused on hy- draulic connection between a stream and an aquifer for pumping wells in alluvial valleys

Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

305

Pumping induced depletion from two streams Dongmin Sun a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Pumping induced depletion from two streams Dongmin Sun a , Hongbin Zhan b-domain and becomes identical to that of Hunt [Hunt B. Unsteady stream depletion from ground water pumping. Ground of the shortest distance from the pumping well to the other stream over the shortest distance between the two

Zhan, Hongbin

306

The Hazard Posed by Depleted Uranium Munitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper assesses the radiological and chemical hazards resulting from the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. Due to the low radioactivity of DU, radiological hazards to individuals would become significant in comparison to natural background radiation doses only in cases of prolonged contact---for example, when shards of a DU penetrator remain embedded in a soldier's body. Although the radiation doses to virtually all civilians would be very low, the cumulative "population dose" resulting from the dispersal of hundreds of tons of DU, as occurred during the Gulf War, could result in up to ten cancer deaths. It is highly unlikely that exposures of persons downwind from the use of DU munitions or consuming food or water contaminated by DU dust would reach the estimated threshold for chemical heavy-metal effects. The exposures of soldiers in vehicles struck by DU munitions could be much higher, however, and persons who subsequently enter such vehicles without adequate respiratory protection could potentially be at risk. Soldiers should be trained to avoid unnecessary exposure to DU, and vehicles struck by DU munitions should be made inaccessible to curious civilians. INTRODUCTION

Steve Fetter And; Steve Fetter A

307

Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 9 and 40 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 50 and 430 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Calibrated Computer Model for the Thermal Simulation of Courtyard Microclimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a calibrated stand-alone courtyard microclimate model. This model is considered to be the fIrst calibrated computer program for the simulation of courtyard microclimates. In order to accomplish this a calibrated simplif...

Bagneid, A.; Haberl, J.

310

Development of models for the sodium version of the two-phase three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code THERMIT. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several different models and correlations were developed and incorporated in the sodium version of THERMIT, a thermal-hydraulics code written at MIT for the purpose of analyzing transients under LMFBR conditions. This includes: a mechanism for the inclusion of radial heat conduction in the sodium coolant as well as radial heat loss to the structure surrounding the test section. The fuel rod conduction scheme was modified to allow for more flexibility in modelling the gas plenum regions and fuel restructuring. The formulas for mass and momentum exchange between the liquid and vapor phases were improved. The single phase and two phase friction factors were replaced by correlations more appropriate to LMFBR assembly geometry.

Wilson, G.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermal stress analysis of fused-cast AZS refractories during production; Part 2: Development of thermo-elastic stress model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mathematical models of heat flow and thermo-elastic stress, based on the finite-element method, have been developed and utilized to analyze the voidless,'' fused-cast, AZS, solidification process. The results of the mathematical analysis, in conjunction with information obtained in a comprehensive industrial study, presented in Part 1 of this paper, describe the mechanisms for the formation of the various crack types found in the fused-cast product. Thermal stresses are generated early in the solidification process by rapid cooling of the refractory surface as it contacts the initially cool mold and later in conjunction with the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation which occurs in the zirconia component of the AZS refractory. Applying this model, castings were made using a revised mold design. Preliminary results indicate these castings to be free of objectionable transverse cracks.

Cockcroft, S.L.; Brimacombe, J.K. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering); Walrod, D.G.; Myles, T.A. (Carborundum Co., Falconer, NY (United States). Monofrax-S Plant)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mapping between the order of thermal denaturation and the shape of the critical line of mechanical unzipping in 1-dimensional DNA models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Letter, we investigate the link between thermal denaturation and mechanical unzipping for two models of DNA, namely the Dauxois-Peyrard-Bishop model and a variant thereof we proposed recently. We show that the critical line that separates zipped from unzipped DNA sequences in mechanical unzipping experiments is a power-law in the temperature-force plane. We also prove that for the investigated models the corresponding critical exponent is proportional to the critical exponent alpha, which characterizes the behaviour of the specific heat in the neighbourhood of the critical temperature for thermal denaturation.

Buyukdagli, Sahin; 10.1016/j.cplett.2009.11.061

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

looping is selected as the model cycle because of its suitability for solar-driven carbon dioxide captureA Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture Lindsey Yue and Wojciech Lipi´nski, The Australian

314

Millimeter radiation from a 3D model of the solar atmosphere I. Diagnosing chromospheric thermal structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. We use advanced 3D NLTE radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmosphere to carry out detailed tests of chromospheric diagnostics at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Methods. We focused on the diagnostics of the thermal structure of the chromosphere in the wavelength bands from 0.4 mm up to 9.6 mm that can be accessed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) and investigated how these diagnostics are affected by the instrumental resolution. Results. We find that the formation height range of the millimeter radiation depends on the location in the simulation domain and is related to the underlying magnetic structure. Nonetheless, the brightness temperature is a reasonable measure of the gas temperature at the effective formation height at a given location on the solar surface. There is considerable scatter in this relationship, but this is significantly reduced when very weak magnetic fields are avoided. Our results indicate that although instrumental smearin...

Loukitcheva, Maria; Carlsson, Mats; White, Stephen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CUDI A Model for Calculation of Electrodynamic and Thermal Behaviour of Superconducting Rutherford Cables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CUDI is the extended Fortran code to calculate the electrodynamic and thermal behaviour of any type of Rutherford cable subject to global and/or local variations in field, transport current, and external heat release. The internal parameters of the cable can be freely varied along the length and across the width, such as contact resistances, critical current, cooling rates etc. In this way, all the typical non-uniformities occurring in a cable, e.g. broken filaments, strand welds, cable joints, and edge degradation can be simulated. Also the characteristics of the strands in the cable can be varied from strand to strand. Heat flows through the matrix, through the interstrand contacts, and to the helium are incorporated, as well as the self-field and self- and mutual inductances between the strands. The main features and structure of the program will be discussed.

Verweij, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and Electrochemical Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupled hierarchical models...

317

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that our model can predict future indoor temperature trends with a 90th percentile aggregate error between thermo- stat actuates the heating, ventilation, and air condition- ing (HVAC) infrastructure to bring and these energy approaches, a heating model could allow future temperature trends to be predicted using

Hazas, Mike

318

A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device,M, and Ferrari V. , Thermal energy harvesting throughand G. P. Carman, Thermal energy harvesting device using

He, Hong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing UpModeling &

320

A phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling in the post-critical-heat-flux (post-CHF) regime is developed and discussed. The model was implemented in the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer code (an advanced best-estimate computer program written for the analysis of pressurized water reactor systems). The model was built around the determination of flow regimes downstream of the quench front. The regimes were determined from the flow-regime map suggested by Ishii and his coworkers. Heat transfer in the transition boiling region was formulated as a position-dependent model. The propagation of the CHF point was strongly dependent on the length of the transition boiling region. Wall-to-fluid film boiling heat transfer was considered to consist of two components: first, a wall-to-vapor convective heat-transfer portion and, second, a wall-to-liquid heat transfer representing near-wall effects. Each contribution was considered separately in each of the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The interfacial heat transfer was also formulated as flow-regime dependent. The interfacial drag coefficient model upstream of the CHF point was considered to be similar to flow through a roughened pipe. A free-stream contribution was calculated using Ishii's bubbly flow model for either fully developed subcooled or saturated nucleate boiling. For the drag in the smooth IAF region, a simple smooth-tube correlation for the interfacial friction factor was used. The drag coefficient for the rough-wavy IAF was formulated in the same way as for the smooth IAF model except that the roughness parameter was assumed to be proportional to liquid droplet diameter entrained from the wavy interface. The drag coefficient in the highly dispersed flow regime considered the combined effects of the liquid droplets within the channel and a liquid film on wet unheated walls. 431 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Nelson, R.A.; Unal, C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Numerical Modeling of the Transient Thermal Interference of Vertical U-Tube Haet Exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-linear finite element models were developed to simulate transient heat and mass transfer in the soil surrounding the ground heat exchangers of ground-coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) operating in the cooling mode. Parametric studies were performed...

Muraya, Norman K.

323

TWIST: a Transient Two-dimensional Intra-Subassembly Thermal-Hydraulics model for LMFBRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is concluded that due to physical accuracy and numerical efficiency (5 to 10 times faster than real time) of this model, it provides an excellent tool for study of long duration natural circulation transients in LMFBR assemblies.

Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Cazzoli, E.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Design and thermal modeling of a non-invasive probe for measuring perfusion by thermodiffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research 1) explores the feasibility of developing a non-invasive probe to precisely quantify microcirculatory blood flow (tissue perfusion), in real time and in absolute units, and 2) presents designs and models of ...

Charles, Steven Knight

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 8, 2002 Present Address: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC,Victoria BC, Canada, V8P 5C2 0 #12;Abstract A reformulation of the simple model

Monahan, Adam Hugh

326

Thermal and hydraulic code verification: ATHOS2 and Model Boiler No. 2 data. Final report. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the EPRI/Westinghouse Project S168-1, Westinghouse was contracted to conduct steady-state and transient tests on the Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam genertor test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, and to use the data obtained in these tests for the verification of the ATHOS2 (an updated version of URSULA2) code developed for EPRI by CHAM of North America, Inc. This document presents a description of: (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility; (2) the ATHOS2 code analytical model of MB-2; (3) the tests performed for the code verification program; (4) the comparisons of the test data with ATHOS2 calculations; and (5) recommendations for improving the ATHOS2 code.

Hopkins, G.W.; Lee, A.Y.; Mendler, O.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermal and hydraulic code verification: ATHOS2 and Model Boiler No. 2 data. Final report. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the EPRI/Westinghouse Project S168-1, Westinghouse was contracted to conduct steady-state and transient tests on the Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, and to use the data obtained in these tests for the verification of the ATHOS2 (an updated version of URSULA2) code developed for EPRI by CHAM of North America, Inc. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the ATHOS2 code analytical model of MB-2, (3) the tests performed for the code verification program, (4) the comparisons of the test data with ATHOS2 calculations, and (5) recommendations for improving the ARHOS2 code.

Hopkins, G.W.; Lee, A.Y.; Mendler, O.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats during thermal stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- vention and management. computational modeling; core temperature; finite element method; multiorgan obtained from medical imaging and incorporates the key mechanisms of heat transfer during thermoregulation outcomes associated with heat stress is critical for effective management and mitigation of injury, which

329

A model for thermally driven heat and air transport in passive solar buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for transient interzone heat and air flow transport in passive solar buildings is presented incorporating wall boundary layers in stratified zones, and with interzone transport via apertures (doors and windows). The model includes features that have been observed in measurements taken in more than a dozen passive solar buildings. The model includes integral formulations of the laminar and turbulent boundary layer equations for the vertical walls which are then coupled to a one-dimensional core model for each zone. The cores in each zone exchange mass and energy through apertures that are modeled by an orifice type equation. The procedure is transient in that time dependence is retained only in the core equations which are solved by an explicit method. The model predicts room stratification of about 2/sup 0/C/m (1.1/sup 0/F/ft) for a room-to-room temperature difference of 0.56/sup 0/C(1/sup 0/F) which is in general agreement with the data.

Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.; Otis, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Model for thermally driven heat and air transport in passive solar buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for transient interzone heat and air flow transport in passive solar buildings is presented incorporating wall boundary layers in stratified zones, and with interzone transport via apertures (doors and windows). The model includes features that have been observed in measurements taken in more than a dozen passive solar buildings. The model includes integral formulations of the laminar and turbulent boundary layer equations for the vertical walls which are then coupled to a one-dimensional core model for each zone. The cores in each zone exchange mass and energy through apertures that are modeled by an orifice type equation. The procedure is transient in that time dependence is retained only in the core equations which are solved by an explicit method. The model predicts room stratification of about 2/sup 0/C/m (1.1/sup 0/F/ft) for a room-to-room temperature difference of 0.56/sup 0/C(1/sup 0/F) which is in general agreement with the data. 38 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.; Otis, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Belgirate, Italy, 28-30 September 2005 THERMAL MODELLING OF MULTI-FINGER ALGAN/GAN HEMT's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dissipation of 1.8W. Table 1 gives the thermal conductivity of the materials used in the simul grown on SiC or sapphire substrates. Sapphire substrates are relatively cheap, but their low thermal conductivity is a major disadvantage. To improve the thermal performance, a hybrid integration of the HEMT onto

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Global microRNA depletion suppresses tumor angiogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroRNAs delicately regulate the balance of angiogenesis. Here we show that depletion of all microRNAs suppresses tumor angiogenesis. We generated microRNA-deficient tumors by knocking out Dicer1. These tumors are highly ...

Chen, Sidi

333

Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

alarming oxygen depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T. Doan; Q. Cao; L. Selavo; Y. Wu; L. Fang; Z. He; S. Lin; J. Stankovic 2006-01-01 37 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

335

Sliding Mode Control for Uncertain Thermal SOFC Models with Physical Actuator Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical models for the dynamics of high-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) can be subdivided in the preheating unit and in the inlet elements of the fuel cell stack module. If the above-mentioned sliding mode differential equations (ODEs). In [3] and [4], interval- based global optimization routines accounting

Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

336

Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Denmark c Nordic Laboratory for Luminescence Dating, Department of Earth Science, Aarhus University, Risø luminescence Pulsed OSL Thermoluminescence Quartz Luminescence lifetimes Kinetic rate equations Kinetic model temperature is raised, and has been observed in both thermo- luminescence (TL) and optically stimulated

Chen, Reuven

337

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Develop a general framework for effective flow of water, steam and heat in in porous and fractured geothermal formations. Develop a computational module for handling coupled effects of pressure, temperature, and induced rock deformations. Develop a reliable model of heat transfer and fluid flow in fractured rocks.

338

Thermal Modeling and Experimental Validation of Human Hair and Skin Heated by Broadband Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution within the hair follicle is highly non-uniform: the minimum temperature occurs at the follicle Sun, PhD,1 Alex Chaney,1 Robert Anderson, PhD,2 and Guillermo Aguilar, PhD 1 * 1 Department:(a)determinetheoveralleffectofPPxonskinhumidi- tyandassociatedskinopticalproperties,and;(b)developaPT numerical model to study the spatial and temporal hair and skin temperature

Aguilar, Guillermo

339

Impact of carbon dioxide sequestration in depleted gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Depleted gas-condensate reservoirs are becoming important targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Since depleted below the dew point, retrograde condensate has been deposited in the pore (more)

Ramharack, Richard M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S. National Security Interests, Extend Operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear modification factors of pion and light nuclei in a framework of thermal model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The particle yields and the nuclear modification factor ($R_{cp}$) for $\\pi^\\pm$, $p(\\bar p)$, $d(\\bar d)$, $t(\\bar t)$ and $^3He(\\bar{^3He})$ are studied in Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV/c based on the blast-wave model and nucleonic coalescence model. The influences of resonance decay on $p(\\bar p)$ and $\\pi$ yields, $p/\\pi$-ratio and nuclear modification factors have been discussed. An apparent number-of-constituent-quark scaling of $R_{cp}$ for $p(\\bar p)$ and $\\pi$ is presented. Similarly, the number-of-nucleon scaling of $R_{cp}$ for $p(\\bar p)$, $d(\\bar d)$, $t(\\bar t)$ and $^3He(\\bar{^3He})$ is also addressed.

Zhou, C S; Zhang, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Human leading the Thermal Comfort Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Zhang H., 2003, Human Thermal Sensation and Comfort in Transient and Non Uniform Thermal Environments; Phd Thesis Zhang H., Arens E., Huizinga C., Han T., 2010, Thermal sensations and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments...

Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Van Houten, R.; Vissers, D.; Maaijen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Current capabilities in soil thermal representations within a large scale hydrology model Laura C. Bowling (bowling@purdue.edu) and Keith A. Cherkauer, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current capabilities in soil thermal representations within a large scale hydrology model Laura C. Adam, now at Washington State University, Pullman, WA · Observations of dramatic hydrologic change hydrology under a changing climate (e.g. Smith et al. 2005; Adam & Lettenmaier 2008). Although mathematical

Cherkauer, Keith

344

Thermal Modeling for a HVAC Controlled Real-life Yong Fu1, Mo Sha1, Chengjie Wu1, Andrew Kutta1, Anna Leavey2, Chenyang Lu1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Modeling for a HVAC Controlled Real-life Auditorium Yong Fu1, Mo Sha1, Chengjie Wu1, Andrew consumption in build- ings is heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). For an HVAC system to provide, especially in large open spaces. To optimize HVAC control, it is important to establish accurate dynamic

Lu, Chenyang

345

A comparison of energetic ions in the plasma depletion layer and the quasi-parallel magnetosheath  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energetic ion spectra measured by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) downstream from the Earth`s quasi-parallel bow shock (in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath) and in the plasma depletion layer are compared. In the latter region, energetic ions are from a single source, leakage of magnetospheric ions across the magnetopause and into the plasma depletion layer. In the former region, both the magnetospheric source and shock acceleration of the thermal solar wind population at the quasi-parallel shock can contribute to the energetic ion spectra. The relative strengths of these two energetic ion sources are determined through the comparison of spectra from the two regions. It is found that magnetospheric leakage can provide an upper limit of 35% of the total energetic H{sup +} population in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath near the magnetopause in the energy range from {approximately}10 to {approximately}80 keV/e and substantially less than this limit for the energetic He{sup 2+} population. The rest of the energetic H{sup +} population and nearly all of the energetic He{sup 2+} population are accelerated out of the thermal solar wind population through shock acceleration processes. By comparing the energetic and thermal He{sup 2+} and H{sup +} populations in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath, it is found that the quasi-parallel bow shock is 2-3 times more efficient at accelerating He{sup 2+} than H{sup +}. This result is consistent with previous estimates from shock acceleration theory and simulations. 34 refs., 10 figs.

Fuselier, S.A. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)] [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A semi-analytical model for heat and mass transfer in geothermal reservoirs to estimate fracture surface-are-to-volume ratios and thermal breakthrough using thermally-decaying and diffusing tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model was developed to conduct rapid scoping calculations of responses of thermally degrading and diffusing tracers in multi-well tracer tests in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The model is based on an existing Laplace transform inversion model for solute transport in dual-porosity media. The heat- and mass-transfer calculations are decoupled and conducted sequentially, taking advantage of the fact that heat transfer between fractures and the rock matrix is much more rapid than mass transfer and therefore mass transfer will effectively occur in a locally isothermal system (although the system will be nonisothermal along fracture flow pathways, which is accounted for by discretizing the flow pathways into multiple segments that have different temperature histories). The model takes advantage of the analogies between heat and mass transfer, solving the same governing equations with k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub w} being substituted for {phi}D{sub m} in the equation for fracture transport and k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub m} being subsituted for D{sub m} in the equation for matrix transport; where k = thermal conductivity (cal/cm-s-K), {rho} = density (g/cm{sup 3}), C{sub p} = heat capacity (at constant pressure) (cal/g-K), {phi} = matrix porosity, and D = tracer diffusion coefficient (cm{sup 2}/s), with the subscripts w and m referring to water and matrix, respectively. A significant advantage of the model is that it executes in a fraction of second on a single-CPU personal computer, making it very amenable for parameter estimation algorithms that involve repeated runs to find global minima. The combined thermal-mass transport model was used to evaluate the ability to estimate when thermal breakthrough would occur in a multi-well EGS configuration using thermally degrading tracers. Calculations were conducted to evaluate the range of values of Arrhenius parameters, A and E{sub {alpha}} (pre-exponential factor, 1/s, and activation energy, cal/mol) required to obtain interpretable responses of thermally-degrading tracers that decay according to the rate constant k{sub d} = Ae{sup -E{sub {alpha}}/RT}, where k{sub d} = decay rate constant (1/s), R = ideal gas constant (1.987 cal/mol-K), and T = absolute temperature (K). It is shown that there are relatively narrow ranges of A and E{sub {alpha}} that will result in readily interpretable tracer responses for any given combination of ambient reservoir temperature and working fluid residence time in a reservoir. The combined model was also used to simulate the responses of conservative tracers with different diffusion coefficients as a way of estimating fracture surface-area-to-volume ratios (SA/V) in multi-well EGS systems. This method takes advantage of the fact that the differences in breakthrough curves of tracers with different matrix diffusion coefficients are a function of SA/V. The model accounts for differences in diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature so that tracer responses obtained at different times can be used to obtain consistent estimates of SA/V as the reservoir cools down. Some single-well applications of this approach are simulated with a numerical model to demonstrate the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of EGS stimulations before a second well is drilled.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

Validation of detailed thermal hydraulic models used for LMR safety and for improvement of technical specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed steady-state and transient coolant temperatures and flow rates from an operating reactor have been used to validate the multiple pin model in the SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor systems analysis code. This multiple pin capability can be used for explicit calculations of axial and lateral temperature distributions within individual subassemblies. Thermocouples at a number of axial locations and in a number of different coolant sub-channels m the XXO9 instrumented subassembly in the EBR-II reactor provided temperature data from the Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT) series. Flow meter data for XXO9 and for the overall system are also available from these tests. Results of consistent SASSYS-1 multiple pin analyses for both the SHRT-45 loss-of-flow-without-scram-test and the S14RT-17 protected loss-of-flow test agree well with the experimental data, providing validation of the SASSYS-1 code over a wide range of conditions.

Dunn, F.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Testing Platform for Validation of Overhead Conductor Aging Models and Understanding Thermal Limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power system equipment manufacturers and researchers continue to experiment with novel overhead electric conductor designs that support better conductor performance and address congestion issues. To address the technology gap in testing these novel designs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory constructed the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) facility to evaluate the performance of novel overhead conductors in an accelerated fashion in a field environment. Additionally, PCAT has the capability to test advanced sensors and measurement methods for accessing overhead conductor performance and condition. Equipped with extensive measurement and monitoring devices, PCAT provides a platform to improve/validate conductor computer models and assess the performance of novel conductors. The PCAT facility and its testing capabilities are described in this paper.

Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Young II, Marcus Aaron [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Stovall, John P [ORNL; Overholt, Philip N [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A MODEL FOR THERMAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF CIRCULAR AND ECCENTRIC EXOPLANETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a semi-analytic model atmosphere for close-in exoplanets that captures the essential physics of phase curves: orbital and viewing geometry, advection, and re-radiation. We calibrate the model with the well-characterized transiting planet, HD 189733b, then compute light curves for seven of the most eccentric transiting planets: Gl 436b, HAT-P-2b, HAT-P-11b, HD 17156b, HD 80606b, WASP-17b, and XO-3b. We present phase variations for a variety of different radiative times and wind speeds. In the limit of instant re-radiation, the light-curve morphology is entirely dictated by the planet's eccentricity and argument of pericenter: the light curve maximum leads or trails the eclipse depending on whether the planet is receding from or approaching the star at superior conjunction, respectively. For a planet with non-zero radiative timescales, the phase peak occurs early for super-rotating winds, and late for sub-rotating winds. We find that for a circular orbit, the timing of the phase variation maximum with respect to superior conjunction indicates the direction of the dominant winds, but cannot break the degeneracy between wind speed and radiative time. For circular planets the phase minimum occurs half an orbit away from the phase maximum-despite the fact that the coolest longitudes are always near the dawn terminator-and therefore does not convey any additional information. In general, increasing the advective frequency or the radiative time has the effect of reducing the peak-to-trough amplitude of phase variations, but there are interesting exceptions to these trends. Lastly, eccentric planets with orbital periods significantly longer than their radiative time exhibit 'ringing', whereby the hot spot generated at periastron rotates in and out of view. The existence of ringing makes it possible to directly measure the wind speed (the frequency of the ringing) and the radiative time constant (the damping of the ringing).

Cowan, Nicolas B. [Northwestern University, Dearborn Observatory, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Agol, Eric, E-mail: n-cowan@northwestern.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Effect of Water Vapor on Cr Depletion in Advanced Recuperator Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Durable alloy foils are needed for gas turbine recuperators operating at 650--700 C. It has been established that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr in austenitic stainless steels leading to a reduction in operating lifetime of these thin-walled components. Laboratory testing at 650--800 C of commercial and model alloys is being used to develop a better understanding of the long-term rate of Cr consumption in these environments. Results are presented for commercial alloys 709, 120 and 625. After 10,000h exposures at 650 C and 700 C in humid air, grain boundary Cr depletion was observed near the surface of all these materials. In the Fe-base alloys, 709 and 120, this depletion led to localized Fe-rich nodule formation. This information then can be used to develop low-cost alternatives to currently available candidate materials.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling and Simulation of Solar Chimney Power Plant with and without the Effect of Thermal Energy Storage Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A solar updraft tower power plant sometimes also called 'solar chimney' or just solar tower is a solar thermal power plant utilizing a (more)

Daba, Robera

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational thermal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 40 Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Summary: Dynamic modelling for thermal...

353

Operation and Thermal Modeling of the ISIS H Source from 50 to 2 Hz Repetition Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERNs Linac4 accelerator H? ion source, currently under construction, will operate at a 2 Hz repetition rate, with pulse length of 0.5 ms and a beam current of 80 mA. Its reliability must exceed 99 % with a mandatory 3 month uninterrupted operation period. A Penning ion source is successfully operated at ISIS; at 50 Hz repetition rate it reliably provides 55 mA H? pulses of 0.25 ms duration over 1 month. The discharge plasma ignition is very sensitive to the temperatures of the discharge region, especially of its cathode. The investigation by modeling and measurement of operation parameters suitable for arc ignition and H? production at 2 Hz is of paramount importance and must be understood prior to the implementation of discharge ion sources in the Linac4 accelerator. In its original configuration, the ISIS H? source delivers beam only if the repetition rate is above 12.5 Hz, this paper describes the implementation of a temperature control of the discharge region aiming at lower repetition rate op...

Pereira, H; Lettry, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analytical solution for Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 geo-sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs Simon A.1. Introduction Depleted oil and gas reservoirs (DOGRs)

Mathias, S.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coal thermolysis modeling: The effect of cross-linking on the thermal decomposition of 1,3-diphenylpropane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to model the effects of restricted diffusion and cross-linking on the thermal decomposition of polymethylene units linking aromatic moieties in coal, a surface-attached, cross-linked 1,3-diphenylpropane has been synthesized through the condensation of p, p{prime}-HOPh(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PhOH with a silica surface. Thermolysis of DPP at 375 C has been studied at a variety of surface coverages in which the fraction of diattached DPP varies from ca. 24 to 86% with complete diattachment not yet achieved. The influence of cross-linking and free phenolic functionality (Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PhOH) on the rate of decomposition and product distribution will be discussed and compared to the thermolysis of Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph as well as fluid phase DPP. Solid state CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR will be used to prove the chemical composition and motional behavior of the substrate on the surface and their potential mechanistic impact.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III.; Hagaman, E.W.; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Thermal Design: Sub-module testing and model validation; fanducting testing; optimization * Thermal System Design: Balance- of-system analysis; full system models *...

362

Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2010 DOE...

363

Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2009 DOE...

364

SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Depletion with Parallel KENO in TRITON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system is a powerful and robust tool for performing multigroup (MG) reactor physics analysis using either the 2-D deterministic solver NEWT or the 3-D Monte Carlo transport code KENO. However, as with all MG codes, the accuracy of the results depends on the accuracy of the MG cross sections that are generated and/or used. While SCALE resonance self-shielding modules provide rigorous resonance self-shielding, they are based on 1-D models and therefore 2-D or 3-D effects such as heterogeneity of the lattice structures may render final MG cross sections inaccurate. Another potential drawback to MG Monte Carlo depletion is the need to perform resonance self-shielding calculations at each depletion step for each fuel segment that is being depleted. The CPU time and memory required for self-shielding calculations can often eclipse the resources needed for the Monte Carlo transport. This summary presents the results of the new continuous-energy (CE) calculation mode in TRITON. With the new capability, accurate reactor physics analyses can be performed for all types of systems using the SCALE Monte Carlo code KENO as the CE transport solver. In addition, transport calculations can be performed in parallel mode on multiple processors.

Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL] [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer Received: 12 January 2007 Mainz, Germany M. Oppenheimer (*) Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA e-mail: omichael@princeton.edu M. Oppenheimer Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International

Oppenheimer, Michael

367

The Variation of Magnesium Depletion with Line of Sight Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on the gas-phase abundance of singly-ionized magnesium (Mg II) in 44 lines of sight, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We measure Mg II column densities by analyzing medium- and high-resolution archival STIS spectra of the 1240 A doublet of Mg II. We find that Mg II depletion is correlated with many line of sight parameters (e.g. F(H_2), E_(B-V), E_(B-V)/r, A_V, and A_V/r) in addition to the well-known correlation with . These parameters should be more directly related to dust content and thus have more physical significance with regard to the depletion of elements such as magnesium. We examine the significance of these additional correlations as compared to the known correlation between Mg II depletion and . While none of the correlations are better predictors of Mg II depletion than , some are statistically significant even assuming fixed . We discuss the ranges over which these correlations are valid, their strength at fixed , and physical interpretations.

Adam G. Jensen; Theodore P. Snow

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Defending Resource Depletion Attacks on Implantable Medical Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and storage. In this research, we identify a new kind of attacks on IMDs - Resource Depletion (RD) attacks information. IMD attacks may also be launched by insurance companies. IMD readers may be installed near, and storage. An IMD is implanted in patient's body and expected to run for several years. Typical IMDs

Wu, Jie

369

EIS-0269: Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexaflouride  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this programmatic environmental impact statement to assess the potential impacts of alternative management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride currently stored at three DOE sites: Paducah site near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth site near Portsmouth, Ohio; and K-25 site on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

370

Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

Ireland, Melissa Kara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON BUILDING ENERGY USE, HVAC SIZING AND THERMAL COMFORT aThe results showed that when the HVAC is controlled based onequipment sizing. When the HVAC is controlled based on the

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Experiments and modeling of multilayered coatings and membranes : application to thermal barrier coatings and reverse osmosis membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I developed a novel methodology for characterizing interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coatings. The proposed methodology involves novel experiments-plus numerical simulations in order to determine ...

Luk-Cyr, Jacques

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Cuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development, a consortium of national laboratories and industry is performing visual inspections and temperature measurements of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States. This report documents thermal analyses in in support of the inspections at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI. This site utilizes the HI-STORM100 vertical storage system developed by Holtec International. This is a vertical storage module design, and the thermal models are being developed using COBRA-SFS (Michener, et al., 1987), a code developed by PNNL for thermal-hydraulic analyses of multi assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. This report describes the COBRA-SFS model in detail, and presents pre-inspection predictions of component temperatures and temperature distributions. The final report will include evaluation of inspection results, and if required, additional post-test calculations, with appropriate discussion of results.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dynamics of a system of two coupled quibts in interaction with a thermal bath: A comparative study using different models for the system-bath interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a system constituted by two interacting qubits having one of them isolated and the other coupled to a thermal reservoir. We analyze the dynamics of the system considering two different models of system-reservoir interaction: i) a "microscopic" model, in which the master equation is derived taking into account the interaction between the two subsystems (qubits); ii) a "phenomenological" model, in which the master equation consists of a dissipative term simply added to the unitary evolution term. We obtain an analytical solution of the microscopic model without performing the rotating wave approximation for the qubit-qubit interaction; this allows us to compare the results from both models for a wide range of inter-qubit coupling constants. We show that in the strong coupling regime, the expected thermal equilibrium steady state for the two-qubit system naturally arises in the framework of the microscopic model, while in the phenomenological approach it is obtained a steady state density operator which is not correct. We also make a comparative study of the dynamics of the qubit-qubit entanglement and the quantum coherence associated to the isolated qubit. Furthermore, we find that even in the weak coupling regime, there are also important disagreements between the predictions of the two models. Namely, while according to the microscopic model the isolated qubit would approach a maximally mixed state faster for higher temperatures, the phenomenological model gives just the opposite behavior, i.e., it would take longer for the qubit state to become maximally mixed for higher temperatures of the reservoir.

G. L. Deordi; A. Vidiella-Barranco

2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Accounting for Depletion of Oil and Gas Resources in Malaysia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since oil and gas are non-renewable resources, it is important to identify the extent to which they have been depleted. Such information will contribute to the formulation and evaluation of appropriate sustainable development policies. This paper provides an assessment of the changes in the availability of oil and gas resources in Malaysia by first compiling the physical balance sheet for the period 2000-2007, and then assessing the monetary balance sheets for the said resource by using the Net Present Value method. Our findings show serious reduction in the value of oil reserves from 2001 to 2005, due to changes in crude oil prices, and thereafter the depletion rates decreased. In the context of sustainable development planning, albeit in the weak sustainability sense, it will be important to ascertain if sufficient reinvestments of the estimated resource rents in related or alternative capitals are being attempted by Malaysia. For the study period, the cumulative resource rents were to the tune of RM61 billion. Through a depletion or resource rents policy, the estimated quantum may guide the identification of a reinvestment threshold (after considering needed capital investment for future development of the industry) in light of ensuring the future productive capacity of the economy at the time when the resource is exhausted.

Othman, Jamal, E-mail: jortman@ukm.my; Jafari, Yaghoob, E-mail: yaghoob.jafari@gmail.com [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Economics and Management (Malaysia)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector with 0. 125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector, with 0.125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 165414 (2012) Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon nanotubes: Atomistic modeling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 165414 (2012) Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a process that plays an important role in a range of dynamic phenomena of buckling is reproduced by incorporating a hysteresis loop into the strain energy that accounts

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

379

Computer Simulation of Reservoir Depletion and Oil Flow from the Macondo Well Following the Deepwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Simulation of Reservoir Depletion and Oil Flow from the Macondo Well Following, 2010, Computer simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well following. ..................................................................................12 Figures Figure 1. Oblique schematic view of the M56 oil reservoir

380

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable thermal conditions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toronto Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 16 Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Summary: and Z2lin, and consequently thermal...

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - active thermal control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Life Cycle Analysis Collection: Renewable Energy 36 Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Summary: for control of thermal mems devices,...

385

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Design of bulk thermoelectric modules for integrated circuit thermal management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Index TermsContact resistance, equivalent circuit models,1-D equivalent circuit model. When the thermal resistance

Fukutani, K; Shakouri, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

Gray S. Chang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Real-Time Forcast Model Analysis of Daily Average Building Load for a Thermal Storage System Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a building and three real-time building load forecasting models were developed. They are first-order autogressive model, random walk model and linear regression model. Finally, the comparison of results show the random walk model provides the best...

Song, L.; Joo, I. S.; Guwana, S.

389

Analysis of permafrost thermal dynamics and response to climate change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupled climate-carbon earth system models part i: PhysicalChangeintheCMIP5EarthSystemModels Koven, C.D. , W.J.output from a set of Earth System Models (ESMs) (Table 1)

Koven, C.D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanica...

391

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Clothing Insulation Models based on Outdoor AirPREDICTIVE CLOTHING INSULATION MODELS ON BUILDING ENERGYthat the clothing insulation is equal to a constant value of

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Simulation of the Post-Retrofit Thermal Energy Use for the University Teaching Center (UTC) Building with the Use of Simplified System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-91/12-03 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY TECHNICAL REPORT REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION Simulation of the Post-Retrofit Thermal Energy Use for the University Teaching Center (UTC) Building with the Use of Simplified System Models Srinivas Katipamula, P.... Texas 77843 (409) 845-6402. or (409) 845-3251 INTRODUCTION Several state owned buildings with dual-duct constant volume (DDCV) systems have been retrofitted with energy efficient variable air volume systems (VAV) as part of the Texas LoanSTAR Program...

Katipamula, S.; Claridge, D. E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

Wang, H.-C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Kao, Y.-C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, T-J. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wong, M.-L. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Utilizing weak pump depletion to stabilize squeezed vacuum states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose and demonstrate a pump-phase locking technique that makes use of weak pump depletion (WPD) - an unavoidable effect that is usually neglected - in a sub-threshold optical parametric oscillator (OPO). We show that the phase difference between seed and pump beam is imprinted on both light fields by the non-linear interaction in the crystal and can be read out without disturbing the squeezed output. Our new locking technique allows for the first experimental realization of a pump-phase lock by reading out the pre-existing phase information in the pump field. There is no degradation of the detected squeezed states required to implement this scheme.

Timo Denker; Dirk Schtte; Maximilian H. Wimmer; Trevor A. Wheatley; Elanor H. Huntington; Michle Heurs

2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ion anisotropy driven waves in the earth`s magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies of low frequency waves ({omega}{sub r} {le} {Omega}{sub p}, where {Omega}{sub p} is the proton gyrofrequency) observed by AMPTE/CCE in the plasma depletion layer and magnetosheath proper arereviewed. These waves are shown to be well identified with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves. By statistically analyzing the transitions between the magnetopause and time intervals with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves, it is established that the regions in which ion cyclotron waves occur are between the magnetopause and the regions where the mirror mode is observed. This result is shown to follow from the fact that the wave spectral properties are ordered with respect to the proton parallel beta, {beta}{sub {parallel}p}. The later result is predicted by linear Vlasov theory using a simple model for the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer. Thus, the observed spectral type can be associated with relative distance from the magnetopause. The anisotropy-beta relation, A{sub p} {triple_bond} (T{perpendicular}/T{sub {parallel}}){sub p} {minus} 1 = 0.50{beta}{sub {parallel}p}{sup {minus}0.48} results from the fact that the waves pitch angle scatter the particles so that the plasma is near marginal stability, and is a fundamental constraint on the plasma.

Denton, R.E.; Hudson, M.K. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Anderson, B.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Fuselier, S.A. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Labs., CA (United States); Gary, S.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Ion anisotropy driven waves in the earth's magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies of low frequency waves ([omega][sub r] [le] [Omega][sub p], where [Omega][sub p] is the proton gyrofrequency) observed by AMPTE/CCE in the plasma depletion layer and magnetosheath proper arereviewed. These waves are shown to be well identified with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves. By statistically analyzing the transitions between the magnetopause and time intervals with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves, it is established that the regions in which ion cyclotron waves occur are between the magnetopause and the regions where the mirror mode is observed. This result is shown to follow from the fact that the wave spectral properties are ordered with respect to the proton parallel beta, [beta][sub [parallel]p]. The later result is predicted by linear Vlasov theory using a simple model for the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer. Thus, the observed spectral type can be associated with relative distance from the magnetopause. The anisotropy-beta relation, A[sub p] [triple bond] (T[perpendicular]/T[sub [parallel

Denton, R.E.; Hudson, M.K. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, B.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.); Fuselier, S.A. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Labs., CA (United States)); Gary, S.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cysteamine-induced depletion of somatostatin and prolactin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol (CSH), given in vivo or in vitro, rapidly but reversibly depletes immunoreactive somatostatin (irSS) in the central nervous system and gut as well as biological and immunological prolactin (PRL) activity in both the anterior pituitary and blood of the rat. This depletion of irSS and PRL is dose dependent and cannot be accounted for by release of either compound. Basal and potassium-stimulated SS release is reduced from hypothalamic tissue in vitro in CSH-treated animals. PRL secretion induced both pharmacologically and physiologically is abolished after CSH administration. Furthermore, CSH reduces cellular PRL content in a number of hyperprolactinemic states. The mechanism by which CSH reduces PRL levels is not clear, but it does not appear to act through the dopamine receptor nor does it alter the morphological structure of the lactotrope in normal animals. Most likely, CSH acts by interacting with the disulfide bonds of PRL, thus rendering the molecule both immunologically and biologically inactive.

Millard, W.J.; Sagar, S.M.; Martin, J.B.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements.

Nickels, J.M.; Brown, M.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Evolutionary Path for Concentrating Thermal Solar Power Technologies: A New Approach for Modeling CSP Power Costs and Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) technology is a potentially competitive power generation option, particularly in arid regions where direct sunlight is abundant. We examine the potential role of CSP power plants and their contribution to carbon emissions reduction. The answers to these questions depend on the cost of electricity generated by CSP plants. Although a few studies have projected future CSP costs based on assumptions for technology advancement and the effect of economies of scale and learning curves, few studies have considered the combined effects of intermittency, solar irradiance changes by season, and diurnal and seasonal system load changes. Because the generation of a solar plant varies over a day and by season, the interactions between CSP generators and other generators in the electric system can play an important role in determining costs. In effect, CSP electricity generation cost will depend on the CSP market penetration. This paper examines this relationship and explores possible evolutionary paths for CSP technologies with and without thermal storage.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cermet fuel thermal conductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERMET FUEL THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY A Thesis by JOHN MARK ALVIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&. M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Nuclear... particles of low conductivity dispersed in a metal matrix of high conductivity. A computer code was developed in order to compute the conductivity of cermet fuels as predicted by existing models and an additional model derived in this work...

Alvis, John Mark

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical model of the granite-bentonite- groundwaterconductivity scale effects in granite (Full-scale EngineeredSamper et al. , 2008a). granite heater Relative humidity (%)

Zheng, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Military use of depleted uranium assessment of prolonged population exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is an exposure assessment for a population living in an area contaminated by use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons. RESRAD 5.91 code is used to evaluate the average effective dose delivered from 1, 10, 20 cm depths of contaminated soil, in a residential farmer scenario. Critical pathway and group are identified in soil inhalation or ingestion and children playing with the soil, respectively. From available information on DU released on targeted sites, both critical and average exposure can leave to toxicological hazards; annual dose limit for population can be exceeded on short-term period (years) for soil inhalation. As a consequence, in targeted sites cleaning up must be planned on the basis of measured concentration, when available, while special cautions have to be adopted altogether to reduce unaware exposures, taking into account the amount of the avertable dose.

Giannardi, C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Low-order Model of Water Vapor, Clouds, and Thermal Emission for Tidally Locked Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the spirit of minimal modeling of complex systems, we develop an idealized two-column model to investigate the climate of tidally locked terrestrial planets with Earth-like atmospheres in the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars. The model is able to approximate the fundamental features of the climate obtained from three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) simulations. One important reason for the two-column model's success is that it reproduces the high cloud albedo of the GCM simulations, which reduces the planet's temperature and delays the onset of a runaway greenhouse state. The two-column model also clearly illustrates a secondary mechanism for determining the climate: the nightside acts as a ``radiator fin'' through which infrared energy can be lost to space easily. This radiator fin is maintained by a temperature inversion and dry air on the nightside, and plays a similar role to the subtropics on modern Earth. Since 1D radiative-convective models cannot capture the effects of t...

Yang, Jun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Methane depletion in both polar regions of Uranus inferred from HST/STIS and Keck/NIRC2 observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From STIS observations of Uranus in 2012, we found that the methane volume mixing ratio declined from about 4% at low latitudes to about 2% at 60 deg N and beyond. This is similar to that found in the south polar regions in 2002, in spite of what appears to be strikingly different convective activity in the two regions. Keck and HST imaging observations close to equinox imply that the depletions were simultaneously present in 2007, suggesting they are persistent features. The depletions appear to be mainly restricted to the upper troposphere, with depth increasing poleward from about 30 deg N, reaching ~4 bars at 45 deg N and perhaps much deeper at 70 deg N. The latitudinal variations in degree and depth of the depletions are important constraints on models of meridional circulation. Our observations are qualitatively consistent with previously suggested circulation cells in which rising methane-rich gas at low latitudes is dried out by condensation and sedimentation of methane ice particles as the gas ascend...

Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi; de Pater, Imke; Rages, Kathy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric ozone depletion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

78992007 Summary: ozone depletion based on sequential assimilation of satellite data from the ENVISATMIPAS and Odin... 2007 Abstract. The objective of this study...

412

activity-dependent vmat-mediated depletion: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by which this main- tenance is achieved. Its functions include Huettner, James E. 3 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

413

ampt-induced monoamine depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

monoaminergic and peptidergic signaling due (more) Wragg, Rachel T. 2010-01-01 8 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

414

acid depleted space-flown: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D Hermier 1, D Catheline 2,D Hermier D Catheline Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 2 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

415

EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

416

androgen depletion up-regulates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with androgens has been shown to increase growth rate in fishes (Ron et al., 1995 17 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

417

Integrated fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic sub-channel models for analysis of sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) show promise as an effective way to produce clean safe nuclear power while properly managing the fuel cycle. Accurate computer modeling is an important step in the design and eventual licensing ...

Fricano, Joseph William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A three dimensional simulation of a thermal experiment conducted on an accelerator driven system target model concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamics (CFD). The benchmark for the model comparison is an experiment conducted by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering on one particular ATW system concept. The experimenters used thermocouples to determine the temperature profile...

Pratt, Preston Persley

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal and hydraulic code verification: ATHOS2 and model boiler No. 2 data. Volume 3. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the EPRI/Westinghouse Project S168-1, Westinghouse was contracted to conduct steady-state and transient tests on the Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, and to use the data obtained in these tests for the verification of the ATHOS2 (an updated version of URSULA2) code developed for EPRI by CHAM of North America, Inc. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the ATHOS2 code analytical model of MB-2, (3) the tests performed for the code verification program, (4) the comparisons of the test data with ATHOS2 calculations, and (5) recommendations for improving the ATHOS2 code.

Hopkins, G.W.; Lee, A.Y.; Mendler, O.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Incorporation of a Helical Tube Heat Transfer Model in the MARS Thermal Hydraulic Systems Analysis Code for the T/H Analyses of the SMART Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SMART is a medium sized integral type advanced pressurized water reactor currently under development at KAERI. The steam generators of SMART are designed with helically coiled tubes and these are designed to produce superheated steam. The helical shape of the tubes can induce strong centrifugal effect on the secondary coolant as it flows inside the tubes. The presence of centrifugal effect is expected to enhance the formation of cross-sectional circulation flows within the tubes that will increase the overall heat transfer. Furthermore, the centrifugal effect is expected to enhance the moisture separation and thus make it easier to produce superheated steam. MARS is a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic systems analysis code with multi-phase, multi-dimensional analysis capability. The MARS code was produced by restructuring and merging the RELAP5 and the COBRA-TF codes. However, MARS as well as most other best-estimate systems analysis codes in current use lack the detailed models needed to describe the thermal hydraulics of helically coiled tubes. In this study, the heat transfer characteristics and relevant correlations for both the tube and shell sides of helical tubes have been investigated, and the appropriate models have been incorporated into the MARS code. The newly incorporated helical tube heat transfer package is available to the MARS users via selection of the appropriate option in the input. A performance analysis on the steam generator of SMART under full power operation was carried out using the modified MARS code. The results of the analysis indicate that there is a significant improvement in the code predictability. (authors)

Young Jin Lee; Bub Dong Chung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Dukjin-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jong Chull Jo; Hho Jung Kim [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Gusong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Un Chul Lee [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Validation of SCALE and the TRITON Depletion Sequence for Gas-Cooled Reactor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) is an advanced reactor concept that uses graphite-moderated fuel and helium gas as a coolant. At present there are two primary VHTR reactor designs under consideration for development: in the pebble-bed reactor, a core is loaded with 'pebbles' consisting of 6 cm diameter spheres, while in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, fuel rods are placed within prismatic graphite blocks. In both systems, fuel elements (spheres or rods) are comprised of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles. The TRISO particles are either dispersed in the matrix of a graphite pebble for the pebble-bed design or molded into compacts/rods that are then inserted into the hexagonal graphite blocks for the prismatic concept. Two levels of heterogeneity exist in such fuel designs: (1) microspheres of TRISO particles dispersed in a graphite matrix of a cylindrical or spherical shape, and (2) neutron interactions at the rod-to-rod or sphere-to-sphere level. Such double heterogeneity (DH) provides a challenge to multigroup cross-section processing methods, which must treat each level of heterogeneity separately. A new capability to model doubly heterogeneous systems was added to the SCALE system in the release of Version 5.1. It was included in the control sequences CSAS and CSAS6, which use the Monte Carlo codes KENO V.a and KENO-VI, respectively, for three-dimensional neutron transport analyses and in the TRITON sequence, which uses the two-dimensional lattice physics code NEWT along with both versions of KENO for transport and depletion analyses. However, the SCALE 5.1 version of TRITON did not support the use of the DH approach for depletion. This deficiency has been addressed, and DH depletion will be available as an option in the upcoming release of SCALE 6. At present Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff are developing a set of calculations that may be used to validate SCALE for DH calculations. This paper discusses the results of calculations completed to date and the direction of future validation work.

DeHart, Mark D [ORNL; Pritchard, Megan L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Issues in Three-Dimensional Depletion Analysis of Measured Data Near the End of a Fuel Rod  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of reactor operation result in nonuniform axial-burnup profiles in fuel with any significant burnup. At the beginning of life in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), a near-cosine axial-shaped flux will begin depleting fuel near the axial center of a fuel assembly at a greater rate than at the ends. As the reactor continues to operate, the cosine flux shape will flatten because of the fuel depletion and fission-product buildup that occur near the center. However, because of the high leakage near the end of the fuel assembly, burnup will drop off rapidly near the ends. Partial-length absorbers or nonuniform axial fuel loadings can further complicate the burnup profile. In a boiling water reactor, the same phenomena come into play, but the burnup profile is complicated by the significant variation of axial moderator density and by nonuniform axial loadings of burnable poison rods. Numerous studies of axial burnup effects have been published. However, most analyses performed in estimation of isotopic distributions due to axial burnup have been based on a set of two-dimensional (2-D) calculations performed for burnups that represent the axial burnup distribution in a fuel assembly. In general, this approach works quite well because the in-core axial gradient of the neutron flux is small over most of the length of the fuel rod, and the 2-D approximation is appropriate. Conversely, because the axial gradient becomes significant as one approaches either end of the fuel assembly, the 2-D approximation begins to break down at that point. It has been theorized that axial leakage will lead to a reduced fast flux relative to the thermal flux, softening the spectrum near the ends of the fuel, and that a 2-D approximation is conservative in that it provides more plutonium production. This has not been put the test, however, for two reasons--a lack of good three-dimensional (3-D) analysis methods acceptable for away-from-reactor applications and, more importantly, a scarcity of experimental measurements for fuel taken from the end regions of a fuel rod. A number of 3-D depletion approaches based on Monte Carlo methods have been introduced in the past decade including, but not limited to, those listed in Refs. 5-7. A full listing would be quite extensive. Recent fuel-sample measurements from two discharged assemblies of the Takahama Unit 3 PWR provide data for fuel samples taken very close to the top of the active region of the fuel rod. This paper discusses results of TRITON-based 3-D depletion calculations completed in the analysis of the Takahama fuel samples.

DeHart, Mark D [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Optimizing thermal transport in the Falicov-Kimball model: The binary-alloy picture J. K. Freericks,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material for applications in the space industry or a combustion source. Thermoelectric coolers usually thermoelectric devices have ZT near 1 because few bulk materials have been discovered with much larger values of the Falicov-Kimball model concentrating on locating regions of parameter space where the thermoelectric figure

Freericks, Jim

425

Roles of ATP in Depletion and Replenishment of the Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roles of ATP in Depletion and Replenishment of the Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles RUTH Matthews. Roles of ATP in depletion and replenishment of the releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. J a pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles that undergo rapid calcium-dependent release. ATP

Pennsylvania, University of

426

Separating the dynamical effects of climate change and ozone depletion. Part  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) fixed at 1960 levels and ozone depleting substances (ODSs) varying in time, 2) ODSs fixed at 1960 levels averaged wave drag in SH spring and summer, as well as for final warming dates. Ozone depletion a significant impact on the stratosphere on both a global and a regional scale. Over the past three decades

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

427

Subdiffraction, Luminescence-Depletion Imaging of Isolated, Giant, CdSe/CdS Nanocrystal Quantum Dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subdiffraction spatial resolution luminescence depletion imaging was performed with giant CdSe/14CdS nanocrystal quantum dots (g-NQDs) dispersed on a glass slide. Luminescence depletion imaging used a Gaussian shaped excitation laser pulse overlapped with a depletion pulse, shaped into a doughnut profile, with zero intensity in the center. Luminescence from a subdiffraction volume is collected from the central portion of the excitation spot, where no depletion takes place. Up to 92% depletion of the luminescence signal was achieved. An average full width at half-maximum of 40 10 nm was measured in the lateral direction for isolated g-NQDs at an air interface using luminescence depletion imaging, whereas the average full width at half-maximum was 450 90 nm using diffraction-limited, confocal luminescence imaging. Time-gating of the luminescence depletion data was required to achieve the stated spatial resolution. No observable photobleaching of the g-NQDs was present in the measurements, which allowed imaging with a dwell time of 250 ms per pixel to obtain images with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The mechanism for luminescence depletion is likely stimulated emission, stimulated absorption, or a combination of the two. The g-NQDs fulfill a need for versatile, photostable tags for subdiffraction imaging schemes where high laser powers or long exposure times are used.

Lesoine, Michael D. [Ames Laboratory; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Ames Laboratory; Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory; Petrich, Jacob W. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, Emily A. [Ames Laboratory

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

428

Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

Limpasuvan, Varavut

429

Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we focus on South Eastern South America (SESA), a region that has exhibited one of the largest South America 1 Introduction The depletion of ozone in the polar Antarctic strato- sphere (i.e. `theStratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South

430

Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Study of Biomass Combustion in a Thermal 108 MW Grate-Fired Boiler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Fired Boiler Chungen Yin,*, Lasse Rosendahl, Søren K. Kær, Sønnik Clausen, Søren L. Hvid,§ and Torben Hille, Denmark ReceiVed NoVember 16, 2007. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed January 4, 2008 Grate boilers are widely) model for an industrial biomass-fired grate boiler, which can be used for diagnosis and optimization

Rosendahl, Lasse

431

Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of the cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team`s principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation.

DeVan, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mechanism of action of cysteamine in depleting prolactin immunoreactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thiol reagent cysteamine (CSH) depletes anterior pituitary cells of immunoreactive PRL both in vivo and in vitro. The authors examined the hypothesis that CSH affects either the solubility or immunoreactivity of PRL through a mechanism involving thiol-disulfide exchange. Adult female rats were treated with either CSH (300 mg/kg, sc) or an equimolar dose of ethanolamine as a control. Anterior pituitary glands were extracted in 0.1 M sodium borate buffer, pH 9.0. Treatment of pituitary extracts with beta-mercaptoethanol (BME) destroys the immunoreactivity of PRL. However, extraction in the presence of reduced glutathione or CSH of pituitaries of rats treated with CSH restores immunoreactive PRL to control levels. Extracts were also subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). On gels of pituitary extracts of CSH-treated rats, the band that comigrates with purified PRL is diminished compared to that in ethanolamine-treated controls. However, extraction of the pituitaries in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing buffer followed by chemical reduction with BME restores the PRL band. Therefore, CSH acts on PRL through a thiol-related mechanism to yield a product that is poorly soluble in aqueous buffer at pH 9 and is poorly immunoreactive. Dispersed anterior pituitary cells in tissue culture were incubated with L-(TVS)methionine to radiolabel newly synthesized peptides. PAGE followed by autoradiography confirmed the above results obtained in vivo.

Sagar, S.M.; Millard, W.J.; Martin, J.B.; Murchison, S.C.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Benefits of the delta K of depletion benchmarks for burnup credit validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) burnup credit validation is demonstrated using the benchmarks for quantifying fuel reactivity decrements, published as 'Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty,' EPRI Report 1022909 (August 2011). This demonstration uses the depletion module TRITON available in the SCALE 6.1 code system followed by criticality calculations using KENO-Va. The difference between the predicted depletion reactivity and the benchmark's depletion reactivity is a bias for the criticality calculations. The uncertainty in the benchmarks is the depletion reactivity uncertainty. This depletion bias and uncertainty is used with the bias and uncertainty from fresh UO{sub 2} critical experiments to determine the criticality safety limits on the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}. The analysis shows that SCALE 6.1 with the ENDF/B-VII 238-group cross section library supports the use of a depletion bias of only 0.0015 in delta k if cooling is ignored and 0.0025 if cooling is credited. The uncertainty in the depletion bias is 0.0064. Reliance on the ENDF/B V cross section library produces much larger disagreement with the benchmarks. The analysis covers numerous combinations of depletion and criticality options. In all cases, the historical uncertainty of 5% of the delta k of depletion ('Kopp memo') was shown to be conservative for fuel with more than 30 GWD/MTU burnup. Since this historically assumed burnup uncertainty is not a function of burnup, the Kopp memo's recommended bias and uncertainty may be exceeded at low burnups, but its absolute magnitude is small. (authors)

Lancaster, D. [NuclearConsultants.com, 187 Faith Circle, Boalsburg, PA 16827 (United States); Machiels, A. [Electric Power Research Inst., Inc., 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Modeling the heating of the Green Energy Lab in Shanghai by the geothermal heat pump combined with the solar thermal energy and ground energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This work involves the study of heating systems that combine solar collectors, geothermal heat pumps and thermal energy storage in the ground. Solar collectors (more)

Yu, Candice Yau May

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal-fluid and electrochemical modeling and performance study of a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell : analysis on SOEC resistances, size, and inlet flow conditions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory researchers are analyzing the electrochemical and thermal-fluid behavior of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for high temperature steam electrolysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The major challenges facing commercialization of steam electrolysis technology are related to efficiency, cost, and durability of the SOECs. The goal of this effort is to guide the design and optimization of performance for high temperature electrolysis (HTE) systems. An SOEC module developed by FLUENT Inc. as part of their general CFD code was used for the SOEC analysis by INL. ANL has developed an independent SOEC model that combines the governing electrochemical mechanisms based on first principals to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the operation of SOECs. The ANL model was embedded into the commercial STAR-CD CFD software, and is being used for the analysis of SOECs by ANL. The FY06 analysis performed by ANL and reported here covered the influence of electrochemical properties, SOEC component resistances and their contributing factors, SOEC size and inlet flow conditions, and SOEC flow configurations on the efficiency and expected durability of these systems. Some of the important findings from the ANL analysis are: (1) Increasing the inlet mass flux while going to larger cells can be a compromise to overcome increasing thermal and current density gradients while increasing the cell size. This approach could be beneficial for the economics of the SOECs; (2) The presence of excess hydrogen at the SOEC inlet to avoid Ni degradation can result in a sizeable decrease in the process efficiency; (3) A parallel-flow geometry for SOEC operation (if such a thing be achieved without sealing problems) yields smaller temperature gradients and current density gradients across the cell, which is favorable for the durability of the cells; (4) Contact resistances can significantly influence the total cell resistance and cell temperatures over a large range of operating potentials. Thus it is important to identify and avoid SOEC stack conditions leading to such high resistances due to poor contacts.

Yildiz, B.; Smith, J.; Sofu, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

FEASIBILITY STUDY OF DUPOLY TO RECYCLE DEPLETED URANIUM.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DUPoly, depleted uranium (DU) powder microencapsulated in a low-density polyethylene binder, has been demonstrated as an innovative and efficient recycle product, a very durable high density material with significant commercial appeal. DUPoly was successfully prepared using uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) ''green salt'' obtained from Fluor Daniel-Fernald, a U.S. Department of Energy reprocessing facility near Cincinnati, Ohio. Samples containing up to 90 wt% UF{sub 4} were produced using a single screw plastics extruder, with sample densities of up to 3.97 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3} measured. Compressive strength of as-prepared samples (50-90 wt% UF4 ) ranged from 1682 {+-} 116 psi (11.6 {+-} 0.8 MPa) to 3145 {+-} 57 psi (21.7 {+-} 0.4 MPa). Water immersion testing for a period of 90 days produced no visible degradation of the samples. Leach rates were low, ranging from 0.02 % (2.74 x 10{sup {minus}6} gm/gm/d) for 50 wt% UF{sub 4} samples to 0.72 % (7.98 x 10{sup {minus}5} gm/gm/d) for 90 wt% samples. Sample strength was not compromised by water immersion. DUPoly samples containing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), a DU reprocessing byproduct material stockpiled at the Savannah River Site, were gamma irradiated to 1 x 10{sup 9} rad with no visible deterioration. Compressive strength increased significantly, however: up to 200% for samples with 90 wt% UO{sub 3}. Correspondingly, percent deformation (strain) at failure was decreased for all samples. Gamma attenuation data on UO{sub 3} DUPoly samples yielded mass attenuation coefficients greater than those for lead. Neutron removal coefficients were calculated and shown to correlate well with wt% of DU. Unlike gamma attenuation, both hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous materials interact to attenuate neutrons.

ADAMS,J.W.; LAGERAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.; RUTENKROGER,S.P.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ME 343 Thermal-Fluid Systems ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 8. Unsteady thermal system modeling, energy storage 9. Software design and development ClassME 343 ­ Thermal-Fluid Systems Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 343 ­ Thermal-Fluid Systems Spring thermal and fluid processes are central to function and performance: thermodynamics of nonreacting

Ben-Yakar, Adela

439

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations by MCNPX 2.7.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different approaches to perform automatic whole core criticality and depletion calculations in a research reactor using MCNPX 2.7.0 are presented. An approximate method is to use the existing symmetries of the burned fuel material distribution in the core, i.e., the axial, radial and azimuth symmetries around the core center, in order to significantly reduce the computation time. In this case it is not necessary to give a unique material number to each burn up cell. Cells having similar burn up and power, achieved during similar irradiation history at same initial fuel composition, will experience similar composition evolution and can therefore be given the same material number. To study the impact of the number of unique burn up materials on the computation time and utilized RAM memory, several MCNPX models have been developed. The paper discusses the accuracy of the model on comparison with measurements of BR2 operation cycles in function of the number of unique burn up materials and the impact of the used Q-value (MeV/fission) of the recoverable fission energy. (authors)

Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E. [SCKCEN, BR2 Reactor Dept., Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

Gardner, William Payton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modeling of thermal processes in very high pressure liquid chromatography for column immersed in a water bath: Application of the selected models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, chromatographic analyses are carried out by operating columns packed with sub-2 {micro}m particles under very high pressure gradients, up to 1200 bar for 5 cm long columns. This provides the high flow rates that are necessary for the achievement of high column efficiencies and short analysis times. However, operating columns at high flow rates under such high pressure gradients generate a large amount of heat due to the viscous friction of the mobile phase stream that percolates through a low permeability bed. The evacuation of this heat causes the formation of significant or even large axial and radial gradients of all the physico-chemical parameters characterizing the packing material and the mobile phase, eventually resulting in a loss of column efficiency. We previously developed and successfully applied a model combining the heat and the mass balances of a chromatographic column operated under very high pressure gradients (VHPLC). The use of this model requires accurate estimates of the dispersion coefficients at each applied mobile phase velocity. This work reports on a modification of the mass balance model such that only one measurement is now necessary to accurately predict elution peak profiles in a wide range of mobile phase velocities. The conditions under which the simple equilibrium-dispersive (ED) and transport-dispersive (TD) models are applicable in VHPLC are also discussed. This work proves that the new combination of the heat transfer and the ED model discussed in this work enables the calculation of accurate profiles for peaks eluted under extreme conditions, like when the column is thermostated in a water bath.

Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

444

Thermally Nitrided Stainless Steels for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 1 Model Ni-50Cr and Austenitic 349TM alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal nitridation of a model Ni-50Cr alloy at 1100 C for 2 h in pure nitrogen resulted in the formation of a continuous, protective CrN/Cr{sub 2}N surface layer with a low interfacial contact resistance. Application of similar nitridation parameters to an austenitic stainless steel, 349{sup TM}, however, resulted in a discontinuous mixture of discrete CrN, Cr{sub 2}N and (Cr,Fe){sub 2}N{sub 1-x} (x = 0--0.5) phase surface particles overlying an exposed {gamma} austenite-based matrix, rather than a continuous nitride surface layer. The interfacial contact resistance of the 349{sup TM} was reduced significantly by the nitridation treatment. However, in the simulated PEMFC environments (1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 2 ppm F{sup -} solutions at 70 C sparged with either hydrogen or air), very high corrosion currents were observed under both anodic and cathodic conditions. This poor behavior was linked to the lack of continuity of the Cr-rich nitride surface formed on 349{sup TM} Issues regarding achieving continuous, protective Cr-nitride surface layers on stainless steel alloys are discussed.

Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, Report on Inspection 1, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Dupoly process for treatment of depleted uranium and production of beneficial end products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process of encapsulating depleted uranium by forming a homogenous mixture of depleted uranium and molten virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer into desired shapes. Separate streams of depleted uranium and virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer are simultaneously subjected to heating and mixing conditions. The heating and mixing conditions are provided by a thermokinetic mixer, continuous mixer or an extruder and preferably by a thermokinetic mixer or continuous mixer followed by an extruder. The resulting DUPoly shapes can be molded into radiation shielding material or can be used as counter weights for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships, missiles, armor or projectiles.

Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Adams, Jay W. (Stony Brook, NY); Lageraaen, Paul R. (Seaford, NY); Cooley, Carl R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

Proposal concerning the participation of CERN in the procurement of depleted-uranium sheets for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal concerning the participation of CERN in the procurement of depleted-uranium sheets for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thermal conductivity and heat transfer in superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the thermal conductivity and heat transfer processes in superlattice structures is critical for the development of thermoelectric materials and devices based on quantum structures. This work reports progress on the modeling of thermal conductivity of superlattice structures. Results from the models established based on the Boltzmann transport equation could explain existing experimental results on the thermal conductivity of semiconductor superlattices in both in plane and cross-plane directions. These results suggest the possibility of engineering the interfaces to further reduce thermal conductivity of superlattice structures.

Chen, G.; Neagu, M.; Borca-Tasciuc, T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Development of embrittlement prediction models for U.S. power reactors and the impact of the heat-affected zone to thermal annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 was based on 177 surveillance data points and the EPRI data base, where 76% of 177 data points and 60% of EPRI data base were from Westinghouse`s data. Therefore, other vendors` radiation environment may not be properly characterized by R.G. 1.99`s prediction. To minimize scatter from the influences of the irradiation temperature, neutron energy spectrum, displacement rate, and plant operation procedures on embrittlement models, improved embrittlement models based on group data that have similar radiation environments and reactor design and operation criteria are examined. A total of 653 shift data points from the current FR-EDB, including 397 Westinghouse data, 93 B and W data, 37 CE data, and 106 GE data, are used. A nonlinear least squares fitting FORTRAN program, incorporating a Monte Carlo procedure with 35% and 10% uncertainty assigned to the fluence and shift data, respectively, was written for this study. In order to have the same adjusted fluence value for the weld and plate material in the same capsule, the Monte Carlo least squares fitting procedure has the ability to adjust the fluence values while running the weld and plate formula simultaneously. Six chemical components, namely, copper, nickel, phosphorus, sulfur, manganese, and molybdenum, were considered in the development of the new embrittlement models. The overall percentage of reduction of the 2-sigma margins per delta RTNDT predicted by the new embrittlement models, compared to that of R.G. 1.99, for weld and base materials are 42% and 36%, respectively. Currently, the need for thermal annealing is seriously being considered for several A302B type RPVs. From the macroscopic view point, even if base and weld materials were verified from mechanical tests to be fully recovered, the linking heat affected zone (HAZ) material has not been properly characterized. Thus the final overall recovery will still be unknown. The great data scatter of the HAZ metals may be the result of the metallurgical heterogeneity that exists in the HAZ. The proposed data fitting procedure for the HAZ material is presented in the paper.

Wang, J.A.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Multiscale thermal transport.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

453

arginase-induced l-arginine depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in presence or absence of L-arginine. N-hydroxy-nor-l- arginine (nor-NOHA) and alpha 13 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

454

allogeneic t-cell depleted: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T cells expressed aid mRNA as well as AID protein. We Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 52 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

455

Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

Seo, Jeong Gyu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged thermal power Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences ; Engineering 54 Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Summary: , but sufficiently accurate and powerful...

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - ale3d thermal predictions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 58 Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Summary: -shaped) are presented by Hickey et al....

458

Effects of glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine on radiosensitization by oxygen and misonidazole in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) has been used to deplete glutathione (GSH) in V79-379A cells in vitro, and the effect on the efficiency of oxygen and misonidazole (MISO) as radiosensitizers has been determined. Treatment with 50 or 500 ..mu..M BSO caused a rapid decline in GSH content to less than 5% of control values after 10 hr of exposure. Removal of BSO resulted in a rapid regeneration of GSH after 50 ..mu..M BSO, but little regeneration was observed over the subsequent 10-hr period after 500 ..mu..M. Cells irradiated in monolayer on glass had an oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of 3.1. After 10-14 hr pretreatment with 50 ..mu..M BSO, washed cells were radiosensitized by GSH depletion at all oxygen tensions tested. The OER was reduced to 2.6, due to greater radiosensitization of hypoxic cells than aerated ones by GSH depletion. In similar experiments performed with MISO, an enhancement ratio of 2.0 could be achieved with 0.2 mM MISO in anoxic BSO-pretreated cells, compared to 2.7 mM MISO in non-BSO-treated cells. These apparent increases in radiosensitizer efficiency in GSH-depleted cells could be explained on the basis of radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by GSH depletion alone. These results are consistent with hypoxic cell radiosensitization by GSH depletion and by MISO or oxygen acting by separate mechanisms.

Shrieve, D.C.; Denekamp, J.; Minchinton, A.I.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

Greene, D.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal depletion model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ghabezloo: Micromechanics analysis of thermal expansion and thermal pressurization of a hardened cement paste Micromechanics analysis of thermal expansion and thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pore fluid is anomalously higher than the one of pure bulk water. The micromechanics model water-to-cement ratios. It permits also to calculate the pore volume thermal expansion coefficient expansion and thermal pressurization of a hardened cement paste, Cement and Concrete Research, DOI 10.1016/j

Boyer, Edmond

462

Prediction of future well performance, including reservoir depletion effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, the reservoir material balance (voidage) effects occurring between the end of the measured (known) production history and future Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) time levels have been commonly ignored in the computation of the future IPR behavior. Neglecting the reservoir voidage that occurs during the time interval between the end of the known production history and the future IPR time levels results in erroneous estimates of the future IPR behavior. A detailed description is given of the mathematically rigorous technique that has been used in the development of a multilayer well performance simulator that properly accounts for the reservoir voidage effects. Some of the more significant results are also presented of an extensive effort to develop an accurate and computationally efficient well performance simulation model. The reservoir can be considered to be multilayered, with mixed reservoir layer completion types and outer boundary shapes, drainage areas and boundary conditions. The well performance model can be used to simulate performance in three different operating modes: (1) constant wellhead rate, (2) constant bottomhole pressure, and (3) constant wellhead pressure. The transient performance of vertical, vertically fractured and horizontal wells can be simulated with this well performance model. The well performance model uses mathematically rigorous transient solutions and not simply the approximate solutions for each of the well types, as do most of the other commercially available well performance models.

Poe, B.D. Jr.; Elbel, J.L.; Spath, J.B.; Wiggins, M.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Laboratory test results on the thermal resistance of polyisocyanurate foamboard insulation blown with CFC-11 substitutes: A cooperative industry/government project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbon gases (CFC-11 and CFC-12) are used as blowing agents for foam insulations for building and appliance applications. The thermal resistance per unit thickness of these insulations is greater than that of other commercially available insulations. Mandated reductions in the production of these chemicals may lead to less efficient substitutes and increase US energy consumption by one quad or more. This report describes laboratory thermal and aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminate boardstock to evaluate the viability of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFSs) as alternative blowing agents to chlorofluorcarbon-11 (CFC-11). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC- 123, HCFC-141b, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b. These HCFC gases have a lower ozone depletion potential than CFC-11 or CFC-12. Apparent thermal conductivity (k) was determined from 0 to 50{degrees}C. Results on the laminate boards provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The measured laboratory increase in k was between 8 and 11% after a 240-d field exposure in the RTRA. Results are reported on a thin-specimen, aging procedure to establish the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. These thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 75 and 150{degrees}F for up to 300 d. The resulting k-values were correlated with an exponential dependency on (diffusion coefficient {times} time){sup {1/2}}/thickness and provided diffusion coefficients for air components into, and blowing agent out of, the foam. This aging procedure was used to predict the five-year thermal resistivity of the foams. The thin-specimen aging procedure is supported with calculations by a computer model for aging of foams. 43 refs., 33 figs., 25 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Weaver, F.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Advancing Performance Assessment for Disposal of Depleted Uranium at Clive Utah - 12493  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Performance Assessment (PA) for disposal of depleted uranium (DU) waste has recently been completed for a potential disposal facility at Clive in northwestern Utah. For the purposes of this PA, 'DU waste' includes uranium oxides of all naturally-occurring isotopes, though depleted in U-235, varying quantities of other radionuclides introduced to the uranium enrichment process in the form of used nuclear reactor fuel (reactor returns), and decay products of all of these radionuclides. The PA will be used by the State of Utah to inform an approval decision for disposal of DU waste at the facility, and will be available to federal regulators as they revisit rulemaking for the disposal of DU. The specific performance objectives of the Clive DU PA relate to annual individual radiation dose within a 10,000-year performance period, groundwater concentrations of specific radionuclides within a 500-year compliance period, and site stability in the longer term. Fate and transport processes that underlie the PA model include radioactive decay and ingrowth, diffusion in gaseous and water phases, water advection in unsaturated and saturated zones, transport caused by plant and animal activity, cover naturalization, natural and anthropogenic erosion, and air dispersion. Fate and transport models were used to support the dose assessment and the evaluation of groundwater concentrations. Exposure assessment was based on site-specific scenarios, since the traditional human exposure scenarios suggested by DOE and NRC guidance are unrealistic for this site. Because the U-238 in DU waste reaches peak radioactivity (secular equilibrium) after 2 million years (My) following its separation, the PA must also evaluate the impact of climate change cycles, including the return of pluvial lakes such as Lake Bonneville. The first draft of the PA has been submitted to the State of Utah for review. The results of this preliminary analysis indicate that doses are very low for the site-specific receptors for the 10,000-year compliance period. This is primarily because DU waste is not highly radioactive within this time frame, the DU waste is assumed to be buried beneath zones exposed by erosion, groundwater concentrations of DU waste constituents do not exceed groundwater protection limits with in the 500-year compliance period, and the first deep lake occurrence will disperse DU waste across a large area, and will ultimately be covered by lake-derived sediment. A probabilistic PA model was constructed that considered DU waste and decay product doses to site-specific receptors for a 10,000-yr performance period, as well as deep-time effects. The quantitative results are summarized in Table VII. Doses (as TEDE) are always less than 5 mSv in a year, and doses to the offsite receptors are always much less than 0.25 mSv in a year. Groundwater concentrations of Tc-99 are always less than its GWPL except when the Tc-99 contaminated waste is disposed below grade. Even in this case, the median groundwater concentration is only 4.18 Bq/L (113 pCi/L), which is more than one order of magnitude less than the GWPL for Tc-99. The results overall suggest that there are disposal configurations that can be used to dispose of the proposed quantities of DU waste that are adequately protective of human health. (authors)

Black, Paul; Tauxe, John; Perona, Ralph; Lee, Robert; Catlett, Kate; Balshi, Mike; Fitzgerald, Mark; McDermott, Greg [Neptune and Company, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Shrum, Dan; McCandless, Sean; Sobocinski, Robert; Rogers, Vern [EnergySolutions, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Monte Carlo depletion calculations using VESTA 2.1 new features and perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

VESTA is a Monte Carlo depletion interface code that is currently under development at IRSN. With VESTA, the emphasis lies on both accuracy and performance, so that the code will be capable of providing accurate and complete answers in an acceptable amount of time compared to other Monte Carlo depletion codes. From its inception, VESTA is intended to be a generic interface code so that it will ultimately be capable of using any Monte-Carlo code or depletion module and that can be tailored to the users needs. A new version of the code (version 2.1.x) will be released in 2012. The most important additions to the code are a burn up dependent isomeric branching ratio treatment to improve the prediction of metastable nuclides such as {sup 242m}Am and the integration of the PHOENIX point depletion module (also developed at IRSN) to overcome some of the limitations of the ORIGEN 2.2 module. The task of extracting and visualising the basic results and also the calculation of physical quantities or other data that can be derived from the basic output provided by VESTA will be the task of the AURORA depletion analysis tool which will be released at the same time as VESTA 2.1.x. The experimental validation database was also extended for this new version and it now contains a total of 35 samples with chemical assay data and 34 assembly decay heat measurements. (authors)

Haeck, W.; Cochet, B.; Aguiar, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simulation model is presented for the verification of the recently developed steady-state one-dimensional adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow theory. In this theory, a self-consistent Poisson equation is developed ...

Mok, Rachel V. (Rachel Verla)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation. These Appendices contain the Federal Register Notice, comments on evaluation factors, independent technical reviewers resumes, independent technical reviewers manual, and technology information packages.

Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A. [and others] [and others

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation.

Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A. [and others] [and others

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

Condensed Surfaces of Magnetic Neutron Stars, Thermal Surface Emission, and Particle Acceleration Above Pulsar Polar Caps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For sufficiently strong magnetic fields and/or low temperatures, the neutron star surface may be in a condensed state with little gas or plasma above it. Such surface condensation can significantly affect the thermal emission from isolated neutron stars, and may lead to the formation of a charge-depleted acceleration zone ("vacuum gap") in the magnetosphere above the stellar polar cap. Using the latest results on the cohesive property of magnetic condensed matter, we quantitatively determine the conditions for surface condensation and vacuum gap formation in magnetic neutron stars. We find that condensation can occur if the thermal energy kT of the neutron star surface is less than about 8% of its cohesive energy Q_s, and that a vacuum gap can form if the neutron star's rotation axis and magnetic moment point in opposite directions and kT is less than about 4% of Q_s. Thus, vacuum gap accelerators may exist for some neutron stars. Motivated by this result, we also study the physics of pair cascades in the vacuum gap model for photon emission by accelerating electrons and positrons due to both curvature radiation and resonant/nonresonant inverse Compton scattering. Our calculations of the condition of cascade-induced vacuum breakdown and the related pulsar death line/boundary generalize previous works to the superstrong field regime. We find that inverse Compton scatterings do not produce a sufficient number of high energy photons in the gap and thus do not lead to pair cascades for most neutron star parameters. We discuss the implications of our results for the recent observations of neutron star thermal radiation as well as for the detection/non-detection of radio emission from high-B pulsars and magnetars.

Zach Medin; Dong Lai

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotope) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, were considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation.

Hermann, O.W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic compo