Sample records for thc geophysical methad

  1. GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS OF SQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goubau, W.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. M. , and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Zimmerman, J. : Second1976). Sims, W. K. :, Geophysics E. , physics~. and Ketchen,Geo- and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Gamble, T. D. , Goubau, W.

  2. INTRODUCTION APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    GEOL 384.3 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS GEOL 384 unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know. And if one looks throughout the history of geophysics he didn't really say geophysics. He said, " ... our country and other free countries ...". But I am

  3. 3, 14071417, 2006 geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 3, 1407­1417, 2006 Modeling geophysical complexity: geometric determinism C. E. Puente and B System Sciences Modeling geophysical complexity: a case for geometric determinism C. E. Puente and B (cepuente@ucdavis.edu) 1407 #12;HESSD 3, 1407­1417, 2006 Modeling geophysical complexity: geometric

  4. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  5. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONSite Characterization Geophysics SELF-POTENTIAL Referencesand Environmental Geophysics, S. H. Ward, ed. (Soc. Expl.

  6. Marine Geophysics: A Navy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shor, Elizabeth N; Ebrahimi, Carolyn L

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical polarization. Geophysics 22:660-687. Vacquier,Raitt, R. W. 1964. Geophysics of the South Pacific.Research in Geophysics 2:223-241. Francis, T. J. G. , and R.

  7. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) is a unique program designated to introduce geophysics students to geophysical exploration and research. SAGE's purpose is to enhance a...

  8. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  9. Numerical modeling of a thermohydrochemical (T-H-C) coupling and the implications to radionuclide transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esh, D. W.; Scheetz, B. E.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermohydrochemical (T-H-C) processes result from the placement of heat-generating radioactive materials in unsaturated, fractured geologic materials. The placement of materials in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository will result in complex environmental conditions. Simple models are developed liking the thermohydrological effects simulated with TOUGHZ to system chemistry, with an example presented for chloride. Perturbations to near-field chemistry could have a significant impact on the migration of actinides and fission products in geologic materials. Various conceptual models to represent fractures are utilized in TOUGHZ simulations of thermohydrological processes. The simulated moisture redistribution is then coupled to simple chemical models to demonstrate the potential magnitude of T-H-C processes. The concentration of chloride in solution (returning to the engineered barrier system) is demonstrated, in extreme cases, to exceed 100,000 mg/L. The implication is that the system (typically ambient chemical and hydrological conditions) in which radionuclide transport is typically simulated and measured may be significantly different from the perturbed system.

  10. Geophysical Exploration (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas...

  11. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 11 (Geophysics) On Original Copies Dr. Terence K. Young Professor and Head Department of Geophysics Approved

  12. Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry

  13. 2, 637671, 2005 Geophysics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor brines S. B. Joye et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Geophysical and geochemical signatures under a Creative Commons License. 637 #12;BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor

  14. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  15. ESTIMATING UNCERTAINTIES FOR GEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    to directly measure the amount of oil in an area is to drill several wells, but drilling is a very expensive. These techniques are applied to the inversion of traveltime data collected in a cross well seismic experiment procedure, and the whole idea of geophysics is to predict the amount of oil without drilling in all possible

  16. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date: April 14, 2005 Signed

  17. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 10 (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date May 15, 2006 Signed: on original copy Jeongmin Lee Signed: on original

  18. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: September fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date

  19. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    duckling of environmental geophysics, Leading Edge, 21(5),Pure and Applied Geophysics, 157, 357-382. Pinder, G.F. ,sulfide self-potentials, Geophysics, 25, 226–249. Sauck, W.

  20. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  1. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  2. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

  3. INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL Douglas W. Oldenburg* and Yaoguo Li** * UBC-Geophysical, V6T 1Z4 ** Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, 80401 INTRODUCTION Throughout this book there are numerous cases where geophysics has been used to help solve practical

  4. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Dongjie Cheng #12;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: December 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li (GP

  5. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Alisa Marie Green #12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: November 06, 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li

  6. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program . Description teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including...

  7. APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE STORAGE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    letal Ore Deposits, 11 in Geophysics and Geochemistry in the11 Applications of Borehole Geophysics to Water-ResourcesAPPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE

  8. Lunar geophysics: The Moon's fundamental shape and paleomagnetism studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Viranga

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tectonics.   Reviews  of  Geophysics  and  Space   Physics  SANTA CRUZ Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental shapeViranga Perera Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental

  9. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal...

  10. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 2530 Reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 25­30 Reservoir geophysics Wayne D. Pennington INTRODUCTION The concept of petroleum reservoir geophysics is relatively new. In the past, the role of geophysics was largely confined to exploration and, to a lesser degree, the development

  11. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  12. INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY (LANL) FY11, 2010 1. INTRODUCTION The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National of California's Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Its science mission is to promote

  13. 2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Search Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2010), Title: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States AU: Ragunathan, S EM: srivatta@gi.alaska.edu AF: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United

  14. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: scientific predictions, space physics, atmospheric sciences, snow, ice and permafrost, tectonics and sedimentation, seismology, volcanology, remote sensing, and other projects.

  15. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance assessment of a geological repository for radioactive waste requires quantifying the geochemical evolution of the bentonite engineered barrier. This barrier will be exposed to coupled thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. This paper presents a coupled THC model of the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test which accounts for bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis. Model results attest the relevance of thermal osmosis and bentonite swelling for the geochemical evolution of the bentonite barrier while chemical osmosis is found to be almost irrelevant. The model has been tested with data collected after the dismantling of heater 1 of the in situ test. The model reproduces reasonably well the measured temperature, relative humidity, water content and inferred geochemical data. However, it fails to mimic the solute concentrations at the heater-bentonite and bentonite-granite interfaces because the model does not account for the volume change of bentonite, the CO{sub 2}(g) degassing and the transport of vapor from the bentonite into the granite. The inferred HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and pH data cannot be explained solely by solute transport, calcite dissolution and protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation, suggesting that such data may be affected also by other reactions.

  16. Environmental geophysics - fad or future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romig, P.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For ten years, the oil industry has suffered cycles of downsizing, out-sourcing, and reorganization. As layoffs and early retirement have become widespread, an increasing number of geophysicists have seen the environmental business as an opportunity to stay in their chosen professions. There have been predictions that the use of geophysics for environmental mapping and characterization could spawn an industry larger than oil exploration. These predictions have come from serious financial analysts as well as from hopeful geophysicists, so they cannot be ignored. There also are reputable professionals who believe that environmentalism is a fad which will die out as soon as the next oil shortage occurs. They point to recent publicity about excessive expenditures for waste remediation as a signal of the beginning of the end. These conflicting views raise serious questions about the form and function of, and the future for, environmental geophysics. This paper reviews these views.

  17. Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications Author resistivity imaging, geophysical imaging, ground-penetrating radar, plant­soil interactions, soil be costly, time consuming, andinfeasible, especially if the spatial scales involved are large. Geophysical

  18. Towards Real Earth Models --Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Towards Real Earth Models -- Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes? Colin tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Disadvantages, difficulties, challenges. Conclusions. #12;Outline: Geological models! Advantages of unstructured tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics

  19. Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebker, Howard

    Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 1995-2006 Associate Professor, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University

  20. Unstructured grid modelling to create 3-D Earth models that unify geological and geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Unstructured grid modelling to create 3-D Earth models that unify geological and geophysical Conclusion The common Earth model Geophysical inversion Geological and geophysical models Instructured meshes Geophysical inversion Geological and geophysical models Instructured meshes Motivation: The common Earth model

  1. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

  2. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. On the Quantum Aspects of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Darabi

    2004-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple quantum mechanical justification for the formation of folded mountains. It is very appealing to develop this idea to a theory of {\\it Quantum Geophysics}

  4. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Author USGS Published Publisher Not...

  5. March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical (geophysical) fluid models: two-dimensional vortical systems in a generalized streamfunction-vorticity rep

  6. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce...

  7. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D...

  8. Geophysical investigations of certain Montana geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wideman, C.J. (Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte); Dye, L.; Halvorson, J.; McRae, M.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected hot springs areas of Montana have been investigated by a variety of geophysical techniques. Resistivity, gravity, seismic, and magnetic methods have been applied during investigations near the hot springs. Because the geology is extremely varied at the locations of the investigations, several geophysical techniques have usually been applied at each site.

  9. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437 SPRING 2014 OF NATURAL RESOURCES INCLUDING OIL, COAL, MINERALS AND GROUNDWATER. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF GEOPHYSICS MAY, IF AVAILABLE, WE WILL VISIT AN OIL DRILLING RIG IN OPERATION. DATES FOR FIELD TRIPS WILL DEPEND ON THE WEATHER

  10. Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS Lesparre N., Adler A., Gibert to adapt EIDORS for applications in geophysics. In geophysics, we apply EIT in order to image inner. The spatial resolution of the method in geophysics is of the order of meters and the penetration depth can

  11. Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency with Lab 4 COMPSCI 115 Introduction to C 2 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOPH 300 Physics of the Earth 3 GEOPH 305 Applied Geophysics 3 GEOPH 420 Geophysical Applications

  12. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  13. PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise on the GrIS. A solid background in field geophysics is preferred. The successful applicant will join the CryoGars group and Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface (CGISS) at Boise

  14. Fractals in geophysics Geophysical phenomena of interest to geoscientists include both atmospheric and terrestrial related processes, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Govindan

    Preface Fractals in geophysics Geophysical phenomena of interest to geoscientists include both-fractal type. Recently, there has been much interdisciplinary interest in the application of geophysical of the spatio-temporal organization of geophysical phenomena from micro to macro levels [1­6]. Wider application

  15. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?nite-element formulation (Smith. I975). handle any kind of waves in complex media but are limited mainly because nu- merical dispersion prevents them from

  16. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  17. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    battery belt, 4 batteries, 2 chargers ) IO0 ,,L t ,, , i l,, E__d CharacterizationCharacterization Geophysics SPECIFICATIONS: TEMI3 MAGNETIC ANTENNA General Power: Two 9V alkaline batteries BatteryCharacterization Geophysics RESISTIVITY/ INDUCED POLARIZATION (_nt'd/ For the standard resistivit 7 technique, a battery-

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-233, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-233, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid

  19. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  20. MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS DANIEL SCHERTZER LEESU, Que. H3A 2T8, Canada lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Received The complexity of geophysics has been with anisotropy, which is rather ubiquitous in geophysics. Keywrods: multifractals, generalized scale invariance

  1. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author are known to be highly dependent on local site characteristics. Therefore combining geophysical meth- ods. In order to calibrate geophysical measurements, obser- vations of 130 boreholes (4 meters deep) were made

  2. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  3. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Geophysical observations at cavity collapse Philippe Jousset, Behrooz Bazargan-Sabet, François relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals

  4. GEOPHYSICAL DETECTION OF UNDERGROUND CAVITIES DRIAD-LEBEAU1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    GEOPHYSICAL DETECTION OF UNDERGROUND CAVITIES DRIAD-LEBEAU1 Lynda, PIWAKOWSKI2 Bogdan, STYLES3 & Environmental Geophysics Research Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, UK; p.lataste@ghymac.u- bordeaux1.fr ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a synthesis of the geophysical investigations conducted

  5. Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits (Version 110824e) Instructor: Mark Grasmueck, Associate Professor Marine Geology and Geophysics RSMAS University of Miami Tel: The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with the fundamentals of near-surface geophysical site

  6. Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights Daniel Schertzer Department, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Uncertainty and error growth are crosscutting geophysical extremes. The focus is now on time-space geophysical scaling behavior: their multifractality. It is found

  7. Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

  8. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 The DIGISOIL multi-sensor system: from geophysical measurements to soil properties. Gilles geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues

  9. 2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics N.J. Balmforth1 and R.V. Craster2 1 research, both for industrial fluid prob- lems and for applications elsewhere, notably geophysically and where this theory might be used in the geophysical contexts. 2.2 Microstructure and Macroscopic Fluid

  10. Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics The University of Texas Pickle Research Campus@utig.ig.utexas.edu EDUCATION B.A. Williams College, 1983, Geology and Physics M.A. Columbia University, 1986, Marine Geophysics M. Phil. Columbia University, 1987, Marine Geophysics Ph.D. Columbia University, 1991, Marine

  11. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  12. Geophysical Institute biennial report 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Geophysical Institute is to understand the basic physical processes governing Earth, especially as they occur in, or are relevant to the Arctic; to train graduate and undergraduate students to play leading roles in tomorrow`s society; to solve applied geophysical problems and develop resource-oriented technology of importance to the state and the nation; and to satisfy the intellectual and technological needs of fellow Alaskans through public service. The variety of subjects studied by the faculty, research staff members, and graduate students at the Geophysical Institute include auroral physics and chemistry, arctic haze, ice fog, atmospheric dynamics, ozone, Alaska weather patterns, regional meteorology and climatology, global climate change, cloud physics and radiation, permafrost, glaciers, sea ice, remote sensing, geothermal energy, tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Summaries are presented of the projects undertaken by the Institute in these fields.

  13. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 3615 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters Geoffrey Blewitt Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology is gener- alized here, to seek the network configuration that optimizes the precision of geophysical

  14. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical viscoelastic flow Oleg V. Vasilyev,1 David A. Yuen,2 and Yuri Yu. Podladchikov3 Abstract. This paper introduces a newly developed wavelet technique for modeling of geophysical

  15. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  16. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  17. INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH ADVANCED CONSTRAINED INVERSIONS by Peter George framework (i.e. minimization of an objective function). I developed several methods to reach this goal constraints to the inverse problem. Lastly, I developed an iterative procedure for cooperatively inverting

  18. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEophySicS College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 credits The geophysics program at UAF specializes in several broad areas of re- search and is closely connected with the Geophysical Institute. Although much of the research conducted by geophysics faculty

  19. Unified geophysical and geological 3-D Earth models Colin Farquharson, Peter Leli`evre, and Charles Hurich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Unified geophysical and geological 3-D Earth models Colin Farquharson, Peter Leli`evre, and Charles and geophysics. Outline Geological models Geophysical models and numerical modelling Rectilinear grids vs triangles. Can capture arbitrarily complicated subsurface contacts. #12;Geophysical models: rectilinear

  20. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA V. Ramaswamy, Paul A. Ginoux, and Larry W. Horowitz Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New

  1. Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM PERIODICALLY STRATIFIED from Periodically Stratified Media with Interfacial Slip, Geophysical Prospecting 31 phase propagation in some other direction. INTRODUCTION Geophysical media often exhibit anisotropic

  2. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study, is to a significant extent based on tomographic methods developed in geophysics. The proposed time-lapse seismic methods developed in petroleum geophysics offer the next

  3. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumley, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” David Lumley (U. W.on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” was held August 23-27,sequestration: Model Studies: Geophysics, 73, WA105-WA112.

  4. Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer Jerry the geophysically derived hydraulic conductivity representation in numerical simulations of the natural the effectiveness of geophysically derived and flowmeter based representations of the hydraulic conductivity field

  5. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C.

  6. Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 141 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition, Eds. T. Spohn & G. Schubert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition Author manuscript, published in "Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd edition, G. Schubert, T. Spohn (Ed.) (2014) in press" #12;T. Guillot & D. Gautier / Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 2 Contents 1

  7. NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration on Unleased State LandsLegal Published NA Year...

  8. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the ongoing development of joint geophysical imaging methodologies for geothermal site characterization and demonstrate their potential in two regions: Krafla volcano and associated geothermal fields in ...

  9. Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce...

  10. An Initial Value of Information (VOI) Framework for Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal Energy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: An Initial Value of Information (VOI) Framework for Geophysical...

  11. Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area, Rye Patch, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Dissertation: Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

  12. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    approach is particularly effective in geothermal exploration because it promotes the interpretation of geophysics in the context of this wider range of geoscience information....

  13. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  14. advanced borehole geophysical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: and depth of penetration). Techniques used for...

  15. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Patrick Walsh Ormat Nevada Inc. Innovative technologies May 19, 2010...

  16. Marine Geophysical Researches 20: 403423, 1998. 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Marine Geophysical Researches 20: 403­423, 1998. © 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed Abstract Recent multibeam bathymetric and geophysical data recorded in the West Philippine Basin, east

  17. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. High resolution imaging of the melt distribution in 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. High resolution imaging of the melt;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Abstract We determine the 3-D melt geometry

  18. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2011 1 (2011). Lunar swirls: Examining crustal magnetic anomalies and space weathering trends. J. Geophysics

  19. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2000 1 Sensing Volcanism, Remote Sensing of Active Volcanism, AGU Geophysical Monograph Series 116, Mouginis

  20. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  1. NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, HYDERABAD, INDIA. Induction Workshop: (18 -23 October, 2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    . 13. Open session · Venue:: National Geophysical Research Institute (An ISO 9001 Organisation in different sectors of the Himalaya. #12;· Venue:: National Geophysical Research Institute (An ISO 9001

  2. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal...

  3. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

  4. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  5. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  6. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Steering Panel, NASA GRM mission University Corporation of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  7. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Dynamics EDUCATION: Ph.D. Geophysics, June 1977, University of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B.A. Geology, June 1972, University

  8. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  9. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale Juan E. Santos Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale ­ p. #12;Introduction. I layering, fractures and craks at the mesoscale (on the order of centimeters) are common in the earth

  10. Large natural geophysical events: planetary planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, J.B.; Smith, J.V.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical data suggest that during the evolution of the earth and its species, that there have been many mass extinctions due to large impacts from comets and large asteroids, and major volcanic events. Today, technology has developed to the stage where we can begin to consider protective measures for the planet. Evidence of the ecological disruption and frequency of these major events is presented. Surveillance and warning systems are most critical to develop wherein sufficient lead times for warnings exist so that appropriate interventions could be designed. The long term research undergirding these warning systems, implementation, and proof testing is rich in opportunities for collaboration for peace.

  11. BDGEOS :The geophysical data base at SHOM (Service Hydrographiqueet OcCanographique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    BDGEOS :The geophysical data base at SHOM (Service Hydrographiqueet OcCanographique -dela Marine) M-mail :ribaud@ysecafr Abstract - A Geophysical Data Base (BDGEOS) has been developped at EPSHOM to come up~esand from geophysical surveys or are interpreted and modelled data bases wati0d Geophysical ~ ~ t a values

  12. CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics Sonneggstrasse 5: ++41 (0) 44 633 3154 fax: ++41 (0) 44 633 1065 AUGUST 5, 2010 Education 2007 Ph.D. Geophysics in field geology, mathematics, seismology, geodynamics, geophysics 2001 Diplom Geophysics (M

  13. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J. [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Prototype Climate Modelling, NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Grooms, Ian, E-mail: grooms@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  14. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  15. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  16. Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mabey, D.R.; Hoover, D.B.; O'Donnell, J.E.; Wilson and C.W. Published Journal Geophysics, 1211978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Citation...

  17. airborne geophysical survey: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V; Vaalsta, Timo P; Li, Ju; Blair, David G 2011-01-01 12 A Virtual Excavation: Combining 3D Immersive Virtual Reality and Geophysical Surveying Computer Technologies and...

  18. airborne geophysical surveys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V; Vaalsta, Timo P; Li, Ju; Blair, David G 2011-01-01 12 A Virtual Excavation: Combining 3D Immersive Virtual Reality and Geophysical Surveying Computer Technologies and...

  19. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geothermal...

  20. REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986 RecentResearchin SnowHydrology JEFF DOZIER Centerfor Remote thespectraldistri- butionof the incomingsolardirectanddiffuseirradianceand thespectralalbedo: Copyfight1987bytheAmericanGeophysical

  1. Joint stochastic inversion of geophysical data for reservoir parameter estimation Jinsong Chen* and G. Michael Hoversten, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Joint stochastic inversion of geophysical data for reservoir parameter estimation Jinsong Chen the stochastic framework, both reservoir parameters and geophysical attributes at unsampled locations. Introduction Conventional methods for reservoir parameter estimation using multiple sources of geophysical data

  2. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non-uniform ambient noise on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. T. Nissen-Meyer, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. Olaf Schenk, Institute of Computational

  3. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. The 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. The 2010 California Research at the Nexus.50331 AcceptedArticle #12;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Abstract

  4. International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition, 26-29 February 2012 -Brisbane, Australia 1 Structurally constrained lithology characterization using magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22 nd International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition, 26-29 February 2012 - Brisbane meaningful lithologic information directly from geophysical data. Here, we describe a multi-faceted approach

  5. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

  6. Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojahedi, Mohammad

    Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service · Find Similar Abstracts (with default | Query Form | Preferences | HELP | FAQ Physics/Geophysics arXiv e-prints Send Query Reset #12;

  7. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2003 1 volcanic collapse formation, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 4 (9), 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000483

  8. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi

  9. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2005 1. 2 craters. Journal of Geophysical Research 110, E10001, doi: 10.1029/2004JE002338, 2005. 7. Blewett, D. T

  10. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale Vikranth scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical

  11. A NEW PETROLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENT-DAY PLUMBING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A NEW PETROLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENT-DAY PLUMBING SYSTEM OF MT. VESUVIUS, on geophysical information, in particular, magnetotelluric (MT) data, and on petrological and geochemical

  12. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented documenting potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers.

  13. Integrated Geophysical Examination of the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel's Fairbanks Silt Units, Fox, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    C41A-0429 Integrated Geophysical Examination of the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel's Fairbanks Silt Units report on a recent geophysical survey of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Region Research geophysical signatures of permanently frozen loess and massive wedge ice. We exploited the increasing path

  14. GEON: Geophysical data add the 3rd dimension in geospatial studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    GEON: Geophysical data add the 3rd dimension in geospatial studies Aldouri, R.; Keller, G. R of subsurface information to provide a 3-D perspective on data. Geophysical data provide information about projects has required the development of many sophisticated tools to allow users to utilize geophysical

  15. MonteCarloType Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte­Carlo­Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  16. Analysis of Geophysical Time Series Using Discrete Wavelet Transforms: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Analysis of Geophysical Time Series Using Discrete Wavelet Transforms: An Overview Donald B geophysical time series. The basic idea is to transform a time series into coefficients describing how in geophysical data analysis. The intent of this article is to give an overview of how DWTs can be used

  17. Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  18. Geophysical inversion in an integrated mineral exploration program: examples from the San Nicolas deposit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Geophysical inversion in an integrated mineral exploration program: examples from the San Nicol´as deposit Nigel Phillips and Douglas W. Oldenburg, UBC-Geophysical Inversion Facility, University of British of the subsurface from surface geophysical data, coupled with an increasing need to explore for minerals

  19. 1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by doing geophysics The increasing world demand and record-high costs for energy and mineral resources, along and educators we must seriously ask if our geophysics pipeline can adequately address this crisis. One program

  20. Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University, Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University of pos- sible applications in geophysics. It is elaborated how a description of the well log measurement to the mentioned elds. This paper is written in the hope of achieving the same in the area of geophysics. The idea

  1. GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL AS DEPOSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL ´AS DEPOSIT information to the explorationist. This thesis examines the role geophysical inversion can assume in an integrated explo- ration program, and the impact it can have on the results. As an example, geophysical data

  2. Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty Boise State University conducted a geophysics field camp in northern Thailand in January, 2010 to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental and engineering challenges. Faculty, technicians

  3. GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    W HAT IS GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.] In applied geophysics we inject a signal into the ground and record how the ground changes that signal as it passes://duke.usask.ca~merriam/geo_phys/ Rewarding careers are possible in exploration and environmental geophysics. Graduates of the U of S qualify

  4. Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project [Extended for geophysical surveying. This paper describes the main features of the envisaged developments, with a focus.00. Figure 1: Conventional geophysical surveying using long lines of towed streamers team. Such teams

  5. Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National for Geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin developing earthquake location techniques in support. Associate Program Director, Geophysics National Science Foundation 4201 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA 22230

  6. Geophysical Prospecting 36,571-590,1988 ELASTIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN MEDIA WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 36,571-590,1988 ELASTIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN MEDIA WITH PARALLEL FRACTURES propagation in media with parallel frac- tures and aligned cracks. Geophysical Prospecting 36,571-590. A model,CT 06877-4108, USA. Institute for Earth Sciences, Department of Geophysics, PB 80021, 3508 TA Utrecht

  7. Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree General Chemistry II with Lab 4 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOG 360 Physics I & II with Calculus & Labs Physics Option II: PHYS 111-112 General Physics 8-10 Geophysics

  8. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2002 1-scale multielement analysis of the lunar surface using iron, titanium, and thorium abundances, Journal of Geophysical distribution of lunar composition: New results from Lunar Prospector Journal of Geophysical Research, VOL. 107

  9. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 56, OctoberDecember 2007, 469487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 5­6, October­December 2007, 469, USA zInstitute of Geophysics, University of Go¨ ttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Go¨ ttingen (though later work by Banka and *Corresponding author. Email: dpl@complex.umd.edu Geophysical

  10. Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe to create the IRGGEA (International Group in Geophysics Europe Africa) in order to pursue the scientific: Scientific network, ethical rules, geophysics, sustainable research, Africa. 1. Introduction

  11. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2006 1 with an albedo feature near Airy crater in the lunar nearside highlands. Geophysical Research Letters. 9. Boyce viewed by the THEMIS instrument: Double-layered ejecta craters. J. Geophysical Research, 111, E10005, doi

  12. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2 , C attempt to characterize with geophysical methods the state of landfill covers to detect damages that can. The geophysical methods used were the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), cartography with an Automatic

  13. Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

  14. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  15. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  16. Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics -The University of Alabama Department of Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position ­ Geophysics - The University of Alabama invites applications for a three-year, non-tenure track visiting faculty position in geophysics geophysical sub-disciplines, preference will be given to candidates who will enhance our existing geophysics

  17. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Geomagnetic data provided by different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    (from measurements to modeling) in Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism [Gub- bins geomagnetic variations over a long time and at a given location. Currently, more than 70 countries oper- ateEOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Geomagnetic data provided by different platforms

  18. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  19. Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, Yoram

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research project is to increase water savings and show better ecological control of natural vegetation by developing hydrogeological-geophysical methods for characterizing the permeability and content of water in soil. The ground penetrating radar (GPR) tool was developed and used as the surface geophysical method for monitoring water content. Initial results using the tool suggest that surface GPR is a viable technique for obtaining precision volumetric water content profile estimates, and that laboratory-derived petrophysical relationships could be applied to field-scale GPR data. A field-scale bacterial transport study was conducted within an uncontaminated sandy Pleistocene aquifer to evaluate the importance of heterogeneity in controlling the transport of bacteria. Geochemical, hydrological, geological, and geophysical data were collected to characterize the site prior to and after chemical and bacterial injection experiments. Study results shows that, even within the fairly uniform shallow marine deposits of the narrow channel focus area, heterogeneity existed that influenced the chemical tracer transport over lateral distances of a few meters and vertical distances of less than a half meter. The interpretation of data suggest that the incorporation of geophysical data with limited hydrological data may provide valuable information about the stratigraphy, log conductivity values, and the spatial correlation structure of log conductivity, which have traditionally been obtainable only by performing extensive and intrusive hydrological sampling.

  20. Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.

    Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Jordan, T. H., H. W. Menard, and D.K. Smith, Density and size distribution of seamounts in the eastern. Smith, H. W. Menard, J. A. Orcutt and T. H. Jordan, Seismic reflection site survey: correlation

  1. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    surface, referred to as "bed topography." Observations show that bed topography affects erosion. HereJournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE 10.1002/2013JF002872 Key Points topography yields orders of magnitude increase in erosion rates · With bed topography, greatest ero- sion

  2. ADVANCES IN GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 39 LOCAL TSUNAMIS AND EARTHQUAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equations describe the evolution of tsunamis during run-up in such a way that the shoreline is fixed in (ADVANCES IN GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 39 LOCAL TSUNAMIS AND EARTHQUAKE SOURCE PARAMETERS ERIC L. GEIST u in estimating the severity of local tsunamis gener- ated by earthquakes is explaining the great event

  3. Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modication experiment at Troms, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modi®cation experiment at Tromsù, Norway N. F-9037, Tromsù, and The University Courses of Svalbard, Svalbard, Norway 3 EISCAT, N-9027 Ramfjùrdbotn, Norway Received: 13 October 1997 / Revised: 11 May 1998 / Accepted: 26 May 1998 Abstract. We present

  4. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2002) 9: 7578 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Society 2002 A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features type modes downstream of the Earth's bow shock were reported (Hubert et al., 1989). The dispersion

  5. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 201209 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of prediction of climate changes due to hu- man activity. All anthropogenic actions on the climate sys- tem Geophysical Society 2001 Climate model attractors: chaos, quasi-regularity and sensitivity to small, Russia Received: 6 July 2000 ­ Revised: 25 October 2000 ­ Accepted: 28 November 2000 Abstract

  6. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  7. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: SpacePhysics RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    of the high-energy solar particles in interplanetary space. The method includes the determination , and I. G. Usoskin1,3 1 Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (Oulu Unit), University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 2 Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

  8. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 429438 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical Society 2001 Mesoscale predictability under various synoptic regimes W. A. Nuss and D. K. Miller slightly ro- tated terrain are compared to gauge the sentivity of mesoscale forecasts to small forecast errors on the mesoscale in both wind and precipitation. The largest mesoscale errors occur when

  9. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-PREVIEW, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (s) 2010 Overview of seismic imagery techniques applied to landslides characterization. Gilles Grandjean, geophysical methods based on seismic surveying appear to be well-adapted to investigate the morpho and non-intrusive measurements of acoustic (Vp) or shear (Vs) wave velocity, two important physical

  10. Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

  11. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  12. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

  13. The general area of geophysical fluid mechanics is truly interdisciplinary. Ideas from statistical physics are now being applied in novel ways to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoming

    The general area of geophysical fluid mechanics is truly interdisciplinary. Ideas from statistical and oceans. In this book, the basic ideas of geophysics, probability theory, information theory, nonlinear Spot. The various competing approaches of equilibrium statistical mechanics for geophysical flows

  14. The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory science institutes; it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory of the University of California's Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Its science mission. We address the problem within four specific disciplines: · Geophysics · Global

  15. Southeast Asia applied geophysics workshop: Geoscientists without borders Lee M. Liberty*, Spencer H. Wood, Emily A. Hinz, and Dylan Mikesell, Boise State University, Fongsaward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Southeast Asia applied geophysics workshop: Geoscientists without borders Lee M. Liberty*, Spencer of the SEG Foundation Geoscientists Without Borders program, we conducted a geophysics workshop in northern Thailand to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental

  16. Geophysical Mapping of Lost Historical Sites: Brenham, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Charles

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    summer. And to my bros who were always ready to slash it; Tate Meehan, Tim de Smet, and Leo Keeler. 3 NOMENCLATURE MAG Magnetics EMI Electromagnetic Induction GPR Ground Penetrating Radar s Seconds m Meters – measurement... the south-west corner of the grid Figure 8 - Charles Stanford measuring the south-east grid corner 12 Figure 9 - Tim De Smet and Leo Keeler measuring the north-east grid corner Data acquisition All three geophysical techniques were...

  17. Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

  18. The facts on file. Dictionary of geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapidus, D.F.; Coates, D.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference to the basic vocabulary of geology and geophysics has more than 3,000 clear and concise entries defining the entire range of geological phenomena. This book covers such areas as types of rocks and rock formations, deformation processes such as erosion and plate tectonics, volcanoes, glaciers and their effects on topography, geodesy and survey methods, earthquakes and seismology, fuels and mineral deposits.

  19. Geophysical constraint on a relic background of the dilatons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachie Shiomi

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a scenario in string cosmology, a relic background of light dilatons can be a significant component of the dark matter in the Universe. A new approach of searching for such a dilatonic background by observing Earth's surface gravity was proposed in my previous work. In this paper, the concept of the geophysical search is briefly reviewed, and the geophysical constraint on the dilaton background is presented as a function of the strength of the dilaton coupling, $q_b^2$. For simplicity, I focus on massless dilatons and assume a simple Earth model. With the current upper limit on $q_b^2$, we obtain the upper limit on the dimensionless energy density of the massless background, $\\Omega_{DW}h^2_{100} \\leq 6 \\times 10^{-7}$, which is about one-order of magnitude more stringent than the one from astrophysical observations, at the frequency of $\\sim$ 7 $\\times$ 10$^{-5}$ Hz. If the magnitude of $q_b^2$ is experimentally found to be smaller than the current upper limit by one order of magnitude, the geophysical upper limit on $\\Omega_{DW}h^2_{100}$ becomes less stringent and comparable to the one obtained from the astrophysical observations.

  20. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics 1993 annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M. [eds.

    1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief papers on the research being conducted at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics in 1993 in Geosciences, High-Pressure sciences, and Astrophysics.

  1. An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    considered. The combination of these data with earlier studies on the geology and geophysics of Milos allow the compilation of a possible model of the geothermal reservoir and...

  2. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; source code (programs H-P)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving source code for potential-field geophysical programs (programs H-P) for VAX 7xx computers.

  3. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; source code (programs A-G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving the source code of potential-field geophysical programs (programs A-G) for VAX 7xx computers.

  4. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; source code (programs R-Y)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving source code for Potential-field geophysical programs (programs R-Y) for VAX 7xx computers.

  5. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    at Pagosa Springs (CO) * New method of time lapse geophysics * New method to monitor fracking Summary 16 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Timeline: Budget: Project...

  6. Preclosure Monitoring and Performance Confirmation at Yucca Mountain: Applicability of Geophysical, Geohydrological, and Geochemical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of rock and geochemical properties of rock andDynamic Elastic Properties of Sedimentary Rocks, Geophysics,since the elastic properties of rock are not affected

  7. A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilt, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the primary reservoir inferred from well data. iv Telluricreservoir. These data also suggest that the reservoir regionthe reservoir region from geological and geophysical data.

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102,NO. DS, PAGES 6081-6098, MARCH 20, 1997 An integratedair pollutionmodelingsystemfor urban and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102,NO. DS, PAGES 6081-6098, MARCH 20, 1997 An integratedair thisapproach couldhavewide applications.However,it is criticalto test Copyright1997bytheAmericanGeophysical

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 5, PAGES 923-926, MARCH 1, 2001 Laboratory observation of Alfven resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 5, PAGES 923-926, MARCH 1, 2001 Laboratory observation. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 2000GL012165. 0094-8276/01/2000GL012165

  10. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 21, NO. 15, PAGES 1619-1622,JULY 15, 1994 A studyofTypeI polarstratosphericcloudformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 21, NO. 15, PAGES 1619-1622,JULY 15, 1994 A studyof sulfateparticles. Copyright1994by theAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Paper number94GL01368 0094-8534/94/94GL-01368503

  11. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) 193, 603614 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) 193, 603­614 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs120 of the Earth's magnetic field, performed by satel- lite and geophysical observatories, through historical

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 6, 01855, 2004 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU04-A-01855

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 6, 01855, 2004 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU04-A-01855 c European (benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr), (2) Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College

  13. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 11521, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-11521

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 11521, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-11521, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, (3) Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary

  14. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 05723, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-05723

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 05723, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-05723 © European) Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, la Jolla, USA, (3) Dpt of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Wyoming

  15. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 68, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 2003); P. 441452, 16 FIGS., 2 TABLES. 10.1190/1.1567214

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 68, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 2003); P. 441­452, 16 FIGS., 2 TABLES. 10 National Laboratory, Geophysics Group, Seismic Research Center, MS D443, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545. E

  16. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 06396, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-06396

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 06396, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-06396 © European) Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada This study investigates

  17. Geologic and geophysical investigation of a small water retention structure, Salado, Tx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, James Lewis

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the landowner because costs incurred in the repairs are the landowner s responsibility. At worst, an improperly designed/maintained dam could fail and cause significant property damage There is a large body of literature on the siting, design... Eiterature exists to address these same issues with sntall farm potltls anti daIns. Thc Natural Rcsoul'ccs Consctvatlon Scrvlcc (NRCS? ponds. However? this publication is very general and lacks specific details about dam siting and construction Bnd also...

  18. AFFILIATIONS: Smith, minder, nugent, and Storelvmo--Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minder, Justin

    AFFILIATIONS: Smith, minder, nugent, and Storelvmo-- Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale Science, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Professor Ronald B. Smith, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 E-mail: ronald.smith

  19. MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM ACTIVE VOLCANIC Name: MAURI Guillaume Degree: PhD of Science Title of Thesis: Multi-scale analysis of multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data from active volcanic systems Examining Committee: Chair: Dr John Clague

  20. Wavelets and wavelet-like transforms on the sphere and their application to geophysical data inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Frederik J.

    Wavelets and wavelet-like transforms on the sphere and their application to geophysical data the Slepian basis, harmonic splines, wavelets and wavelet-like Slepian frames. In this paper we focus on the latter two: spherical wavelets developed for geophysical applications on the cubed sphere

  1. Towards a comprehensive open-source system for geophysical data processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, William P.

    used in seismic interpretation. These three components operate in parallel on a distributed computerTowards a comprehensive open-source system for geophysical data processing and interpretation Glenn of a broad range of geophysical data, with emphasis on reflection/refraction seismics. The package also

  2. Geology and Geophysics: Building Partnerships Forging New Links and Strengthening Old Ones Builds a Stronger Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    , course-work tracks that equip students for roles in industry, geological engineering, oil and mineralGeology and Geophysics: Building Partnerships Forging New Links and Strengthening Old Ones Builds. The Geology and Geophysics Department at the University of Utah has a long history of successful partnerships

  3. RELATING GEOPHYSICAL AND HYDROLOGIC PROPERTIES USING FIELD-SCALE ROCK PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Rosemary

    CMWRXVI 1 RELATING GEOPHYSICAL AND HYDROLOGIC PROPERTIES USING FIELD-SCALE ROCK PHYSICS STEPHEN has been made by rock physics investigations that define how pore-scale variations in properties like in pore-scale rock properties with an understanding of geophysical sampling at the field

  4. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, James Howard

    Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C) of this area, the presence of gas hydrates. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates consists of a shallow (300, and is interpreted as the top of the gas hydrate layer. Similarly, a high-amplitude Rc

  5. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Tidal dissipation in the early Eocene and implications for ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Tidal dissipation in the early Eocene this article as doi: 10.1002/grl.50510 AcceptedArticle #12;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Passage and Tasman Gateways AcceptedArticle #12;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved

  6. Application of geophysical measurements for assessing the role of fissures in water infiltration within a clay landslide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Application of geophysical measurements for assessing the role of fissures in water infiltration relationship with shallow slip surfaces. This work presents the results of a geophysical study which aimed to be linked with sub-vertical preferential paths, such as fissures. Geophysical parameters (electrical

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Efficient stochastic estimation of the model resolution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Efficient stochastic estimation of the model resolution1 matrix diagonal and generalized cross­validation for2 large geophysical inverse and Environmental Science and Geophysical Research Cen- ter, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801

  8. Quantifying and relating land-surface and subsurface variability in permafrost environments using LiDAR and surface geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LiDAR and surface geophysical datasets S. S. Hubbard & C. Gangodagamage & B. Dafflon & H. Wainwright. Wullschleger Abstract The value of remote sensing and surface geophysical data for characterizing the spatial to extract geomorphic metrics, which potentially indicate drainage potential. Geophysical data were used

  9. Combined use of geophysical methods and remote techniques for characterizing the fracture network of a potential unstable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Combined use of geophysical methods and remote techniques for characterizing the fracture network of the site. Geophysical experiments were also conducted on the plateau and on the cliff face in order to be located in the vicinity of the surface. Best geophysical results in terms of penetration and resolution

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Continental constriction and oceanic ice-cover1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Continental constriction and oceanic of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. (Abbot Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. 3 Department of Solar

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 19, PAGES 3085-3088, OCTOBER 1, 2000 On the Relationship Between Microstructure and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 19, PAGES 3085-3088, OCTOBER 1, 2000 On the Relationship, Jeffery J. Roberts, and Eric D. Carlberg Experimental Geophysics Group, Lawrence Livermore National size) Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 2000GL011553. 0094-8276/00/2000GL

  12. Transition study plans for current G&G students OPTION 1: Majors -Geology, Geophysics and Spatial Information Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transition study plans for current G&G students OPTION 1: Majors - Geology, Geophysics and Spatial Approved Level II Remote Sensing III Geology Summer Sch GIS for Environmental Management III Geophysics Semester 1 Tectonics III Igneous & Metamorphic Geology III Geophysics III Exploration Methods III Semester

  13. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 62, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1997); P. 18671878, 10 FIGS., 2 TABLES. Poroelastic Backus averaging for anisotropic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 62, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1997); P. 1867­1878, 10 FIGS., 2 TABLES. Poroelastic of other borehole geophysical methods (Dewan, 1983; Sams, 1995). Properties of single layers, such as perme manuscript received January 2, 1997. Formerly Geophysical Institute, Karlsruhe University, Hertzstrasse 16

  14. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 06422, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-06422

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 06422, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-06422 © European Geosciences Union 2007 Deep Alpine Valleys - examples of geophysical explorations in Austria E. Brückl (1), J. Brückl (2), W. Chwatal (1), Ch. Ullrich (1,3) (1) Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics

  15. Dear Susan, On behalf of the entire Near Surface Geophysics Section (NSGS) of the Society of Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear Susan, On behalf of the entire Near Surface Geophysics Section (NSGS) of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), I would like extraordinary leadership in advancing the cause of near surface geophysics through longterm, tireless

  16. This article was downloaded by: [Institute of Geology and Geophysics of CAS] On: 29 November 2011, At: 16:34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    This article was downloaded by: [Institute of Geology and Geophysics of CAS] On: 29 November 2011 a & Dunyi Liu b a Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China b Beijing Fana and Dunyi Liub a Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface are likely craters. Accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters. Copyright 2004 American Geophysical Union. Further re- production or electronic distribution is not permitted. 1. Introduction

  18. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 67, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2002); P. 15321541, 5 FIGS. 10.1190/1.1512749

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 67, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2002); P. 1532­1541, 5 FIGS. 10.1190/1.1512749 3-D inhomogeneous geological structures is a challenging problem in exploration geophysics. Despite significant of Geology and Geophysics, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112. E-mail: oleg@cs.utah.edu; mzhdanov@mines.utah.edu. c

  19. Geology and geophysics of the Beata Ridge - Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roemer, Lamar Burton

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assem- blage. They conclude that the Beats Ridge was higher in the Eocene and subsequently has subsided to its present depth, Edgar et al. (1971a) presented a synthesis of most of the geophysical data collected in the Caribbean by the Lamont.../sec. The layer below Horizon B" (3. 2 - 4. 7 km/sec) 1s attributed by Edgar et al. (1971) to an accumulation of either sedimentary or low grade metamorphic and igneous rocks since the measured velocities are too low for purely igneous material. Legs 4 and 15...

  20. User's manual for geophysical well-logging software programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G.M.; Gibson, D.; Blair, S.C.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1958 the Ground-Water Surveillance Program for the Hanford Site has made geophysical logging measurements in most of the 800 wells and deep boreholes that have been drilled on the Hanford Site. In 1980 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which conducts the Ground-Water Surveillance Program, began forming a computerized data base for storing and retrieving geophysical well log data and developing software for quantitative analysis of the well log data. This report, designed to serve as a user's guide, documents the data base system that handles the well log data. Two programs, DIGLOG1 and LOGIT, are used to manipulate the data. The program DIGLOG1 translates analog paper strip charts into digital format; the program LOGIT is a general utility program that edits, displays, checks, stores, writes, and deletes sets of well log data. These two programs do not provide sophisticated display and analytical capabilities; rather, they provide programs that give the user easy access to powerful standard analytical software.

  1. Flow networks: A characterization of geophysical fluid transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Ser-Giacomi; Vincent Rossi; Cristobal Lopez; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We represent transport between different regions of a fluid domain by flow networks, constructed from the discrete representation of the Perron-Frobenius or transfer operator associated to the fluid advection dynamics. The procedure is useful to analyze fluid dynamics in geophysical contexts, as illustrated by the construction of a flow network associated to the surface circulation in the Mediterranean sea. We use network-theory tools to analyze the flow network and gain insights into transport processes. In particular we quantitatively relate dispersion and mixing characteristics, classically quantified by Lyapunov exponents, to the degree of the network nodes. A family of network entropies is defined from the network adjacency matrix, and related to the statistics of stretching in the fluid, in particular to the Lyapunov exponent field. Finally we use a network community detection algorithm, Infomap, to partition the Mediterranean network into coherent regions, i.e. areas internally well mixed, but with little fluid interchange between them.

  2. Geophysical investigation of the ``Thimble,`` 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the geophysical investigations conducted as part of the characterization of the buried ``Thimble`` site. The site is located just south of the 116-H-2 Crib and is in the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit. Available documentation has it located between, and at the convergence of, two railroad spurs that run north-south. A concrete monument is believed to mark the site. The burial ground is suspected of containing a vertical safety rod thimble that is reportedly 40 ft long. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other similar investigations on the Hanford Site. The objective of the investigation was to locate the buried thimble.

  3. Deterministic treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes a novel approach for the treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation. In this method, model error is treated as a deterministic process fully correlated in time. This allows for the derivation of the evolution equations for the relevant moments of the model error statistics required in data assimilation procedures, along with an approximation suitable for application to large numerical models typical of environmental science. In this contribution we first derive the equations for the model error dynamics in the general case, and then for the particular situation of parametric error. We show how this deterministic description of the model error can be incorporated in sequential and variational data assimilation procedures. A numerical comparison with standard methods is given using low-order dynamical systems, prototypes of atmospheric circulation, and a realistic soil model. The deterministic approach proves to be very competitive with only minor additional computational c...

  4. Parameterization of geophysical inversion model using particle clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Dikun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new method of constructing physical models in a geophysical inverse problem, when there are only a few possible physical property values in the model and they are reasonably known but the geometry of the target is sought. The model consists of a fixed background and many small "particles" as building blocks that float around in the background to resemble the target by clustering. This approach contrasts the conventional geometric inversions requiring the target to be regularly shaped bodies, since here the geometry of the target can be arbitrary and does not need to be known beforehand. Because of the lack of resolution in the data, the particles may not necessarily cluster when recovering compact targets. A model norm, called distribution norm, is introduced to quantify the spread of particles and incorporated into the objective function to encourage further clustering of the particles. As proof of concept, 1D magnetotelluric inversion is used as example. My experiments reveal that the ...

  5. Wavelet correlations to reveal multiscale coupling in geophysical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casagrande, Erik; Miralles, Diego; Entekhabi, Dara; Molini, Annalisa

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interactions between climate and the environment are highly complex. Due to this complexity, process-based models are often preferred to estimate the net magnitude and directionality of interactions in the Earth System. However, these models are based on simplifications of our understanding of nature, thus are unavoidably imperfect. Conversely, observation-based data of climatic and environmental variables are becoming increasingly accessible over large scales due to the progress of space-borne sensing technologies and data-assimilation techniques. Albeit uncertain, these data enable the possibility to start unraveling complex multivariable, multiscale relationships if the appropriate statistical methods are applied. Here, we investigate the potential of the wavelet cross-correlation method as a tool for identifying multiscale interactions, feedback and regime shifts in geophysical systems. The ability of wavelet cross-correlation to resolve the fast and slow components of coupled systems is tested on syn...

  6. Proposed geologic model based on geophysical well logs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz C, S.; Puente C, I.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the subsurface based on a qualitative interpretation of well logs was carried out at Cerro Prieto to obtain information on the distribution of the different lithofacies that make up a deltaic depositional system. The sedimentological interpretation derived from the resistivity and spontaneous potential are shown in several cross-sections of the field. In addition to the sedimentological interpretation, a map of the structural geology of the region based on well logs and available geophysical information was prepared, including the results of gravity and seismic refraction surveys. The depth to the zone of hydrothermal alteration described by Elders (1980) was found by means of temperature, electrical, and radioactive logs. Two maps showing the configuration of the top of this anomaly show a clear correlation with the gravity anomalies found in the area.

  7. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Clean enough for industry? An airborne geophysical case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Beard, L.P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from two airborne geophysical surveys of the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were extremely valuable in deciding whether a 1000-acre (400 hectare) parcel of the ORR should be released to the City of Oak Ridge for industrial development. Our findings, based on electromagnetic and magnetic data, were incorporated in the federally mandated Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS), and in general supported claims that this land was never used as a hazardous waste disposal site. We estimated the amount of iron required to produce each anomaly using a simple dipole model. All anomalies with equivalent sources greater than approximately 1000 kg of iron were checked in the field, and the source of all but one identified as either a bridge, reinforced concrete debris, or a similarly benign object. Additionally, some smaller anomalies (equivalent sources of roughly 500 kg) have been checked; thus far, these also have innocuous sources. Airborne video proved invaluable in identifying logging equipment as the source of some of these anomalies. Geologic noise may account for some of the remaining anomalies. Naturally occurring accumulations of magnetic minerals in the soil on the ORR have been shown to produce anomalies which, at a sensor height of 30 m, are comparable to the anomaly produced by about 500 kg of iron. By comparison, the electronic noise of the magnetic gradiometer, 0.01--0.02 nT/m, is equivalent to only about 50--100 kg of iron at a 30 m sensor height. The electromagnetic data, combined with field mapping of karst structures, provided evidence of a northeast-southwest striking conduit spanning the parcel. The possible existence of a karst conduit led the EAS authors to conclude that this is a ``sensitive hydrologic setting.`` We conclude that aerial geophysics is an extremely cost-effective, and efficient technique for screening large tracts of land for environmental characterization.

  9. The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

  10. Course MA59800: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Course MA59800: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale matrix properties, fine layering, frac- tures and craks at the mesoscale (on the order of centimeters

  11. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale Professor variations in the fluid and solid matrix properties, fine layering, frac- tures and craks at the mesoscale

  12. Interactions between mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges : constraints from geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgen, Jennifer E

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies interactions between mid-ocean ridges and mantle plumes using geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the Marion and Bouvet hotspots on the ultra-slow ...

  13. Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Beatrice Smith

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

  14. Geophysical evidence of multiple glacier advances in Lago Fagnano (54 southernmost Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Geophysical evidence of multiple glacier advances in Lago Fagnano (54 S), southernmost Patagonia t The Island of Tierra del Fuego, at the southernmost extreme of Patagonia, is located in one of the most

  15. The utilization of satellite geoidal anomalies for computer analysis of geophysical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Bruce Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORRECTIONS OCEAN SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL CORRECTIONS lASER SITE OCEAN SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ~ GEO IG ~ EOTTOM TOPOGRAPHY I' LR REFERENCE E LUPSO ID Figure 7. SETLSAT data collection, modeling and tracking system (from Tapley et al, 1982). 16 SEASAT...

  16. A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilt, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil Company of California, and Public Service Company of New Mexico,Rio Arriba Counties, New Mexico. Union Oil Internal ReportGNew Mexico. Private geophysical survey for Union Oil Co.

  17. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrated geophysical and reservoir data" by Hoversten anddata inversion, in which the top and base of the reservoirdata with other information in order to produce more accurate maps of change within the reservoir.

  18. Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

  19. NANJING INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICAL PROSPECTING AND INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICS AND ENGINEERING J. Geophys. Eng. 1 (2004) 128133 PII: S1742-2132(04)76378-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ursin, Bjørn

    OF GEOPHYSICS AND ENGINEERING J. Geophys. Eng. 1 (2004) 128­133 PII: S1742-2132(04)76378-5 New travel

  20. REVIEWS OF GEOPHYSICS, SUPPLEMENT, PAGES 585-589, JULY 1995 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY A N D GEOPHYSICS 1991-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) [Kahler 1992], it was tempting to assume that the particle accel eration emphasized the presence of two accel eration mechanisms and prophetically suggested that particle abundances UNION OF GEODESY A N D GEOPHYSICS 1991-1994 Solar energetic particles: A paradigm shift Donald V. Reames

  1. Geophysical site characterization methods -- the ``divining rods`` of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fieber, L.L. [Mostardi-Platt Associates, Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Have you ever wished that you could use a ``divining rod`` to quickly and reliably define the magnitude of environmental impacts in soil or water? To the uninitiated, such ideas seem like a farfetched script from a star trek episode where a guy named Spock is walking around with a device called a tri-quarter. In realty, such approaches to site characterization have been used in the petroleum and mineral exploration industries for decades. These techniques are so reliable that they are widely used in the medical field today. Consider the value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Ultrasound. Using the principles of electromagnetics, resistivity, seismology, and gravity, explorationists have successfully measured minute differences in the properties of earth materials. Using these differences, called anomalies, scientists can predict actual conditions with little or no sampling or analysis and with striking repeatability. This paper provides a plain English description of some common geophysical methods in use today. The general principles and specific applications of several methods will be described. The obvious and not-so-obvious limitations of those methods will be examined in detail.

  2. Spectral estimation on a sphere in geophysics and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Dahlen; Frederik J Simons

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of estimating the spherical-harmonic power spectrum of a statistically isotropic scalar signal from noise-contaminated data on a region of the unit sphere. Three different methods of spectral estimation are considered: (i) the spherical analogue of the one-dimensional (1-D) periodogram, (ii) the maximum likelihood method, and (iii) a spherical analogue of the 1-D multitaper method. The periodogram exhibits strong spectral leakage, especially for small regions of area $A\\ll 4\\pi$, and is generally unsuitable for spherical spectral analysis applications, just as it is in 1-D. The maximum likelihood method is particularly useful in the case of nearly-whole-sphere coverage, $A\\approx 4\\pi$, and has been widely used in cosmology to estimate the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation from spacecraft observations. The spherical multitaper method affords easy control over the fundamental trade-off between spectral resolution and variance, and is easily implemented regardless of the region size, requiring neither non-linear iteration nor large-scale matrix inversion. As a result, the method is ideally suited for most applications in geophysics, geodesy or planetary science, where the objective is to obtain a spatially localized estimate of the spectrum of a signal from noisy data within a pre-selected and typically small region.

  3. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 92, NO. A1, PAGES 282-284, JANUARY 1, 1987 Density Fluctuation Spectra in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 92, NO. A1, PAGES 282-284, JANUARY 1, 1987 Density* results from taking the diver- genceof (la) and using(lb): Copyright 1987by the American Geophysical

  4. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 97, NO. B1, PAGES 217-239, JANUARY 10, 1992 Reconstructionof SubductionZonePaleogeometriesandQuantificationof Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 97, NO. B1, PAGES 217-239, JANUARY 10, 1992 Reconstructionof theAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber91JB02342. 0148-0227/92/91JB-02342505.00 data

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 49985007, doi:10.1002/jgra.50479, 2013 Tracing magnetic separators and their dependence on IMF clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 4998­5007, doi:10.1002/jgra.50479, 2013, USA. (ckomar@mix.wvu.edu) ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. 2169

  6. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. B6, PAGES 12,033-12,055,JUNE 10, 1994 Coulomb theory applied to accretionary and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. B6, PAGES 12,033-12,055,JUNE 10, 1994 Coulomb theory theAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber94JB00124. 0148- 0227/94/94 JB-00124505.00 "critical taper

  7. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 22, PAGES4185-4188,NOVEMBER 15, 1998 Nitric acid scavengingby mineral and biomassburning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 22, PAGES4185-4188,NOVEMBER 15, 1998 Nitric acid by the American GeophysicalUnion. Paper number 1998GL900062. 0094-8276/98/1998 GL900062505.00 Data Presentation

  8. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 21, NO. 23, PAGES 2475-2478, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 Analysisof the physicalstate of one Arctic polar stratospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 21, NO. 23, PAGES 2475-2478, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 Analysisof Copyright1994by theAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber94GL02405 0094-8534/94/94GL-02405 $03

  9. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102,NO. D5, PAGES 6063-6079, MARCH 20, 1997 An integratedair pollutionmodelingsystemfor urban and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102,NO. D5, PAGES 6063-6079, MARCH 20, 1997 An integratedair and regionalscalesare Copyright1997bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber96JD03501. 0148-0227/97/96JD-03501 $09

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. D6, PAGES 12,897-12,914,JUNE 20, 1994 A model for studying the composition and chemical effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. D6, PAGES 12,897-12,914,JUNE 20, 1994 A model thegasaccommodationcoefficientand liquid-phasediffusion coefficient. Measuringor estimating Copyright1994by theAmericanGeophysical

  11. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105, NO. B2, PAGES 2903-2914, FEBRUARY 10, 2000 Helium diffusion from apatite' General behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105, NO. B2, PAGES 2903-2914, FEBRUARY 10, 2000 Helium.Provideddiffusionin the natural setting Copyright2000by the American GeophysicalUnion. Paper number 1999JB900348. 0148

  12. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 97, NO. B6, PAGES 9003-9014, JUNE 10, 1992 Effectsof CrystallineAnisotropyonFluidDistribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 97, NO. B6, PAGES 9003-9014, JUNE 10, 1992 Effectsof-pressure/high-temperatureexperimentswith basalt-olivine mixtures [Waft and Bulau, 1982]. The Copyright1992by theAmericanGeophysical

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 34863494, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50339, 2013 The signature of the stratospheric Brewer-Dobson circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 3486­3494, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50339, 2013 Collins, Colorado 80523, USA. (yingli@atmos.colostate.edu) ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103,NO. B5,PAGES 10,161-10,176,MAY 10, 1998 Episodic imbricate thrusting and underthrusting'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103,NO. B5,PAGES 10,161-10,176,MAY 10, 1998 Episodic. Copyright 1998 by the American GeophysicalUnion. Paper number 97JB03541. 0148-0227/ 98/ 97JB-03541

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 20, PAGES 3205-3208, OCTOBER 15, 1999 SubmillisecondResolutionLightning Currents and Sprite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 20, PAGES 3205-3208, OCTOBER 15, 1999 Submillisecond spriteemissionsdependsstrongly Copyright1999bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber1999GL003635. 0094-8276/99/1999GL003635505

  16. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 14, PAGES 2073-2076, JULY 15, 1999 The lastspreadingepisodeof the WestPhilippineBasinrevisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 14, PAGES 2073-2076, JULY 15, 1999 Copyright1999bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber1999GL900448. 0094-8276/99/1999GL900448505.00 pass

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 18, NO. 4, PAGES 581-584, APRIL 1991 GENERATION OF LONG WAVELENGTH HETEROGEITY IN THE MANTLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 18, NO. 4, PAGES 581-584, APRIL 1991 GENERATION OF LONG by the AmericanGeophysicalUnion. Paper number 91GL00823 0094-8534/ 91/ 9!GL-00823 $03ß00 mantle. We show

  18. Geophysical survey to estimate the 3D sliding surface and the 4D evolution of the water pressure on part of a deep seated landslide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical survey to estimate the 3D sliding surface and the 4D evolution of the water pressure slide. The geometry and the structure can be determined only by geotechnical and/or geophysical methods

  19. Inversion of surface and borehole gravity with thresholding and density constraints Jiajia Sun and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Department of Geophysics, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of geophysical data has been widely uti- lized in data interpretation in both hydrocarbon and mineral exploration

  20. Data-driven approach to identify field-scale biogeochemical transitions using geochemical and geophysical data and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    desirable pathways (e.g., uranium removal) are more highly favored. The use of geophysical data and geophysical data and hidden Markov models: Development and application at a uranium-contaminated aquifer.g., Fe(II), sulfate, sulfide, acetate, and uranium concentrations) and induced polarization (IP) data. We

  1. Density distribution of the India plate beneath the Tibetan plateau: Geophysical and petrological constraints on the kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Density distribution of the India plate beneath the Tibetan plateau: Geophysical and petrological combine seismological and Bouguer anomaly data with thermo-kinematic and petrological modelling of its descent is reached. In an integrated geophysical and petrological approach, the temperature field

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 24, PAGES 4029-4032, DECEMBER 15, 2000 The distention of the magnetosphere on May 11, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 24, PAGES 4029-4032, DECEMBER 15, 2000 The distention, and with geomagnetic data collected at low latitudes. It is shown that the southern hemisphere was geophysically active decrease in geomagnetic activity throughout the magnetosphere. However, some geophysical activity

  3. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 42254230, doi:10.1002/grl.50793, 2013 Flexure of the India plate underneath the Bhutan Himalaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 4225­4230, doi:10.1002/grl.50793, 2013 Flexure of the India, Sonneggstrasse 5, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland. (gyorgy.hetenyi@sed.ethz.ch) ©2013. American Geophysical Union over Central and Eastern Nepal, submit- ted to Geophysical Journal International, 2013), we focus

  4. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103,NO. B12,PAGES 30,245-30,267,DECEMBER 10, 1998 Okinawa trough backarc basin'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103,NO. B12,PAGES 30,245-30,267,DECEMBER 10, 1998 Okinawa,NationalTaiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; and C. Wang, Institute of Applied Geophysics,NationalTaiwanOceanUniversity,Keelung,Taiwan. Copyright1998bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion Papernumber98JB01823. 0148-0227/98/98JB-01823509.00 1

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCHLETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 9, PAGES 1231-1234,MAY 1, 1999 The structure of iron under the conditions of the Earth's inner core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vocadlo, Lidunka

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCHLETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 9, PAGES 1231-1234,MAY 1, 1999 The structure of iron ResearchSchoolof GeologicalandGeophysicalSciences,BirkbeckCollegeandUniversityCollegeLondon, UK Michael J conjunctionwithquasiharmonic Copyright1999bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. latticedynamicsto obtainfree energiesof all

  6. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104,NO. A5, PAGES10,191-10,204,MAY 1, 1999 Global-scaleelectronprecipitationfeaturesseenin UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104,NO. A5, PAGES10,191-10,204,MAY 1, 1999 Global-MartinAdvancedTechnologyCenter,PaloAlto,California. 4GeophysicsProgram.UniversityofWashington,Seattle. 5TheAerospaceCorporation,LosAngeles,California. Copyright1999bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion Papernumber1999JA900004. 0148-0227/99/1999JA900004509

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 100, NO. 84, PAGES 6313-6327, APRIL 10, 1995 Far-field tilting of Laurentia during the Ordovician

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 100, NO. 84, PAGES 6313-6327, APRIL 10, 1995 Far continent Bernard Coakley1 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, Madison Michael Observatory, Palisades, New York. Copyright 1995 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 941B02916

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105,NO. B12, PAGES 28,159-28,171,DECEMBER 10, 2000 Crustal and upper mantle structure beneath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105,NO. B12, PAGES 28,159-28,171,DECEMBER 10, 2000 Crustal,Strasbourg,France. ·'DepamnentofGeophysics,UniversityofThessaloniki,Thessalonik1, Greece. 7Departmentof GeophysicsandGeothermy,Universityot Athens, Athens, Greece. Copyright2000bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber2000JB900216. 0148

  9. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. D10, PAGES 12,851-12,871, SEPTEMBER 20, 1989 Can Milankovitch Orbital Variations Initiate the Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridlind, Ann

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. D10, PAGES 12,851-12,871, SEPTEMBER 20, 1989 Can periodschosenare thosein which geophysical evidence suggestsice sheets may have been growing rapidly. The reduced the Copyright 1989by the American GeophysicalUnion. Paper number 89JD00885. 0148-0227/89/89JD-00885 $05

  10. arXiv:physics/0602109v115Feb2006 Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light in the geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the geophysical field range V. Acosta, M. P. Ledbetter, S. M. Rochester, and D. Budker Department of Physics- netic field is in the geophysical range ( 500 mG), of particular interest for many applications. The consequences of these effects for FM-NMOR-based atomic magnetometry in the geophysical field range

  11. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 54, NO. 9 (SEPTEMBER 1989): P. 1153-I 163, 14 FIGS.. 4 TABLES. Stability of wide-angle absorbing boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 54, NO. 9 (SEPTEMBER 1989): P. 1153-I 163, 14 FIGS.. 4 TABLES. Stability of wide and numerically. Our numerical results confirm that INTRODUCTION Many geophysical problems, including modeling-1804. *Bergen Scientific Centre, IBM, N5006 Bergen, Norway. 0 1989 Society of Exploration Geophysic

  12. The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) at Los Alamos National: · Geophysics · Global Climate · Space Science · Astrophysics and Cosmology FY15 CALL FOR RESEARCH PROPOSALS and quality of life in our increasingly technological society. 3. Solid earth geoscience (geophysics

  13. Student-based archaeological geophysics in northern Thailand Emily A. Hinz*, Lee M. Liberty, and Spencer H. Wood, Boise State University, Fongsaward Singharajawarapan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Student-based archaeological geophysics in northern Thailand Emily A. Hinz*, Lee M. Liberty of Western Australia Summary As part of the 2010 near-surface geophysics workshop in Chiang Mai, Thailand, local archaeological targets were used as a basis for teaching geophysical data collection, processing

  14. Archaeological investigations using geophysics at Chimney Rock Great House, Colorado Michael A. Mitchell, Sarah G.R. Devriese, Roxanna N. Frary, Richard A. Krahenbuhl, Brenda K. Todd,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archaeological investigations using geophysics at Chimney Rock Great House, Colorado Michael A of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder SUMMARY In this talk, we present results from a geophysical investiga- tion at the Chimney Rock Great House using

  15. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 61, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1996); P. 17151727, 13 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Inversion of seismic refraction data using genetic algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 61, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1996); P. 1715­1727, 13 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Inversion ABSTRACT The use of genetic algorithms in geophysical inverse problems is a relatively recent development in the application of genetic algorithms to geophysical problems: i.e., high dimensionality. The ad- dition

  16. Inverse Modeling and Geostatistics Project 17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meeting -2010-05-052 DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Inverse Modeling and Geostatistics Project #12;17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meeting Geophysics research group meeting - 2010-05-053 DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark Bayesian PROBLEM? #12;17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meeting - 2010-05-054 DTU Informatics, Technical

  17. Inverse Modeling and Geostatistics Project 17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meeting -2010-09-102 DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Inverse Modeling and Geostatistics Project #12;17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meetingModelingandGeostatisticsProject #12;17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meeting - 2010-09-103 DTU Informatics, Technical #12;17/04/2008DTU Geophysics research group meeting - 2010-09-105 DTU Informatics, Technical

  18. CorrelationF unctions of Random Media Summary ---In geophysics, the correlation functions of random media are of principal importance for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    CorrelationF unctions of Random Media LUDE Ÿ K KLIMES Ÿ 1 Summary --- In geophysics, in a simple general form enabling the random media used in geophysics to be specified. The medium correlation.g., SHAPIRO and KNEIB, 1993; SHAPIRO et al., 1996; MU Ë? LLER and SHAPIRO, 2001). 1 Department of Geophysics

  19. Department of Geology and Geophysics-Frederick A. Sutton Building 115 South 1460 East, Room 383, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Department of Geology and Geophysics- Frederick A. Sutton Building to The University of Utah Department of Geology and Geophysics Donor's Information, to the Department of Geology and Geophysics of the University of Utah as an unrestricted gift. Fill out and sign

  20. Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhdanov; Michael S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

  1. Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Hardin, E.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)] [eds.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the in situ vitrification program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focusses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results. The literature review shows that all the ISV objectives are theoretically achievable because they involve physical properties (such as electrical conductivity, density, or magnetization) that can be sensed by geophysical instruments. However, most of the ISV objectives require substantially higher resolution than is achieved in typical waste site investigations, or than has been demonstrated by researches using state-of-the-art techniques. The survey at the INEL simulated waste pit yielded useful, qualitative information on subsurface materials and boundaries; but quantitative information, such as depth, size, or composition of buried materials, was subject to significant uncertainty. For ISV, the usefulness of geophysical characterization depends both on the capabilities of geophysical methods and on an assessment of the amount of uncertainty that is acceptable. Based on a preliminary assessment of these factors, the location of trench boundaries and detection of massive metallic objects are the important achievable objectives using current technology.

  3. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the in situ vitrification program. Volume 3, Discussion and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focusses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results. The literature review shows that all the ISV objectives are theoretically achievable because they involve physical properties (such as electrical conductivity, density, or magnetization) that can be sensed by geophysical instruments. However, most of the ISV objectives require substantially higher resolution than is achieved in typical waste site investigations, or than has been demonstrated by researches using state-of-the-art techniques. The survey at the INEL simulated waste pit yielded useful, qualitative information on subsurface materials and boundaries; but quantitative information, such as depth, size, or composition of buried materials, was subject to significant uncertainty. For ISV, the usefulness of geophysical characterization depends both on the capabilities of geophysical methods and on an assessment of the amount of uncertainty that is acceptable. Based on a preliminary assessment of these factors, the location of trench boundaries and detection of massive metallic objects are the important achievable objectives using current technology.

  4. Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

  5. Geophysical characterization of mineral and energy resources at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenheim, V.E.; Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hoover, D.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Yucca Mountain Project (Department of Energy) as part of the study of the mineral and energy resource potential of the site (Activity 8.3.1.9.2.1.5) under the Human Interference part of the program. Most of the 1991 geophysical scoping activities in the Mineral Resources Study were involved with the acquisition and evaluation of existing data. This report presents an overview of how geophysical data (existing and planned) will aid in the evaluation of the potential for mineral and energy resource potential at Yucca Mountain and vicinity.

  6. Geophysical remote sensing of water reservoirs suitable for desalinization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Bonal, Nedra; Engler, Bruce Phillip

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many parts of the United States, as well as other regions of the world, competing demands for fresh water or water suitable for desalination are outstripping sustainable supplies. In these areas, new water supplies are necessary to sustain economic development and agricultural uses, as well as support expanding populations, particularly in the Southwestern United States. Increasing the supply of water will more than likely come through desalinization of water reservoirs that are not suitable for present use. Surface-deployed seismic and electromagnetic (EM) methods have the potential for addressing these critical issues within large volumes of an aquifer at a lower cost than drilling and sampling. However, for detailed analysis of the water quality, some sampling utilizing boreholes would be required with geophysical methods being employed to extrapolate these sampled results to non-sampled regions of the aquifer. The research in this report addresses using seismic and EM methods in two complimentary ways to aid in the identification of water reservoirs that are suitable for desalinization. The first method uses the seismic data to constrain the earth structure so that detailed EM modeling can estimate the pore water conductivity, and hence the salinity. The second method utilizes the coupling of seismic and EM waves through the seismo-electric (conversion of seismic energy to electrical energy) and the electro-seismic (conversion of electrical energy to seismic energy) to estimate the salinity of the target aquifer. Analytic 1D solutions to coupled pressure and electric wave propagation demonstrate the types of waves one expects when using a seismic or electric source. A 2D seismo-electric/electro-seismic is developed to demonstrate the coupled seismic and EM system. For finite-difference modeling, the seismic and EM wave propagation algorithms are on different spatial and temporal scales. We present a method to solve multiple, finite-difference physics problems that has application beyond the present use. A limited field experiment was conducted to assess the seismo-electric effect. Due to a variety of problems, the observation of the electric field due to a seismic source is not definitive.

  7. ERNEST LUTHER MAJER Ph.D., June 1978 Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    responsibilities were to provide research oversight and direction for a group of seven professionals, five faculty, and for tracking fluid injection fronts. Staff Scientist, Group Leader Geophysics/Geomechanics Group Earth Sciences data acquisition and processing systems for crosswell and single well systems. Group leader

  8. HANOHANO: A DEEP OCEAN ANTINEUTRINO DETECTOR FOR UNIQUE NEUTRINO PHYSICS AND GEOPHYSICS STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    HANOHANO: A DEEP OCEAN ANTI­NEUTRINO DETECTOR FOR UNIQUE NEUTRINO PHYSICS AND GEOPHYSICS STUDIES JOHN G. LEARNED, STEPHEN T. DYE AND SANDIP PAKVASA Department of Physics and Astronomy, University potential of a 10 kiloton deep­ocean liquid scintillation detector for 1 MeV energy scale electron anti­neutrinos

  9. GEOPHYSICS BY NEUTRINOS*) Institute of Theoretical Physics, Roland Ei~tviis University, Budapest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    GEOPHYSICS BY NEUTRINOS*) G. MARX Institute of Theoretical Physics, Roland Ei~tviis University paper is concentrated on the second important task of neutrino physics: the Earth. The idea of observing It was suggested many years ago that the neutrino and antineutrino luminosity of different celestial bodies might

  10. Geophysical investigation of a large landslide in glaciolacustrine clays in the Trives area (French Alps)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical investigation of a large landslide in glaciolacustrine clays in the Trièves area Lyon, LRPC Autun, BP 141, 71404 Autun cedex, France Abstract Slope movements in clay deposits are world differentiating the body to be mapped. For landslides affecting thick clay materials (from soft clay to shale

  11. Annales Geophysicae (2002) 20: 711715 c European Geophysical Society 2002 Geophysicae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Annales Geophysicae (2002) 20: 711­715 c European Geophysical Society 2002 Annales Geophysicae al. (1973), Gedzelman (2000), Atlas (2001), and many cloud atlases and web-sites. Fallstreaks that parent clouds of fallstreaks are often located in a layer of strong wind-shear, adiabatic lapse rate

  12. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. , XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. , XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Sun V­dimensional evolution of solar eruptions as they leave the Sun and move into the interplanetary space. One of the most important processes, responsible for many dynamical phenomena ob­ served in the Sun, is the emergence

  13. USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES Campos, D.1-Noranda, Canada (bruno.bussiere@uqat.uquebec.ca) INTRODUCTION Mine waste rock piles, or rockwaste dumps rock piles. One of the most critical of these is water flow and water distribution in the waste rock

  14. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Geophysical flight line flying and flight path recovery utilizing the Litton LTN-76 inertial navigation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitkus, A.F.; Cater, D.; Farmer, P.F.; Gay, S.P. Jr.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Litton LTN-76 Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) with Inertial Track guidance System (ITGS) software is geared toward the airborne survey industry. This report is a summary of tests performed with the LTN-76 designed to fly an airborne geophysical survey as well as to recover the subsequent flight path utilizing INS derived coordinates.

  16. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 14, Three-dimensional energetic ion sounding of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,4 Abstract. We present new results using energetic parti- cles to remotely sound the highGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 1­4, Three-dimensional energetic ion sounding present a new technique to remotely sense the magnetopause in three dimensions as a function of time

  17. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

  18. Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

  19. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEology College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907-474-7565 www.uaf.edu/geology/ MS, phD Degrees Minimum Requirements for Degrees: MS: 30 credits; PhD: 18 thesis credits Graduates in geology have broad backgrounds in the earth sciences and firm foundations

  20. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    geoscience College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907-474-7565 www.uaf.edu/geology/ Bs Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 120 credits Graduates in geoscience. Four con- centrations are available to allow students to pursue their own emphasis: geology

  1. Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah Spring 2002 down to earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    1 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah Spring 2002 down to earth Message From of Bill Parry and Duke Picard resulted in openings in both Geological Engineer- ing and Sedimentary Geology. Our search for their replacements has been successful and we are once again at full strength

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A stochastic method for improving seasonal1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    component of the CNRM-CM5.1 global climate model, using ERA-Interim7 as a reference over a 1979. Copyright 201217 American Geophysical Union. Further reproduction or electronic distribution18 systematic errors are cancelled out provided that individual model errors30 are different, and reliability

  3. Geophysical Prospecting, 1997, 45, 39-64 Fractured reservoir delineation using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Geophysical Prospecting, 1997, 45, 39-64 Fractured reservoir delineation using multicomponent of delineating fractured reservoirs and optimizing the development of the reservoirs using shear-wave data the potential of shear waves for fractured reservoir delineation. Introduction Most carbonate reservoirs contain

  4. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data using Bayesian techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    of ground penetrating radar (GPR) tomographic velocity, GPR tomographic attenuation, and seismic tomographic where prior information is limited. Among the geophysical data, GPR and seismic velocity are more useful in situ hydrological measurements. Conventional borehole techniques such as flowmeter and slug tests

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Subordinated Kinematic Wave Equation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bäumer, Boris

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Subordinated Kinematic Wave this assumption, a subordinated kinematic wave equa- tion is proposed for moderately to highly heterogeneous at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA. 5 Also at: Department of Water Management, Faculty of Civil Engineering

  6. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Interferometric electromagnetic Green's functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Interferometric electromagnetic of a direct pulse-echo ex- periment in a three-dimensional configuration. The con- dition-dimensional media. Wave propagation invariants have been used in acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic wave

  7. Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical and petrological modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    and petrological modeling: Application to the Kaapvaal Craton and Rehoboth Terrane, southern Africa J. Fullea,1 M LitMod, which allows for petrological and geophysical modeling of the lithosphere and sublithospheric and petrological observables: namely, elevation, surface heat flow, and magnetotelluric and xenolith data. We find

  8. Geophysical Prospecting, 2004, 52, 183195 Effective elastic properties of randomly fractured soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    relationships be- tween pore structure and elastic properties of porous rocks is an ongoing problem and fluids, and how they control rock properties is cru- cial to a better understanding of acousticGeophysical Prospecting, 2004, 52, 183­195 Effective elastic properties of randomly fractured soils

  9. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    an important role in the climate system. Ice clouds reflect solar radiation25 back to space, cooling the planetJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation1 A for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO, 80305, USA. (andrew@ucar.edu) 1 National Center

  10. Marine Geophysical Researches 21: 489511, 2000. 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , UK; 3Department of Geology & Geophysics, School of Ocean & Earth Science &Technology, University margins, map series, multibeam bathymetry, tectonic erosion, Tonga forearc, Tonga Trench Abstract Four new-going programs in the region, particularly the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the National Science Foundation

  11. Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network. Informations about lunar seismicity and seismic subsurface models from the Apollo missions are used as a priori information in this study to optimise the geometry of future lunar seismic networks in order to best resolve

  12. Internal geophysics (Physics of Earth's interior) Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internal geophysics (Physics of Earth's interior) Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension of momentum across the interface, a possibly anisotropic surface tension and terms including an inter- face equals the jump of pressure; and in the presence of surface tension defined as a capillary action due

  13. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

  14. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

    2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

  15. On Optimizing Joint Inversion of Constrained Geophysical Datasets Anibal Sosa1 Leticia Velazquez1;2, Aaron Velasco3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968-0514, USA 3Department of Geological Sciences, The University) algorithm to characterize 1D earth structure using geophysical datasets with two different optimization

  16. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2015) 200, 390401 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu398

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fracturing becoming a common practice for uncon- ventional gas and oil fields, there has been an increasedGeophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2015) 200, 390­401 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu398 GJI

  17. Integrated geophysical study of near-surface faults in the Wilcox Group, Texas, with application to lignite mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satti, Sara A

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are exposed. Several geophysical tools, namely magnetics, frequency and time domain electromagnetics (FEM and TEM), ground penetrating radar (GPR) as well as seismic refraction were tested in an attempt to qualitatively determine the most efficient...

  18. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  19. Some Mathematical and Numerical Issues in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianping Li; Shouhong Wang

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we address both recent advances and open questions in some mathematical and computational issues in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) and climate dynamics. The main focus is on 1) the primitive equations (PEs) models and their related mathematical and computational issues, 2) climate variability, predictability and successive bifurcation, and 3) a new dynamical systems theory and its applications to GFD and climate dynamics.

  20. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  1. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  2. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lumley, David [U. W. AUSTRALIA; Sherlock, Don [CHEVRON; Daley, Tom [LBNL; Lawton, Don [U CALGARY; Masters, Ron [SHELL; Verliac, Michel [SCHLUMBERGER; White, Don [GEOL. SURVEY CANADA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  3. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  4. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 13, NO. 13, PAGES 1474-1477, DECEMBER 1986 STIRRING AND MIXING IN THE MANTLE BY PLATE-SCALE FLOW: LARGE PERSISTENT BLOBS AND LONG TENDRILS COEXIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 13, NO. 13, PAGES 1474-1477, DECEMBER 1986 STIRRING AND MIXING; Copyright 1986 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 6L7019. 0094-8276/86/006L-7019$03.00 in other

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105,NO. B3, PAGES 5567-5581,MARCH 10,2000 Strain partitioning and interplate friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105,NO. B3, PAGES 5567-5581,MARCH 10,2000 Strain partitioning(Marianas,for example).What Copyright2000 bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. Papernumber1999JB900332. 0148-0227/00/1999JB

  6. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 59885993, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728, 2013 Up-gradient eddy fluxes of potential vorticity near the subtropical jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 5988­5993, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728, 2013 Up-gradient eddy@atmos.colostate.edu) ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. 0094-8276/13/10.1002/2013GL057728 scales

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 97, NO. E8, PAGES 13,643-13,665 AUGUST 25, 1992 Fluid OutflowsFromVenusImpactCraters'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolphs, Ralph

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 97, NO. E8, PAGES 13,643-13,665 AUGUST 25, 1992 FluidDivisionofGeologicalandPlanetarySciences,California Instituteof Technology,Pasadena. Copyright1992bytheAmericanGeophysicalUnion. PaperNumber9ZIE00981 0148

  8. Anderson-Gregory; Constable-Steven; Orcutt-John; Staudigel-Hubert; Tolstoy-Maya; Wyatt-Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    -Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.22; 2, Pages 147-150. 1995. Baker-Edward-T; Fox eruption of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.26; 23, Pages 3445-3448. 1999

  9. 10-Ch09-N51893 [13:43 2008/9/13] Temam & Tribbia: Computational Methods for the Atmosphere and the Oceans Page: 377 377434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    and the Oceans Page: 377 377­434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical Fluids Jacques Blum Laboratoire Jean of a flow. In the first part, the mathematical models governing geophysical flows are presented together of information on geophysical flows is provided by satellites displaying images of their evolution

  10. Adams-R-D, Thickness of the earth's crust beneath the Pacific-Antarctic ridge, New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics. 7; 3, Pages 529-542. 1964.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    Journal of Geology and Geophysics. 7; 3, Pages 529-542. 1964. Allen,-R-M., The mantle plume beneath-frequency traveltimes; I, Theory, Geophysical Journal International. 141; 1, Pages 157-174. 2000. Forsyth-D-W , Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity Variations in a Regionalized Pacific, Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union

  11. Department of Geology and Geophysics Frederick A. Sutton Building 115 South 1460 East, Room 383, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0102 (801) 581-7162 FAX (801) 581-7065

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Department of Geology and Geophysics ­ Frederick A. Sutton Building 115 South 1460 East, Room 383/2012 Deed of Gift to The University of Utah Department of Geology and Geophysics Donor's Information, to the Department of Geology and Geophysics of the University of Utah as an unrestricted gift. Filled out and sign

  12. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications.

  13. Three-Dimensional Surface Geophysical Exploration of the 200-Series Tanks at the 241-C Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crook, N. [HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., Tuscon, AZ (United States); McNeill, M. [HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., Tuscon, AZ (United States); Dunham, Ralph [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (United States); Glaser, Danney R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States)

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface geophysical exploration (SGE) survey using direct current electrical resistivity was conducted within the C Tank Farm in the vicinity of the 200-Series tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This survey was the second successful SGE survey to utilize the Geotection(TM)-180 Resistivity Monitoring System which facilitated a much larger survey size and faster data acquisition rate. The primary objective of the C Tank Farm SGE survey was to provide geophysical data and subsurface imaging results to support the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation, as outlined in the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation / Corrective Measures work plan RPP-PLAN-39114.

  14. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

  15. Geophysical modeling of the Franklin Township buried valley, and associated aquifer, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yuejun; Palmer, D.F. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed geophysical survey was conducted in Franklin Township, Portage County, Ohio to delineate a buried valley. A combination of the gravity, electrical resistivity, and surface refraction seismic modeling has been applied to determine the bedrock topography, the lithology of the bedrock, the nature of the glacial fill, and the thickness of the associated aquifer. Three dimensional gravity modeling defines the size and shape of the glacial fill with low density compared to the surrounding bedrock and provides a bedrock topography map with a high resolution. The calculated bedrock topography coincides with the water well data available in the area. Resistivity modeling was used to search for a least-squares fit between the measured and the theoretical curves to evaluate the layer thickness and resistivity. The resistivity profile indicates that there exists an aquifer with the thickness about 50 feet within the glacial fill. The level of the soil moisture and the water table is suggested by the resistivity data as well. The seismic profile supports the bedrock boundary calculated by gravity modeling, and shows that the upper part of the bedrock consists of three layers, upper sandstone, shale, and lower sandstone. The comprehensive geophysical interpretation infers that the pre-glacial valley, cut through Sharon Sandstone, Meadville Shale to Berea Sandstone, was extended and deepened at the northern end, and filled with glacial material derived from the north during the later glacial period, resulting in a thick aquifer in the glacial fill.

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves generated by the1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves TSUNAMI Abstract. Detection of low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves as precur-4 sor components model gave us the opportunity to study13 the hydro-acoustic wave propagation in a large-scale domain

  17. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 187191 Geophysical aspects of very long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Robert

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 187­191 Geophysical aspects of very long baseline neutrino experiments Robert J. Gellera, *, Tatsuhiko Harab a Department of Earth, Tatehara 1, Tsukuba 305-0802, Japan Abstract Several proposed experiments will send beams of neutrinos

  18. A multi-physics, integrated approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    porosity are obtained via active gamma ray density tools. Porosity estimates are subsequently used together with resistivity measurements to provide estimates of in- situ water saturation. Formation tester measurements of multi-physics borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data. The objective is to estimate in-situ

  19. Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error Paul E. Johnson and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error -Wind I Paul E. Johnson (which relates the wind to the normalized radar cross section, NRCS, of the ocean surface) is uncertainty in the NRCS for given wind conditions. When the estimated variability is in- cluded in the maximum likelihood

  20. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  1. BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT from: EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 82(38), September 18, 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT from: EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL conditions as uranium, this study site serves as an excellent surrogate for uranium-contaminated sites BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT http://www.ce.berkeley.edu/~rubin/EOS_finalversion

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Parametric Model for the Brazil Current Meanders and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Parametric Model for the Brazil Current Meanders and Eddies off Southeastern Brazil L. Calado Instituto Oceanogr´afico, Universidade de S~ao Paulo, Brazil A. Gangopadhyay Department of Physics and School for Marine Science and Technology, UMass

  3. Mechanical action and Geophysical reaction: Equipment Oil sand Interactions (Originally presented at CAMI, September 8 10, 2003, Calgary, Alberta)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    . Vibrations from on-board equipment, as was found with shovels to a lesser extent, such as pumps, motors and other moving sources, dirties the ground response signal with noise. To facilitate a better correlation geophysical computer applications are manipulated and enhanced to evaluate the extent of this noise problem

  4. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 62, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST 1997); P. 11511162, 9 FIGS. Effects of pore structure and wettability on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Rosemary

    and Rosemary J. Knight ABSTRACT A network model of porous media is used to assess the effects of pore structure distribution of water. The effects of pore structure are assessed by varying pore size distributionGEOPHYSICS, VOL. 62, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST 1997); P. 1151­1162, 9 FIGS. Effects of pore structure

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. , XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Plasma sheet changes caused by sudden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    enhancements of the solar wind pressure2 Y. Miyashita, 1 K. Keika, 2 K. Liou, 3 S. Machida, 4 Y. Kamide, 5 Y for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan. K. Keika, Center for Solar Road, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. S. Machida, Department of Geophysics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa

  6. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The Effects of Hard Spectra Solar Proton Events on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    to deposit their energy28 in the mesosphere and stratosphere. Therefore Solar Proton Events provide a directJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The Effects of Hard Spectra Solar Helsinki, Finland. (annika.seppala@fmi.fi) M. A. Clilverd, Physical Sciences Division (NERC), British

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Evaluation of 'all weather' microwave-derived land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Evaluation of 'all weather measurements over land are still limited, especially under cloudy con- ditions. Ts estimates from infrared water vapor, cloud liquid wa- ter, and surface emissivities over land from Special Sensor Microwave / Im

  8. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics, 12, 527536, 2005 SRef-ID: 1607-7946/npg/2005-12-527

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Processes in Geophysics The COSMO-LEPS mesoscale ensemble system: validation of the methodology been designed to have a probabilistic support at the mesoscale, fo- cusing the attention on extreme a challenging problem. The key role played by mesoscale and orographic- related processes can seriously limit

  9. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The long runout of the Heart Mountain landslide: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The long runout of the Heart, Palisades, NY, USA. D R A F T June 30, 2010, 6:44pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 GOREN ET AL.: HEART MOUNTAIN LANDSLIDE DYNAMICS Abstract. The Heart Mountain landslide of northwestern Wyoming is the largest subaerial

  11. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2005) 12: 311320 SRef-ID: 1607-7946/npg/2005-12-311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes in Geophysics Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction B. Knopf1, H, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the cur- rently preferred strategy for simulating. Such a simplifying tech- nique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources

  12. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Intermittent Upper Ocean1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heat content locally. Recent studies5 suggest that TC-induced ocean mixing can have global climate climate impacts by contributing to oceanic poleward heat transport [Emanuel,32 2001; Sriver and HuberJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Intermittent

  13. Integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of lithosphereasthenosphere1 boundary in Central Tibet using electromagnetic and seismic data2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    1 Integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of lithosphere­asthenosphere1 boundary in Central magnetotelluric and seismic data in petrologically24 consistent manner25 · Lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary a petrologically-driven approach to jointly model magnetotelluric (MT) and29 seismic surface wave dispersion (SW

  14. Eighth International Congress of The Brazilian Geophysical Society Computer simulation of the nongyrotropic electron beam-plasma interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1 Universidade de Taubaté, Brazil. 2 Kyoto University, Japan, 3 INPE, Brazil Copyright 2003, SBGf Congress of The Brazilian Geophysical Society held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 14-18 September 2003 that the magnetic field energy became much larger than in the gyrotropic case, indicating a strong electromagnetic

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps to sea level rise:1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps - 2 BJ¨ORNSSON ET AL.: MASS LOSS FROM ICELANDIC ICE CAPS In total, Icelandic ice caps contain 3,600 km3 of ice, which if melted would3 raise sea level by 1 cm. Here, we present an overview of mass

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, A subordinated advection model for uniform bedload1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bäumer, Boris

    tivate adoption of fractional-derivative models (FDMs) to describe sediment13 dispersion R A F T #12;X - 2 ZHANG ET AL: SUBORDINATED MODEL FOR BEDLOAD TRANSPORT Abstract. Sediment tracersJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, A subordinated advection model

  17. Lyapunov exponents for 2-D ray tracing without interfaces Ludek Klimes , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Lyapunov exponents for 2-D ray tracing without interfaces Ludek Klimes , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Summary The Lyapunov exponents asymptotically quantify the ex- ponential divergence of rays. The \\Lyapunov exponent" for a nite 2-D ray and the average \\Lyapunov exponents

  18. Lyapunov exponents for 2D ray tracing without interfaces Ludek Klimes \\Lambda , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Lyapunov exponents for 2­D ray tracing without interfaces LudŸek KlimeŸs \\Lambda , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Summary The Lyapunov exponents asymptotically quantify the ex­ ponential divergence of rays. The ``Lyapunov exponent'' for a finite 2­D ray and the average

  19. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  20. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES AT THE POWELL STAGE STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Julie B. Braun; Brenda R. Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the boundaries of the Idaho National Laboratory, an ongoing archaeological investigation of a late 19th century stage station was expanded with the use of Electro-Magnetic and Magnetic geophysical surveying. The station known as the Powell Stage Station was a primary transportation hub on the Snake River Plain, bridging the gap between railroad supply depots in Blackfoot, Idaho and booming mining camps throughout Central Idaho. Initial investigations have shown a strong magnetic signature from a buried road and previously unknown features that were not detected by visual surface surveys. Data gained from this project aids in federally directed cultural resource and land management and use requirements and has contributed additional information for archeological interpretation and cultural resource preservation.

  1. Mechanism of destruction of transport barriers in geophysical jets with Rossby waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uleysky, M Yu; Prants, S V; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.017202

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of destruction of a central transport barrier in a dynamical model of a geophysical zonal jet current in the ocean or the atmosphere with two propagating Rossby waves is studied. We develop a method for computing a central invariant curve which is an indicator of existence of the barrier. Breakdown of this curve under a variation of the Rossby wave amplitudes and onset of chaotic cross-jet transport happen due to specific resonances producing stochastic layers in the central jet. The main result is that there are resonances breaking the transport barrier at unexpectedly small values of the amplitudes that may have serious impact on mixing and transport in the ocean and the atmosphere. The effect can be found in laboratory experiments with azimuthal jets and Rossby waves in rotating tanks under specific values of the wave numbers that are predicted in the theory.

  2. Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

  3. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. D13, PAGES 16,417-16,421,NOVEMBER 20, 1989 Greenhouse Effect of Chlorofluorocarbons and Other Trace Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridlind, Ann

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. D13, PAGES 16,417-16,421,NOVEMBER 20, 1989 Greenhouse Effect of Chlorofluorocarbons and Other Trace Gases JAMESHANSEN,ANDREW LACIS,AND MICHAEL PRATHER NASA

  4. Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

  5. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  6. National Report for the International Association of Geodesy of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 2011-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savinykh, V P; Malkin, Z; Pobedinsky, G; Stoliarov, I A; Sermiagin, R; Zotov, L; Gorshkov, V; Shestakov, N; Steblov, G; Dokukin, P; Ustinov, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this National Report are given major results of researches conducted by Russian geodesists in 2011-2014 on the topics of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG). This report is prepared by the Section of Geodesy of the National Geophysical Committee of Russia. In the report prepared for the XXVI General Assembly of IUGG (Czhech Republic, Prague, 22 June - 2 July 2015), the results of principal researches in geodesy, geodynamics, gravimetry, in the studies of geodetic reference frame creation and development, Earth's shape and gravity field, Earth's rotation, geodetic theory, its application and some other directions are briefly described. For some objective reasons not all results obtained by Russian scientists on the problems of geodesy are included in the report.

  7. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA_Appendix 4_Geophysical Survey Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CR Environmental, Inc. (CR) was contracted by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA) to perform hydrographic and geophysical surveys of an approximately 3.35 square mile area off the eastern shore of Hull, Massachusetts. Survey components included: • Single-beam bathymetry; • 100-kHz and 500-kHz side scan sonar; • Magnetometry; and • Low to mid-frequency sub-bottom profiling.

  8. Fall 2007 American Geophysical Union Meeting Student Travel Support for Environmental Nanomaterials Session (#B35) (December 10-14, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Hochella, Jr.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of award no. DE-FG02-08ER15925 was to fund travel for students to present at the Fall 2007 American Geophysical Meeting. This was done successfully, and five students (Bin Xie, Qiaona Hu, Katie Schreiner, Daria Kibanova, and Frank-Andreas Weber) gave excellent oral and poster presentations at the meeting. Provided are the conference abstracts for their presentations.

  9. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

  11. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

  12. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, C. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Compton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shingleton, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, J. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtmeier, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loey, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mirkarimi, P. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guyton, R. L. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States); Huffman, E. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  13. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent ...

  14. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) andwasdependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation.

  15. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-481, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E. [National Securities Technologies, Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  16. A Geological and Geophysical Study of the Geothermal Energy Potential of Pilgrim Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, Robert B. [eds.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located about 75 km north of Nome, was the subject of an intensive, reconnaissance-level geophysical and geological study during a 90-day period in the summer of 1979. The thermal springs are located in a northeast-oriented, oval area of thawed ground approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} in size, bordered on the north by the Pilgrim River. A second, much smaller, thermal anomaly was discovered about 3 km northeast of the main thawed area. Continuous permafrost in the surrounding region is on the order of 100 m thick. Present surface thermal spring discharge is {approx} 4.2 x 10{sup -3} m{sup 3} s{sup -1} (67 gallons/minute) of alkali-chloride-type water at a temperature of 81 C. The reason for its high salinity is not yet understood because of conflicting evidence for seawater vs. other possible water sources. Preliminary Na-K-Ca geothermometry suggests deep reservoir temperatures approaching 150 C, but interpretation of these results is difficult because of their dependence on an unknown water mixing history. Based on these estimates, and present surface and drill hole water temperatures, Pilgrim Springs would be classified as an intermediate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system.

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104, NO. B7, PAGES 15,005-15,023, JULY 10, 1999 Dynamics of a phase change at the base of the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104, NO. B7, PAGES 15,005-15,023, JULY 10, 1999 Dynamics by the American GeophysicalUnion. Paper number 1999JB900065. 0148-0227/ 99/ 1999JB900065509.00 The large

  18. 11/12/11 Journal of Geophysical Research -Atmospheres: Editors' Highlight 1/1www.agu.org/cgi-bin/highlights/highlights.cgi?action=show&doi=10.1029/20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    11/12/11 Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres: Editors' Highlight 1/1www.agu.org/cgi-bin/highlights/highlights.cgi?action=show&doi=10.1029/20 ©2011. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. AGU: Jo nal of Geoph ical Re ea ch

  19. 024/01/Wednesday 17h44Geophysical Constraints on the Nature of Atlantis Massif, 30N MAR Page 1 sur 2http://www.agu.org/cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?language=English&verbo...%2034995275%20%2fdata2%2fepubs%2fwais%2fdata%2ffm05%2ffm05.txt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    024/01/Wednesday 17h44Geophysical Constraints on the Nature of Atlantis Massif, 30°N MAR Page 1 sur AN: T33G-05 INVITED TI:Geophysical Constraints on the Nature of Atlantis Massif, 30° N MAR AU challenges prior interpretations that this OCC was mainly ultramafic, geophysical data having suggested much

  20. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty members (from both UC and other institutions) on sabbatical leave. To focus attention on areas of topical interest i

  1. Collaborative Research: hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (US); Rubin, Y.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'The general purpose is the subsurface characterization of LLNL superfund site. The goal is to get the most accurate map of the hydrogeological parameters, necessary for modeling and designing the cleanup efforts at the site, using well log data and remote sensing geophysical techniques. In the second year of the project progress has been made in several areas: gathering and interpreting Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) and Electromagnetic (EM) surveys; investigating the impact of various seismic measurements on upscaling of rock physics relations between sediment properties; and developing a new approach to integrate geophysical and hydrological data using state of the art methods to characterize the subsurface lithology. Vertical Seismic Profile data has been gathered from selected wells at the Treatment Facility D (TFD) during April 1996 and April 1998. The most striking finding here is the detection of anomalies related to saturation conditions. Preliminary results have revealed three anomalously low acoustic velocity zones with velocities below 1,000 m/s; this is lower than the natural acoustic velocity in saturated media by pure water (1,500 m/s). These three zones appear to be associated with HSUs 3a, 3b and 5. Velocities below 600 m/s have been revealed in the 3a and 3b HSUs (http://www.ce.Berkeley.edu/{approximately}ezzedine/DOE/paul.html). The authors believe that these anomalies are indicative of partial saturation. This explanation is supported by the water samples taken from pumping stations near the VSP well sites which appears to contain air bubbles. A gas analysis of water samples has not yet been performed. The authors hypothesize that this gas can be either air being sucked-in from the vadose zone above the water table, or from some chemical reaction. As a matter of fact, the natural water table level at this site was around 20 m below ground surface before any large scale pumping began, and had dropped to 25.5 m, in April 98. Furthermore, some of these low velocity zones are occurring not only in the major free-flowing sand or gravel parts of the HSU, but in boundary layers of silty sand either above or below the main HSU conductor. An electromagnetic survey was conducted at the site during June 4--25, 1997, and they worked on its interpretation. Seven cross well EM data sets were collected. Both 1D and 2D simulations, approximating the actual site and survey setup, were conducted. The 1D simulations were conducted using the code EM1D for one data set. Newman and Alumbaugh''s 3D forward code was used to simulate the response of both a resistive layer (representing HSU 4) and a conductive layer at the same location. Three separate inversion algorithms were applied to the data: Newman and Alumbaugh''s 2.5D finite difference and integral solution algorithm, Alumbaugh''s iterative Born approximation with a cylindrical symmetry, and Tseng''s 3D extended born approximation. The field EM data are still being analyzed.'

  2. Special Issue on geophysics applied to detection and discrimination of unexploded ordnance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Gasperikova, Erika; Beard, Les P.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO) presents serious problems in Europe, Asia, as well as in the United States. Explosives and mines from World War I and World War II still turn up at European and Asian construction sites, backyard gardens, beaches, wildlife preserves and former military training grounds. The high rate of failure among munitions from 60-90 years ago is cited as one of the main reasons for such a high level of contamination. Apart from war activities, military training has resulted in many uncovered ordnance. It is especially true in the United States, where most UXO has resulted from decades of military training, exercises, and testing of weapons systems. Such UXO contamination prevents civilian land use, threatens public safety, and causes significant environmental concern. In light of this problem, there has been considerable interest shown by federal, state, and local authorities in UXO remediation at former U.S. Department of Defense sites. The ultimate goal of UXO remediation is to permit safe public use of contaminated lands. A Defense Science Board Task Force Report from 1998 lists some 1,500 sites, comprising approximately 15 million acres, that potentially contain UXO. The UXO-related activity for these sites consists of identifying the subareas that actually contain UXO, and then locating and removing the UXO, or fencing the hazardous areas off from the public. The criteria for clearance depend on the intended land end-use and residual hazard risk that is deemed acceptable. Success in detecting UXO depends on the ordnance's size, metal content, and depth of burial, as well as on the ability of geophysical systems to detect ordnance in the presence of metallic fragments from exploded UXO and other metal clutter.

  3. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  4. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  5. Results of Tank-Leak Detection Demonstration Using Geophysical Techniques at the Hanford Mock Tank Site-Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During July and August of 2001, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), hosted researchers from Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National laboratories, and a private contractor, HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., for deployment of the following five geophysical leak-detection technologies at the Hanford Site Mock Tank in a Tank Leak Detection Demonstration (TLDD): (1) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT); (2) Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction (CEMI); (3) High-Resolution Resistivity (HRR); (4) Cross-Borehole Radar (XBR); and (5) Cross-Borehole Seismic Tomography (XBS). Under a ''Tri-party Agreement'' with Federal and state regulators, the U.S. Department of Energy will remove wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) and other miscellaneous underground tanks for storage in the double-shell tank system. Waste retrieval methods are being considered that use very little, if any, liquid to dislodge, mobilize, and remove the wastes. As additional assurance of protection of the vadose zone beneath the SSTs, tank wastes and tank conditions may be aggressively monitored during retrieval operations by methods that are deployed outside the SSTs in the vadose zone.

  6. Allan variance computed in space domain: Application to InSAR data to characterize noise and geophysical signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalié, Olivier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Allan variance was introduced fifty years ago for analyzing the stability of frequency standards. Beside its metrological interest, it is also an estimator of the large trends of the power spectral density (PSD) of frequency deviation. For instance, the Allan variance is able to discriminate different types of noise characterized by different power laws in the PSD. But, it was also used in other fields: accelerometry, geophysics, geodesy, astrophysics and even finances! However, it seems that up to now, it has been exclusively applied for time series analysis. We propose here to use the Allan variance onto spatial data. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is used in geophysics to image ground displacements in space (over the SAR image spatial coverage) and in time thank to the regular SAR image acquisitions by dedicated satellites. The main limitation of the technique is the atmospheric disturbances that affect the radar signal while traveling from the sensor to the ground and back. In this p...

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104,NO. E4, PAGES 8489-8507, APRIL 25, 1999 A Mossbauer investigationof iron-rich terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104,NO. E4, PAGES 8489-8507, APRIL 25, 1999 A Mossbauer, as a component on the robotic arm, a Mossbauer spectrometer. In the context of future Mars exploration we present results of Mossbauer analysis of a suite of samples from an iron-rich thermal spring in the Chocolate Pots

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) Earthquake -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey, 2012, 5:45pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 ELLIOTT ET AL.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY moment and source.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY X - 3 Interferograms from the ENVISAT satellite were derived from

  9. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. Dll, PAGES23,131-23,148,NOVEMBER 20, 1994 NCAR CCM2 simulation of the modem Antarctic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. Dll, PAGES23,131-23,148,NOVEMBER 20, 1994 NCAR CCM2 Abstract. The National Centerfor AtmosphericResearchcommunityclimatemodelversion 2 (CCM2) simulationof,winds,andatmosphericmoistureandenergybudgetsareexaminedtovalidatethe model'srepresentationof thepresent-dayAntarcticclimate.Theresultsshowthat theCCM2

  10. Geochemical Characterization Using Geophysical Data and Markov Chain Monte Carolo methods: A Case Study at the South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Murray, Chris; Roden, Eric; Majer, Ernest

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of field-scale geochemical parameters, such as extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III), influences microbial processes and thus the efficacy of bioremediation. Because traditional characterization of those parameters is invasive and laborious, it is rarely performed sufficiently at the field-scale. Since both geochemical and geophysical parameters often correlate to some common physical properties (such as lithofacies), we investigated the utility of tomographic radar attenuation data for improving estimation of geochemical parameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. The data used in this study included physical, geophysical, and geochemical measurements collected in and between several boreholes at the DOE South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia. Results show that geophysical data, constrained by physical data, provided field-scale information about extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III) in a minimally invasive manner and with a resolution unparalleled by other geochemical characterization methods. This study presents our estimation framework for estimating Fe(II) and Fe(III), and its application to a specific site. Our hypothesis--that geochemical parameters and geophysical attributes can be linked through their mutual dependence on physical properties--should be applicable for estimating other geochemical parameters at other sites.

  11. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105, NO. Dl, PAGES 1387-1415, JANUARY 20,2000 Sulfur chelllistry in the National Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Understanding the tropospheric sulfur cycle is impor- tant because of its contribution to acid rain and its effect on the Earth's radiation balance. The role of sulfuric acid in acid rain has been recognizedJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105, NO. Dl, PAGES 1387-1415, JANUARY 20,2000 Sulfur

  12. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using AMSR-E 89 GHz Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using AMSR progress in sea ice concentration remote sensing by satellite microwave radiometers has been stimulated, a new algorithm enables to estimate sea ice concentration from the channels near 90 GHz, despite the en

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 87, NO. C12, PAGES 9667-9674, NOVEMBER 20, 1982 Sensitivity of an Annual Mean Diffusive Energy Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an Annual Mean Diffusive Energy Balance Model With an Ice Sheet KENNETH P. BOWMAN GeophysicalFluid Dynamics averaged energy balance models have received muchattentionsincethey were introducedby Budyko[1969. For a review of energy balance models and a discussionof albedo feedback, see North et al. [1981]. Models have

  14. At the 2010 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, two presentations (Devitt et al. 2010; Saito et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biondi, Franco

    2 Overview At the 2010 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, two), the Nevada State College (NSC), and the community colleges that are part of the Nevada System of Higher, soil temperature, hydraulic head, etc.), and vegetational (stem increment, sap flow, NDVI, phenological

  15. A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics eruptions) and from human activities involving burning of fossil fuels and vegetation. Visible forms, the concerns over public health prompted researchers to study the fallout (radioactive dust) from nuclear

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103, NO. D24, PAGES 32,257-32,276, JANUARY 27, 1998 Synergistic algorithm for estimating vegetation canopy leaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103, NO. D24, PAGES 32,257-32,276, JANUARY 27, 1998 32257 communities across the globe in response to climate changes. Leaf area index (LAI) is a state parameter in all models describing the exchange of fluxes of energy, mass (e.g., water and CO2), and momentum between

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: OCEANS, VOL. 118, 17591 , doi:10.1002/jgrc.20155, 2013 A three-dimensional eddy census of a high-resolution global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: OCEANS, VOL. 118, 1759­1 , doi:10.1002/jgrc.20155, 2013 A three-dimensional eddy census of a high-resolution global ocean simulation Mark R. Petersen,1 Sean J. Williams,1,2 Mathew from a global ocean simulation with one-tenth degree resolution and a duration of 7 years. The census

  18. Lithospheric structure in the Baikal-central Mongolia region from integrated1 geophysical-petrological inversion of surface-wave data and topographic elevation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    1 Lithospheric structure in the Baikal-central Mongolia region from integrated1 geophysical the inversion to central Mongolia, south of the24 Baikal Rift Zone, a key area of deformation in Asia-asthenosphere boundary, petro-physical modeling,35 Mongolia, Baikal Rift, mantle composition36 37 38 39 1. Introduction40

  19. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 60, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 1995); P. 431-436, 9 FIGS., 4 TABLES. Rock/water interaction in dielectric properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Rosemary

    properties. The focus of this study is the fact that the wetting of the rock solid by the waterGEOPHYSICS, VOL. 60, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 1995); P. 431-436, 9 FIGS., 4 TABLES. Rock/water interaction in dielectric properties: Experiments with hydrophobic sandstones Rosemary Knight* and Ana Abad

  20. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 60, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST 1995); P. 998-1006, 6 FIGS., 2 TABLES. The effect of steam quality on the electrical behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Rosemary

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 60, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST 1995); P. 998-1006, 6 FIGS., 2 TABLES. The effect of steam quality on the electrical behavior of steam-flooded sands: A laboratory study David B. Butler* and Rosemary J. Knight* ABSTRACT Laboratory measurements of the effects of steam injection on the electrical

  1. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. D12, PAGES 25,86925,880, DECEMBER 20, 1994 Radiative sensitivities of tropical anvils to small ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    - ation budget and climate. Cirrus anvils account for the most cloud cover over tropical oceans besides over the warmest oceans and thus produce the strongest green- house effect. The Earth Radiation BudgetJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. D12, PAGES 25,869­25,880, DECEMBER 20, 1994 Radiative

  2. Geophysical investigations of French Drain 116-B-9, and Dry Well 116-B-10, 100 B/C Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.; Fassett, J.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    French Drain 116-B-9 and Dry Well 116-B-10 are both located within the 100 B/C-2 Operable Unit, 100 B/C Area (Figure 1). The 116-B-9 French Drain is approximately 4 ft in diameter by 3 ft deep. The exact location or use of the drain in not clear. The 116-B-10 Dry Well is a 3 ft-diameter, tile-lined well on a concrete slab, 7 ft below the surface, overlain by a manhole cover (DOE-RL 1991). The exact location of the well is uncertain. The objective of the survey was to locate the Dry Well and the French Drain. The area to be investigated had several buildings in the area which subsequently have been torn down. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was the geophysical method chosen for the investigation.

  3. Applications of Geophysical and Geological Techniques to Identify Areas for Detailed Exploration in Black Mesa Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, S.; Reeves, T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, M.

    1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent report submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (NIPER/BDM-0226) discussed in considerable detail, the geology, structure, tectonics, and history of oil production activities in the Black Mesa basin in Arizona. As part of the final phase of wrapping up research in the Black Mesa basin, the results of a few additional geophysical studies conducted on structure, stratigraphy, petrophysical analysis, and oil and gas occurrences in the basin are presented here. A second objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of relatively inexpensive, noninvasive techniques like gravity or magnetic in obtaining information on structure and tectonics in sufficient detail for hydrocarbon exploration, particularly by using the higher resolution satellite data now becoming available to the industry.

  4. National Report for the International Association of Geodesy of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 2007-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyarsky, E A; Gerasimenko, M D; Demianov, G V; Kaufman, M B; Kaftan, V I; Mazurova, E M; Malkin, Z M; Molodenskii, S M; Neyman, Yu M; Pevnev, A K; Savinykh, V P; Steblov, G M; Tatevian, S K; Tolchel'nikova, S A; Shestakov, N V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report submitted to the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) contains results obtained by Russian geodesists in 2007-2010. In the report prepared for the XXV General Assembly of IUGG (Australia, Melbourne, 28 June - 7 July 2011), the results of principal researches in geodesy, geodynamics, gravimetry, in the studies of geodetic reference frame creation and development, Earth's shape and gravity field, Earth's rotation, geodetic theory, its application and some other directions are briefly described. The period from 2007 to 2010 was still difficult for Russian geodesy mainly due to the permanent reformation of state geodetic administration as well as state education structure and organization. The report is organized as a sequence of abstracts of principal publications and presentations for symposia, conferences, workshops, etc. Each of the report paragraphs includes a list of scientific papers published in 2007-2010 including those prepare...

  5. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  6. An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright (2011) American Geophysical Union. Lilly, J. M., R. K. Scott, and S. C. Olhede (2011), Extracting waves and vortices from Lagrangian trajectories,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, Jonathan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trajectories, Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L23605, doi:10.1029/2011GL049727. To view the published open that this problem remains un- solved is evidenced by the fact that large-scale studies ei- ther continue to rely

  7. Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

  8. Use of integrated geologic and geophysical information for characterizing the structure of fracture systems at the US/BK Site, Grimsel Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, S.J.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture systems form the primary fluid flow paths in a number of rock types, including some of those being considered for high level nuclear waste repositories. In some cases, flow along fractures must be modeled explicitly as part of a site characterization effort. Fractures commonly are concentrated in fracture zones, and even where fractures are seemingly ubiquitous, the hydrology of a site can be dominated by a few discrete fracture zones. We have implemented a site characterization methodology that combines information gained from geophysical and geologic investigations. The general philosophy is to identify and locate the major fracture zones, and then to characterize their systematics. Characterizing the systematics means establishing the essential and recurring patterns in which fractures are organized within the zones. We make a concerted effort to use information on the systematics of the fracture systems to link the site-specific geologic, borehole and geophysical information. This report illustrates how geologic and geophysical information on geologic heterogeneities can be integrated to guide the development of hydrologic models. The report focuses on fractures, a particularly common type of geologic heterogeneity. However, many aspects of the methodology we present can be applied to other geologic heterogeneities as well. 57 refs., 40 figs., 1 tab.

  9. I3ULLETIN O F THE UNITED STATES FISH COMblISSION. 51 With thc close of thc month a iuuch better feeling is shomuj disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shoro, trnwlon .~ -. Maine. .?. ........................ Tiverton, R. I .................... Fares. Cod5

  10. Interaction of a monopole vortex with an isolated topographic feature in a three-layer geophysical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny A. Ryzhov; K. V. Koshel

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the frame of a three-layer quasi-geostrophic analytical model of a $f$-plane geophysical flow, Lagrangian advection being induced by the interaction of a monopole vortex with an isolated topographic feature is addressed. Two different cases when the monopole locates either within the upper or the middle layer are of our interest. In the bottom layer, there is a delta function topographic feature, which generates a closed recirculation region in its vicinity due to the background flow. This recirculation region extends to the middle and upper layers, and it plays the role of a topographic vortex. The interaction between the monopole and the topographic vortex causes complex, including chaotic, advection of fluid particles. We show that the model's parameters, namely, the monopole and topographic vortices' strengths and initial positions, the layers' depths and densities are responsible for the diverse advection patterns. While the patterns are rather complicated, however, one can single out two major processes, which mostly govern fluid particle advection. The first one is the variation in time of the system's phase space structure, so that within the closed region of the topographic vortex, there appear periodically unclosed particle pathways by which the particles leave the topographic vortex. The second one is chaotic advection that arises from the nonstationarity of the monopole-topography interaction.

  11. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Solid State Electron Transfer via Bacterial Nanowires: Contributions Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Geophysical Response of Biostimulated Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estella Atekwana

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of organic matter by microorganisms provides a source of electrical potential or so-called 'self potential' (SP) that can be measured by using a voltmeter. During this process electrons are being produced as a waste-product and bacterial cells have to dispose of these to allow for the complete biodegradation of organic matter. Especially in anaerobic microbial communities, exo-cellular electron transfer is the most important driving force behind this process and organisms have developed different, but also similar, ways to transfer electrons to other microorganisms. Recently, it has been postulated that direct electron transfer from cell-to-cell is actually done by 'hard-wired' microorganisms. This shuttling of electrons is most likely done by certain c-type cytochromes that form the functional part of electrically conductive nanowires. In this study we investigated if nanowires can explain the geoelectrical (self potential and spectral induced polarization) signals observed at some biostimulated environments such as DOE sites. The objectives of our project are to: (1) investigate any temporal changes in the geophysical signatures (Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP)) associated with nanowires of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type and mtrc/omcA deletion mutant, (2) demonstrate that mutant strains of bacteria that produce nonconductive nanowires do not contribute to geoelectrical responses. We accomplished the following: (1) Provided training to students and a postdoctoral fellow that worked on the project, (2) Conducted several SP & IP measurements correlating the distribution of nanowires and SIP/SP signals in partial fulfillment of object No. 1 and 2. On the following we will report and discuss the results of our last experiment with some emphasis on the source mechanisms of both SP and IP associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type in sand columns.

  13. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  14. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  15. Modeling the resolution of inexpensive, novel non-seismic geophysical monitoring tools to monitor CO2 injection into coal beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) techniques, and amplitude vs. angle (AVA) analysis for CO{sub 2} movement in coal beds was based on the SECARB pilot test planned in the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. In the area of interest, coalbed methane is produced mainly from the Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Pratt coal zones at depths between 400 and 700 m and approximately 3 m thick on average. The permeability of coal in the Black Warrior basin decreases exponentially with depth as overburden stress increases. The permeability of the top layer is 100 mD, while the permeability of the deepest layer is around 1 mD. The pilot field test will include injecting a total of 1000 tons of CO{sub 2} into these three coal zones ({approx}300 tons to each zone). The density, sonic and resistivity well-logs from a deep disposal well a couple of miles from the pilot test site were used to create background (pre-injection) models. Our laboratory measurements of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation on coal core samples were used to provide a link between the coalbed CO{sub 2} flow simulation models and the geophysical models. The sensitivity studies showed that while the response to the 300 tons of CO{sub 2} injected into a single layer wouldn't produce measurable surface response for either gravity or EM, the response due to an industrial-size injection would produce measurable surface signal for both techniques. Gravity inversion results illustrated that, provided we can collect high-quality gravity data in the field and we have some a priori information about the depth of the reservoir, we can recover the spatial location of CO{sub 2} plume correctly, although with the smoothing constraint of the inversion, the area was slightly overestimated, resulting in an underestimated value of density change. AVA analysis showed that by inverting seismic and EM data jointly, much better estimates of CO{sub 2} saturation can be obtained, especially in the third injection zone, where seismic AVA data fail to detect the high CO{sub 2} saturation. Analysis of spatial resolution and detectability limits show that gravity and EM measurements could, under certain circumstances, be used as a lower-cost alternative to seismic measurements.

  16. COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR survey used a 200 megahertz (MHz) antenna to provide the maximum depth penetration and subsurface detail yielding usable signals to a depth of about 6 to 10 feet in this environment and allowed discrimination of objects that were deeper, particularly useful in the southern area of the site where shallow depth metallic debris (primarily roof flashing) complicated interpretation of the EM and magnetic data. Several geophysical anomalies were defined on the contour plots that indicated the presence of buried metal. During the first phase of the project, nine anomalies or anomalous areas were detected. The sizes, shapes, and magnitudes of the anomalies varied considerably, but given the anticipated size of the primary target of the investigation, only the most prominent anomalies were considered as potential caches of 30 to 60 buried drums. After completion of a second phase investigation, only two of the anomalies were of sufficient magnitude, not identifiable with existing known metallic objects such as monitoring wells, and in positions that corresponded to the location of alleged dumping activities and were recommended for further, intrusive investigation. Other important findings, based on the variable frequency EM method and its combination with total field magnetic and GPR data, included the confirmation of the position of the old NSDD, the ability to differentiate between ferrous and non-ferrous anomalies, and the detection of what may be plumes emanating from the landfill cell.

  17. GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the vadose zone (i.e., 79 m [260 ft] bgs) within the footprint of the Crib, and (b) 15 to 30 m (50 to 100 ft) east of the Crib footprint, where contaminants are inferred to have migrated through relatively permeable soils. Confirmation of the presence of contamination in historic boreholes correlates well with mapping from the 2010 survey, and serves as a basis to site future characterization boreholes that will likely intersect contamination both laterally and at depth.

  18. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  19. Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics & Planetary Physics S C R I P P S I N S T I T U T I O N O F O C E A N O G R A P H Y , U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I F O R N I A , S A N D I E G O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    the behavior of ice sheets, improved methods of ener- gy exploration, monitoring of carbon dioxide sequestration and so on. Our work spans a broad range of subject matter in geophysics and oceanography. A wide

  20. Estimation of the direction of remanent magnetization: an inverse method using the phase spectrum of a magnetic anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moriarty, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in partial fidfillment of thc requirements for the degree of XIAS IER OF SOIL'NGF. December l988 iviajor Subject: Geophysics ES'I'llvlATION Ol' THV. DIIIECTION OF' RElvIANENT MACNETIZATION: AN INVERSE METHOD DSINC 'THE PIIASV. SPECTRIIM OV A MAGNETIC... ot Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Estimation of Direction of Remanent Magnetization: An Inverse Method Using th~ Phase Spectrum ot a. Magnetic Anomaly. (December 1988) Thomas Daniel Moriarty, B. S. , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Co...

  1. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical Methods in Geomechanics, 29: 751-787. Page 37 ofAnalytical Methods in Geomechanics, 28: 1479- Zheng, L. ,

  2. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in situ test, however, block joints were not pre-sealed.swelling and seal the joints between bentonite blocks. In

  3. Urine THC Metabolite Levels Correlate with Striatal D2/D3 Receptor Availability D.S. Albrecht, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    ) PET scan; striatal RAC binding potential (BPND) was calculated on a voxel- wise basis and cannabis metabolites in urine, markers of recent cannabis consumption, are negatively correlated

  4. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical model of the granite-bentonite- groundwaterconductivity scale effects in granite (Full-scale EngineeredSamper et al. , 2008a). granite heater Relative humidity (%)

  5. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    years to improve the water extraction methods, developtake place during pore water extraction which change theJ.F. , 2001. Extraction of water and solution from

  6. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5037. Samper, J. , Yang, C. , Montenegro, L. , 2003. CORE 2DSamper, J. , Zheng, L. , Montenegro, L. , Fernández, A.M. ,L. , Fernández, A.M. , Montenegro, L. , 2008b. Inverse

  7. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;4 · When internal diffusion is low, winds end up being dominant source of energy Toggweiler et al, 1993 #12;5 · When internal diffusion is low, winds end up being dominant source of energy · Shifts in winds in Brazil BasinWhile ocean is turbulent both horizontally and vertically.... Diffusivities associated

  8. Exoplanetary Geophysics -- An Emerging Discipline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Gregory

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered, and it is clear that the galactic planetary census draws on a diversity greatly exceeding that exhibited by the solar system's planets. We review significant landmarks in the chronology of extrasolar planet detection, and we give an overview of the varied observational techniques that are brought to bear. We then discuss the properties of the currently known distribution, using the mass-period diagram as a guide to delineating hot Jupiters, eccentric giant planets, and a third, highly populous, category that we term "ungiants", planets having masses less than 30 Earth masses and orbital periods less than 100 days. We then move to a discussion of the bulk compositions of the extrasolar planets. We discuss the long-standing problem of radius anomalies among giant planets, as well as issues posed by the unexpectedly large range in sizes observed for planets with masses somewhat greater than Earth's. We discuss the use of transit observations to probe the atmo...

  9. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barhen, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    they are solved using nonlinear conjugate gradient methods.within the conjugate gradient method require repeated solvesThe nonlinear conjugate gradient (CG) methods and variants

  10. 4, 26592681, 2007 Geophysical proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (University of Heidelberg). The unsaturated materials investigated range from coarse-grain gravel to sandy of the packing,20 temperature and water content are preserved. This is a major advantage compared to samples

  11. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barhen, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Unconstrained Optimization and Nonlinear Equations,equality constrained optimization, SIAM J. Optim. , 7, 28.R. , Practical Methods of Optimization, Wiley, New York, 436

  12. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ice from continent out to open ocean to melt ­ Avoids coldfresh bias around Antarctica (led to excess seaice) · Lagrangian model of icebergs · Exporting fresh cap beyond shelf edge increases is most useful for ocean climate? ­ Some issues affecting zcoords also affect hybrid coords if coordinate

  13. Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,Jump to:Locations2002)|EnergyOregon,

  14. Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,JumpValley near

  15. Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

  16. Geothermal Data via the Virginia Tech and DMME Portal to the National Geothermal Data System for the Eastern and Southeastern United States from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The former title for this record was "Geothermal Data for the Eastern and Southeastern U.S. from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Tech." The content originally referenced is still available. It includes geothermal maps of seven southeastern states with accompanying data tables. The seven states are: New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Caroline, and Georgia. Data types include geothermal data, seismic data, and magnetic and gravity data. Typical geothermal data may include tables of temperature versus depth data, plots of temperature/gradient versus depth, tables of thermal conductivity data, and tables of gamma log data. Other resources available from the RGL provide information about hot springs in the southeastern U.S., temperatures for Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments, and deep fracture permeability in crystalline rocks in the eastern and southeastern U.S. Recently, this website and its collection of geothermal data has been renamed and reorganized as a portal into the National Geothermal Data System, a move that makes far more data both available and integrated.

  17. Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Air due to Terrestrial Radionuclides in Southern Brazil: Synthesis by Geological Units and Lithotypes Covered by the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory-Department of Physics-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pinese, Jose P. P. [Department of Geosciences-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorbed dose rates in air due to terrestrial radionuclides were estimated from aerial gamma spectrometric data for an area of 48,600 km{sup 2} in Southern Brazil. The source data was the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project back-calibrated in a cooperative work among the Geological Survey of Brazil, the Geological Survey of Canada, and Paterson, Grant and Watson Ltd. The concentrations of eU (ppm), eTh (ppm) and K (%) were converted to dose rates in air (nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}) by accounting for the contribution of each element's concentration. Regional variation was interpreted according to lithotypes and a synthesis was performed according to the basic geological units present in the area. Higher values of total dose were estimated for felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, with average values varying up to 119{+-}24 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}, obtained by Anitapolis syenite body. Sedimentary, metasedimentary and metamafic rocks presented the lower dose levels, and some beach deposits reached the lowest average total dose, 18.5{+-}8.2 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Thorium gives the main average contribution in all geological units, the highest value being reached by the nebulitic gneisses of Atuba Complex, 71{+-}23 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Potassium presents the lowest average contribution to dose rate in 53 of the 72 units analyzed, the highest contribution being obtained by intrusive alkaline bodies (28{+-}12 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}). The general pattern of geographic dose distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

  18. Institute of geophysics and planetary physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.; Budwine, C.M. (eds.)

    1991-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on topics of high-pressure sciences, astrophysics, and geosciences. (LSP)

  19. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between incident wave energy and seacliff erosion rates: Sanby precipitation and wave energy, respectively. Beachas a natural barrier to wave energy. Within our study area,

  20. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between incident wave energy and seacliff erosion rates: Sanby precipitation and wave energy, respectively. Beachas a natural barrier to wave energy. Within our study area,

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: American Geophysical Union

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Study Rebuts Hypothesis...

  2. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcanism was modeled in experiments in which thermite melt fFe + AtOj explosively interacted with water

  3. SUMMER PROGRAM IN GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Philip J.,

    JUNE 20-AUGUST 26, 2011 Norman Lebovitz and Phil Morrison, codirectors #12;ii Preface The theme, Keiji Kimura, Norman Lebovitz (standing) Third row (left to right): Ed Spiegel (standing), Karl Helfrich, Unknown, Stefan LlewellynSmith, Philip Hall, Greg Chini, Jan Feys, Andrew Crosby, John Gibson

  4. Geophysical study of the East African margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias, Paul Kulman

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    file in the Lamont- Doherty System Directory. 14 22 29 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Plate tectonic theory has described the fitting together of various continents to varying degrees of accuracy. These fits have been based primarily on matching... and Somali Basin (fig. 8) is fairly extensive. The cruise tracks are those of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO), Scripps Institute of Oceanography, and the British Admiralty...

  5. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in a manufactured gas plantPermeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) [Doherty et al. , 2006;

  6. Modelling Seismic Wave Propagation for Geophysical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut de Recherche pour le développement 3Instituto de Geofisica

  7. D.D. Sentman Geophysical Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Tops Jarvis Australia Camera Image #12;TLEs exhibit a complex variety of forms with considerable, and the parent storm of the sprites are marked. The FOV of the primary camera is indicated. Below: Video clip

  8. Russian Geology Geologiya and Geophysics i Geofizika

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    ), Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer (IUEM), Technopôle Brest-Iroise, Place Nicolas Copernic, F-29280

  9. Engineering and environmental geophysics at the millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steeples, Don W.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . They are used also at contaminated sites to measure the per- turbation of the earth’s magnetic field caused by buried ferrous metal objects such as steel drums, the ferrous metal waste in landfills, and iron pipes (e.g., Roberts et al., 1990a). Magnetic... contaminants. Spectral gamma methods are useful in identifying specific isotopes that occur within a meter or two of the earth’s surface, and these methods may be useful in locating natural radioactive hazards, such as radon gas sources. Nielson et al. (1990...

  10. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  11. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    currents using stacked microbial fuel cells, Environ. Sci.Keller, et al. (2006), Microbial fuel cells: methodology andbiogeobattery, microbial fuel cell, biogeophysics,

  12. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT PETITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    . If the cause of this petition is to prevent delay in graduation, record on page 2 your project schedule for each semester until your expected date of graduation.) _____________________________________________________________________________________________' _____________________________________________________________________________________________' _____________________________________________________________________________________________' _____________________________________________________________________________________________' _____________________________________________________________________________________________' Current graduation: ______________________________ Revised graduation: ____________________________ Month

  13. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the core, neutralizing the corona sheath charge and causing rapid heating in the core, which in turn referred to as the "core") is created either by the downward stepped leader for the first return stroke or by a dart leader for the subsequent return stroke. It is generally believed that the core is sur- rounded

  14. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 7. DC, VLF, andin Groundwater at a Landfill: A Case Study, Journal of2007] for the municipal landfill of Entressen located in the

  15. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    Collisionless shock waves are important mechanisms for converting ram pressure into thermal energy and affect, such as the Earth's bow shock [Russel and Greenstadt, 1979] or coronal mass ejections, and astrophysical shocks-stationary shocks, such as Earth's bow shock. Shock formation has been modeled numerically with particle

  16. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John

    2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  17. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to avoid conflicts with wildlife migration. The drilling will apply closed-circuit, low footprint sump-less drilling techniques for the first time in geothermal exploration...

  18. Advancesin Laboratory Geophysics Using Bender Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blandford, Ann

    geometriesaxetested. Synthetic rubber is usedasa substitute for soft clay,dueto the great numberof samplesinvolvedand

  19. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the hydraulic fracturing, and to predict the earthquakes. Moreover, we detail the studies on geothermal of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan Correspondence should to detect at distance the water flow, to deduce the thickness of the aquifer and to predict the hydraulic

  20. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Information: · Readme · Figure S1 · Figure S2 Correspondence to: B. Rose, brose@albany.edu Citation: Rose, B

  1. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Planets RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    without this implementation. However, a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls = 180 is persistent: · Radiatively active clouds impact atmospheric water vapor and ice in a GCM · Cloud microphysics with dynamic cli- mate modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water

  2. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    of Geosciences, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104-9700, USA 2 Colorado School of Mines, CO 80401-1893, USA

  3. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arora, T. , A. Revil, N. Linde, J. Castermant (2007), Non-F. Trolard, G. Bourrié, and N. Linde (2008), Redox potentialUnion, Baltimore, USA, 2006. Linde, N. , Revil A. (2007),

  4. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic interpretation of seismic reflection patternsSeismic Stratigraphy and Its Sedimentological Interpretation

  5. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    not exhibited positive trends over the last 15­30 years · Blocking shows large interannual and decadal: · Readme · Barnes_etal_2014_GRL_ Supplementary_Materials Correspondence to: E. A. Barnes, eabarnes Hemisphere. To ensure robust results, we diagnose blocking using three unique blocking identification methods

  6. Department of Geophysics Earth Science Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    detection in the Akal block Jurassic section, Cantarell Field, Mexico, SEG 79th Annual meeting Houston

  7. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cores have not experienced diagenesis from deep burial andwith redox-related diagenesis. Maximums in Fe/Ti ratio

  8. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cores have not experienced diagenesis from deep burial andwith redox-related diagenesis. Maximums in Fe/Ti ratio

  9. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T O. (2006). The Avaatech XRF Core Scanner: technicalshelf cores ..54 XRFand X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) instruments. Elemental ratio

  10. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T O. (2006). The Avaatech XRF Core Scanner: technicalcores54 3.3.7 XRFand X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) instruments. Elemental ratio

  11. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

  12. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

  13. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Biogeosciences RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    analyzed emission-driven simu- lations from 15 Earth System Models (ESMs) · Most ESMs had a small positive atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models, J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci., 119, 141­162, doi:10 of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models F. M. Hoffman1,2 , J. T. Randerson1 , V

  14. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to optical frequencies, extending to X-rays and gamma rays. The electromagnetic pulse associated to its abundance in nature. Lightning processes radiate impulsive electromagnetic waves from DC

  15. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkins, Ian

    convection to start from more levels · Simple modification of convective parameterization Correspondence to of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4), we show that the overall accuracy in the diurnal simulation of convective rise to diurnal cycles in cloud amount [May et al., 2012] and relative humidity [Soden, 2000] which

  16. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Castermant (2007), Non-intrusive determination of theoil offers a promising non-intrusive method of detection forenvironments and a non-intrusive or minimally invasive way

  17. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Labratory staff Providing Los Alamos National Laboratory programs with systematic infusion of new ideas, people, and contact with the larger university community Direct support...

  18. Monitoring DNAPL pumping using integrated geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The removal of DNAPL during pumping was monitored. At Hill AFB in Utah, a free-product DNAPL plume (predominantly TCE, with some TCA, PCE, methylene chloride) is pooled in water-wet soil on a thick clay aquitard. Groundwater pumping at Operable Unit 2 began in 1994; to date, nearly 30,000 gal DNAPL have been recovered. From Sept. 1994 through Sept. 1995, changes in the basin during DNAPL pumping were monitored using fiber optic chemical sensors, neutron logs, and electrical resistance tomography (ERT). The first two sensor types verify the presence of DNAPL in vicinity of 3 boreholes which form a cross section from the perimeter of the basin to its center. Cross borehole ERT images the changes in formation electrical properties due to removal of DNAPL, extending the understanding of DNAPL removal between the boreholes. During pumping, electrical resistivities decreased; we suggest these decreases are directly caused by the reduction in DNAPL. During ground water pumping, water with relatively low resistivity replaces some of the DNAPL pockets as the highly insulating DNAPL is removed. Results suggest that, as DNAPL is pumped from a nearby well, product slowly drains along the top of an aquitard and into the pump well, where it collects.

  19. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to merge their data into a broader picture. The techniques used for this project were seismic refraction reflection (using a Vibroseis source), gravity, and electromagnetics...

  20. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf NSEC

  1. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Eagle (1990), Hydrology, sedimentology and the fate andMorpho-structure and sedimentology of the Holocene Ebroshelf para- sequences, Sedimentology, 50(4), 667 – 701.

  2. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sam Jr. , Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (3rdMorpho-structure and sedimentology of the Holocene Ebroshelf para- sequences, Sedimentology, 50(4), 667 – 701.

  3. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFPTri-PartyForThe

  4. Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.pngpage? For

  5. Borehole Geophysical Logging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,BelcherBlundell 1Fort Fairfield BiomassBorehole

  6. Borehole Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,BelcherBlundell 1Fort Fairfield BiomassBoreholeMethods

  7. LANL | Solid Earth Geophysics | EES-17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157 /TopLANLLANL(EES) Groups

  8. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobs Running jobsS O U T H W E S T E R N

  9. Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II JumpMepsolar AG akaSurvey

  10. Generic Geophysical Permit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/Puesta enOpenEnergyOrder No.

  11. Geophysical Exploration Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) | Open Energy(Blackwell, EtRaftArea, Canon

  12. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics What does the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory do for the Nation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 2015 President's budget request for modeling system for predictions and projections on time scales from days to decades. The Fiscal Year (FY

  13. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soc. Expl. Geophys. , Tulsa, OK), pp. 127-145. Goldstein,ed. (Soc. Expl. Geophys. , Tulsa, OK), 2,145-152. (coat'@Soc. Explor. Geophys. , Tulsa, OK), 1, 147-189. Zonge, no

  14. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATIONS Gamma-ray spectrometry is a tool for geologicGAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY .Seismic reflection • Gamma-ray • Metal-specific spectrometry

  15. Geophysical LaboratoryGeophysical Laboratory Carnegie Institution of WashingtonCarnegie Institution of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemley, Russell J.

    )] [Lazicki et al., Solid State Comm. (2009)] Melting of Simple Substances #12;[Lazicki et al., Solid State;History of X-ray Sources Evolution ofEvolution of Light SourcesLight Sources ·· XX--ray to infraredray · Technology #12;Carnegie InstitutionCarnegie Institution Brave New World Under PressureBrave New World Under

  16. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of “blind” geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the “Best Geophysics Paper” at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the fault zones is constrained by geological, drilling, and geothermal production data. The objective is to determine interpretation techniques for evaluating structural controls of fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The conclusions are: • directions of MT polarization and anisotropy and MEQ S-splitting correlate. Polarization and anisotropy are caused by fluid filled fractures at the base of the clay cap. •Microearthquakes occur mainly on the boundary of low resistivity within the fracture zone and high resistivity in the host rock. Resistivity is lowest within the core of the fracture zone and increases towards the margins of the fracture zone. The heat source and the clay cap for the hydrothermal have very low resistivity of less than 5?m. •Fracture porosity imaged by resistivity indicates that it varies between 45-5% with most between 10-20%, comparable to values from core samples in volcanic areas in Kenya and Iceland. For resistivity values above 60?m, the porosity reduces drastically and therefore this might be used as the upper limit for modeling fracture porosity from resistivity. When resistivity is lower than 5?m, the modeled fracture porosity increases drastically indicating that this is the low resistivity limit. This is because at very low resistivity in the heat source and the clay cap, the resistivity is dominated by ionic conduction rather than fracture porosity. •Microearthquakes occur mainly above the heat source which is defined by low resistivity at a depth of 3-4.5 km at the Krafla hydrothermal system and 4-7 km in the Longonot hydrothermal system. •Conversions of S to P waves occur for microearthquakes located above the heat source within the hydrothermal system. Shallow microearthquakes occur mainly in areas that show both MT and S-wave anisotropy. •S-wave splitting and MT anisotropy occurs at the base of the clay cap and therefore reflects the variations in fracture porosity on top of the hydrothermal system. •In the Krafla hydrothermal system in Iceland, both MT polarization and MEQ splitting directions align with

  17. Geophysical inversion with adaptive array processing of ambient noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traer, James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer ocean surface wave energy into the Earth’s crustthe transmission of surface wave energy to seismic energy issteady high winds and wave energy [see Fig.2.1 (c)–(e)] over

  18. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Krafla MEQ Network 11 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov East-West Profile Joint Analysis of Krafla MT-MEQ Data Not Coupled to Resistivity Structure Coupled to...

  19. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review June 30 -July 2, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in extreme weather events? We are making rapid progress on the effects of warming on tropical cyclones. How prediction system (coupled, multiple mesh) C180 global model C90 global model C360/720 track of different versions of the modelControl ITCZ The response of tropical rainfall to high latitude heating/cooling

  20. Geophysical interpretation of the PASSCAL Ouachita experiment: southern part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wen-Kung

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whereas tsvo-dimensional gravity modeling is used to constrain the resulting sismic model. The final model has the follosving major features: (1) Tertiary-Cretaceous sediments consist of four layers with a range of velocity from 1. 9 km/s to 4. 1 km...