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1

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Vol. II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II – Technical Report – provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix – contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Verdict, Malcolm; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Montgomery, Cynthia; McKelvey, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II – Technical Report – provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix – contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. II – Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its third annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The report is organized in three volumes. Volume 1 – Summary Report, provides an executive summary with key areas summarized; Volume II – Technical Report, provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix, contains detailed data from simulations for each of the forty-one counties included in the analysis.

Degelman, L. O.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Verdict, M.; Liu, Z.; Muns, S.; Ahmad, M.; Turner, W. D.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Bryant, J.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. I – Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its third annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume 1 – Summary Report, provides an executive summary with key areas summarized; Volume II – Technical Report, provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix, contains detailed data from simulations for each of the forty-one counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmad, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Bryant, J.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. II - Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fourth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. III - Technical Appendix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fourth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Verdict, M.; Yazdani, B.; Ahmed, M.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Liu, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Degelman, L. O.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide emissions reduction.

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EPA rule requires SO 2 emissions reduction from Texas coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting in 2012, power plants in 23 states must meet new sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions caps in order to comply with the Cross State Air Pollution ...

9

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III--Technical Appendix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its seventh annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II – Technical Report – provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix – contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the renewable energy projects installed throughout Texas after the year 2000. The collection of these projects was done in response to the Energy System Laboratory’s requirement to fulfill its obligations for Senate Bill 5 (SB5). The renewable energy projects researched and presented herein include: solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal, and landfill gas-fired power plants. However, information on wind energy farms has been omitted in this report due to the fact that a more complete ESL report on this subject has already been prepared, ESL-TR-06-08-01. In addition to locating these projects, SB5 required the calculation of reduced NOx emissions. To accomplish this, the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University developed “eCalc” in 2004 -- a web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator. This program is able to calculate weather-normalized NOx emissions estimates for energy efficiency and renewable sources projects, such as solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. Annual energy savings from renewable projects resulted in the following: • Solar photovoltaic projects resulted in energy savings of 424.18 MWh/yr and a reduction of 0.28 tons of NOx/year. • Solar thermal projects resulted in energy savings of 332.88 MWh/yr and a reduction of 0.26 tons of NOx/year. The peak ozone season day (OSD) NOx reductions were calculated to be: • Solar photovoltaic projects resulted in savings of 1.29 MWh/day. • Solar thermal projects resulted in savings equivalent to 0.94 MWh/day. The emissions reduction values for hydroelectric and geothermal projects are not presented here since there is no methodology in place at this time to obtain these values.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Ramirez, E. J.; Champeau, K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Calculation of NOx Emissions Reductions From Energy Efficient Residential Building Construction in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone pollution levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from code-compliant residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties. This paper reviews the calculation methods and presents results that show the 2003 annual electricity and natural gas savings and NOx reductions from implementation of the 2000 IECC to single-family and multi-family residences in 2003, which use a code-tracable DOE-2 simulation. A discussion of the development of a web-based emissions reductions calculator is also discussed.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Calculation of Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficient Residential Building Construction in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone pollution levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from code-compliant residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties. This paper reviews the calculation methods and presents results that show the 2003 annual electricity and natural gas savings and NOx reductions from implementation of the 2000 IECC to single-family and multi-family residences in 2003, which use a code-traceable DOE-2 simulation. A discussion of the development of a web-based emissions reductions calculator is also discussed.

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its eighth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II – Technical Report – provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix – contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar, J. C.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.; Liu, Z.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Energy Savings and NOx Emissions Reduction Potential from the 2012 Federal Legislation to Phase Out Incandescent Lamps in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information about the potential savings from the 2012 Federal Legislation to phase out incandescent lamps and the NOx emissions reduction from the replacement of incandescent bulbs with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL). In Texas, this analysis includes the savings estimates from both the annual and Ozone Season Day (OSD) NOx reductions. The NOx emissions reduction in this analysis are calculated using estimated emissions factors for 2007 from the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) eGRID database, which had been specially prepared for this purpose.

Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Haberl, Jeff; Soman, Rohit

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Methodology to Calculate NOx Emissions Reductions from the Implementation of the 2000 IECC/IRC Conservation Code in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits (i.e., affected areas). In 2001, the Texas State Legislature formulated and passed the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), to reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx by sources that are currently not regulated by the state. An important part of this legislation is the State's energy efficiency program, which includes reductions in energy use and demand that are associated with the adoption of the 2001 IECC, which represents one of the first times that the EPA is considering emissions reductions credits from energy conservation - an important new development for building efficiency professionals, since this could pave the way for documented procedures for financial reimbursement for building energy conservation from the state's emissions reductions funding. This paper provides a detailed discussion of the procedures that have been used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties using the eGRID database. The previous paper by Haberl et al. (2004) presents results from the application of the methodology that is detailed in this paper.

Haberl, J. S.; Im, P.; Culp, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CALCULATING EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAMS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE WIND FARMS IN THE TEXAS ERCOT REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2008 the Texas State Legislature required adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015, and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also required the Public Utility Commission (PUC) to establish a target of 10,000 MW of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and required the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop a methodology for computing emission reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory is required to assist the TCEQ to quantify emission reduction credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. To satisfy these requirements the ESL has been developing and refining a method to calculate annually creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the TCEQ. This paper provides a detailed description of an improved methodology developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by a wind farm. Details are presented for the wind farm Sweetwater I (Abilene) as well as results from the application of this procedure to all the wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region in 2006.

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Chandrasekaran, V.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits this sixth annual report, ‘Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (Preliminary Report)’ to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. In this preliminary report the NOx emissions savings from the energy-efficiency programs from multiple Texas State Agencies working under Senate Bill 5 and Senate Bill 7 in a uniform format to allow the TECQ to consider the combined savings for Texas’ State Implementation Plan (SIP) planning purposes. This required that the analysis should include the cumulative savings estimates from all projects projected through 2020 for both the annual and Ozone Season Day (OSD) NOx reductions. The NOx emissions reduction from all these programs were calculated using estimated emissions factors for 2007 from the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) eGRID database, which had been specially prepared for this purpose. In 2007 the cumulative total annual electricity savings from all programs is 12,591,561 MWh/yr (8,326 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs is 37,421 MWh/day, which would be a 1,559 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (25.05 tons-NOx/day). By 2013 the total cumulative annual electricity savings from will be 28,802,074 MWh/year (18,723 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs will be 88,560 MWh/day, which would be 3,690 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (58.47 tons-NOx/day).

Degelman, L.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Gilman, D.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

Calculation of NOx Emission Reduction from Implementation of the 2000 IECC/IRC Conservation Code in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits (i.e., affected areas)1. In 2001, the Texas State Legislature formulated and passed Senate Bill 5 to reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx by sources that are currently not regulated by the state2. An important part of this legislation is the State's energy efficiency program, which includes reductions in energy use and demand that are associated with the adoption of the 2001 IECC3, which represents one of the first times that the EPA is considering emissions reductions credits from energy conservation - an important new development for building efficiency professionals, since this could pave the way for documented procedures for financial reimbursement for building energy conservation from the state's emissions reductions funding. This paper reviews the procedures that have been used to calculate the electricity savings from residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties. Results are presented that show the annual electricity savings and NOx reductions from implementation of the 2001 IECC to single family residences in 2002, which use the DOE-2 simulation program.

Turner, W. D.; Yazdani, B.; Im, P.; Verdict, M.; Bryant, J.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III - Appendix, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2006 - June 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II – Technical Report – provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III – Technical Appendix – contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Degelman, L.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Ahmed, M.; Verdict, M.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume II - Technical Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2006 - June 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II - Technical Report - provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III - Technical Appendix - contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Degelman, L.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Ahmed, M.; Verdict, M.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume II--Technical Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality January 2008-December 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its seventh annual report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II - Technical Report - provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III - Technical Appendix - contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume I - Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2006 - June 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II - Technical Report - provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III - Technical Appendix - contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Verdict, M.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.; Ahmed, M.; Degelman, L.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gilman, D.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume I-Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2009-December 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its eighth annual report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II - Technical Report - provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III - Technical Appendix - contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Claridge, D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume I--Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2008-December 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its seventh annual report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II - Technical Report - provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III - Technical Appendix - contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Claridge, David; Yazdani, Bahman; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Liu, Zi; Muns, Shirley; Gilman, Don; Degelman, Larry; Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume III- Technical Appendix, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2009 – December 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its eighth annual report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II - Technical Report - provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III - Technical Appendix - contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NOx Emissions Reductions from Implementation of the 2000 IECC/IRC Conservation Code to Residential Construction in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits (i.e., classified as affected areas). In 2001, the Texas State Legislature formulated and passed the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), to reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx by sources that are currently not regulated by the state. An important part of this legislation is the State's energy efficiency program, which includes reductions in energy use and demand that are associated with the adoption of the 2000 IECC1, which represents one of the first times that the EPA is considering emissions reductions credits from energy conservation - an important new development for building efficiency professionals. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from residential construction in nonattainment and affected counties2. Results are presented that show the annual electricity and natural gas savings and NOx reductions from implementation of the 2000 IECC to singlefamily and multi-family residences in 2003, which use a code-traceable DOE-2 simulation. A second paper provides a detailed discussion of the methods used to calculate the emissions 1 This includes the 2001 Supplement to the 2000 IECC and 2000 IRC (IRC 2000, IECC 2001). 2 The procedures outlined in this paper were developed and used in the Laboratory's 2002 and 2003 Annual Report to the TCEQ to satisfy the requirements of the Senate Bill 5 Legislation. In 2003 the Laboratory was awarded a grant from the EPA, which is administered through the TCEQ, to expand the development of these procedures into a webbased tool that would provide state and local authorities with accurate emissions reductions for use in preparing State Implementation Plans. reductions using the eGRID database (Haberl et al. 2004).

Haberl, J. S.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Methodology for Calculating Integrated Nox Emissions Reduction from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs Across State Agencies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary of the integrated NOx emissions reduction calculation procedures developed by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) to satisfy the reporting requirements for Senate Bill 5. These procedures are used to report annual NOx emissions reduction to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) from the state-wide energy efficiency and renewable energy programs of the Laboratory, Federal buildings, furnace pilot light upgrades, the Texas Public Utility Commission (PUC), the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) and electricity generated from wind power.

Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Culp, C.; Kim, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Im, P.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Methodology For Calculating Integrated NOx Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs Across State Agencies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an update of the integrated NOx emissions reductions calculation procedures developed by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) for the State of Texas. to satisfy the reporting requirements for Senate Bill 5 of the Texas State Legislature. 1 These procedures are used to report annual NOx emissions reductions to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) from the state-wide energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. These programs include: the impact of code-complaint construction, Federal buildings, furnace pilot light upgrades, the Texas Public Utility Commission (PUC), the energy efficiency programs managed by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO), electricity generated from wind power in the state, and several additional statewide measures, including SEER 13 air conditioner and pilot lights.

Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukopadhyay. J; Marshall, K.; Gilman, D.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.; McKelvy, K.; Reid, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Report on NOx Emissions Reduction from Voluntary Energy Efficiency Projects within the Alamo Area Council of Governments to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, August 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Texas A&M University System was contacted by Mr. Peter Bella of the Alamo Area Council of Governments (AACOG) to help document large-scale, energy efficiency projects for credit within their 2004 Clean Air Plan. The purpose of this study is two-fold: 1) estimate the creditable emissions reductions from energy efficiency actions in AACOG regions, and 2) serve as a pilot project for documenting and calculating emissions reductions for TCEQ. The survey was conducted from February through March 2004.

Haberl, J. S.; Verdict, M.; Yazdani, B.; Zhu, Y.; Im, P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume II – Technical Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality September 2002 – August 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory) is pleased to provide our second annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Council on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003, (e) (a) (b) (Vernon Supp. 2002). This annual report: provides an estimate of the energy savings and NOx reductions from energy code compliance in new residential construction in 38 counties, describes the technology developed to enable the TCEQ to substantiate energy and emissions reduction credits from EE/RE to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and provides valuable insights into the effectiveness of additional energy efficiency and renewable energy measures in existing buildings and industrial facilities.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume I – Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality September 2002 – August 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory) is pleased to provide our second annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Council on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003, (e) (a) (b) (Vernon Supp. 2002). This annual report: provides an estimate of the energy savings and NOx reductions from energy code compliance in new residential construction in 38 counties, describes the technology developed to enable the TCEQ to substantiate energy and emissions reduction credits from EE/RE to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and provides valuable insights into the effectiveness of additional energy efficiency and renewable energy measures in existing buildings and industrial facilities.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. I - Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The TERP legislation adopted the energy efficiency provisions of the International Residential Code (IRC) and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential, commercial and industrial buildings. Under the TERP legislation, the Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System must determine the energy savings from energy code adoption and, when applicable, from more stringent local codes or above-code performance ratings and must report these reductions annually to the TCEQ.

Degelman, L. O.; Gilman, D.; Ahmed, M.; Yazdani, B.; Liu, Z.; Verdict, M.; Muns, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Turner, W. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Methodology for Calculating Emissions Reductions from Renewable Energy Programs and Its Application to the Wind Farms in the Texas ERCOT Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Texas Legislature required adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015, and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also required the Public Utility Commission (PUC) to establish a target of 10,000 MW of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and required Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop a methodology for computing emissions reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory was to assist the TCEQ to quantify emissions reductions credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. To satisfy these requirements the ESL has been developing and refining a method to annually calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the TCEQ. This paper provides a detailed description of the methodology developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by a wind farm. Details are presented for the wind farm Sweetwater I as well as results from the application of this procedure to all the wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region.

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reductions in ozone concentrations due to controls on variability in industrial flare emissions in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High concentrations of ozone in the Houston/Galveston area are associated with industrial plumes of highly reactive hydrocarbons, mixed with NOx. The emissions leading to these plumes can have significant temporal variability, ...

Nam, Junsang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

36

NOx Emissions Reduction from CPS Energy's "Save For Tomorrow Energy Plan" Within the Alamo Area Council of Governments Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL used the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s (TCEQ) Guide for Incorporating Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Projects into the SIP for local entities dated February 6, 2004 to survey potential projects in the AACOG area that occurred after the State’s base period (September 1, 2001) for their local Clean Air Plan. CPS Energy retained Nexant, Inc. (Nexant) to conduct a comprehensive, independent measurement and verification (M&V) evaluation of CPS Energy’s 2009 DSM programs. Nexant surveyed the energy and demand savings achieved by CPS Energy’s 2009 DSM programs. In 2009, the programs offered by CPS Energy had two sectors: residential and non-residential (commercial). To determine net program impacts, Nexant conducted market research of evaluations for other utility-sponsored DSM programs around the country. From the survey conducted in 2009, total net energy and demand savings from the residential and non-residential sectors are 86,712,978 kWh (residential subtotal is 62,369,566 kWh and non-residential subtotal is 24,343,412 kWh). Nexant calculated CPS Energy’s DSM potential through 2020 and found there to be significant room for program growth. Total cumulative achievable savings through the 2020 program year are expected to be 2,543 GWh of electricity savings (based on the aggressive incentive scenario and exception of industrial sector). According to the TCEQ/ESL, the total annual NOx emissions reductions estimated through 2009 energy savings were 114.03 ton/year. Annual NOx emissions reductions of residential sector were 82.02 ton/yr and annual NOx emissions reductions of non-residential sector were 32.01 Ton/yr. The NOx emissions reductions estimated through 2020 energy savings potential were 3,344 ton/year. Annual NOx emissions reductions of residential sector were 1,873 ton/yr and annual NOx emissions reductions of non-residential sector, except of industrial sector, were 1,471 ton/yr.

Do, S. L.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A methodology to evaluate energy savings and NOx emissions reductions from the adoption of the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) to new residences in non-attainment and affected counties in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, four areas of Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because they exceeded the national one-hour ground-level ozone standard of 0.12 parts-per-million (ppm). Ozone is formed in the atmosphere by the reaction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) in the presence of heat and sunlight. In May 2002, The Texas State Legislature passed Senate Bill 5, the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), to reduce the emissions of NOx by several sources. As part of the 2001 building energy performance standards program which is one of the programs in the TERP, the Texas Legislature established the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as the state energy code. Since September 1, 2001, the 2000 IECC has been required for newly constructed single and multifamily houses in Texas. Therefore, this study develops and applies portions of a methodology to calculate the energy savings and NOx emissions reductions from the adoption of the 2000 IECC to new single family houses in non-attainment and affected counties in Texas. To accomplish the objectives of the research, six major tasks were developed: 1) baseline data collection, 2) development of the 2000 IECC standard building simulation, 3) projection of the number of building permits in 2002, 4) comparison of energy simulations, 5) validation and, 6) NOx emissions reduction calculations. To begin, the 1999 standard residential building characteristics which are the baseline construction data were collected, and the 2000 IECC standard building characteristics were reviewed. Next, the annual and peak-day energy savings were calculated using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. The building characteristics and the energy savings were then crosschecked using the data from previous studies, a site visit survey, and utility billing analysis. In this thesis, several case study houses are used to demonstrate the validation procedure. Finally, the calculated electricity savings (MWh/yr) were then converted into the NOx emissions reductions (tons/yr) using the EPA's eGRID database. The results of the peak-day electricity savings and NOx emissions reductions using this procedure are approximately twice the average day electricity savings and NOx emissions reductions.

Im, Piljae

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

Hadley, SW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

40

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Texas Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

43

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

45

Energy Cost Reduction Measures Identified for Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According t o energy auditors, state-owned facilities in Texas on the average consume over twice the energy of comparable facilities in the private sector. In 1984 and 1986 as part of the Texas Energy Cost Containment Program, two extensive energy audit programs examined a total of 35.3 million square feet of state-owned space. Energy cost reduction measures with paybacks of four years or less were identified. The purpose of this paper is to present the projects identified in 1986. Most relate to lighting, HVAC, and energy management systems. The type of facilities audited include colleges and universities, health science centers, state schools and centers, hospitals, and office buildings. The relation between the facility type and the energy cost reduction measures identified is discussed. In addition, the energy and dollar savings derived from the identified measures at the different facilities are presented. The total savings of the projects identified in both energy audit programs amount to $23.7 million annually.

Grigg, T. J.; Verdict, M. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Analysis of Emissions Calculators for a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emissions Reductions (CEDER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance on quantifying the air emissions benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework and the basic requirements needed to demonstrate air quality improvements or emissions reductions with adequate certainty to be incorporated into a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for achieving or maintaining National ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The Energy Systems Laboratory, with guidance from both the US EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), developed the first a comprehensive engineering toolkit and database that satisfies the EPA guidance. The value of this unique tool was demonstrated in 2005 when the ESL, at the request of the TCEQ, used it to develop integrated emissions estimates for all state agencies participating in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP). Building on this expertise, the US EPA has established a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emissions Reductions (CEDER) at the Energy Systems Laboratory to research and gather the state-of-the-art air pollution quantification techniques for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy (EE/RE) projects; provide technical support and customized analysis for state and local agencies seeking to estimate the environmental benefits from clean energy policies and programs; and document how a user-friendly tool, based on e2Calc, can be used by clients to fulfill their needs to quantify emissions reductions from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures.

Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Estimation of Annual Reductions of NOx Emissions in ERCOT for the HB3693 Electricity Savings Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing the level of energy efficiency in Texas, as proposed by House Bill 3693, an Act related to energy demand, energy load, energy efficiency incentives, energy programs and energy performance measures, would reduce the amount of electricity demanded from Texas utilities. Since approximately eighty-eight percent of electricity generated in Texas is from plants powered by fossil fuels, such as coal and natural gas, this decrease would also reduce the air pollution that would otherwise be associated with burning these fuels. This report presents the potential emission reductions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would occur in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region if new energy efficiency targets for investor owned utilities are established for 2010 and 2015. These energy efficiency targets are the subject of a feasibility study as prescribed by Texas House Bill 3693. This report describes the details of the methodology, data and assumptions used, and presents the results of the analysis. The total energy savings targets for utilities within ERCOT are 745,710 megawatt-hours (MWh) by 2010 under the 30 percent reduction of growth scenario and 1,788,953 MWh by 2015 under the 50 percent reduction of growth scenario. The total projected annual NOx emissions reductions from these electricity savings are 191 tons in 2010 and 453 tons in 2015, or converting the annual totals into average daily avoided emissions totals, 0.5 tons per day by 2010 and 1.25 tons per day by 2015. The average avoided emission rate is approximately 0.51 pounds (lb) of NOx reduced per MWh of electricity savings. While House Bill 3693 is an Act related to energy and does not target emissions levels, the energy efficiency improvements would achieve air pollution benefits that could positively affect air quality and human health. The emissions reductions projected to result in 2010 and 2015 are comparable to the Texas Emission Reduction Program (TERP) Energy-Efficiency Grants Program, which does target emission reductions and estimated 2005 annual NOx emissions reductions of about 89 tons. While the projected emissions reductions are small compared to the total emission reductions needed to bring the state’s non-attainment areas into attainment of the national ambient air quality standards for ozone, they can be a part of an overall strategy to reduce emissions and improve human health in Texas.

Diem, Art; Mulholland, Denise; Yarbrough, James; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Im, Piljae; Haberl, Jeff

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

49

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power plant. Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), WE Energies demonstrated the TOXECON(TM) process in a $52.9million project at the Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Mich. TOXECON is a relatively cost-effective option for achieving significant reductions in mercury emissions and increasing the

50

Impacts of Texas Lignite on Selective Catalytic Reduction System Life and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NOx control are being broadly applied to U.S. power generating units fired with western subbituminous and eastern bituminous coals and natural gas. Prior to 2010, no power generating units firing Texas lignite were equipped with SCR. To develop an understanding of the potential deactivation and erosion of SCR catalyst by Texas lignite, a pilot-scale SCR reactor was used in a two-phase program at the Sandow Station, located near Rockdale, Texas. The test pro...

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...

52

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

53

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of...

54

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Title Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...

55

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School District School District Emissions Reduction Policies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School District Emissions Reduction Policies

56

Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER): Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2004, the USEPA issued guidance on quantifying the air emission benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework and the basic requirements needed to demonstrate air quality improvements or emission reductions with adequate certainty to be incorporated into a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for achieving or maintaining National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The Energy Systems Laboratory, with guidance from both the US EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), developed the first comprehensive engineering toolkit and database that satisfies the EPA guidelines. The value of this unique tool was demonstrated in 2005 when the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), at the request of the TCEQ, used it to develop integrated emissions estimates for all state agencies participating in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP). Building on this expertise, the US EPA has established a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER) at the Energy Systems Laboratory to research and gather the state-of-the-art on air pollution quantification techniques for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy (EE/RE) projects; provide technical support and customized analysis for state and local agencies seeking to estimate the environmental benefits from clean energy policies and programs; and to document how a user-friendly tool, based on e2Calc, can be used by clients to fulfill their needs to quantify emission reductions from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures.

Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Do, Sung Lok

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Emissions Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

58

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fleet Emissions Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

59

NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions Reduction from Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) Measures at the Rent-A-Car Facility in the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Texas A&M University System was contracted to fulfill a Continuous Commissioning® (CC®)project on the Rent-a-Car facility (RAC) of the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFWIA) in which energy savings are directly related to an emission reduction that can be credited. The purpose of this study is to estimate the creditable emissions reductions from energy efficiency CC® measures in the RAC of DFWIA.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

TEXAS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

texas lacaff martin tx80 317 393223 oa 1969 lacal willacy tx40 489 393254 on 1965 lacasa stephens tx70 429 393270 ona 1975 lacey hemphill tx95 211 393347 n 1996

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on

62

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Employer Invested Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on AddThis.com...

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mobile Source Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

64

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Tax Credit An income tax credit is available to individuals who install diesel particulate emissions reduction technology equipment at any truck stop,

65

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report: A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the Period September 2007 - August 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 79th Legislature, through Senate Bill 20, House Bill 2481 and House Bill 2129, amended Senate Bill 5 to enhance its effectiveness by adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015 and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also requires the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT) to establish a target of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and requires the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop methodology for computing emissions reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this Legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL or Laboratory) is to assist the TCEQ in quantifying emissions reductions credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, through a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC) to develop and annually calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under this Legislation, submits its third annual report, “Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables,” to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in several deliverables: • A Summary Report, which details the key areas of work; • Supporting Documentation; and • Supporting data files, including weather data, and wind production data, which have been assembled as part of the third year’s effort. This executive summary provides summaries of the key areas of accomplishment this year, including: • Continuation of stakeholder’s meetings; • Analysis of power generation from wind farms using improved method and 2006 data; • Analysis of emissions reduction from wind farms; • Updates on degradation analysis; • Analysis of other renewables, including: PV, solar thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal and landfill gas; • Review of electricity generation by renewable sources and transmission planning study reported by ERCOT; • Review of combined heat and power projects in Texas; and • Preliminary reporting of NOx emissions savings in the 2007 Integrated Savings report to the TCEQ.

Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Subbarao, K.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Impacts of Texas Lignite on Selective Catalytic Reduction System Life and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NOx control are being broadly applied to U.S. power generating units fired with western subbituminous and eastern bituminous coals and natural gas. To date, no power generating units firing Texas lignite are equipped with SCR. To develop an understanding of the potential deactivation and erosion of SCR catalyst by Texas lignite, a pilot-scale SCR reactor was used in a one-year program to test a plate-type catalyst at the Sandow Station, located near Rockdal...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Emissions State Emissions Reductions Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Emissions Reductions Requirements Washington state must limit greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Emissions Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Each full-sized school bus with a Model Year (MY) 1994 or newer engine that transports children in the state must be equipped with specific emissions

70

The Window Market in Texas: Opportunities for Energy Savings and Demand Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of high performance windows represents a promising opportunity to reduce energy consumption and summer electrical demand in homes and commercial buildings in Texas and neighboring states. While low-e glass coatings and other energy efficiency features have become standard features in windows in states with building energy codes, their sales in the Texas market remain limited. This paper presents findings from a pilot energy efficiency program sponsored by American Electric Power Company (AEP). The Texas Window Initiative (TWI) has conducted over 160 on-site training sessions for hardware store sales personnel and builders across the AEP service areas in Texas over the past two years. Companion promotional activities have also been completed. The past one and a half years have witnessed a very significant increase in the market penetration of energy efficient windows in the AEP service area; from about 2.5% of total window sales in early 2000 to roughly 25% (according to preliminary data) by the end of 2001.1 Some of this increase is attributable to TWI's activities, although other factors may be responsible for a portion of this increase as well. The market for windows in Texas is described. TWI's approach to promoting energy efficient windows is reviewed. Initial impact estimates from TWI's activities are presented. The technical potential for energy savings and utility peak demand reduction from the installation of energy efficient windows in Texas is presented. The paper also provides some speculation on how the window market might be impacted by the adoption of building energy codes in Texas.

Zarnikau, J.; Campbell, L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_ers.html Cost: Free CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Screenshot References: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series[1] "IGES ERs Calculation Sheet aims at providing a simplified spreadsheet for demonstrating emission reductions based on the approved methodologies corresponding to eligible project activities. The sheet will provide you

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Emissions School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

73

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission...

74

TEXAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEXAS TEXAS PARKS & WILDLIFE Life's better outside.(tm) Commissioners Peter M. Holt Chairman San Antonio T. Dan friedkin Vice-Chairman Houston Mark E. Bivins Amarillo J. Robert Brown EIPaso Ralph H. Duggins fort Worth Antonio Falcon, M.D. Rio Grande City Karen J. Hixon San Antonio Margaret Martin Boerne John D. Parker Lufkin Lee M. Bass Chairman-Emeritus fort Worth Carter P. Smith Executive Director July 20,2009 James Ray Engineering & Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, TX 79120 Dear Mr. Ray: This letter authorizes you and B&W Pantex employees Scott McLaughlin, Ken Nicholson, Kevin Rutledge, Todd Mahlin, Mike Payne, Lee Read, Nicholas Willaims and Monty Schoenhals to possess for transport and release on the Pantex

75

Case History - Energy Reduction at the Abilene Texas Instruments Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1977, TI purchased a 158,000 SF, single story building which was designed and built prior to the 1973 energy crises and, hence, has no built in energy conservation. This paper addresses the principal retrofit measures taken at this calculator & home computer assembly plant. They are: 1. A roof spray system; 2. Reduction of illumination levels and the use of more efficient luminaries; 3. Chilled water temperatures in the 52 F to 55 F range with condenser water temperatures near the cooling tower designed approach; 4. Installation of a programmed controller with signals sent over existing power lines to control times on and off of exhaust fans, lighting, DX A/C units, etc.; 5. Substitution of energy efficient electrical motors for the original motors where cost justified; 6. Reduction of the volume of air circulated and minimization of fresh air intake; 7. 'Free' cooling from the latent heat of evaporation of spray nozzles used to keep a high plant humidity; and S. Heating incoming water for PCB washers with the 150 F washer effluent. The implementation of these energy conservation measures resulted in a continuing lower KW demand and KW-hr usage during a four-year period when manufacturing levels were steadily increasing.

Reed, J. C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants

77

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transit Emissions and Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

78

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on AddThis.com... Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool

79

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country Mexico Central America References Greenhouse Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials for Buildings[1] Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report represents the first comprehensive description of the factors that determine the present and future impacts of residential and commercial

80

Development of an ammonia emission protocol and preliminary emission factor for a central Texas dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A protocol was developed to measure ammonia emission concentrations from dairies using an isolation flux chamber. A hybrid dairy in Comanche county, Texas, was measured for one week each during August 2002 and January 2003. Sixty total ammonia samples were taken from the free stall barn, open lot, mixing tank, separated solids, compost, and two lagoons using the developed protocol. The ammonia concentration measurements were made using a chemiluminescence analyzer located inside a mobile laboratory. From the emission concentrations recorded, it was estimated that 9.68 metric tons of ammonia were produced from this dairy per year. An emission factor of 13.34 ± 28.80 kilograms per day per thousand head of cattle (kg/day/1000 head) was estimated for this dairy (±95% confidence intervals) during summer conditions. For winter conditions the emission factor was 12.05 ± 12.89 kg/day/1000 head. The 11% difference of the emission factors from summer to winter conditions was predominantly from the change in ambient and control volume temperatures (a mean difference of approximately 25 degrees Celsius), differences in source temperatures, and seasonal variability in husbandry. The adsorption of ammonia onto different polymer tubing used in pollutant stream conveyance was researched for possible systematic losses. Teflon and low density polyethylene (LDPE) were tested for ammonia losses with treatments of: temperature, length, and inlet concentration. Inlet concentration and temperature were significant factors used to describe ammonia adsorption for Teflon, whereas LDPE was also affected by tubing length. These factors were used to create a model to correct the summer dairy measurements for ammonia losses, resulting in an emission factor increase of 8.3% over the original value obtained from the flux chamber. A nitrogen mass balance was performed to estimate the amount of nitrogen available for ammonia formation as excreted - 177.5 kilograms per year per animal (wet basis). The amount of ammonia excreted per year was also estimated to be 26.63 kilograms per year. The measured ammonia emitted from the dairy was five times less than the ammonia excreted and thirty-six times less than the total nitrogen excreted.

Rose, Adam Joseph

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modeling and control of airport departure processes for emissions reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taxiing aircraft contribute significantly to the fuel burn and emissions at airports. This thesis investigates the possibility of reducing fuel burn and emissions from surface operations through a reduction of the taxi ...

Simaiakis, Ioannis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: wbcarbonfinance.org/docs/REDD_Mosaic_Methodology.pdf Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Screenshot References: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation[1] Overview "This methodology is for project activities that reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) from mosaic deforestation and, where relevant and

83

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets October 7, 2013 - 10:24am Addthis Question to Answer What are appropriate GHG emission reduction targets for specific agency programs and sites? Not all administrative units within the agency have the same potential to contribute to agency-level targets. This step aims to help agencies establish what each major administrative unit (e.g. program site) should contribute to the agency goal based on its planned growth trajectory and estimates of its cost and potential to reduce GHG emissions. As illustrated in the figure below, two sites may have equal potential to reduce GHG emissions. But a site expecting significant mission-related growth prior to the 2020 target year may have a lower reduction target

84

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country South Africa UN Region Southern Africa References South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings[1] South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report aims to provide: a summary quantification of the influence of buildings on climate

85

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Act (Maryland) Reduction Act (Maryland) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires the State to reduce statewide

86

Experimental research on comprehensive emission reduction of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensively considering the factors of the reduction effect, the influence on ... Effects of reducer and slag concentrations in the iron-carbon nuggets coalescence in ... Simulation Calculation on Calciothermic Reduction of Titanium Dioxide.

87

India-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies India-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Website http://www.ecofys.com/files/fi Program Start 2009 Country India Southern Asia References G8 Climate Scorecards[1] Overview Ecofys developed emission reduction scenarios for the G5 developing countries including; business as usual, no- regret, and ambitious scenarios. They also evaluated current national climate plans. From the study: "The participation of emerging economies is one of the major items of discussion on a future international climate regime. Action

88

Mexico-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Mexico-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Website http://www.ecofys.com/files/fi Program Start 2009 Country Mexico Central America References G8 Climate Scorecards[1] Overview Ecofys developed emission reduction scenarios for the G5 developing countries including; business as usual, no- regret, and ambitious scenarios. They also evaluated current national climate plans. From the study: "The participation of emerging economies is one of the major items of discussion on a future international climate regime. Action

89

South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Website http://www.ecofys.com/files/fi Program Start 2009 Country South Africa Southern Africa References G8 Climate Scorecards[1] Overview Ecofys developed emission reduction scenarios for the G5 developing countries including; business as usual, no- regret, and ambitious scenarios. They also evaluated current national climate plans. From the study: "The participation of emerging economies is one of the major items of discussion on a future international climate regime. Action

90

Brazil-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Brazil-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Website http://www.ecofys.com/files/fi Program Start 2009 Country Brazil South America References G8 Climate Scorecards[1] Overview Ecofys developed emission reduction scenarios for the G5 developing countries including; business as usual, no- regret, and ambitious scenarios. They also evaluated current national climate plans. From the study: "The participation of emerging economies is one of the major items of discussion on a future international climate regime. Action

91

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

92

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

93

Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conference of December 2009. Brazil, China, India, Mexico, South Africa and South Korea are responsible for about two thirds for the emissions of Non-Annex I countries. This...

94

Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

ME EET Seminar: Black Carbon: Snow Albedo Reduction and Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ME EET Seminar: Black Carbon: Snow Albedo Reduction and Emissions from Cookstoves Speaker(s): Thomas Kirchstetter Date: February 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: Campus TBD For more...

96

Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER)- 2008 Annual Report to the United States Environmental Protection Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2004, the USEPA issued guidance on quantifying the air emission benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework and the basic requirements needed to demonstrate air quality improvements or emission reductions with adequate certainty to be incorporated into a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for achieving or maintaining National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The Energy Systems Laboratory, with guidance from both the US EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), developed the first comprehensive engineering toolkit and database that satisfies the EPA guidelines. The value of this unique tool was demonstrated in 2005 when the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), at the request of the TCEQ, used it to develop integrated emissions estimates for all state agencies participating in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP). Building on this expertise, the US EPA has established a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER) at the Energy Systems Laboratory to research and gather the state-of-the-art on air pollution quantification techniques for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy (EE/RE) projects; provide technical support and customized analysis for state and local agencies seeking to estimate the environmental benefits from clean energy policies and programs; and to document how a user-friendly tool, based on e2Calc, can be used by clients to fulfill their needs to quantify emission reductions from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures. The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities, submits this annual report, “Analysis of Emissions Calculators for National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER)” to the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The report is organized in several deliverables: • Summary Report, which details the progress of tasks; • Appendix, which shows the survey documentation, screenshots of emissions calculators, and screenshots for the test of each online emissions calculator. The three main tasks that have been performed in 2008 are as follows: • Task 1: Review existing emissions calculators from U.S. Department of Energy’s EE/RE Building Energy Software Tools Directory. • Task 2: Review and test currently available emissions calculators from the World Wide Web. • Task 3: Assistance with the estimation of Annual Reductions of NOx Emissions in ERCOT for the HB3693 Electricity Savings Goals.

Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Do, S. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

TRANSPORTATION SECTOR CO2 EMISSION REDUCTION STRATEGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories · Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories · RSD

Delaware, University of

98

Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI); Thiel, Matthew P. (Madison, WI)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbon reduction emissions in South Africa  

SciTech Connect

This project is a feasibility study for a control system for existing backup generators in South Africa. The strategy is to install a system to enable backup generators (BGs) to be dispatched only when a large generator fails. Using BGs to provide ''ten minute reserve'' will save energy and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by an estimated nearly 500,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Temchin, Jerome

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Grid Expansion Planning for Carbon Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to upgrade and expand electric power transmission and generation to meet specified renewable energy targets and simultaneously minimize construction cost and carbon emissions. Some challenges are: (1) Renewable energy sources have variable production capacity; (2) Deficiency of transmission capacity at desirable renewable generation locations; (3) Need to incorporate models of operations into planning studies; and (4) Prevent undesirable operational outcomes such as negative dispatch prices or curtailment of carbon neutral generation.

Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions By Patti Wieser April 25, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. In an effort to respond to President Obama's call to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 28 percent by the year 2020, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have identified ways to cut emissions that will allow the facility to exceed that goal - a decade early. Staff members at the laboratory, where scientists are finding ways to produce fusion energy, have trimmed the facility's greenhouse gas emissions

103

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

104

Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI): Sun, Yong (Madison, WI)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sets minimum targets for the use of bioenergy and biofuels,biofuels with low GHG intensity to meet the emission reductions target.biofuels future, is unable to meet the 80% emission reductions target

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

New England Wind Forum: Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Emissions Markets Emission markets are a tool used on a state, regional, national, or global basis to limit emissions of various pollutants and greenhouse gases, typically in an approach referred to as "cap-and-trade". Several programs are in place or being developed that apply to electric generation sources in New England. In some of these programs, a wind generator can apply for and receive a form of tradable emission rights (usually in the form of set-aside allowances) in recognition of emissions a wind generator displaces on the system. In these cases, tradable emission rights have a market value and can be sold to bring a supplemental revenue stream to a wind generator. In other programs (such as the federal sulfur dioxide (SO2) program) in which participation is limited to emitters, wind generators cannot directly participate in programs, but the program drives up the cost of all emitting generation technologies, making wind power more competitive. The Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management has information about clean-air activities and initiatives in New England. The Environmental Protection Agency provides information about state and regional cap-and-trade programs for various pollutants.

107

Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reductions in Urban Transport Reductions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Name Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner Ministry of Transportation Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References GTZ Transport & Climate Change Website[1] GTZ is working with Indonesia on this program with the following objective: "Indonesian cities increasingly plan and implement measures for a transport system that is energy efficient as well as environmentally and climate friendly." Background of the project is the absence of a national policy on

108

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

109

Barnsley Biomass Working towards carbon emissions reduction in Yorkshire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barnsley Biomass Working towards carbon emissions reduction in Yorkshire objectives Fifteen years Yorkshire town are being replaced by a cleaner, green alternative: biomass. Barnsley's Communal Biomass on to residents. · To increase energy efficiency. · To develop biomass usage in new and refurbished public

110

Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigates the technologies that have the potential to provide feasible reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a reference power plant. Particular focus has been given to mineral carbonation (at 1 bar) in which magnesium (Mg) and/or ... Keywords: carbon dioxide, emissions, mineral carbonation

C. J. Sturgeon; M. G. Rasul; Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

112

Energy Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness, and Air Pollutant Reduction Analysis From Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Projects in Texas Public Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide the preliminary results from an analysis of the potential energy savings, and resultant air pollution reductions associated with the energy savings from the application of cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) projects applied to new and existing Texas Independent School Districts (ISDs). The final report from this analysis would be used in a marketing outreach program to school districts through the Texas Education Agency (TEA), Texas Association of School Boards (TASB), and others. This outreach program would be designed in concert with State agencies such as the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO), Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT), and Texas General Land Office (GLO); NGOs, and other federal agencies as appropriate.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Kim, H.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Do, S.; Kim, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comprehensive Community NOx Emission Reduction Methodology: Overview and Results from the Application to a Case Study Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a methodology to estimate energy use in a community and its associated effects on air pollution. This methodology would allow decision makers to predict the impacts of various energy conservation options and efficiency programs on air pollution reduction, which will help local governments and their residents understand how to reduce pollution and mange the information collection needed to accomplish this. This paper presents a broad overview of a community-wide energy use and NOx emissions inventory process and discusses detailed procedures used to calculate the residential sector's energy use and its associated NOx emissions. In an effort to better understand community-wide energy use and its associated NOx emissions, the City of College Station, Texas, was selected as a case study community to demonstrate the application of this methodology.

Sung, Y. H.; Haberl, J. S.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

REDUCTION OF EMISSIONS FROM A HIGH SPEED FERRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions from marine vessels are being scrutinized as a major contributor to the total particulate matter (TPM), oxides of sulfur (SOx) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) environmental loading. Fuel sulfur control is the key to SOx reduction. Significant reductions in the emissions from on-road vehicles have been achieved in the last decade and the emissions from these vehicles will be reduced by another order of magnitude in the next five years: these improvements have served to emphasize the need to reduce emissions from other mobile sources, including off road equipment, locomotives, and marine vessels. Diesel-powered vessels of interest include ocean going vessels with low- and medium-speed engines, as well as ferries with high speed engines, as discussed below. A recent study examined the use of intake water injection (WIS) and ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) to reduce the emissions from a high-speed passenger ferry in southern California. One of the four Detroit Diesel 12V92 two-stroke high speed engines that power the Waverider (operated by SCX, inc.) was instrumented to collect intake airflow, fuel flow, shaft torque, and shaft speed. Engine speed and shaft torque were uniquely linked for given vessel draft and prevailing wind and sea conditions. A raw exhaust gas sampling system was utilized to measure the concentration of NOx, carbon dioxide (CO2), and oxygen (O2) and a mini dilution tunnel sampling a slipstream from the raw exhaust was used to collect TPM on 70 mm filters. The emissions data were processed to yield brake-specific mass results. The system that was employed allowed for redundant data to be collected for quality assurance and quality control. To acquire the data, the Waverider was operated at five different steady state speeds. Three modes were in the open sea off Oceanside, CA, and idle and harbor modes were also used. Data have showed that the use of ULSD along with water injection (WIS) could significantly reduce the emissions of NOx and PM while not affecting fuel consumption or engine performance compared to the baseline marine diesel. The results showed that a nominal 40% reduction in TPM was realized when switching from the marine diesel to the ULSD. A small reduction in NOx was also shown between the marine fuel and the ULSD. The implementation of the WIS showed that NOx was reduced significantly by between 11% and 17%, depending upon the operating condition. With the WIS, the TPM was reduced by a few percentage points, which was close to the confidence in measurement.

Thompson,G.; Gautam, M; Clark, N; Lyons, D; Carder, D; Riddle, W; Barnett, R; Rapp, B; George, S

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Emissions Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program

116

Optimal Deployment Plan of Emission Reduction Technologies for TxDOT's Construction Equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop and test an optimization model that will provide a deployment plan of emission reduction technologies to reduce emissions from non-road equipment. The focus of the study was on the counties of Texas that have nonattainment (NA) and near-nonattainment (NNA) status. The objective of this research was to develop methodologies that will help to deploy emission reduction technologies for non-road equipment of TxDOT to reduce emissions in a cost effective and optimal manner. Three technologies were considered for deployment in this research, (1) hydrogen enrichment (HE), (2) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and (3) fuel additive (FA). Combinations of technologies were also considered in the study, i.e. HE with FA, and SCR with FA. Two approaches were investigated in this research. The first approach was "Method 1" in which all the technologies, i.e. FA, HE and SCR were deployed in the NA counties at the first stage. In the second stage the same technologies were deployed in the NNA counties with the remaining budget, if any. The second approach was called "Method 2" in which all the technologies, i.e. FA, HE and SCR were deployed in the NA counties along with deploying only FA in the NNA counties at the first stage. Then with the remaining budget, SCR and HE were deployed in the NNA counties in the second stage. In each of these methods, 2 options were considered, i.e. maximizing NOx reduction with and without fuel economy consideration in the objective function. Thus, the four options investigated each having different mixes of emission reduction technologies include Case 1A: Method 1 with fuel economy consideration; Case 1B: Method 1 without fuel economy consideration; Case 2A: Method 2 with fuel economy consideration; and Case 2B: Method 2 without fuel economy consideration and were programmed with Visual C++ and ILOG CPLEX. These four options were tested for budget amounts ranging from $500 to $1,183,000 and the results obtained show that for a given budget one option representing a mix of technologies often performed better than others. This is conceivable because for a given budget the optimization model selects an affordable option considering the cost of technologies involved while at the same time maximum emission reduction, with and without fuel economy consideration, is achieved. Thus the alternative options described in this study will assist the decision makers to decide about the deployment preference of technologies. For a given budget, the decision maker can obtain the results for total NOx reduction, combined diesel economy and total combined benefit using the four models mentioned above. Based on their requirements and priorities, they can select the desired model and subsequently obtain the required deployment plan for deploying the emission reduction technologies in the NA and NNA counties.

Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

For stricter emissions needs, try custom catalytic reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When O`Brien California Cogen Ltd. was contracted to develop a system to generate steam for an Artesia, Calif., mild producer`s evaporation process, local regulations required NO{sub x} emissions reduced 9 ppm and CO to 10 ppm. Johnson Matthey supplied the solution with a custom system combining an oxidation catalyst to control CSO emissions and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to control NO{sub x}. O`Brien`s cogen operation runs off an aircraft-derivative GE Gas Turbine, model LM2500, with a 22.4-MW output. The catalyst system is installed in the exhaust stream of a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) form the Henry Vogt Machine Co.

Chambers, A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Towards Zero Emissions CO2-Reduction in Mediterranean Social Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the construction, use and deconstruction of a 60 apartment social housing complex to be built close to Barcelona revealed the importance of the application of life-cycle analysis, as the materials’ embodied energy showed to be responsible for half of the building’s life-cycle emissions. A 72% energy reduction compared to conventional housing projects is expected by implementation of centralised HVAC and DHW systems, based on ground source heat pumps and solar thermal energy, introducing an in Catalonia innovative facility management approach where energy and flow meters are installed in each flat for internet-based control of energy consumption, invoicing and supervision of the installation. A second study showed that up to 90% CO2 reduction considering the overall lifecycle is feasible at reasonable cost by giving priority to organic building materials like wood (CO2 storage effect), minimizing underground construction and increasing energy supply based on renewable energies.

Sabate, J.; Peters, C.; Cuchi, A.; Lopez, F.; Sagrera, A.; Wadel, G.; Vidal, J.; Cantos, S.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

Jacobson, D.; High, C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biface reduction and blade manufacture at the Gault site (41bl323): a Clovis occupation in Bell County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is a technological study that deals with those techniques employed by the Gault Clovis people in the manufacture of both bifaces and blades. The materials studied were recovered during the 2000 and 2001 field seasons conducted by the Anthropology Department of Texas A&M University. The study involves an analysis that deals with raw material selection, blank production, reduction methods, and problems encountered, and includes a definitive description and metric calculations for each of the various artifact types analyzed. The results are then compared to similar artifact assemblages from known Clovis sites. The conclusions derived from this analysis show that the Gault Clovis people utilized a number of different strategies in both biface and blade reduction. It was found that some of these strategies, previously felt to be restricted to one reductive procedure, were connected and utilized in both procedures. In addition, it was discovered that some techniques thought to be limited to use only within the initial reduction sequence were, in fact, utilized throughout.

Dickens, William A.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Economic Potential of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions: Comparative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX, 77845-2124 Uwe Schneider (uwe@iastate.edu,...

122

EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS USING HYDROGEN FROM PLASMATRON FUEL CONVERTERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Substantial progress in engine emission control is needed in order to meet present and proposed regulations for both spark ignition and diesel engines. Tightening regulations throughout the world reflect the ongoing concern with vehicle emissions. Recently developed compact plasmatron fuel converters have features that are suitable for onboard production of hydrogen for both fuel pretreatment and for exhaust aftertreatment applications. Systems that make use of these devices in conjunction with aftertreatment catalysts have the potential to improve significantly prospects for reduction of diesel engine emissions. Plasmatron fuel converters can provide a rapid response compact means to transform efficiently a wide range of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen rich gas. They have been used to reform natural gas [Bromberg1], gasoline [Green], diesel [Bromberg2] and hard-to-reform biofuels [Cohn1] into hydrogen rich gas (H2 + CO). The development of these devices has been pursued for the purpose of reducing engine exhaust pollutants by providing hydrogen rich gas for combustion in spark ignition and possibly diesel engines, as shown in Figure 1 [Cohn2]. Recent developments in compact plasmatron reformer design at MIT have resulted in substantial decreases in electrical power requirements. These new developments also increase the lifetime of the electrodes.

Bromberg, L

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

Waste Coal Fines Reburn for NOx and Mercury Emission Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Injection of coal-water slurries (CWS) made with both waste coal and bituminous coal was tested for enhanced reduction of NO{sub x} and Hg emissions at the AES Beaver Valley plant near Monaca, PA. Under this project, Breen Energy Solutions (BES) conducted field experiments on the these emission reduction technologies by mixing coal fines and/or pulverized coal, urea and water to form slurry, then injecting the slurry in the upper furnace region of a coal-fired boiler. The main focus of this project was use of waste coal fines as the carbon source; however, testing was also conducted using pulverized coal in conjunction with or instead of waste coal fines for conversion efficiency and economic comparisons. The host site for this research and development project was Unit No.2 at AES Beaver Valley cogeneration station. Unit No.2 is a 35 MW Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) front-wall fired boiler that burns eastern bituminous coal. It has low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air ports and a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system for NO{sub x} control. The back-end clean-up system includes a rotating mechanical ash particulate removal and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Coal slurry injection was expected to help reduce NOx emissions in two ways: (1) Via fuel-lean reburning when the slurry is injected above the combustion zone. (2) Via enhanced SNCR reduction when urea is incorporated into the slurry. The mercury control process under research uses carbon/water slurry injection to produce reactive carbon in-situ in the upper furnace, promoting the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers. By controlling the water content of the slurry below the stoichiometric requirement for complete gasification, water activated carbon (WAC) can be generated in-situ in the upper furnace. As little as 1-2% coal/water slurry (heat input basis) can be injected and generate sufficient WAC for mercury capture. During July, August, and September 2007, BES designed, procured, installed, and tested the slurry injection system at Beaver Valley. Slurry production was performed by Penn State University using equipment that was moved from campus to the Beaver Valley site. Waste coal fines were procured from Headwaters Inc. and transported to the site in Super Sacks. In addition, bituminous coal was pulverized at Penn State and trucked to the site in 55-gallon drums. This system was operated for three weeks during August and September 2007. NO{sub x} emission data were obtained using the plant CEM system. Hg measurements were taken using EPA Method 30B (Sorbent Trap method) both downstream of the electrostatic precipitator and in the stack. Ohio Lumex Company was on site to provide rapid Hg analysis on the sorbent traps during the tests. Key results from these tests are: (1) Coal Fines reburn alone reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 0-10% with up to 4% heat input from the CWS. However, the NO{sub x} reduction was accompanied by higher CO emissions. The higher CO limited our ability to try higher reburn rates for further NO{sub x} reduction. (2) Coal Fines reburn with Urea (Carbon enhanced SNCR) decreased NO{sub x} emissions by an additional 30% compared to Urea injection only. (3) Coal slurry injection did not change Hg capture across the ESP at full load with an inlet temperature of 400-430 F. The Hg capture in the ESP averaged 40%, with or without slurry injection; low mercury particulate capture is normally expected across a higher temperature ESP because any oxidized mercury is thought to desorb from the particulate at ESP temperatures above 250 F. (4) Coal slurry injection with halogen salts added to the mixing tank increased the Hg capture in the ESP to 60%. This significant incremental mercury reduction is important to improved mercury capture with hot-side ESP operation and wherever hindrance from sulfur oxides limit mercury reduction, because the higher temperature is above sulfur oxide dew point interference.

Stephen Johnson; Chetan Chothani; Bernard Breen

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF DIESEL ENGINE NOX EMISSIONS USING ETHANOL AS A REDUCTANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOx emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine were reduced by more than 90% and 80% utilizing a full-scale ethanol-SCR system for space velocities of 21000/h and 57000/h respectively. These results were achieved for catalyst temperatures between 360 and 400 C and for C1:NOx ratios of 4-6. The SCR process appears to rapidly convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, which subsequently slipped past the catalyst at appreciable levels at a space velocity of 57000/h. Ammonia and N2O were produced during conversion; the concentrations of each were higher for the low space velocity condition. However, the concentration of N2O did not exceed 10 ppm. In contrast to other catalyst technologies, NOx reduction appeared to be enhanced by initial catalyst aging, with the presumed mechanism being sulfate accumulation within the catalyst. A concept for utilizing ethanol (distilled from an E-diesel fuel) as the SCR reductant was demonstrated.

(1)Kass, M; Thomas, J; Lewis, S; Storey, J; Domingo, N; Graves, R (2) Panov, A

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

Translating Energy Efficiency into CO2 Emissions Reduction: A Modeling Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology that EPRI has developed to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though energy efficiency is intuitively recognized to reduce carbon emissions, one barrier to its broader application is the lack of precision in attributing emissions reductions to specific program activities. Coarse estimates based on utilities' average emissions factors, while straightforward to calculate, do not provide enough specificity on emissions reductions...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductionconsumption and related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions.during Cumulative Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction (MtCO

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Meeting an 80% Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation by 2050: A Case Study in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from ,Board, 2008. California Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory.A. , 2003. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from US

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Arsenate uptake, sequestration and reduction by a freshwater cyanobacterium: a potenial biologic control of arsenic in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The toxicity and adverse health effects of arsenic are widely known. It is generally accepted that sorption/desorption reactions with oxy-hydroxide minerals (iron, manganese) control the fate and transport of inorganic arsenic in surface waters through adsorption and precipitation-dissolution processes. In terrestrial environments with limited reactive iron, recent data suggest organoarsenicals are potentially important components of the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic in near-surface environments. Elevated arsenic levels are common in South Texas from geogenic processes (weathering of As-containing rock units) and anthropogenic sources (a byproduct from decades of uranium mining). Sediments collected from South Texas show low reactive iron concentrations, undetectable in many areas, making oxy-hydroxide controls on arsenic unlikely. Studies have shown that eukaryotic algae isolated from arsenic-contaminated waters have increased tolerance to arsenate toxicity and the ability to uptake and biotransform arsenate. In this experiment, net uptake of arsenic over time by a freshwater cyanobacterium never previously exposed to arsenate was quantified as a function of increasing As concentrations and increasing N:P ratios. Toxic effects were not evident when comparing cyanobacterial growth, though extractions indicate accumulation of intracellular arsenic by the cyanobacterium. Increasing N:P ratios has minimal effect on net arsenate uptake over an 18 day period. However, cyanobacteria were shown to reduce arsenate at rates faster than the system can re-oxidize the arsenic suggesting gross arsenate uptake may be much higher. Widespread arsenate reduction by cyanobacterial blooms would increase arsenic mobility and potential toxicity and may be useful as a biomarker of arsenic exposure in oxic surface water environments.

Markley, Christopher Thomas

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An Analysis of the Efficacy of US Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper provides an analysis of the efficacy of United States (US) greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction policy implemented in the mid-1990s, specifically targeting the… (more)

Meyer, Russell

131

Reduction of PFC Emissions at Pot Line 70 kA of Companhia ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Reduction of PFC Emissions at Pot Line 70 kA of Companhia Brasileira De Alumínio. Author(s), Henrique Correa dos Santos, Danilo Haddad ...

132

Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology in the southern Untied States; where energy demand for cooling buildings is high, and the urban heat island effect is more pronounced. This paper reports early findings for rooftop membrane temperature reductions from 11.6-cm-deep modular green roof trays, typical of large-scaled, low-maintenance applications. Measurements observed during May, 2010 reveal that temperatures below the modular planted green roof units were 82% to 91.6% cooler compared to the surface temperatures of the control roof membrane. These findings on low-input modular green roof trays reinforce other research findings that indicate green roof technology can dramatically reduce and modify temperatures on roof deck surfaces during peak energy demand periods in hot sunny climates.

Dvorak, B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control: NOx Reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Reduction Technologies NOx reduction technologies can be grouped into two broad categories: combustion modifications and post-combustion processes. Some of the more important...

134

Locomotive Emission and Engine Idle Reduction Technology Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to a United States Department of Energy (DOE) solicitation, the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), in partnership with CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSXT), submitted a proposal to DOE to support the demonstration of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) technology on fifty-six CSXT locomotives. The project purpose was to demonstrate the idle fuel savings, the Nitrous Oxide (NOX) emissions reduction and the noise reduction capabilities of the APU. Fifty-six CSXT Baltimore Division locomotives were equipped with APUs, Engine Run Managers (ERM) and communications equipment to permit GPS tracking and data collection from the locomotives. Throughout the report there is mention of the percent time spent in the State of Maryland. The fifty-six locomotives spent most of their time inside the borders of Maryland and some spent all their time inside the state borders. Usually when a locomotive traveled beyond the Maryland State border it was into an adjoining state. They were divided into four groups according to assignment: (1) Power Unit/Switcher Mate units, (2) Remote Control units, (3) SD50 Pusher units and (4) Other units. The primary data of interest were idle data plus the status of the locomotive--stationary or moving. Also collected were main engine off, idling or working. Idle data were collected by county location, by locomotive status (stationary or moving) and type of idle (Idle 1, main engine idling, APU off; Idle 2, main engine off, APU on; Idle 3, main engine off, APU off; Idle 4, main engine idle, APU on). Desirable main engine idle states are main engine off and APU off or main engine off and APU on. Measuring the time the main engine spends in these desirable states versus the total time it could spend in an engine idling state allows the calculation of Percent Idle Management Effectiveness (%IME). IME is the result of the operation of the APU plus the implementation of CSXT's Warm Weather Shutdown Policy. It is difficult to separate the two. The units demonstrated an IME of 64% at stationary idle for the test period. The data collected during calendar year 2004 demonstrated that 707,600 gallons of fuel were saved and 285 tons of NOX were not emitted as a result of idle management in stationary idle, which translates to 12,636 gallons and 5.1 tons of NOx per unit respectively. The noise reduction capabilities of the APU demonstrated that at 150 feet from the locomotive the loaded APU with the main engine shut down generated noise that was only marginally above ambient noise level.

John R. Archer

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cross State Air Pollution Rule requires emissions reductions from ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

136

INTERACTIVE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF EMISSION REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BOILERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERACTIVE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF EMISSION REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BOILERS Darin an emission reduction sys- tem for commercial boilers. The interactive environment is used to optimize for commercial boilers and incinerators. This work has been done as part of a collaboration between Nalco Fuel

137

Electromagnetic emissions reduction in a CAN transceiver system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project deals with the emissions behavior of a Controller Area Network (CAN). CAN systems are widely used in automotive applications. Recently, CAN systems have… (more)

Slayton, Jason R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Analysis of Carbon Emission Reduction of China's Integrated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a model, based on carbon balance, was developed for CO2 emission analysis, with data obtained from a typical integrated steelworks in China.

139

Controlling Fugitive Emissions to Achieve GHG Reduction Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Josh Silverman Chair, DOE Fugitive Emissions Working Group Director, Office of Sustainability Support Office of Health, Safety, and Security Presented at ISM Workshop September...

140

Argonne Transportation R&D Center: Characterizing Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characterization, and the use of a Visioscope for endoscopic imaging of in-cylinder combustion kinetics. This engine was recently used to compare emissions resulting from the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

391 KB) Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions from Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Joe Mauderly Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (PDF 325...

142

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: Fuels and Lubrication, Part 2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Stuart Neill National Research...

143

The reduction of gas emissions from the use of bioethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work deals with the examination of farm Tractor with Diesel engine from the viewpoint of power and gas emissions, using as fuel Diesel-ethanol mixtures. A series of laboratory instruments was used for the realization of the experiments. The tractor ... Keywords: bioethanol, biofuels, gas emissions

Charalampos Arapatsakos

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Quantifying emissions reductions from New England offshore wind energy resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Access to straightforward yet robust tools to quantify the impact of renewable energy resources on air emissions from fossil fuel power plants is important to governments aiming to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse ...

Berlinski, Michael Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Summary: A cooperative effort between EPA and US magnesium industry to reduce emissions of SF6. Created On: 7/1/2008 9:12 AM, Topic View:.

146

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

147

Ris-R-1545(EN) Emission reduction by means  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Plasma Research Department, Risø), Helge Egsgaard (Biosystems Department, Risø), Per G. Kristensen reduction by means of low temperature plasma. Summary Department: Optics and Plasma Research Department Risø

148

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Summary of NOx Emissions Reduction from Biomass Cofiring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOx emissions from commercial- and pilot-scale biomass/coal cofiring demonstrations are reduced as the percentage of energy supplied to the boiler by the biomass fuel is increased. This report attempts to provide a summary of the NO{sub x} emissions measured during recent biomass/coal cofiring demonstrations. These demonstrations were carried out at the commercial and pilot-scales. Commercial-scale tests were conducted in a variety of pulverized fuel boiler types including wall-fired, T-fired, and cyclone furnaces. Biomass input ranged up to 20% on a mass basis and 10% on an energy basis.

Dayton, D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reduction of NOx Emissions in Alamo Area Council of Government Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This reports summarizes the electricity, natural gas and NOx emissions reductions from retrofit measures reported as part of the AACOG emissions reduction effort. The electricity and natural gas savings were collected by the Brooks Energy and Sustainability Laboratory (BESL), and reported to the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL). The ESL then assembled these data for processing by eGRID. The results from BESL’s data collection efforts and the eGRID analysis are contained in this report.

Haberl, J. S.; Zhu, Y.; Im, P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reduction of CO2 emissions and utilization of slag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Expectations from the industry partners (as pre- sented at the kick-off meeting): Applicability of the steel emissions is 314 #12;CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. Con- crete and steel manufacturers produce of industrial by-products and residues is the possibility to use CO2 in local flue gases for the carbonation

Zevenhoven, Ron

152

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Field Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or without performance additives, to reduce mercury emissions from a Texas utility burning either Texas lignite or a blend of Texas lignite and subbituminous coals. Sorbents...

153

REDUCTION OF INHERENT MERCURY EMISSIONS IN PC COMBUSTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mercury emission compliance is one of the major potential challenges raised by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Simple ways of controlling emissions have not been identified. The variability in the field data suggests that inherent mercury emissions may be reduced if the source of this inherent capture can be identified and controlled. The key mechanisms appear to involve the oxidation of the mercury to Hg{sup 2}, generally producing the more reactive HgCl{sub 2} , followed by its capture by certain components of the fly ash or char. This research focuses on identifying the rate-limiting steps associated with the oxidation step. Work in this reporting period focused on the development and application of a kinetics model to the oxidation data developed in the present program and literature data under MSW conditions. The results indicate that the pathway Hg + Cl = HgCl followed by HgCl + HCl = HgCl{sub 2} + H predominates over Hg + Cl{sub 2} under high-temperature conditions. This primarily occurs because Cl{sub 2} concentrations are too low under the present conditions to contribute significantly.

John C. Kramlich; Rebecca N. Sliger; David J. Going

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This Act is designed to safeguard the state's air resources from pollution by requiring the control and abatement of air pollution and emissions of air contaminants, consistent with the protection of public health, general welfare, and physical property, including the esthetic enjoyment of air resources by the public and the maintenance of adequate visibility. The Act

155

Texas Capital Fund (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Capital Fund is designed to promote growth in rural non-entitlement areas, generally defined as cities with less than 50,000 residents or counties with less than 200,000 residents....

156

A Community Responds to Collective Trauma: An Ecological Analysis of the James Byrd Murder in Jasper, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and disasters. College Station, Texas: Hazard Reduction andData.com. (2004). Jasper, Texas. Retrieved March 20, 2004Byrd Murder in Jasper, Texas Thomas Wicke • Roxane Cohen

Wicke, Thomas; Silver, Roxane Cohen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

In-home demonstration of the reduction of woodstove emissions from the use of densified logs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a need to reduce emissions from conventional wood stoves in the short-term while stove replacement takes place over the longer term. One possible is to use fuels that would burn cleaner than cordwood. Densified fuels have been commercially available for years and offer such a possibility. The objective of this project was to evaluate the emissions and efficiency performance of two commercially available densified log types in homes and compare their performance with cordwood. Researchers measured particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), and volatile organic matter (VOC) emissions. Both total VOC and methane values are presented. Each home used an Automated Woodstove Emissions Sampler system, developed for the EPA and Bonneville Power Administration, in a series of four week-long tests for each stove. The sequence of tests in each stove was cordwood, Pres-to-Logs, Eco-Logs, and a second, confirming test using Pres-to-Logs. Results show an average reduction of 52% in PM grams per hour emissions overall for the nine stoves using Pres-to-Logs. All nine stoves displayed a reduction in PM emissions. CO emissions were more modestly reduced by 27%, and VOCs were reduced 39%. The emissions reduction percentage was similar for both types of stoves.

Barnett, S.G.; Bighouse, R.D.

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

In-Home Demonstration of the Reduction of Woodstove Emissions from the Use of Densified Logs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a need to reduce emissions from conventional wood stoves in the short-term while stove replacement takes place over the longer term. One possible is to use fuels that would burn cleaner than cordwood. Densified fuels have been commercially available for years and offer such a possibility. The objective of this project was to evaluate the emissions and efficiency performance of two commercially available densified log types in homes and compare their performance with cordwood. Researchers measured particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), and volatile organic matter (VOC) emissions. Both total VOC and methane values are presented. Each home used an Automated Woodstove Emissions Sampler system, developed for the EPA and Bonneville Power Administration, in a series of four week-long tests for each stove. The sequence of tests in each stove was cordwood, Pres-to-Logs, Eco-Logs, and a second, confirming test using Pres-to-Logs. Results show an average reduction of 52% in PM grams per hour emissions overall for the nine stoves using Pres-to-Logs. All nine stoves displayed a reduction in PM emissions. CO emissions were more modestly reduced by 27%, and VOCs were reduced 39%. The emissions reduction percentage was similar for both types of stoves.

Barnett, Stockton G.; Bidhouse, Roger D.

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions  

SciTech Connect

Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Texas Emissions and Energy Calculator (eCALC): Documentation of Analysis Methods, Report to the TCEQ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides documentation about the Energy Systems Laboratory’s Emissions and Energy Calculator (eCALC), including information about the web structure, new building models, and community projects. In each of the sections a description of the basic user input is provided, and a description of the analysis that eCALC performs once the use submits a project for analysis. This report also provides a brief summary of the literature reviews for the analysis methods that were developed to document the uncertainty reported in the literature, including: F-Chart, PV F-Chart, ASHRAE’s Inverse Model Toolkit (IMT), Cool Roofs, and the DOE-2 program. This report also provides a description of the methods used to assemble actual weather data files for 1999 through 2003 for use in eCALC.

Haberl, J. S.; Gilman, D.; Culp, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Ozone Weekend Effect in California: Evidence Supporting NOx Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ozone is typically higher on weekends (WE) than on weekdays (WD) at many of California’s air-monitoring stations. Sometimes called the “ozone WE effect, ” this phenomenon occurs despite substantially lower estimates of WE emissions for the major ozone precursors – volatile organic compounds (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Compared to WD emissions, WE emissions of NOx decrease more (proportionally) than do the WE emissions of VOC. Because the WE increases in ozone coincide with the relatively large WE reductions in NOx, some conclude that regulations that would reduce NOx emissions on all days would undermine ozone attainment efforts by causing ozone to decrease more slowly (or even to increase). At this time, public discussion of the ozone WE effect has mostly reflected the viewpoint that NOx emission reductions would not help reduce ambient ozone levels. A large body of published research from this perspective has accumulated over the last 10 to 20 years. Nevertheless, the presently available scientific evidence can also lead to the conclusion that NOx emission reductions may be needed to maintain or even to expedite progress toward attainment

Lawrence C. Larsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Methods for Systematic Evaluation of Emissions Reduction Options: Managing Risks from Climate Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate policy creates substantial risks and opportunities for companies in the electric sector and the broader energy sector. Activities to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions differ widely in terms of scale, time horizon, timing of costs and benefits, and risk of costs and benefits. To develop effective climate risk management strategies, companies need to understand and systematically assess available emissions reduction options. This report introduces a fundamental framework to systematically a...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.  

SciTech Connect

Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.

Santini, D. J.; Saricks, C. L.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Procedure to Calculate NOx Reductions Using the Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (E-Grid) Spreadsheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report a detailed description of the procedure to calculate NOx reductions from energy savings due to the 2000 IECC code implementation in single family residences using the United States Environmental Protect Agency's (USEPA's) Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (E-GRID) is presented. This procedure is proposed for calculating county-wide NOx reductions in pounds per MWh for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy projects (EE/RE) implemented in each Power Control Area (PCA) in the ERCOT region.

Haberl, J. S.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Verdict, M.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A fuel cycle framework for evaluating greenhouse gas emission reduction technology  

SciTech Connect

Energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions arise from a number of fossil fuels, processes and equipment types throughout the full cycle from primary fuel production to end-use. Many technology alternatives are available for reducing emissions based on efficiency improvements, fuel switching to low-emission fuels, GHG removal, and changes in end-use demand. To conduct systematic analysis of how new technologies can be used to alter current emission levels, a conceptual framework helps develop a comprehensive picture of both the primary and secondary impacts of a new technology. This paper describes a broad generic fuel cycle framework which is useful for this purpose. The framework is used for cataloging emission source technologies and for evaluating technology solutions to reduce GHG emissions. It is important to evaluate fuel mix tradeoffs when investigating various technology strategies for emission reductions. For instance, while substituting natural gas for coal or oil in end-use applications to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, natural gas emissions of methane in the production phase of the fuel cycle may increase. Example uses of the framework are given.

Ashton, W.B.; Barns, D.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Bradley, R.A. (USDOE Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Environmental Analysis)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Using market-based dispatching with environmental price signals to reduce emissions and water use at power plants in the Texas grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of using electricity dispatching strategies to achieve a 50% nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission reduction from electricity generating units was examined using the grid of the Electricity Reliability Council of ...

Alhajeri, Nawaf S.

168

Transport Energy-Saving Emission Reduction Countermeasures under the Concept of Sustainable Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper combined the actual situation of China's transport development, analyzed the environmental impact of transport sector and the domestic and international reflected to the advanced experience of traffic pollution. At the same time, I also proposed ... Keywords: Sustainable, Development, transport, Energy-saving, emission, reduction, Environment, Propose

Chengzhi Liu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility boilers Carlos E. Romero *, Ying Li, Harun Bilirgen, Nenad Sarunac, Edward K. Levy Energy Research Center type, boiler operation, fly ash characteristics and type of environmental control equipment installed

Li, Ying

170

The sources of emission reductions : evidence from U.S. SO? emissions from 1985-2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An enduring issue in environmental regulation is whether to clean up existing "old" plants or in some manner to bring in new ?clean? plants to replace the old. In this paper, a unit-level data base of emissions by nearly ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no specific Hg controls) ranged from 5.7 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest to 2 x 10{sup -5} in the Southeast. Reducing emissions from coal plants by 90% reduced the estimated range in risk to 5 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest and 1.5 x 10{sup -5} in Southeast, respectively. The population risk for the subsistence fisher using the Southeast regional fish Hg levels was 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, a factor of 200 greater than the general population risk. For the subsistence fishers and the Savannah River Hg levels, the population risk was 4.3 x 10{sup -5}, a factor of 2 greater than for the general population. The estimated risk reductions from a 90% reduction in coal plant Hg emissions ranged from 25%-68%, which is greater than the assumed reduction in Hg levels in fish, (15.5%). To place this risk in perspective, there are approximately 4 x 10{sup 6} births/year in the U.S (National Vital Statistics Report, 2000). Assuming that the Southeast risk level (the highest of the regions) is appropriate for the entire U.S., an estimate of 80 newborn children per year have a 5% chance of realizing any of the 16 adverse effects used to generate the DRF. If Hg emissions from power plants are reduced 90%, the number of children at risk is reduced to 60.

SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.W.MORRIS,S.C.MOSKOWITZ,P.D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 10 years ENERGY STAR has developed a track record as a certification mark to hang buildings performance hat on. By implementing upgrade strategies and pursuing operations and maintenance issues simultaneously, ENERGY STAR has led the nation and many states to pursue greenhouse gas reduction initiatives using energy efficiency as a model program. In developing these partnerships with industry, states and local government, what has occurred is a variety of program approaches that works to accomplish strategically a reduction in emissions. Through its development, ENERGY STAR has become an integral player with many Green Buildings Program to help them carry the energy efficiency banner to higher levels of cooperation. What is occurring today is that more and more local programs are looking to green buildings as an approach to reducing problems they face in air pollution, water pollution, solid waste, needed infrastructure and better of resources needs and the growth of expensive utility infrastructures. EPA - Region 6's ENERGY STAR and Green Building Program assistance has led to some unique solutions and the beginning workups for the integrated expansion of effort to support State Implementation Plans in new innovative voluntary approaches to transform certain markets, similarly to those of energy efficient products. This presentation will be an overview of activity that is being spearheaded in Texas in the DFW and Houston metro areas in ENERGY STAR and Green Buildings. The voluntary programs impacts are reducing energy consumption, creating markets for renewables, reducing air polluting chemicals and reducing greenhouse gas emissions using verifiable approaches.

Patrick, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. Schafer, Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S.Marintek, Study of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships .Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark Scotto

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Interim Report on Methods for Systematic Evaluation of Emission Reduction Options: Meeting Risks and Climate Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces a fundamental framework to systematically assess the financial value of greenhouse gas reduction options, both individually and as part of a portfolio. It illustrates some of the variety of instruments that can be used to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions, highlights the importance of consistent evaluation, and provides a starting point for in-depth case study applications of the new framework.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Environmental Impact of the Texas LoanSTAR Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the environmental impact of the energy reductions that have been measured in the Texas LoanSTAR program. There are a number of factors that influence emission factors. The three major pollutants considered in this analysis are CO2, SO2 and NOx. Emission factors from three different sources were considered for this paper. This analysis shows that as of October 1997, there has been a reduction of emissions of 1,863 tons of NOx, 1.200 tons of SO2, and 530,000 tons of CO2 through the implementation of energy conserving measures in the 27 sites covering 290 buildings with retrofit savings of $36.6 million. The paper presents the results of the analysis and includes a discussion of the method used to calculate the emissions reduction.

Athar, A.; Abbas, M.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Harvey, T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

DEMONSTRATION OF AN ADVANCED INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS EMISSIONS REDUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project titled ''Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Control System for Simultaneous Emissions Reduction'' was to demonstrate at proof-of-concept scale the use of an online software package, the ''Plant Environmental and Cost Optimization System'' (PECOS), to optimize the operation of coal-fired power plants by economically controlling all emissions simultaneously. It combines physical models, neural networks, and fuzzy logic control to provide both optimal least-cost boiler setpoints to the boiler operators in the control room, as well as optimal coal blending recommendations designed to reduce fuel costs and fuel-related derates. The goal of the project was to demonstrate that use of PECOS would enable coal-fired power plants to make more economic use of U.S. coals while reducing emissions.

Suzanne Shea; Randhir Sehgal; Ilga Celmins; Andrew Maxson

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

Sutherland, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Use of Positive Matrix Factorization with Conditional Probability Functions in Air Quality Studies: An Application to Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study to identify groups of compounds (‘source categories’) associated with different processing facilities, a multivariate receptor model called Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to hourly average concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured at five Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) located near the Ship Channel in Houston, Texas. The observations were made between June and October, 2003, and limited to nighttime measurements (21:00 pm – 6:00 am) in order to remove the complexity of photochemical processing and associated changes in the concentrations of primary and secondary VOCs. Six to eight volatile organic compounds source categories were identified for the five Ship Channel sites. The dominant source categories were found to be those associated with petrochemical, chemical industries and fuel evaporation. In contrast, source categories associated with on-road vehicles were found to be relatively insignificant. Although evidence of biogenic emissions was found at almost all the sites, this broad category was significant only at the Wallisville site, which was also the site furthest away from the Ship Channels area and closest to the northeast forest of Texas. Natural gas, accumulation and fuel evaporation sources were found to contribute most to the ambient VOCs, followed by the petrochemical emission of highly reactive ethene and propylene. Solvent / paint industry and fuel evaporation and emission from refineries were next in importance while the on-road vehicle exhaust generally contributed less than 10% of the total ambient VOCs. Specific geographic areas associated with each source category were identified through the use of a Conditional Probability Function (CPF) analysis that related elevated concentrations of key VOCs in each category to a network of grids superimposed on the source inventories of the VOCs.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Monticello Steam Electric Station, Mount Pleasant, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Why does Monticello, a 30 year old plant, deserve recognition as one of Power's Top Plants of 2006? Because TXU has been blending Powder River Basin (PRB) coal with local lignite at the plant for the past decade, and steady reductions in air-pollutant emission rates have been the result. That positive experience has made the company confident enough to propose building nearly 9,100 MW of new coal or lignite-fired capacity in Texas by 2010 at a cost of $10 billion. The article records some of the lessons that TXU has learned about handling PRB coal safely. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Javetski, J. [TXU Power (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Carbon Footprint of Bioenergy Sorghum Production in Central Texas: Production Implications on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Carbon Cycling, and Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced interest in biofuel production has renewed interest in bioenergy crop production within the United States. Agriculture’s role in biofuel production is critical because it has the potential to supply renewable energy while minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, agronomic management practices influence direct and indirect GHG emissions, and both can have a significant impact on biofuel production efficiency. Our overall objective was to determine the carbon (C) footprint of bioenergy sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) production in central Texas. Specifically, we determined the impacts of crop rotation, nitrogen (N) fertilization, and residue return on direct and indirect GHG emissions, theoretical biofuel yield, C pools, and life cycle GHG emissions from bioenergy sorghum production in 2010 and 2011. An experiment established in 2008 near College Station, TX to quantify the impacts of crop management practices on bioenergy sorghum yield and soil properties was utilized, and included two crop rotations (sorghum-sorghum or corn-sorghum), two fertilization levels (0 or 280 kg N ha^(-1) annually), and two residue return rates (0 or 50% biomass residue returned) to assess management impacts on sorghum production, C cycling, and life cycle GHGs. Corn production was poor under moderate drought conditions, while bioenergy sorghum produced relatively large yields under both moderate and severe drought conditions. Nitrogen addition increased crop yields, and rotated sorghum had higher yield than monoculture sorghum. Fluxes of CO_(2) and N_(2)O were higher than those reported in literature and highest soil fluxes were frequently observed following precipitation events during the growing season. Residue return increased cumulative CO_(2) emissions and N fertilization increased N_(2)O emissions. Residue return also increased soil microbial biomass-C, an important indicator of soil quality. Continuous sorghum significantly increased soil organic C (SOC) concentrations near the soil surface and at two depths below 30 cm. Analysis of change in SOC across time to estimate net CO_(2) emissions to the atmosphere revealed bioenergy sorghum production accrued high amounts of SOC annually. Most treatments accrued more than 4 Mg C ha^(-1) yr^(-1) from 2008 to 2012, which indicated great potential for C sequestration and offsetting GHG emissions. Life cycle GHG emissions (as g CO_(2)-eq MJ^(-1)) were all negative due to high SOC increases each year and indicated all bioenergy sorghum production treatments sequestered atmospheric CO_(2) per unit of theoretical energy provided. Despite its relatively low production efficiency, rotated sorghum with N addition and residue return was selected as the ideal bioenergy sorghum production scenario due to a number of sustainability factors. Bioenergy sorghum may offer great benefit as a high-yielding biofuel feedstock with minimal impacts to net GHG emissions.

Storlien, Joseph Orgean

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fuel savings and emissions reductions from light duty fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) operate efficiently, emit few pollutants, and run on nonpetroleum fuels. Because of these characteristics, the large-scale deployment of FCVs has the potential to lessen US dependence on foreign oil and improve air quality. This study characterizes the benefits of large-scale FCV deployment in the light duty vehicle market. Specifically, the study assesses the potential fuel savings and emissions reductions resulting from large-scale use of these FCVs and identifies the key parameters that affect the scope of the benefits from FCV use. The analysis scenario assumes that FCVs will compete with gasoline-powered light trucks and cars in the new vehicle market for replacement of retired vehicles and will compete for growth in the total market. Analysts concluded that the potential benefits from FCVs, measured in terms of consumer outlays for motor fuel and the value of reduced air emissions, are substantial.

Mark, J.; Ohi, J.M.; Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn Price China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Marlene Arens Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI) January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation and Dow Chemical Company (through a charitable contribution) through the Department of Energy under contract No.DE- AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6106E ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

189

Sulfur emissions reduction at the Great Plains coal gasification facility: Technical and economic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an in-depth technical and economic review of over 40 sulfur control technologies that were considered for use at the Great Plains coal gasification facility in Beulah, North Dakota. The review was based on the production of substitute natural gas at rates of 152.5 {times} 10{sup 6} and 160 {times} 10{sup 6} scf/d from lignite containing 1.7% sulfur. The factors considered in evaluating each technology included the reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, capital and operating costs, incremental cost per unit of produced gas, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success. 21 figs., 37 tabs.

Doctor, R.D.; Wilzbach, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Joseph, T.W. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of a Residential Code-compliant Web-based Energy Efficiency Calculator for Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2001, Texas has been proactive in initiating clean air and energy efficiency-in buildings policies. The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan legislation of 2001 mandated statewide adoption of energy codes; created a 5% annual energy savings goal for public facilities in affected counties through 2007, and provided approximately $150 million in cash incentives for clean diesel emissions grants and energy research. Texas, as part of the TERP, also proposed calculating creditable Nitrogen Oxides emissions reduction credits for energy efficiency and renewable energy through the State Implementation Plan under the Federal Clean Air Act. Residential energy codes create more energy-efficient homes and thus reduce emissions from savings in electricity generation and the burning of on-site natural gas. Since 2001, Texas energy code programs have partially transformed the housing market in Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston with 30,000 Energy Star homes (approximately 27%) in 2006, which have reduced emissions from building energy efficient homes, and created new manufacturing jobs for energy-efficient equipment and windows. However, several obstacles remain to realizing a total market transformation: the market value of energy efficiency is not uniformly assigned, and there is a lack of consumer awareness to achieve market transformation. Therefore, certain old construction practices remain entrenched. To overcome some of these obstacles, the International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) was created. The objectives of IC3 are to: 1) increase the number of homes built in Texas with a target energy performance better than the 2000/2001 IECC baseline1; 2) increase the number of builders and building officials familiar with high performance home building options, technologies and quality assurance requirements; 3) increase the number of builders constructing and marketing high performance homes; and 4) quantify NOx emissions reduction from the energy efficiency measures recorded and verified for each house constructed with IC3. This paper presents information on the design and operation of the IC3 system.

Cordes, J.; O'Neal, S.; Marshall, K.; Montgomery, C.; Stackhouse, R.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, Z.; McKelvey, K.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the procedures developed to calculate the electricity savings and emissions reductions from the infiltration of storm water into sanitary sewage separation using a two-step regression method: one step to correlate the gallons of wastewater treated to the rainfall, and a second step that correlates the gallons of wastewater treated to the electricity consumed during a given period. The procedure integrates ASHRAE’s Inverse Model Toolkit (IMT) for the weather-normalization analysis and the EPA’s Emissions and Generations Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) for calculating the NOx emissions reductions for the electric utility provider associated with the user.

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the procedures developed to calculate the electricity savings and emissions reductions from the infiltration of storm water into sanitary sewage separation using a two-step regression method: one step to correlate the gallons of wastewater treated to the rainfall, and a second step that correlates the gallons of wastewater treated to the electricity consumed during a given period. The procedure integrates ASHRAE's Inverse Model Toolkit (IMT) for the weather-normalization analysis and the EPA's Emissions and Generations Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) for calculating the NOx emissions reductions for the electric utility provider associated with the user.

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesGHG Emissions from Biofuels . in STEPS Research Symposium .NRDC, Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America's

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions for both corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanole/MJ, respectively, a 93% (corn ethanol) and 50% (cellulosicSugar Cane) Ethanol (Corn) Ethanol (Cellulosic biomass) 25

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Reduction of Non-CO2 Gas Emissions Through The In Situ Bioconversion of Methane  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this research were to seek previously unidentified anaerobic methanotrophs and other microorganisms to be collected from methane seeps associated with coal outcrops. Subsurface application of these microbes into anaerobic environments has the potential to reduce methane seepage along coal outcrop belts and in coal mines, thereby preventing hazardous explosions. Depending upon the types and characteristics of the methanotrophs identified, it may be possible to apply the microbes to other sources of methane emissions, which include landfills, rice cultivation, and industrial sources where methane can accumulate under buildings. Finally, the microbes collected and identified during this research also had the potential for useful applications in the chemical industry, as well as in a variety of microbial processes. Sample collection focused on the South Fork of Texas Creek located approximately 15 miles east of Durango, Colorado. The creek is located near the subsurface contact between the coal-bearing Fruitland Formation and the underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The methane seeps occur within the creek and in areas adjacent to the creek where faulting may allow fluids and gases to migrate to the surface. These seeps appear to have been there prior to coalbed methane development as extensive microbial soils have developed. Our investigations screened more than 500 enrichments but were unable to convince us that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was occurring and that anaerobic methanotrophs may not have been present in the samples collected. In all cases, visual and microscopic observations noted that the early stage enrichments contained viable microbial cells. However, as the levels of the readily substrates that were present in the environmental samples were progressively lowered through serial transfers, the numbers of cells in the enrichments sharply dropped and were eliminated. While the results were disappointing we acknowledge that anaerobic methane oxidizing (AOM) microorganisms are predominantly found in marine habitats and grow poorly under most laboratory conditions. One path for future research would be to use a small rotary rig to collect samples from deeper soil horizons, possibly adjacent to the coal-bearing horizons that may be more anaerobic.

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

196

Texas Tech University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University :: TechAnnounce http Academic Departmental Citing scheduling conflicts with the Texas Oklahoma-Texas Tech football game and international environmental reporters, experts and industry and government leaders to the Hub City. Texas Tech

Rock, Chris

197

Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Texas Census Snapshot: 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abilene Missouri Conroe Texas Odessa San Angelo LongviewTexas Census Snapshot: 2010 Same-sex couples Same-sex

Gates, Gary J.; Cooke, Abigail M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wildland Fires Texas 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wildland-Urban Interface Fires, Amarillo, Texas 2011. ... The deployment was conducted jointly with the Texas Forest Service (TFS). ...

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System Dock Burke Regents Fellow Director, Southwest Region University Transportation Center Senior Research Scientist, Texas Transportation Institute Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843 d

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

Price, Lynn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date Published 052012 Conference Location New Orleans, USA Keywords cement, co2 emissions, concrete, emerging technologies, energy efficiency, Low Emissions & Efficient...

203

An Introduction to Texas Senate Bill 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits: Beaumont-Port Arthur, El Paso, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria. The El Paso area also violates the NAAQS maximum allowable limits for carbon monoxide and respirable particulate matter. These areas face severe sanctions, such as loss of access to federal transportation funds, if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits, including: Austin, Corpus Christi, San Antonio, and the Longview-Tyler-Marshall area. Ozone is formed when oxides of nitrogen (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and oxygen (O2) combine in the presence of strong sunlight. In response to this effort the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) developed a strategy with the EPA that reduced VOCs from large regulated, stationary point sources by over 50 percent during the 1990 to 1996 period. Although this first strategy was very successful, levels of ozone failed to meet the national standards, and a second strategy had to be developed to achieve compliance with the ozone standard. In 2001, the Texas State Senate passed Senate Bill 5 (SB 5) to further reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx by sources that are currently not regulated by the TNRCC, including area sources (e.g., residential emissions), on-road mobile sources (e.g., all types of motor vehicles), and non-road mobile sources (e.g., aircraft, locomotives, etc.). This paper outlines the legislation, and responsibilities of the different government entities and the important role that private industry is being encouraged to play.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A new challenge for the energy efficiency evaluation community: energy savings and emissions reductions from urban transportation policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new challenge for the energy efficiency evaluation community: energy savings and emissions reductions from urban transportation policies Dr. Jean-SĂ©bastien BROC, Pr. Bernard BOURGES, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, France Abstract The energy efficiency evaluation community has a large experience about

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Standard Offer Program Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Standard Offer Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Solutions, SCORE, and CitySmart Peak Energy Reduction Standard Offer: $165/kW Provider Texas New Mexico Power Texas-New Mexico Power's Commercial Solutions Program provides incentives

206

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 20% of TNMP's annual Residential Standard Offer Program incentive budget Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Rated Home Builders: Custom Residential Large and Small Projects: $260; $0.08/kWh reduction

207

Reduction of soot emissions by iron pentacarbonyl in isooctane diffusion flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light-scattering measurements, in situ laser-induced fluorescence, and thermophoretic sampling with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, were performed in laboratory isooctane diffusion flames seeded with 4000 ppm iron pentacarbonyl. These measurements allowed the determination of the evolution of the size, number density, and volume fraction of soot particles through the flame. Comparison to unseeded flame data provided a detailed assessment of the effects of iron addition on soot particle inception, growth, and oxidation processes. Iron was found to produce a minor soot-enhancing effect at early residence times, while subsequent soot particle growth was largely unaffected. It is concluded that primarily elemental iron is incorporated within the soot particles during particle inception and growth. However, iron addition was found to enhance the rate of soot oxidation during the soot burnout regime, yielding a two-thirds reduction in overall soot emissions. In situ spectroscopic measurements probed the transient nature of elemental iron throughout the flame, revealing significant loss of elemental iron, presumably to iron oxides, with increasing flame residence, suggesting catalysis of soot oxidation via iron oxide species. (author)

Kim, K.B.; Masiello, K.A.; Hahn, D.W. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Texas Tech University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University System :: Huffaker Named as Texas Tech System General Counsel http://www.texastech.edu/stories/12-03-TTUS-Washington-DC-Trip.php[4/2/2012 8:13:27 AM] Chancellor Hance and leadership from the Texas visited with Texas Tech students and Congressional interns while in Washington, D.C. March 27, 2012 Texas

Rock, Chris

209

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in China’s cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Texas Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: An Overview of Legislative Responsibilities, Code Compliance Issues and Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 77th Texas Legislature, in 2001, established Senate Bill 5, SB-5, which addressed NOx emission reductions by establishing programs to reduce vehicle emissions and reductions due to energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources. The 78th Texas Legislature further expanded SB-5 into code certification for code officials and above code programs. Using data available from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, TCEQ, the EPA and new procedures developed by the Laboratory, the annual energy savings calculated in 2003 from energy-code compliant new residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties were 252,238 megawatt hours of electricity and 887,564 million Btu of natural gas. The resultant annual NOx reductions were 473 tons. On a peak summer day in 2003, the NOx emissions were 2.44 tons. SB-5 recognized Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy, EE/RE, as a valid method to reduce emissions. The Energy Systems Laboratory was made responsible for achieving the following goals. 1. Quantify the NOx reductions from EE/RE by county. 2. Assist cities and counties determine the impact of code amendments that they planned to adopt. 3. Conduct training on the IRC / IECC, including ASHRAE 90.1. 4. Set up a certification program for code officials. 5. Assist cities and counties to achieve above code performance. 6. Translate the EE/RE savings into EPA acceptable emissions reductions which can be applied to the State Implementation Plan, SIP.

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J. A.; Turner, W. D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Exploring the Interaction Between California’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cap-and-Trade Program and Complementary Emissions Reduction Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California enacted Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32) to address climate change in 2006. It required the California Air Resources Board (ARB) to develop a plan to reduce the State’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. ARB developed a plan (i.e., the “Scoping Plan”) made up of a GHG emissions cap-and-trade program and regulatory measures known as “complementary policies” (CPs) to achieve the 2020 target. The CPs, which were designed to achieve climate policy and ...

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Census Snapshot: Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE WILLIAMS INSTITUTE CENSUS SNAPSHOT TEXAS JANUARY 2008TEXAS Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow Clifford J.sex couples raising children in Texas. We compare same-sex “

Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Capital Fund (Texas) The Texas Capital Fund is designed to promote growth in rural non-entitlement areas, generally defined as cities with less than 50,000 residents or...

214

Texas Web Sites - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Web Sites Other Links : Texas Electricity Profile: Texas Energy Profile: Texas Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

215

Detailed Description of Data for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the report for detailed description of data what was used in the research for Senate Bill 5: Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP). Basically this report is a manual for attached CD-ROM. The attached CD-ROM contains all data, documents, figures and spreadsheets that were used for this research. All files were categorized and divided into several folders in the CD-ROM. The detailed accomplishments and progress to date for the project are also able to access from the annual report to the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission which is included in the CDROM.

Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.; Ahmad, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Retail Unbundling - Texas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs > Texas Retail Unbundling - Texas Status: The State has no active residential customer choice programs, but some...

217

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas July 23, 2010 CX-003171: Categorical Exclusion Determination Colonias for Microgrids (Texas) Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) 14.09 CX(s) Applied: A1,...

218

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

219

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canadian River Compact (Texas) The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by...

220

Tornado Jarrell Texas 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornado, Jarrell, Texas, May 27, 1997. ... The most destructive of these tornadoes swept through a housing area on the outskirts of Jarrell, Texas. ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ownership of Carbon Dioxide Captured by Clean Coal Project (Texas) This legislation stipulates that the Railroad Commission of Texas automatically acquires the title to any carbon...

222

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on this program. July 12, 2013 Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) Austin Energy, the municipal utility of Austin Texas, offers the Value of Solar rate...

223

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 EIS-0444: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector County, Texas March 16, 2011 CX-005453: Categorical...

224

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RFG Running Hot Soak Diurnal CNG :Diesel Fuels Emissions RFGwith compressednatural gas (CNG),the hydrocarbontaitpipemethanol, natural gas (CNG),and hydrogen. As noted above,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel distribution, powerplantand refinery emissions -- areemissions fromoil refineries and electrical powerplants. Inproduction of the fuel at the refinery, the distribution of

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reduction of natural gas engine emissions using a novel aftertreatment system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global objective of this study was to develop an exhaust aftertreatment system to reduce gaseous and particulate matter emissions from natural gas fueled vehicles.… (more)

Burlingame, Timothy S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cost-effectiveness of controlling emissions for various alternative-fuel vehicle types, with vehicle and fuel price subsidies estimated on the basis of monetary values of emission reductions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emission-control cost-effectiveness is estimated for ten alternative-fuel vehicle (AFV) types (i.e., vehicles fueled with reformulated gasoline, M85 flexible-fuel vehicles [FFVs], M100 FFVs, dedicated M85 vehicles, dedicated M100 vehicles, E85 FFVS, dual-fuel liquefied petroleum gas vehicles, dual-fuel compressed natural gas vehicles [CNGVs], dedicated CNGVs, and electric vehicles [EVs]). Given the assumptions made, CNGVs are found to be most cost-effective in controlling emissions and E85 FFVs to be least cost-effective, with the other vehicle types falling between these two. AFV cost-effectiveness is further calculated for various cases representing changes in costs of vehicles and fuels, AFV emission reductions, and baseline gasoline vehicle emissions, among other factors. Changes in these parameters can change cost-effectiveness dramatically. However, the rank of the ten AFV types according to their cost-effectiveness remains essentially unchanged. Based on assumed dollars-per-ton emission values and estimated AFV emission reductions, the per-vehicle monetary value of emission reductions is calculated for each AFV type. Calculated emission reduction values ranged from as little as $500 to as much as $40,000 per vehicle, depending on AFV type, dollar-per-ton emission values, and baseline gasoline vehicle emissions. Among the ten vehicle types, vehicles fueled with reformulated gasoline have the lowest per-vehicle value, while EVs have the highest per-vehicle value, reflecting the magnitude of emission reductions by these vehicle types. To translate the calculated per-vehicle emission reduction values to individual AFV users, AFV fuel or vehicle price subsidies are designed to be equal to AFV emission reduction values. The subsidies designed in this way are substantial. In fact, providing the subsidies to AFVs would change most AFV types from net cost increases to net cost decreases, relative to conventional gasoline vehicles.

Wang, M.Q.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO2 emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This paper is an initial effort to compile the available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO2 emissions. This paper consolidates available information on eighteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Texas Industries of the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the Texas Industries of the Future program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of advanced technologies and adoption of best practices that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs, resulting in improved competitive performance. The bottom line for Texas industry is savings in energy and materials, cost-effective environmental compliance, increased productivity, reduced waste, and enhanced product quality. The state program leverages the programs and tools of the federal Department of Energy's Industries of the Future. At the federal level, there are nine Industries of the Future: refining, chemicals, aluminum, steel, metal casting, glass, mining, agriculture, and forest products. These industries were selected nationally because they supply over 90% of the U.S. economy's material needs and account for 75% of all energy use by U.S. industry. In Texas, three IOF sectors, chemicals, refining and forest products, account for 86% of the energy used by industry in this state.

Ferland, K.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new process stores carbon dioxide in precast concrete.G. J. Venta. 2009. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technologyuse of captured carbon dioxide. Available at http://

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the U.S. Chemicals and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction Potential in the U.S. Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

232

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas...

234

Modeling Ambient Carbon Monoxide Trends to Evaluate Mobile Source Emissions Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression models have been used with poor success to detect the effect of emission control programs in ambient concentration measurements of carbon monoxide. An advanced CO regression model is developed whose form is based on an understanding of ...

Robin L. Dennis; Mary W. Downton

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NOx emissions while also generating electricity at an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented.

Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 gm/mifor the mid-size electric car. All the emissions areemissions for the mid-size electric cars vary from about Isize. In the case of electric cars, the efficiency standard

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Combined Catalyzed Soot Filter and SCR Catalyst System for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Substantially reduces particulate emission for diesel vehicles Up to 90% effective against carbonaceous particulate matter Significantly reduces CO and HC Filter regenerates at normal diesel operation temperatures Removable design for easy cleaning and maintenance.

Kakwani, R.M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

Texas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas State Regulations: Texas State of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas (RCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, administers oil and gas exploration, development, and production operations, except for oil and gas leasing, royalty payments, surface damages through oil and gas operations, and operator-landowner contracts. The RCC and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formerly, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding clarifying jurisdiction over oil field wastes generated in connection with oil and gas exploration, development, and production. The RCC Oil and Gas Division operates nine district offices, each staffed with field enforcement and support personnel.

240

Development of a Web-Based, Code-Compliant 2001 IECC Residential Simulator for Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a web-based, code-compliant 2001 IECC1 residential simulation for Texas. Included in the paper is a description of the software and database platform used in the web application and how this software is attached to the DOE-2 legacy software running on a cluster of servers attached to the web. Additional information is included about how a residence is dynamically updated by the web-page, using macro commands and a flexible yet fixed-schematic input file. This tool is currently in use by builders in Texas to check code compliance of new residential construction. It also calculates NOx, SOx and CO2 emissions reductions from the energy savings of the proposed house for the electric utility associated with the user using the data from the Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) provided by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China has implemented a series of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for over 30 appliances, voluntary energy efficiency label for 40 products and a mandatory energy information label that covers 19 products to date. However, the impact of these programs and their savings potential has not been evaluated on a consistent basis. This paper uses modeling to estimate the energy saving and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potential of the appliances standard and labeling program for products for which standards are currently in place, under development or those proposed for development in 2010 under three scenarios that differ in the pace and stringency of MEPS development. In addition to a baseline 'Frozen Efficiency' scenario at 2009 MEPS level, the 'Continued Improvement Scenario' (CIS) reflects the likely pace of post-2009 MEPS revisions, and the likely improvement at each revision step. The 'Best Practice Scenario' (BPS) examined the potential of an achievement of international best practice efficiency in broad commercial use today in 2014. This paper concludes that under 'CIS', cumulative electricity consumption could be reduced by 9503 TWh, and annual CO{sub 2} emissions of energy used for all 37 products would be 16% lower than in the frozen efficiency scenario. Under a 'BPS' scenario for a subset of products, cumulative electricity savings would be 5450 TWh and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reduction of energy used for 11 appliances would be 35% lower.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Letschert, Virginie; Ke, Jing

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modelling of catalytic aftertreatment of NOx emissions using hydrocarbon as a reductant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR) is emerging as one of the most practical methods for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from light-duty-diesel engine exhaust… (more)

Sawatmongkhon, Boonlue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Calibration and performance of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) bench rig for NOx? emissions control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A laboratory test rig was designed and built to easily test SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) technology. Equipped with three 6 kW heaters, connections for liquid N2 and an assortment of test gases, and a connection with ...

Castro Galnares, Sebastián (Castro Galnares Wright Paz)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic-reconnaissance survey portions of New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas. Volume I. Instrumentation and data reduction. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, a rotary-wing high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey was flown covering portions of the State of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. The survey encompassed six 1:250,000 scale quadrangles, Holbrook, El Paso, Las Cruces, Carlsbad, Fort Sumner and Roswell. The survey was flown with a Sikorsky S58T helicopter equipped with a high sensitivity gamma ray spectrometer which was calibrated at the DOE calibration facilities at Walker Field in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the Dynamic Test Range at Lake Mead, Arizona. The radiometric data were processed to compensate for Compton scattering effects and altitude variations. The data were normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance. The reduced data is presented in the form of stacked profiles, standard deviation anomaly plots, histogram plots and microfiche listings. The results of the geologic interpretation of the radiometric data together with the profiles, anomaly maps and histograms are presented in the individual quadrangle reports. The survey was awarded to LKB Resources, Inc. which completed the data acquisition. In April, 1980 Carson Helicopters, Inc. and Carson Geoscience Company agreed to manage the project and complete delivery of this final report.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Texas LoanSTAR Program Savings Calculation Workbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the report and manual for the Texas LoanSTAR Program Savings Calculation Workbook. The purpose of this report is to document the Texas LoanSTAR Program Savings Calculation Workbook to be used by the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). The workbook may be used to track the historical energy and dollar savings as of August 2002, and to project the future LoanSTAR program savings including: measured retrofit savings, Continuous Commissioning (CC) savings, estimated retrofit savings, emission reductions, and state agencies savings. In addition, an example of how to use this worksheet also is presented. The workbook includes twelve worksheets that have been developed to preserve the program savings data from 1990 to August 2002, and to forecast the LoanSTAR program savings beginning on September 2002. The workbook comprises: a) three output worksheets, b) four information worksheets, and c) five supporting worksheets. Three graphs are provided in the workbook: cumulative savings, measured retrofit savings and yearly savings graphs. All the spreadsheets and graphs are updated automatically through built-in programs. This workbook was developed by the Energy Systems Laboratory of Texas A&M University Systems in MS Excel.

Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A fair compromise to break the climate impasse. A major economies forum approach to emissions reductions budgeting  

SciTech Connect

Key messages of the study are: Given the stalemate in U.N. climate negotiations, the best arena to strike a workable deal is among the members the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF); The 13 MEF members—including the EU-27 (but not double-counting the four EU countries that are also individual members of the MEF)—account for 81.3 percent of all global emissions; This proposal devises a fair compromise to break the impasse to develop a science-based approach for fairly sharing the carbon budget in order to have a 75 percent chance of avoiding dangerous climate change; To increase the likelihood of a future climate agreement, carbon accounting must shift from production-based inventories to consumption-based ones; The shares of a carbon budget to stay below 2 deg C through 2050 are calculated by cumulative emissions since 1990, i.e. according to a short-horizon polluter pays principle, and national capability (income), and allocated to MEF members through emission rights. This proposed fair compromise addresses key concerns of major emitters; According to this accounting, no countries have negative carbon budgets, there is substantial time for greening major developing economies, and some developed countries need to institute very rapid reductions in emissions; and, To provide a 'green ladder' to developing countries and to ensure a fair global deal, it will be crucial to agree how to extend sufficient and predictable financial support and the rapid transfer of technology.

Grasso, Marco [Univ. of Milan-Bicocca (Italy). International Environmental Policy; J. Roberts, Timmons [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Environmental Studies and Sociology; The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Potential of solar domestic hot water systems in rural areas for greenhouse gas emission reduction in Poland  

SciTech Connect

Application of solar energy for preparing domestic hot water is one of the easiest methods of utilization of this energy. At least part of the needs for warm tap water could be covered by solar systems. At present, mainly coal is used for water heating at dwellings in rural areas in Poland. Warm tap water consumption will increase significantly in the future as standards of living are improved. This can result in the growth of electricity use and an increase in primary fuel consumption. Present and future methods of warm sanitary water generation in rural areas in Poland is discussed, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are estimated. It is predicted that the emission of CO{sub 2} and NOx will increase. The emission of CO and CH{sub 4} will decrease because of changes in the structure of the final energy carriers used. The economic and market potentials of solar energy for preparing warm water in rural areas are discussed. It is estimated that solar systems can meet 30%-45% of the energy demand for warm water generation in rural areas at a reasonable cost, with a corresponding CO{sub 2} emission reduction. The rate of realization of the economic potential of solar water heaters depends on subsidies for the installation of equipment. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Skowronski, P. [Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency, Warsaw (Poland); Wisniewski, G. [Institute for Building, Mechanization and Electrification of Agriculture, Warsaw (Poland)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Reduction of NO[sub x] emissions coke oven gas combustion process  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes by-product processing at Clairton Works which uses a unique cryogenic technology. Modifications to the desulfurization facility, nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes (both thermal and fuel NO[sub x]), and the boilers plants are described. Boilers were used to study the contribution of fuel NO[sub x] formation during the combustion of coke oven gas. Results are summarized. The modifications made to the desulfurization facility resulted in the overall H[sub 2]S emission being reduced by 2-4 grains/100scf and the NO[sub x] emission being reduced by 21-42% in the boiler stacks.

Terza, R.R. (USS Clairton Works, PA (United States)); Sardesai, U.V. (Westfield Engineering and Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

Sakakibara, Y; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K; Chen, D; Koike, S; Tokoku, C; Uchiyama, T; Ohashi, M; Kuroda, K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

Y. Sakakibara; N. Kimura; T. Suzuki; K. Yamamoto; D. Chen; S. Koike; C. Tokoku; T. Uchiyama; M. Ohashi; K. Kuroda

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY USAGE, AND GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS GAS 4. ASSESSMENT ANDgas consumption (miles per gallon or Wh mile) of a vehicle, calculation of the fuel usageGas from Biomass from Solar Carbon Dioxide Table 2: [gin ~mlsslons~-~iJf°r Usage

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Traffic Congestion Mitigation as an Emissions Reduction Strategy Alexander York Bigazzi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as electric and gas- electric hybrid vehicles. But travel volume is also a key consideration for the total hydrocarbons and particulate matter), and decreases with the fraction of advanced-drivetrain vehicles assume that traffic congestion mitigation results in reduced vehicle emissions without proper

Bertini, Robert L.

255

Texas Distant Learning Association Annual Conference San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other departments), Texas Southern University, Texas A&M, Mexico Department of Health, UNAM, PEMEX, QGSI

Azevedo, Ricardo

256

Reduction in Mercury Emissions with Lignite Coke W. Esser-Schmittmann, J. Wirling and U. Lenz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Therefore, without cooling the flue gas, significant quantities of mercury will pass through the particulate, page 4824. Licata, A., et al, June 1994, "An Economic Alternative to Controlling Acid Gases, Mercury electrostatic precipitator combination. -Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction System to reduce nitrogen oxide

Columbia University

257

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System Timothy J. Lomax, Ph.D., P.E. Research Engineer SWUTC Associate Director for Transportation Research at Texas A&M University Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843 t-lomax@tamu.edu (979) 845-9960 Biography

258

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System H. Gene Hawkins Jr., Ph.D., P Scholars, TAMU Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843 of Zachry Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University, where he has served for the past seven years

259

Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Texas Project" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

260

New Technology for America`s Electric Power Industry. Emissions reduction in gas turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is examining alternatives to straight natural gas firing. Research has shown that the addition of certain catalytic agents, such as in hydrogen co-firing, shows promise. When hydrogen co-firing is used in tandem with steam injection, a decrease in both CO and NO{sub x} emissions has been observed. In-process hydrogen production and premixing with the natural gas fuel are also being explored.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains a minimum of 92 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Inc. is a world leader in the development and production of diesel engines for on-highway vehicles, off-highway industrial machines, and power generation units. Cummins Inc. diesel products cover a 50-3000 HP range. The power range for this project includes 174-750 HP to achieve EPA's Tier 3 emission levels of 4.0 NOx+NMHC gm/kW-hr and 0.2 PM gm/kWhr and Tier 4 Interim emission levels of 2.0 gm/kW-hr NOx and 0.02 gm/kW-hr PM. Cummins' anticipated product offerings for Tier 4 in this range include the following: QSB6.7, QSC8.3, QSL9, QSM11, QSX15, QSK19. (For reference, numerical values indicate engine displacement in liters, the letter designation ns indicate the product model). A summary of the EPA's mobile off-highway emissions requirements is given in Figure 1.

Jennifer Rumsey

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tornado Lubbock Texas May 1970  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornado, Lubbock, Texas, May, 1970. On May 11, 1970, in the late evening, Lubbock Texas experienced a tornado that ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China is now the world's largest producer and consumer of household appliances and commercial equipment. To address the growth of electricity use of the appliances, China has implemented a series of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for 30 appliances, and voluntary energy efficiency label for 40 products. Further, in 2005, China started a mandatory energy information label that covers 19 products to date. However, the impact of these standard and labeling programs and their savings potential has not been evaluated on a consistent basis. This research involved modeling to estimate the energy saving and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potential of the appliances standard and labeling program for products for which standards are currently in place, or under development and those proposed for development in 2010. Two scenarios that have been developed differ primarily in the pace and stringency of MEPS development. The 'Continued Improvement Scenario' (CIS) reflects the likely pace of post-2009 MEPS revisions, and the likely improvement at each revision step considering the technical limitation of the technology. The 'Best Practice Scenario' (BPS) examined the potential of an achievement of international best practice MEPS in 2014. This paper concludes that under the 'CIS' of regularly scheduled MEPS revisions to 2030, cumulative electricity consumption could be reduced by 9503 TWh, and annual CO{sub 2} emissions would be 16% lower than in the frozen efficiency scenario. Under a 'BPS' scenario for a subset of products, cumulative electricity savings would be 5450 TWh and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reduction would be 35% lower than in the frozen scenario.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeill, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Letschert, Virginie; Ke, Jing; Saheb, Yamina

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2009 CX-000351: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12102009 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy...

268

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 27, 2010 CX-002520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05272010 Location(s): Grapevine, Texas Office(s):...

269

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 CX-002947: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 07092010 Location(s): Angleton, Texas Office(s): Energy...

270

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycling Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03092010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy...

271

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2010 CX-007042: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 03302010 Location(s): Kickapoo Tribe, Texas Office(s):...

272

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 10, 2011 CX-005000: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas-City-Pearland CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01102011 Location(s): Pearland, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency...

273

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A fair compromise to break the climate impasse. A major economies forum approach to emissions reductions budgeting  

SciTech Connect

Key messages of the study are: Given the stalemate in U.N. climate negotiations, the best arena to strike a workable deal is among the members the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF); The 13 MEF members—including the EU-27 (but not double-counting the four EU countries that are also individual members of the MEF)—account for 81.3 percent of all global emissions; This proposal devises a fair compromise to break the impasse to develop a science-based approach for fairly sharing the carbon budget in order to have a 75 percent chance of avoiding dangerous climate change; To increase the likelihood of a future climate agreement, carbon accounting must shift from production-based inventories to consumption-based ones; The shares of a carbon budget to stay below 2 deg C through 2050 are calculated by cumulative emissions since 1990, i.e. according to a short-horizon polluter pays principle, and national capability (income), and allocated to MEF members through emission rights. This proposed fair compromise addresses key concerns of major emitters; According to this accounting, no countries have negative carbon budgets, there is substantial time for greening major developing economies, and some developed countries need to institute very rapid reductions in emissions; and, To provide a 'green ladder' to developing countries and to ensure a fair global deal, it will be crucial to agree how to extend sufficient and predictable financial support and the rapid transfer of technology.

Grasso, Marco [Univ. of Milan-Bicocca (Italy). International Environmental Policy; J. Roberts, Timmons [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Environmental Studies and Sociology; The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

UNIVERSITIES IN TEXAS, PRIVATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caption FOR PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN TEXAS, PRIVATE SUPPORT IS THE ENGINE OF QUALITY. Indeed, state support (general revenues) today provides just one-third of Texas A&M University's total budget per student as Texas A&M. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE http://www.science.tamu.edu 3257 TAMU College Station

276

Jamail Texas Recreational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lot 40 Lot 31 Lot 16 Lot 11 Lot 70 Lot 99 Lot 80 Lot 118 Lot 108 Trinity Garage Jamail Texas Swimming Blanton Museum of Art Brazos Garage Conference Center Garage Main Building San Jacinto Garage DKR Texas Memorial Stadium Bellmont Hall North End Zone North End Zone Bellmont Hall DKR Texas Memorial Stadium San

Texas at Austin, University of

277

Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 31,2010 March 31,2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FROM: STEVEN CHU SUBJECT: Implementation of Executive Order 135 14, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Addressing the crisis of climate change is the challenge of our time, and a fundamental priority for the Department of Energy. As the agency charged with advancing the Nation's energy security, we are committed to developing energy efficient technologies that support the transformation to a low-carbon economy. We must also lead by example in reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with our own operations and facilities. On October 5,2009, the President issued Executive Order (EO) 135 14, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance." This requires all

278

Selling Texas: an internship at the Texas Department of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"SELLING TEXAS," an overview of the Texas Department of Agriculture and its Marketing and Agribusiness Division, takes a look at how the organization promotes Texas as the best of the best, and considers what would make the campaign better. Enriched by abundant resources and industrious people, Texas is a modem worldwide leader in the export of many raw and processed agricultural products ... Your market is our market ... Supply, quality and diversity--that's Texas agriculture" (TDA, 1996a). The Texas Department of Agriculture's Marketing and Agribusiness Development Division has a unique opportunity to encourage businesses to locate in Texas (and thereby boost the Texas economy) as a result of the State's mystique. For instance, the number of brand names including "Texas" places it in the top five-among other U.S. states in terms of popularity as an advertising tool. "Savor all the flavors of Texas ... Bred to survive and flourish in the unique Texas climate ... The vast ranges and fertile soils of Texas produce the world's finest fibers..." (TDA, 1996c). The division's BLJY TEXAS cwnpaign also promotes Texas products to its residents with whom Texas pride and loyalty are an arguable second only to American patriotism. The BUY TEXAS initiative is an umbrella consumer marketing effort that "encourages ocnsumers to seek and purchase products grown, sewn, and processed in Texas" (Marketing and Agribusiness Development, 1996) including Taste of Texas foods, Vintage Texas wines, TEXAS GROAN plants, and Naturally TEXAS apparel.

Cross, Kelly D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Texas Emerging Technology Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Emerging Technology Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas Emerging Technology Fund Place Texas Product String representation "The Texas Emerg ... hnology fields." is...

280

Texas Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Department of Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Department of Transportation Name Texas Department of Transportation Short Name TxDOT Place Austin, Texas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DoD Fuel Cell Demonstration Program: Energy Savings and Emissions Reductions to Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under the Department of Defense (DoD) Fuel Cell Demonstration Program managed by the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL), 200 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plants have been installed and made operational at 30 DoD sites located throughout the U.S. All of the fuel cells in the DoD fleet are being monitored for electrical and thermal efficiency, and total availability. Additionally, a subset of the DoD fleet is being monitored for pollutant emissions including NOx, SOx, CO, CO2, total hydrocarbons, and non-methane hydrocarbons. As of January of 1998, the 30 installed PAFCs have generated 35,967 MWh of electricity, 46,117 MBtus of thermal energy, and saved $1,288,746 in displaced electrical and thermal energy costs. In addition, these fuel cells have abated an estimated 179 tons of SOx, 67 tons of NOx, and have an adjusted availability rate of 81%. Additional program and site-specific information can be found at the official website of the DoD Fuel Cell Demonstration Program, located at http://www.dodfuelcell.com.

Holcomb, F. H.; Binder, M. J.; Taylor, W. R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The coprocessing of fossil fuels and biomass for CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is underway to evaluate the Hydrocarb process for conversion of carbonaceous raw material to clean carbon and methanol products. These products are valuable in the market either as fuel or as chemical commodities. As fuel, methanol and carbon can be used economically, either independently or in slurry form, in efficient heat energies (turbines and internal combustion engines) for both mobile and stationary single and combined cycle power plants. When considering CO{sub 2} emission control in the utilization of fossil fuels, the copressing of those fossil fuels with biomass (which may include, wood, municipal solid waste and sewage sludge) is a viable mitigation approach. By coprocessing both types of feedstock to produce methanol and carbon while sequestering all or part of the carbon, a significant net CO{sub 2} reduction is achieved if the methanol is substituted for petroleum fuels in the transportation sector. The Hydrocarb process has the potential, if the R&D objectives are achieved, to produce alternative transportation fuel from indigenous resources at lower cost than any other biomass conversion process. These comparisons suggest the resulting fuel can significantly displace gasoline at a competitive price while mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions and reducing ozone and other toxics in urban atmospheres.

Steinberg, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Yuanji [Hydrocarb Corp., New York, NY (United States); Borgwardt, R.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions of 1% in national energy consumption. As a subset1% reductions in national energy consumption above business-

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-Wet FGD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control for Plants firing Mercury control for Plants firing texas lignite and equiPPed with esP-wet fgd Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. One promising mercury control technology involves the use of sorbents such as powdered activated carbon. Full-scale sorbent injection tests conducted for various combinations of fuel and plant air pollution control devices have provided a good understanding of variables that affect sorbent performance. However, many uncertainties exist regarding long-term performance, and data gaps remain for specific plant configurations. Sorbent injection has not been demonstrated at full-scale for plants firing Texas lignite coal, which are responsible for about 10 percent of annual U.S. power plant

285

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System Barbara Lorenz Program Coordinator Southwest Region University Transportation Center Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843 b-lorenz@tamu.edu (979) 845-8861 Biography Barbara Lorenz is the Program

286

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Thinking Ahead Donna Coggeshall North Central Texas Council of Governments #12;North Central Texas Council of Governments Thinking Ahead are for the 12-county MPA #12;North Central Texas Council of Governments Thinking Ahead Development Form #12

Texas at Arlington, University of

287

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN, TEXAS, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN AUSTIN, TEXAS, USA UNIVERSITY-WIDE PARTNER Fast facts Language university website. Location The University of Texas is located in the centre of Austin. The city is situated on the banks of the Colorado River in Central Texas. This part of Texas is also known as the Hill Country

Hopkins, Gail

288

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions Significant Energy Consumption - and Opportunities for Reduction Transportation is essential to our economy and quality of life, and currently accounts for 71% of the nation's total petroleum use and 33% of our total carbon emissions. Energy-efficient transportation strategies could reduce both oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective is to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an

289

Renewable energy and its potential for carbon emissions reductions in developing countries: Methodology for technology evaluation. Case study application to Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many projects have been proposed to promote and demonstrate renewable energy technologies (RETs) in developing countries on the basis of their potential to reduce carbon emissions. However, no uniform methodology has been developed for evaluating RETs in terms of their future carbon emissions reduction potential. This study outlines a methodology for identifying RETs that have the potential for achieving large carbon emissions reductions in the future, while also meeting key criteria for commercialization and acceptability in developing countries. In addition, this study evaluates the connection between technology identification and the selection of projects that are designed to demonstrate technologies with a propensity for carbon emission reductions (e.g., Global Environmental Facility projects). Although this report applies the methodology to Mexico in a case study format, the methodology is broad based and could be applied to any developing country, as well as to other technologies. The methodology used in this report is composed of four steps: technology screening, technology identification, technology deployment scenarios, and estimates of carbon emissions reductions. The four technologies with the highest ranking in the technology identification process for the on-grid category were geothermal, biomass cogeneration, wind, and micro-/mini-hydro. Compressed natural gas (CNG) was the alternative that received the highest ranking for the transportation category.

Corbus, D.; Martinez, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Mark, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration's 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO[sub 2] emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO[sub 2] emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO[sub 2] emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO[sub 2] emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration`s 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO{sub 2} emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO{sub 2} emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas Retail Energy, LLC Place Texas Utility Id 50046 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

293

Texas Crop Profile: Onions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This profile of onion production in Texas gives an overview of basic commodity information; discusses insect, disease and weed pests; and covers cultural and chemical control methods.

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blues The Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant in Austin, Texas in utilizing biogas generation to reduce energy costs and become self-sufficient. January 11, 2012...

295

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

development. Some Texas property owners may be eligible to receive refunds of state sales and use taxes and franchise taxes for paying local school property taxes, subject to...

296

Algae biofuels in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texas – the energy center of the world – is emerging as a pioneer in algae biodiesel research and production. There are a number of… (more)

Salpekar, Ashwini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 18, 2010 CX-004242: Categorical Exclusion Determination Colonias for Microgrids (Texas) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 14.09 CX(s) Applied:...

298

Retail Unbundling - Texas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Retail Unbundling - Texas. Status: The state has no active residential customer choice programs, but some municipalities have formed cooperative arrangements with ...

299

OpenEI - Texas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm690 en NREL GIS Data: Texas High Resolution Wind Resource http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode893

Abstract: Annual average...

300

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Texas Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly...

302

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Start - Development of a National Liquid Propane Refueling Network CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12202011 Location(s): Texas...

303

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Field Testing and Diagnostics of Radial-Jet Well-Stimulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery from Marginal Reserves Date: 02112011 Location(s): The Woodlands, Texas...

304

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

305

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas June 2, 2008 EA-1613: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed High Explosive Pressing...

306

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership for Energy. July 12, 2013 City of Plano - Smart Energy Loan Program (Texas) '''''Note: The City of Plano is currently offering a Streamlined Emergency Process...

307

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a checklist from Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) , Green Built Texas, or any other approved green building standard. The checklist must show that the...

308

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas April 25, 2013 EA-1939: Finding of No Significant Impact Center for Commercialization...

309

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mechanisms. July 12, 2013 Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard The City of Austin, Texas, has been an early adopter of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) regulatory...

310

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Proposed Gas Main and Distribution System Upgrade, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas August 1, 2005 EA-1533: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Gas Main and...

311

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

312

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 18, 2010 CX-004521: Categorical Exclusion Determination County of Travis, Texas 700 Lavaca Street Building Retrofit Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11182010...

313

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sharyland Utilities - Commercial Standard Offer Program (Texas) Sharyland Utilities offers its Commercial Standard Offer Program to encourage business customers of all sizes to...

314

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

units. July 12, 2013 Magic Valley Electric Cooperative - ENERGY STAR Builders Program (Texas) Magic Valley Electric Cooperative's (MVEC) ENERGY STAR Builders Program offers a...

315

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Additional 208,759,900 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Texas Block Grants to Support Jobs, Cut Energy Bills, and Increase Energy Independence March...

316

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Refrigeration Institute directory. July 12, 2013 Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following...

317

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas September 30, 2010 Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library The library is seeing...

318

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 12, 2010 CX-002249: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05122010...

319

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 CX-001430: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 04082010...

320

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 18, 2011 Thermal Energy Corporation's (TECO) Control Room | Photo Courtesy of the Texas Medical Center The World's Largest Medical Center is Now Among the Most Energy Efficient...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plano - Smart Energy Loan Program (Texas) '''''Note: The City of Plano is currently offering a Streamlined Emergency Process for this Program.''''' July 12, 2013 City of Plano -...

322

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2012 An aerial view of the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant in Austin, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Austin Water. Austin Using Green Innovation to Beat the Utility...

323

The Use of Conditional Probability Functions and Potential Source Contribution Functions to Identify Source Regions and Advection Pathways of Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we demonstrate the utility of conditional probability functions (CPFs), potential source contribution functions (PSCFs), and hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the source region and transport pathways of hydrocarbons measured at five photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) near the Houston ship channel from June to October 2003. Over 50 volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured on the hourly collected samples. Routine surface observations of wind directions measured at each of the receptor sites were used extensively. We show that VOCs with similar CPF patterns likely have common transport pathways. This was established with the multivariate technique, which uses the hierarchical clustering analysis to allow clusters of groups of VOCs to form with similar CPF patterns. This method revealed that alkenes, and in particular those with geometric isomers such as cis-/trans-2-butene and cis-/trans-2-pentene, have similar CPF patterns. The alkane isomers often show CPF patterns among themselves, and similarly, aromatic compounds often show similar patterns among themselves too. We also show how trajectory information can be used in conjunction with the PSCF analysis to produce a graphic analysis suggesting specific source areas for a given VOC. The use of these techniques in the chemically and meteorologically complex environment of Houston, Texas, suggests its further utility in other areas with relatively simpler conditions.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Urban scale integrated assessment for London: Which emission reduction strategies are more effective in attaining prescribed PM10 air quality standards by 2005?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightening of air quality standards for populated urban areas has led to increasing attention to assessment of air quality management areas (AQMAs) where exceedance occurs, and development of control strategies to eliminate such exceedance. Software ... Keywords: Air quality management, Dispersion modelling, Emission reduction strategies, Integrated assessment, Particulate matter, Urban air pollution

A. Mediavilla-Sahagún; H. M. ApSimon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand The UK's climate goals are ambitious and challenging. Achieving an 80% reduction in GHG emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate and scale of emission reduction is without historical precedent and presents an enormous policy of the electricity sector; the rapid and widespread deployment of innovative technologies such as heat pumps and battery electric vehicles; dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in all sectors of the economy

Jensen, Max

326

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Texas Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Texas Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Texas Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Texas Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Texas Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area Products and Services in the Texas Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

328

Restaurant Fire Houston Texas 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Houston Fast Food Restaurant Fire, Texas, 2000. On February 14, 2000, a fire in a one story restaurant in Texas claimed the lives of two firefighters. ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates all surface mining activities for the extraction of coal. The Commission acts with the authority of the Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act, which establishes that the state of Texas has exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in the state, in accordance with the

330

International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms  

SciTech Connect

Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect

Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Magnitude and value of electric vehicle emissions reductions for six driving cycles in four US cities with varying air quality problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emissions of logically competing mid-1990 gasoline vehicles (GVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) are estimated as if the vehicles were driven in the same pattern of driving. Six different driving cycles are evaluated, ranging in speed from 7 to 49 miles per hour (mph). These steps are repeated using specifics of fuel composition, electric power mix, and environmental conditions applicable to Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, and New York in the month of July. The year 2000 emissions differences for each of four regulated pollutants - HC, CO, NO{sub x,} SO{sub x} - are estimated. CO{sub 2} emissions are also estimated. With use of EVs, HC and CO emissions are consistently lowered by 98% or more. CO{sub 2} emissions reductions are uniformly large at low speed, but variable at high speed. It is found that initially introduced EVs could achieve 100% emission reductions in Chicago by using off-peak power from nuclear power plants for EV electricity generation. Emissions reductions occur for all combinations in Los Angeles, and for most combinations in New York, excepting SO{sub x}. NO{sub x} emissions are reduced in all four cities. An ``avoided cost`` value for each regulated pollutant is estimated for each of the cities. The values for each city depend on severity of air quality violations. It is estimated that the emissions reduction value of EVs driven an average of one and one half hours per day in Los Angeles ranges from $1050 to $3,900; $590 to $2100 in New York; $270 to $1200 in Chicago, and $330 to $1250 in Denver (1989$). Assuming a range of about 100 miles in congested conditions with speeds of 10 mph or less, the estimates range from $3600 to $13300 for Los Angeles; $2004 to $7200 for New York; $930 to $2930 for Chicago; and $1120 to $4290 for Denver. Low estimates are obtained using EPA`s draft Mobile5 model for GV emissions, high values by using California`s EMFAC7EP-SCF1 model. The dollar value benefit estimates include no economic value.

Wang, Q. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Santini, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Magnitude and value of electric vehicle emissions reductions for six driving cycles in four US cities with varying air quality problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emissions of logically competing mid-1990 gasoline vehicles (GVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) are estimated as if the vehicles were driven in the same pattern of driving. Six different driving cycles are evaluated, ranging in speed from 7 to 49 miles per hour (mph). These steps are repeated using specifics of fuel composition, electric power mix, and environmental conditions applicable to Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, and New York in the month of July. The year 2000 emissions differences for each of four regulated pollutants - HC, CO, NO[sub x,] SO[sub x] - are estimated. CO[sub 2] emissions are also estimated. With use of EVs, HC and CO emissions are consistently lowered by 98% or more. CO[sub 2] emissions reductions are uniformly large at low speed, but variable at high speed. It is found that initially introduced EVs could achieve 100% emission reductions in Chicago by using off-peak power from nuclear power plants for EV electricity generation. Emissions reductions occur for all combinations in Los Angeles, and for most combinations in New York, excepting SO[sub x]. NO[sub x] emissions are reduced in all four cities. An avoided cost'' value for each regulated pollutant is estimated for each of the cities. The values for each city depend on severity of air quality violations. It is estimated that the emissions reduction value of EVs driven an average of one and one half hours per day in Los Angeles ranges from $1050 to $3,900; $590 to $2100 in New York; $270 to $1200 in Chicago, and $330 to $1250 in Denver (1989$). Assuming a range of about 100 miles in congested conditions with speeds of 10 mph or less, the estimates range from $3600 to $13300 for Los Angeles; $2004 to $7200 for New York; $930 to $2930 for Chicago; and $1120 to $4290 for Denver. Low estimates are obtained using EPA's draft Mobile5 model for GV emissions, high values by using California's EMFAC7EP-SCF1 model. The dollar value benefit estimates include no economic value.

Wang, Q. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)); Santini, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TX3","N3010TX3","N3020TX3","N3035TX3","N3045TX3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Texas (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Price of...

335

Texas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Texas Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Texas. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Texas. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile in a UTM zone 19, datum WGS 84 projection system. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released November 30th, 2003 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 14th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS NREL shapefile Texas wind Data application/zip icon Shapefile (zip, 315.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

336

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2, 2012 October 2, 2012 CX-009237: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Dow Chemical Company CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 10/02/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Fossil Energy September 27, 2012 CX-009327: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/27/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 20, 2012 CX-009218: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Sparge Piping at Bryan Mound Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/20/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office September 19, 2012 CX-009359: Categorical Exclusion Determination Houston Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment

337

Schools Move Forward with Idle Reduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schools Move Forward with Idle Reduction Schools Move Forward with Idle Reduction Schools Move Forward with Idle Reduction November 2, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program With schools back in session returns the inevitable procession of parents waiting for their children in parking lots. Unfortunately, many of these parents idle their vehicles, wasting fuel and producing both smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. As children are particularly susceptible to pollution, reducing these emissions can help improve air quality and students' health. Thankfully, various Clean Cities coalitions, supported by EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program, have stepped up to reduce idling at schools. In San Antonio, Texas, the Alamo Area Clean Cities taught students

338

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas January 25, 2011 Robert Adams Alan Plummer Associates, Inc. radams@apaienv.com Ashley Alexander Texas State Soil Station, Texas Tech University tom.arsuffi@ttu.edu Jenna Barrett Brazos River Authority jbarrett

339

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... GHG Measurement and Inventory for Aluminum Production · HEX Retrofit Enables Smelter Capacity Expansion · HF Emission Reduction from ...

340

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,emission factors through 2030 were from the factors used in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Stress reduction as a link between aerobic activity and academic performance experienced by undergraduate women through the use of the Student Recreation Center at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between aerobic activity and academic performance through stress reduction using a student recreational facility. Research indicated that learning in college tends to focus on the academic aspects of the undergraduate experience - the classroom, laboratory, and the library - not other factors potentially affecting academic performance (Kuh et al., 1991). Forty women were randomly selected from the undergraduate population at Texas A&M University in order to analyze the relationship between aerobic activity and academic performance by measuring perceived stress levels. All participants completed an on-line stress questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), every three weeks. Exam scores from an introductory sociology course and an educational statistics course were used for data analysis also. The experimental group (exercise group) used twelve weeks of regular aerobic exercise, while the control group (non-exercise) remained sedentary. During the twelve-week period, all participants self-reported data for additional qualitative data. Research findings of this study included: 1. The main benefit from aerobic activity was that women who exercised regularly felt more positive about academics and non-academic activities than women who did not exercise regularly. 2. There was no statistical significant difference between exam scores and academic performance of women who exercised regularly and those who did not exercise regularly. 3. There was no statistical significant difference between stress levels of women who exercised regularly and women who did not exercise regularly. Based on the findings of the study, researcher recommendations include: 1. Continue to investigate the changing demographics of college students - namely, age, sex, and non-traditional students. This study was limited to fulltime women between the ages of 18-24. Men and part-time students need to be included in a comparable study, providing campuses with more data that reflects the entire student population. 2. Explore additional areas in sociology and psychology that address exercise behavior trends in college students. Results from this study indicated that there are many variables, including stress, that affect college students in the behavioral sciences that can be attributed to differences in physical activity between sedentary and non-sedentary people. 3. Analyze health factors, which include amount of exercise, nutrition, and sleep patterns.

Brennan, Martha

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Texas school district enlightens students with solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas school district enlightens students with solar Texas school district enlightens students with solar Texas school district enlightens students with solar July 21, 2010 - 11:33am Addthis Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas is installing solar panels which will be used incorporated into the school's curriculum. | Photo courtesy of Sam Rayburn High School Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas is installing solar panels which will be used incorporated into the school's curriculum. | Photo courtesy of Sam Rayburn High School Solar energy systems at two Houston high schools to save $15,000 annually Generate an estimated 172,000 kilowatt hours annually Avoid green house gas emissions equivalent to 14,000 gallons of gas consumed School-based solar isn't just for math and science students. At two Houston-area high schools students in core courses - ranging from

343

Texas school district enlightens students with solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas school district enlightens students with solar Texas school district enlightens students with solar Texas school district enlightens students with solar July 21, 2010 - 11:33am Addthis Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas is installing solar panels which will be used incorporated into the school's curriculum. | Photo courtesy of Sam Rayburn High School Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas is installing solar panels which will be used incorporated into the school's curriculum. | Photo courtesy of Sam Rayburn High School Solar energy systems at two Houston high schools to save $15,000 annually Generate an estimated 172,000 kilowatt hours annually Avoid green house gas emissions equivalent to 14,000 gallons of gas consumed School-based solar isn't just for math and science students. At two Houston-area high schools students in core courses - ranging from

344

Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas AgriLife Research, and Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vendor Guide Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas AgriLife Research, and Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory are members of The Texas A&M University System. All purchases made by Texas A&M AgriLife follow State Law, the Texas A&M University System Procurement Code, and the Texas A

345

TEXAS AGRILIFE RESEARCH Regent Fellows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRILIFE RESEARCH Regent Fellows 1997/98 Dr. Fuller W. Bazer, Professor, Department of Animal, Professor, Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Overton Dr. William R. Ocumpaugh, Professor, Texas AgriLife Research Station at Beeville 1999/2000 Dr. Darrell N. Ueckert, Professor, Texas Agri

346

Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3tx6251 1,280 11,304 100.8 PWR 9,823 87.6 2,560 21,127 94.2 South Texas Project Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor. Note: Totals may ...

347

Entergy Texas - SCORE, CitySmart, and Commercial Solutions Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Texas - SCORE, CitySmart, and Commercial Solutions Programs Entergy Texas - SCORE, CitySmart, and Commercial Solutions Programs Entergy Texas - SCORE, CitySmart, and Commercial Solutions Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Solutions Program: $175/kW demand reduction + $0.02/kWh saved SCORE/CitySmart Programs: $200/kW Provider Entergy Texas, Inc. The Commercial Solutions Program is designed to help participants identify

348

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co Co 2 SequeStration Potential of texaS low-rank CoalS Background Fossil fuel combustion is the primary source of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a major greenhouse gas. Sequestration of CO 2 by injecting it into geologic formations, such as coal seams, may offer a viable method for reducing atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Injection into coal seams has the potential added benefit of enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The potential for CO 2 sequestration in low-rank coals, while as yet undetermined, is believed to differ significantly from that for bituminous coals. To evaluate the feasibility and the environmental, technical, and economic impacts of CO 2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coal beds, the Texas Engineering Experimental Station is conducting a four-year study

349

South Texas Blending | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon South Texas Blending Jump to: navigation, search Name South Texas Blending Place Laredo, Texas Zip...

350

Fermilab Today | University of Texas at Arlington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas at Arlington Aug. 22, 2012 NAME: University of Texas at Arlington HOME TOWN: Arlington, Texas MASCOT: Blaze the Mustang SCHOOL COLORS: Orange and blue COLLABORATING AT...

351

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington,related to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsDenmark - Energy Efficiency Agreements………. …………..……. ……4

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Essays on the U.S Biofuel Policies: Welfare Impacts and the Potential for Reduction of GHG Emission.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation study investigates the impact of the US biofuel policies related to greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulation, tax credit and renewable fuel standard (RFS2)… (more)

Wamisho Hossiso, Kassu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Texas Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional...

355

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of the North Compost Tent CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04222010 Location(s): Amarillo, Texas Office(s):...

356

Reinvestment Zones (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reinvestment Zones a local economic development tool used by municipalities and counties throughout the state of Texas. These zones can be created for the purpose of granting local businesses ad...

357

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Golden Field Office May 27, 2010 CX-002520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A7, B5.1 Date: 05272010 Location(s): Grapevine,...

358

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

359

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02072010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 29, 2010...

360

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mound Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12292009 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office December 29, 2009...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Project Objectives) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06142010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 10, 2010...

362

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

363

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Resources in the U.S. CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.2, B3.11 Date: 11302011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office November 28, 2011 CX-007509: Categorical Exclusion...

364

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System CX(s) Applied: A11, B5.1 Date: 07152010 Location(s): Bexar County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 13, 2010...

365

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Integration CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6 Date: 07212011 Location(s): Amarillo, Texas Office(s): Pantex Site Office July 20, 2011 Today's Forecast: Improved Wind...

366

Tornado Vulnerability in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornado vulnerability depends on the incidence of and societal exposure to tornadoes for a particular location. This study assesses the vulnerability of Texas counties to tornadoes using tornado incidence and societal exposure composite scores. ...

Richard W. Dixon; Todd W. Moore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04302010 Location(s): Cedar Hill, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 30, 2010 CX-002188:...

368

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2010 CX-001820: Categorical Exclusion Determination City of Houston, Texas (TX) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 0415...

369

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2010 Illinois and Texas Towns See Weatherization Boost "It cropped about a hundred bucks off my bill in the cold, cold winter," says Springfield resident Donald Dagget, a...

370

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2010 Wind turbines like this will grace Gabe Nesbitt Community Park in McKinney, Texas, thanks to an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant | Photo courtesy of...

371

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Board, Brownsville to Mexico 138 kV Transmission Line Project, Brownsville, Texas February 25, 2000 EIS-0200: Record of Decision Treatment and Disposal of Low-Level...

372

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

School Photovoltaic System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02252010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office February 25,...

373

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2010 CX-003175: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX(s) Applied: A1, A7, B5.1 Date: 07282010...

374

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process described in detail in the Program Manual. July 12, 2013 Cavern Protection (Texas) It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under...

375

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings 11-10 and 11-30 CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07072010 Location(s): Amarillo, Texas Office(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Pantex Site Office July 6, 2010 CX-002907: Categorical...

376

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1090: Finding of No Significant Impact Disbursement of 65 Million to the State of Texas for Construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center May 1, 1995 EA-1090: Final...

377

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crops CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08252010 Location(s): College Station, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 25, 2010...

378

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting (EEDAL), 1:Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments inSaheb Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Texas | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Texas Home Alevine's picture Submitted by Alevine(5) Member 29 July, 2013 - 14:46 Texas Legal Review BHFS flora and fauna leasing Legal review permitting roadmap Texas The NREL roadmap team recently met with our legal team Brownstein Hyatt Farber and Schreck (www.bhfs.com) for a review of the Texas portion of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap (GRR). BHFS provided excellent suggestions to the Section 3 flowcharts for geothermal leases on Texas state lands. The Texas portion of the GRR now encompasses a flowchart for Texas state land leasing on Permanent School Fund Lands, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Lands, Land Trade Lands, and Relinquishment Act Lands. Additionally, BHFS provided many other helpful tips for clarifying other issue Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155)

380

Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2011 Annual Report campaign information 2011 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (chair), Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center David Abercia, Texas Tech University Dianah Ascencio, Texas Department of Transportation

Rock, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Texas A&M University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

with Texas A&M and DOE Texas A&M's Dwight Look College of Engineering Texas A&M quantum physicist Marlan Scully Texas A&M takes lead on tropical forest evapotranspiration...

382

WKN Texas LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name WKN Texas LLC Place Texas Sector Wind energy Product A wind farm developer based in Texas. Originally a subsidiary of Windkraft Nord USA,...

383

Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Come and Walk Across Texas! with us. The Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the Texas Education Agency are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Come and Walk Across Texas! with us. The Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the Texas Education Agency are partnering to Walk Across Texas! Walk Across Texas! is a great way to promote physical for people who work at all levels of Texas' school systems. Senate Bill 891 requires all public school

Wilkins, Neal

385

EIS-0444: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas 44: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas EIS-0444: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas Overview The Department of Energy proposes to provide approximately $450 million to Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project. The Project would use coal-based integrated gasification combined-cycle technology to generate electricity and capture carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery and sequestration. The plant would generate 400 MW (gross) of electricity, of which 130-213 MW would be provided to the power grid. It would also produce marketable urea, argon, and sulfuric acid. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

386

~RESEARCH TEXAS AGRILIFE RESEARCH AT AMARILLO Texas A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH TEXAS AGRILIFE RESEARCH AT AMARILLO Texas A&M System Improving Life Through Science and Technology. February 19,2010 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. J. Brian Bidwell, Prime Contract...

387

Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

Morris, Jennifer

388

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand Opportunities through 2030. Washington, DC: CCAP. Wang,cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. Iron and Steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. 26 Energy Conservation SupplyDioxide Emissions from Energy For U.S. Steel Production (2 Final Energy Use for U.S. Steel Production (

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, N.; Price, L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supporting policies offered by the government • Energy/GHGpolicy package, and include a real threat of increased government regulation or energy/energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Adaptive PI control of NOx? emissions in a Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction System using system identification models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Urea SCR System has shown great potential for implementation on diesel vehicles wanting to meet the upcoming emission regulations by the EPA. The objective of this thesis is to develop an adaptive controller that is ...

Ong, Chun Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Baldrige Award Recipients--Texas Nameplate Company ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award 1998 Recipient Texas Nameplate Company, Inc. Founded in 1946, Texas Nameplate Company, Inc. ...

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial...

394

TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that will begin to appear in metropolitan transportation plans (MTPs) in the near future. #12;- 3 - INTRODUCTIONTEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS Sponsored by the Capital Area Council of Governments August 2006 Transportation Institute Texas School Bus Biodiesel (B20

395

Planning for future uncertainties in electric power generation : an analysis of transitional strategies for reduction of carbon and sulfur emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this paper is to identify strategies for the U.S. electric utility industry for reduction of both acid rain producing and global warming gases. The research used the EPRI Electric Generation Expansion Analysis ...

Tabors, Richard D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

West Texas A&M  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Texas A&M ffiUNIVERSITY Division of Nursing MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING AND AFFILIATION AGREEMENT BWXT PANTEX, Amarillo, Texas and WEST TEXASA&M UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF...

397

Uranium Recovery Surface Activities (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality enforces and makes the rules and regulations for handling and recovering radioactive materials associated with in situ mining in Texas....

398

South Texas Project Dosimetry Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

South Texas Project Dosimetry Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 100519-0. Address and Contact Information: PO Box 289 ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Guide to the Texas Ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . ! . 0-5538-P1 Guide to the Economic Value of Texas Ports CTRCENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN www.utexas.edu/research/ctr/pdf_reports/0_5538_P1.pdf #12;#12;0-5538-P1 Guide to the Economic Value of Texas Ports Peter Siegesmund, CTR Jim Kruse, TTI

Texas at Austin, University of

400

Texas.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Texas.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

402

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arizona (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arizona. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arizona to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 818 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Kansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Kansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Kansas to be $1.08 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,816 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Michigan to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,542 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Virginia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Virginia to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,600 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nevada (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nevada. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nevada to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 944 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nebraska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nebraska. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nebraska to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.1 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,840 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Indiana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Indiana to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,684 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arkansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arkansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arkansas to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.7 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,507 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Ohio (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Ohio. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Ohio to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,343 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Utah (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Utah. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Utah to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 828 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reduction, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Georgia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Georgia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Georgia to be $2.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,628 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Idaho (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Idaho. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Idaho to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 906 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maryland (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maryland to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,581 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New York (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New York. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New York to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,230 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Texas Instruments Incorporated provides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entirely new ones. A constant thread throughout our history has been our use of progressively more complex to the revolutionary ­ to literally and repeatedly change the world. History: · Founded in 1930 as a geophysical exploration company that used seismic signalprocessing technology to search for oil · Adopted the name Texas

Mellor-Crummey, John

418

Wind powering America - Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet contains a description of the wind energy resources in the state of Texas and the state's efforts to develop wind energy production, green power, and net metering programs. The fact sheet also includes a list of contacts for those interested in obtaining more information.

O'Dell, K.

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Investigation of feasibility of injecting power plant waste gases for enhanced coalbed methane recovery from low rank coals in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) may be to blame for a gradual rise in the average global temperature. The state of Texas emits more CO2 than any other state in the U.S., and a large fraction of emissions are from point sources such as power plants. CO2 emissions can be offset by sequestration of produced CO2 in natural reservoirs such as coal seams, which may initially contain methane. Production of coalbed methane can be enhanced through CO2 injection, providing an opportunity to offset the rather high cost of sequestration. Texas has large coal resources. Although they have been studied there is not enough information available on these coals to reliably predict coalbed methane production and CO2 sequestration potential. The goal of the work was to determine if sequestration of CO2 in low rank coals is an economically feasible option for CO2 emissions reduction. Additionally, reasonable CO2 injection and methane production rates were to be estimated, and the importance of different reservoir parameters investigated. A data set was compiled for use in simulating the injection of CO2 for enhanced coalbed methane production from Texas coals. Simulation showed that Texas coals could potentially produce commercial volumes of methane if production is enhanced by CO2 injection. The efficiency of the CO2 in sweeping the methane from the reservoir is very high, resulting in high recovery factors and CO2 storage. The simulation work also showed that certain reservoir parameters, such as Langmuir volumes for CO2 and methane, coal seam permeability, and Langmuir pressure, need to be determined more accurately. An economic model of Texas coalbed methane operations was built. Production and injection activities were consistent with simulation results. The economic model showed that CO2 sequestration for enhanced coalbed methane recovery is not commercially feasible at this time because of the extremely high cost of separating, capturing, and compressing the CO2. However, should government mandated carbon sequestration credits or a CO2 emissions tax on the order of $10/ton become a reality, CO2 sequestration projects could become economic at gas prices of $4/Mscf.

Saugier, Luke Duncan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

2008 Texas State Energy Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 Texas State Energy Plan 2008 Texas State Energy Plan 2008 Texas State Energy Plan. Governor's Competitiveness Council. July 2008 2008 Texas State Energy Plan More Documents &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

OpenEI Community - Texas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Review Legal Review http://en.openei.org/community/blog/texas-legal-review The NREL roadmap team recently met with our legal team Brownstein Hyatt Farber and Schreck (www.bhfs.com) for a review of the Texas portion of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap (GRR).  BHFS provided excellent suggestions to the Section 3 flowcharts for geothermal leases on Texas state lands.  The Texas portion of the GRR now encompasses a flowchart for Texas state land leasing on Permanent School Fund Lands, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Lands, Land Trade Lands, and Relinquishment Act Lands.  Additionally, BHFS provided many other helpful tips for clarifying other issuetexas-legal-review"

422

Impact of Component Sizing in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Energy Resource and Greenhouse Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of alternative hybrid powertrains currently appears inevitable and many opportunities for substantial progress remain. The necessity for environmentally friendly vehicles, in conjunction with increasing concerns regarding U.S. dependency on foreign oil and climate change, has led to significant investment in enhancing the propulsion portfolio with new technologies. Recently, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. PHEVs are especially appealing for short daily commutes with excessive stop-and-go driving. However, the high costs associated with their components, and in particular, with their energy storage systems have been significant barriers to extensive market penetration of PEVs. In the research reported here, we investigated the implications of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions in a medium duty PHEV. An optimization framework is proposed and applied to two different parallel powertrain configurations, pre-transmission and post-transmission, to derive the Pareto frontier with respect to motor/generator and battery size. The optimization and modeling approach adopted here facilitates better understanding of the potential benefits from proper selection of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions. This understanding can help us identify the appropriate sizing of these components and thus reducing the PHEV cost. Addressing optimal sizing of PHEV components could aim at an extensive market penetration of PHEVs.

Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

Sobolevskiy, Anatoly (Orlando, FL); Rossin, Joseph A. (Columbus, OH); Knapke, Michael J. (Columbus, OH)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Recycling, Source Reduction,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type:" ,"Emission Reductions by Gas in U.S. Units:" ,"Year","Carbon Dioxide (CO2)",,"Methane (CH4)",,"Perfluoromethane (CF4)",,"Perfluoroethane (C2F6)" ,,"short...

425

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger · Industrial Test of Low-voltage Energy-saving Aluminum Reduction ...

426

An analysis of the performance of certification schemes in the hotel sector in terms of CO2 emissions reduction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Selina Hext, Freya Roe, Sarah Farmer, Gary Watson and Jason Maynard and Howard Carter on making it possible for me to continue my studies. Thank you for the incredible friendships I have made over the years in Cambridge which I hope will last... 8 xiii List of Publications Peer Reviewed Conference papers Houlihan Wiberg, A., Baker, N.V., 20 08a. 305: Certification in The Hotel Sector; Does It Actually Reduce Global CO2 Emissions? In: PLEA 2008 – 25th Conference on Passive...

Houlihan-Wiberg, Aoife Anne-marie

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water Rights (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Rights (Texas) Water Rights (Texas) Water Rights (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Water Development Board The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regulates the water rights for the state of Texas. Water and state water may be appropriated, stored, or diverted in the state of Texas for beneficial uses in reasonable amounts, with certain conditions. The Commission issues permits and regulations for water rights in Texas. Included in beneficial uses are: agricultural and industrial uses;

428

Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners and the environment through regulation and permitting, and to ensure that mining is operated within the rules and regulations to prevent unreasonable degradation of

429

Texas Radiation Control Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Control Act (Texas) Radiation Control Act (Texas) Texas Radiation Control Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality It is the policy of the state to institute and maintain a regulatory program for radiation sources that is compatible with federal standards and regulatory programs, and, to the degree possible, compatible with other states' systems. The program permits the development and use of sources of radiation for peaceful purposes consistent with public health and safety and environmental protection. This legislation contains provisions for the

430

Texas, Our Texas Introduction: Texas is one of the 50 states of the United States. As we walk across Texas, we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas, Our Texas Introduction: Texas is one of the 50 states of the United States. As we walk across Texas, we will get to know the symbols of our special state. Grade Level and Subject: First grade, 18a, 18b; Language Arts: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 13b Materials: coloring pages from Texas Bob website crayons

Wilkins, Neal

431

Review and Assessment of Air Quality Management Activities in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many air quality studies indicate that ozone, fine particulates, and haze are interrelated and often regional in extent. Emission management strategies to mitigate these pollutants are likely to involve regional control measures. This report summarizes recent air quality studies in the State of Texas to support the development of integrated air quality management strategies to meet new air quality standards.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan  

SciTech Connect

During the period 1980 to 2002, China experienced a 5% average annual reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). The period 2002-2005 saw a dramatic reversal of the historic relationship between energy use and GDP growth: energy use per unit of GDP increased an average of 3.8% per year during this period (NBS, various years). China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), which covers the period 2006-2010, required all government divisions at different levels to reduce energy intensity by 20% in five years in order to regain the relationship between energy and GDP growth experienced during the 1980s and 1990s. This report provides an assessment of selected policies and programs that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal of a 20% reduction in energy intensity by 2010. The report finds that China has made substantial progress toward its goal of achieving 20% energy intensity reduction from 2006 to 2010 and that many of the energy-efficiency programs implemented during the 11th FYP in support of China's 20% energy/GDP reduction goal appear to be on track to meet - or in some cases even exceed - their energy-saving targets. It appears that most of the Ten Key Projects, the Top-1000 Program, and the Small Plant Closure Program are on track to meet or surpass the 11th FYP savings goals. China's appliance standards and labeling program, which was established prior to the 11th FYP, has become very robust during the 11th FYP period. China has greatly enhanced its enforcement of new building energy standards but energy-efficiency programs for buildings retrofits, as well as the goal of adjusting China's economic structure to reduce the share of energy consumed by industry, do not appear to be on track to meet the stated goals. With the implementation of the 11th FYP now bearing fruit, it is important to maintain and strengthen the existing energy-saving policies and programs that are successful while revising programs or adding new policy mechanisms to improve the programs that are not on track to achieve the stated goals.

Levine, Mark D.; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Aden, Nathaniel; Lu, Hongyou; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Yining, Qin; Yowargana, Ping

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

ZLOT: The Z Texas Implementation Component of the Library of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZLOT: The Z Texas Implementation Component of the Library of Texas William E. Moen, Principal Investigator Texas Session, Texas Library Association Dallas, TX -- April 25, 2002 1 ZLOT The Z Texas Implementation Component of the Library of Texas William E. Moen

Moen, William E.

434

Feral Hogs in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feral hogs are found in almost parts of Texas. They are prized by hunters but despised by landowners who suffer from their damage. This publication is a comprehensive look at feral hogs, from their history and identification to their biology and ecology. You'll learn about feral hog behavior, signs of their presence, and the damage they can cause to the environment. A section on control methods covers exclusion, trapping and hunting. Color photos bring these interesting animals to life.

Mapston, Mark; Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Effect of Hydrocarbon Emissions From PCCI-Type Combustion On The Performance of Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Core samples cut from full size commercial Fe-and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. Subsequently, the NOx reduction performance of the exposed catalysts was evaluated on a laboratory bench- reactor fed with simulated exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOx conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite was much more resistant to HC fouling than the Fe-zeolite catalyst. In the case of the Cu-zeolite, PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOx conversion efficiency. For all cases, the clean catalyst performance was recovered after heating to 600 C. GC-MS analysis of the HCs adsorbed to the catalyst surface provided insights into the observed NOx reduction performance trends.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Effect of Hydrocarbon Emissions From PCCI-Type Combustion On The Performance of Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core samples cut from full size commercial Fe-and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. Subsequently, the NOx reduction performance of the exposed catalysts was evaluated on a laboratory bench- reactor fed with simulated exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOx conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (catalyst was exposed to the engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite was much more resistant to HC fouling than the Fe-zeolite catalyst. In the case of the Cu-zeolite, PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOx conversion efficiency. For all cases, the clean catalyst performance was recovered after heating to 600 C. GC-MS analysis of the HCs adsorbed to the catalyst surface provided insights into the observed NOx reduction performance trends.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

An investigation to define the physical/chemical constraints which limit NO sub x emission reduction achievable by reburning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reburning is a NO{sub x} control technology which uses fuel to reduce NO. Thus, the main heat release zone can be operated normally to achieve optimum combustion conditions without regard for NO{sub x} control. Objectives of this program are to define the physical and/or chemical constraints which prevent realization of Point 5 (85% NO{sub x} reduction) with reburning, to use this information to identify and test improved configurations for reburning as an NO{sub x} control technique on coal-fired boilers, and to test various methods which could be used in practice to reduce NO{sub x} during the burnout step of the reburning process. The program will be performed at two experimental scales. Bench scale studies will be carried out in a 100 {times} 10{sup 3} Btu/hr tunnel furnace to evaluate the importance of chemical and physical constraints in the absence of mixing limitations. A 10 {times} 10{sup 6} Btu/hr pilot scale facility will subsequently be used to investigate the impacts of finite rate mixing and determine methods of minimizing them. A series of experiments will be conducted to verify the various concepts and demonstrate the optimum configuration for an advanced reburning process to achieve 85% NO{sub x} reduction at a cost lower than SCR. 24 figs.

McCarthy, J. M.; Moller, E. C.; Chen, S. L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Mack Trucks Inc.), a filter recycler (American Wastes Industries), and a low-sulfur fuel supplier (Equilon, a joint venture between Shell and Texaco).

Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ultra-low Sulfur Reduction Emission Control Device/Development of an On-board Fuel Sulfur Trap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell has completed working on a multiyear program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an 'on-vehicle' desulfurization fuel filter for both light duty and heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NOx adsorbers. The NOx adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and '2007-Rule' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters was also examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. In the second phase of the program a light duty diesel engine test was also demonstrated. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consisted of four phases. Phase I focused on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II concentrated on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III studied life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV focused on efficacy and benefits in the desulfation steps of a NOx adsorber on both a heavy and light duty engine. The project team included a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Navistar Inc. (formerly International Truck & Engine Corporation) and Mack Trucks Inc.), and filter recycler (American Wastes Industries).

Rohrbach, Ron; Barron, Ann

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Abandoned Texas oil fields  

SciTech Connect

Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Recipient: City of Arlingtou, Texas ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

959 959 Recipient: City of Arlingtou, Texas ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination/ Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions and Rationale (Restrictions and Allowable Activity) Emission Reduction Goal & Climate Action Plan A9, All, B5.1 City Hall Public Space (1st Floor) EE Project B5.1 Waste stream, engineering and historical preservation clauses. City Facility Services Building EE Project B5.1 Waste stream, engineering and historical preservation clauses. Convention Center LED Lighting Upgrade B5.1 Waste stream clause Internal Facilities Lighting Upgrades B5.1 Waste stream, engineering and historical preservation clauses. City Tower EE Project B5.1 Waste stream, engineering and historical preservation clauses.

444

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

445

Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Michigan Mississippi Montana Nebraska New Mexico North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah West Virginia Wyoming Period: Annual Download Series...

446

Texas Datos del Precio de la Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TexasGasPrices.com (Busqueda por Ciudad o Cdigo Postal) - GasBuddy.com Texas Gas Prices (Ciudades Selectas) - GasBuddy.com Texas Gas Prices (Organizado por Condado) -...

447

TRANSPORTATION The University of Texas at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH The University of Texas at Austin February 2010 Characteristics of Freight Movements in Texas #12;#12;Table of Contents 1. Introduction............................................................................................................ 34 6.6. Texas's Transportation System

Texas at Austin, University of

448

INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER ERCOT (Texas)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS ERCOT (Texas) November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 A. Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 B. The 1995 Texas Electricity Restructuring Statute

Laughlin, Robert B.

449

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxice Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2000/1111 2000/1111 Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal- Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment August 1998 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center Morgantown, WV/Pittsburgh, PA 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respon- sibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

450

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NO ) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers X Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment March 2000 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

451

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Tennessee (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Tennessee. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Tennessee to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,321 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Wisconsin (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Wisconsin. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Wisconsin to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,476 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in North Carolina (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in North Carolina. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in North Carolina to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,558 million gallons.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Massachusetts. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Massachusetts to be $1.4 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,293 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in South Dakota (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in South Dakota. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in South Dakota to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,795 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Pennsylvania. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Pennsylvania to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,837 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Montana (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Montana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Montana to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,207 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New Mexico (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New Mexico. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New Mexico to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,117 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maine (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Maine. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maine to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,387 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "texas emissions reduction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Wind-Driven House Fire, Texas, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind-Driven House Fire, Texas 2009. ... Selected Publications. Simulation of the Dynamics of a Wind-Driven Fire in a Ranch-Style House - Texas. ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Gas Production Tax (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax (Texas) Gas Production Tax (Texas) Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Local...

463

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Texas ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliant (An NRG Company) Information for Businesses Texas-New Mexico Power Company (TNMP) Information for Businesses TXU Energy Information for Businesses Xcel Energy (Texas...

464

Gas Pipelines (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipelines (Texas) Gas Pipelines (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Local Government...

465

Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

466

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial...

467

Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

468

Water Quality Control (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control (Texas) Water Quality Control (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial Construction...

469

Rio Grande Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Compact (Texas) Rio Grande Compact (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial...

470

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Antonio, Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antonio, Texas to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Antonio, Texas on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Antonio,...

471

Regional Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Districts (Texas) Regional Districts (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial Construction...

472

Fermilab Today | University of Texas at Austin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Austin March 13, 2013 NAME: University of Texas at Austin HOME TOWN: Austin, Texas MASCOT: Bevo the Longhorn COLORS: Burnt orange COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: Mid-1990s...

473

Polish country study to address climate change: Strategies of the GHG`s emission reduction and adaptation of the Polish economy to the changed climate. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Polish Country Study Project was initiated in 1992 as a result of the US Country Study Initiative whose objective was to grant the countries -- signatories of the United Nations` Framework Convention on Climate Change -- assistance that will allow them to fulfill their obligations in terms of greenhouse gases (GHG`s) inventory, preparation of strategies for the reduction of their emission, and adapting their economies to the changed climatic conditions. In February 1993, in reply to the offer from the United States Government, the Polish Government expressed interest in participation in this program. The Study proposal, prepared by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, Natural Resources and Forestry was presented to the US partner. The program proposal assumed implementation of sixteen elements of the study, encompassing elaboration of scenarios for the strategy of mission reduction in energy sector, industry, municipal management, road transport, forestry, and agriculture, as well as adaptations to be introduced in agriculture, forestry, water management, and coastal management. The entire concept was incorporated in macroeconomic strategy scenarios. A complementary element was the elaboration of a proposal for economic and legal instruments to implement the proposed strategies. An additional element was proposed, namely the preparation of a scenario of adapting the society to the expected climate changes.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Impact of the Texas A&M University- Kingsville's Industrial Assessment Center in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) was established at Texas A&M University-Kingsville in November 1993 by the U. S. Department of Energy. The Center is managed by the University City Science Center, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During the period of November, 93 through July, 96 the Center conducted 65 energy audits of small and medium sized manufacturing plants in South Texas. The Center's chief purpose is to serve the energy and waste related needs of small and medium sized manufacturers. The findings were reported to the manufacturers, together with estimates of their savings, implementation costs, and payback periods. By the end of July, 1996, the center had performed 65 industrial survey and had recommended over 388 Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) and 53 Waste Minimization Opportunities (WMOs). During this time, the IAC estimated energy savings totaled 158,906 MMBtu/year (7.6 percent of total energy usage) for a total savings of over $1.89 million (9.3 percent of total energy costs). The waste assessment audits have estimated a total of $1.14 million in waste reductions costs (10.5 percent of total waste related costs). This paper describes the Center, its mission, and its impact in South Texas. The estimated average savings per plant including energy and waste reductions was approximately $81,030/yr.

Medina, M. A.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Farahmand, K.; Bhalavat, M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Microsoft Word - texas.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Texas NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 108,258 1 Electric Utilities .............