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1

Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting on AddThis.com... Coordinator Basics Outreach Education & Webinars Meetings Reporting Contacts Mammoth Cave National Park Coordinator Meeting The 2007 Clean Cities coordinator meeting at Mammoth Cave National Park

2

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mammoth Cave National Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on AddThis.com...

3

Historical GIS as a Platform for Public Memory at Mammoth Cave National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mammoth Cave Historical GIS (MCHGIS) fosters new understandings of a national park landscape as a historic farming community and offers a web-based platform for public memory of pre-park inhabitants. It maps the 1920 manuscript census at the household ... Keywords: Historical GIS, Kentucky, Mammoth Cave, National Parks, Public Memory, Public Participation GIS, Virtual Community Building

Katie Algeo; Ann Epperson; Matthew Brunt

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Mammoth Genetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mammoth Genetics Mammoth Genetics Name: Alexandra Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have just read your questions and answers on "Jurassic Park" and was wondering what the potential was for recreating a mammoth or dodo? The problems I forsee (and my knowledge is very limited) are that the samples are old and may have been effected by age due to being organic - is this possible? The mammoth tissue samples have all been frozen, will this effect DNA? (I have been trying to research cryonics but with limited success). If we were able to obtain some DNA, could we add missing pieces? Finally, if we had sufficient DNA, how could we produce the animal? Would invitro-fertilisation of a simialar species ie elephant be possible? I'm sure some of this is impossible as yet, but what is the potential for the future?

5

Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition Contact Information Phillip Cameron 307-413-1971 phil@ytcleanenergy.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Phillip Cameron Photo of Phillip Cameron Phillip Cameron became the coordinator of the Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition in November 2009. He brings a diverse professional experience to this position with strong background in environmental outreach and education, grant writing, community service, and resource management. He has experience in both board and staff positions with a variety of regional and local non-profit environmental organizations.

6

Models of tet-on system with epigenetic effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first results of ongoing work investigating two models of the artificial inducible promoter Tet-On that include epigenetic regulation. We consider chromatin states and 1D diffusion of transcription factors that reveal, respectively, stochastic ...

Russ Harmer; Jean Krivine; Élise Laruelle; Cédric Lhoussaine; Guillaume Madelaine; Mirabelle Nebut

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cave Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cave Animals Cave Animals Nature Bulletin No. 95 December 14, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CAVE ANIMALS Our Senior Naturalist, with a group of scientists exploring one of the big limestone quarries southwest of Chicago, found several dozen strange animals where a small underground stream pours from a seam in the rock wall. They were nearly an inch long, slender, with legs on both ends and snow white. That was a rare discovery because they were Blind Amphipods -- small members of the crayfish family that live their entire lives in secret subterranean waters. A large part of the United States is underlain by limestone, sometimes hundreds of feet thick, often close to the surface as it is here. Surface water gradually seeps down through crevices in this limestone and along horizontal seams, dissolving the rock to form channels that grow larger and larger. As the centuries pass, these form underground rivers and the caves so common in some parts of this country.

8

CAVE WINDOW  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

Levenson, M.

1960-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Teton-Yellowstone Tornado of 21 July 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Teton-Yellowstone Tornado, rated F4, crossed the Continental Divide at 3070 m, leaving behind a damage swath 39.2-km long and 2.5-km wide. A detailed damage analysis by using stereo-pair and color photos revealed the existence of four spinup ...

T. Theodore Fujita

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Teton County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teton County, Idaho: Energy Resources Teton County, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.886579°, -111.6777396° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.886579,"lon":-111.6777396,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.722568°, -110.6406547° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.722568,"lon":-110.6406547,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility General Information Name Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility Facility Mammoth Pacific I Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Sierra Nevada Mtns.-Mono, California Coordinates 37.644943°, -118.91428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.644943,"lon":-118.91428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility General Information Name Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility Facility Mammoth Pacific II Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Sierra Nevada Mtns-Mono, California Coordinates 37.646227°, -118.909092° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.646227,"lon":-118.909092,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Oxygen in Underwater Cave  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen in Underwater Cave Oxygen in Underwater Cave Name: Natalie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: HI Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Is it possible for there to be free oxygen in an underwater cave? If it is, then how does it work? Replies: Yes it is possible as I have personally experienced. If the cave roof rises to a level above the water, air dissolved in the water will slowly out gas until the water is at the same level at all places. A pocket of breathable air will form. In many caves the roof dips below water level in one place but it above it on both sides. Think of a U shaped tube where the bottom of the U is blocked by water. This is called a siphon and I have passed through many of these to find breathable air on the other side. R. W. "Bob" Avakian Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology

15

Studies on the Cave- Spider Family Leptonetidae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cave, Comal County (AMNH), Texas, habitus. A. T. coecas Cave, Comal County, Texas (AMNH), habitus. A. T. coecaLost Gold Cave, Travis County, Texas (AMNH), habitus. A. T.

Ledford, Joel M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

17

Silica Extraction at the Mammoth Lakes Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost-effective method to extract marketable silica (SiO{sub 2}) from fluids at the Mammoth Lakes, California geothermal power plant. Marketable silica provides an additional revenue source for the geothermal power industry and therefore lowers the costs of geothermal power production. The use of this type of ''solution mining'' to extract resources from geothermal fluids eliminates the need for acquiring these resources through energy intensive and environmentally damaging mining technologies. We have demonstrated that both precipitated and colloidal silica can be produced from the geothermal fluids at Mammoth Lakes by first concentrating the silica to over 600 ppm using reverse osmosis (RO). The RO permeate can be used in evaporative cooling at the plant; the RO concentrate is used for silica and potentially other (Li, Cs, Rb) resource extraction. Preliminary results suggest that silica recovery at Mammoth Lakes could reduce the cost of geothermal electricity production by 1.0 cents/kWh.

Bourcier, W; Ralph, W; Johnson, M; Bruton, C; Gutierrez, P

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cool CAVEs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAVEs CAVEs Cool CAVEs January 5, 2011 - 6:18pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? The Idaho National Laboratory's "CAVE" -- 3-D Computer-Assisted Virtual Environment -- allows scientists to literally walk into their data and look at it from multiple perspectives. Projectors, mounted behind the walls and on the ceiling, are manipulated by researchers using 3-D goggles and a handheld controller -- and allow them to study everything from terrain to applied nuclear research, to active sites of proteins. To escape the holiday chaos, many folks found refuge in caves - dark places with sticky floors, lumpy seating and Jeff Bridges playing scenes against a computer-enhanced younger version of himself . . . at least if

19

Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

20

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO2 emission rates. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m- 2 d- 1 (mean = 1346 g m- 2 d- 1). Using footprint modeling, EC CO2 fluxes were compared to CO2 fluxes measured by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evolution of blind cave fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of blind cave fish Evolution of blind cave fish Name: rudeeric Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am a biology teacher, now starting a unit on evolution. Just about every book on the topic mentions the blind and albino cave fish. But I've always been bothered by this example. Why is being blind and white an advantage for animals in a cave? I understand that they have no use for eyes or pigment, but this sounds like we're back to Lamarck's law of use and disuse. Wouldn't there first have to be the mutations to cause these? And in order for the changes to become common, they would have to be advantageous. Although there is no use for the eyes or pigment, what is the advantage to losing them? Replies: I can think of one important use for the loss of pigment in fish. It has been documented with the early breeding of black mollies and black angelfish, that the fry were extremely hard to keep alive. The breeders found that these fish required much greatly quantities of protein to produce the pigment melanin, and therefore supplementing the fry with protein quantities that were many times higher than those required by less pigmented fish kept them alive. Imagine then, a situation where a random mutation of albinism in a cave dwelling fish results in a population that can use the protein that it consumes for growth and reproduction, rather than for pigment production. The albino fish could quickly out-produce the pigmented fish. What the "real" explanation would be as described by an evolutionary biologist, I have no idea.

22

Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

2000-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geothermal space/water heating for City of Mammoth Lakes, California. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are presented. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and uses existing technology in its design and operation. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Clean Cities: Clean Cities National Parks Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Parks Initiative National Parks Initiative Submit a Project, National Park Service logo Clean Cities partners with the National Park Service (NPS) through the Clean Cities National Parks Initiative to support transportation projects that educate park visitors on the benefits of reducing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions. This initiative complements the NPS Climate Friendly Parks program by demonstrating the environmental benefits of reducing petroleum use. Glacier Greater Yellowstone Area Rocky Mountain Denali National Mall and Memorial Park Mississippi River Sleeping Bear Dunes Yellowstone Grand Teton Mammoth Cave Zion Blue Ridge Parkway Great Smoky Mountains Shenandoah Acadia San Antonio Missions Grand Canyon Golden Gate Mesa Verde Project Locations - Photo of the snow-covered Teton Mountain range in Grand Teton National Park.

25

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13-December 12, 1976  

SciTech Connect

During the first three months of this one-year study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating the town of Mammoth Lakes, California using geothermal energy, the following work was completed. Literature concerning both geothermal and conventional hydronic heating systems was reviewed and put on file. Estimates were prepared for the monthly electrical energy consumption and peak electrical demand for space and water heating in Mammoth Lakes Village in 1980. An analysis of the energy potential of the Casa Diablo geothermal reservoir was completed. Discussions were held with US Forest Service and Mammoth County Water District employees, to obtain their input to the feasibility study.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1976-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain: What Do They Tell Us about the Security of Engineered Storage of CO2 Underground?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: What do they teLL us about the security of eNgiNeered storage of co 2 uNdergrouNd? Introduction Lake Nyos in the Northwest Province of Cameroon in western Africa and Mammoth Mountain in California are the sites of two well-known underground releases of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in nature, both with adverse effects. Both Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain are atop current or former volcanoes and the released CO 2 is volcanic in origin (sometimes referred to as magmatic origin). Molten rock (magma) far below the Earth's surface contains entrained amounts of water, CO 2 , and other gases. If the magma rises toward the Earth's surface, the pressure it is under is reduced and the entrained gases begin to expand. The expansion of the

27

Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears  

SciTech Connect

Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Author Andreas Kucha Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave Citation Andreas Kucha. Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/17]. Available from: http://www.agw.kit.edu/english/blauhoele_cave.php Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydrogeology_of_the_Blautopf_spring_-_Tracer_tests_in_Blauhohle_cave&oldid=688895"

29

Spatial user interface for experiencing Mogao caves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the Pure Land AR, which is an installation that employs spatial user interface and allows users to virtually visit the UNESCO world heritage -- Mogao Caves by using handheld devices. The installation ... Keywords: augmented reality, heritage preservation, virtual reality

Leith Kin Yip Chan; Sarah Kenderdine; Jeffrey Shaw

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Eco-climatic conditions and biodiversity of Orlova?a cave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within specific ecological condition of Orlova?a cave existed living world failing rich and large in number. They are adapted on absentia light as well as the other characteristic ecology parameter. On an occasion of researching and organizing Orlova?a ... Keywords: Orlova?a cave, cave biodiversity, cave ecosystems, cave microclimate, data base, software, troglobionts

Milovan Pecelj; Danimir Mandi?; Jelena Pecelj; Milica Pecelj; Srboljub Stamenkovi?; Dejan Djordjevi?

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Feasibility of geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, September 1976--September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study to determine the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are reported. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and will use existing technology in its design and operation. District heating can provide space and water heating energy for typical customers at lower cost than alternative sources of energy. If the district heating system is investor owned, lower costs are realized after five to six years of operation, and if owned by a nonprofit organization, after zero to three years. District heating offers lower costs than alternatives much sooner in time if co-generation and/or DOE participation in system construction are included in the analysis. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, 13 December 1976-12 March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the second three months of this feasibility study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating Mammoth Lakes Village, California using geothermal energy, the following work was accomplished. A saturation survey of the number and types of space and water heaters currently in use in the Village was completed. Electric energy and ambient temperature metering equipment was installed. Peak heating demand for Mammoth Lakes was estimated for the years 1985, 1990 and 2000. Buildings were selected which are considered typical of Mammoth Lakes in terms of their heating systems to be used in estimating the cost of installing hydronic heating systems in Mammoth. Block diagrams and an order of magnitude cost comparison were prepared for high-temperature and low-temperature geothermal district heating systems. Models depicting a geothermal district heating system and a geothermal-electric power plant were designed, built and delivered to ERDA in Washington. Local input to the feasibility study was obtained from representatives of the State of California Departments of Transportation and Fish and Game, US Forest Service, and Mono County Planning Department.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs October 22, 2010 - 1:55pm Addthis INL intern, Vanessa Gertman, shares her experiences in the CAVE Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs At Idaho National Laboratory, engineers are walking into the core of nuclear reactors and rappelling down cliffs, all without ever leaving the office. Using a new 3D computer-assisted virtual environment (aka CAVE), INL researchers are literally walking into their data. In the CAVE, engineers use 3D goggles and a handheld controller that allows them to manipulate the data. The system tracks the movement of the user's head

34

Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living 22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs October 22, 2010 - 1:55pm Addthis INL intern, Vanessa Gertman, shares her experiences in the CAVE Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs At Idaho National Laboratory, engineers are walking into the core of nuclear reactors and rappelling down cliffs, all without ever leaving the office. Using a new 3D computer-assisted virtual environment (aka CAVE), INL researchers are literally walking into their data. In the CAVE, engineers use 3D goggles and a handheld controller that allows them to manipulate the data. The system tracks the movement of the user's head

35

Bee Cave, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bee Cave, Texas: Energy Resources Bee Cave, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.3085373°, -97.94501° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3085373,"lon":-97.94501,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Cave Creek, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cave Creek, Arizona: Energy Resources Cave Creek, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8333716°, -111.9507042° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.8333716,"lon":-111.9507042,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

File:CaveProtectionLaw.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CaveProtectionLaw.pdf CaveProtectionLaw.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:CaveProtectionLaw.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 32 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 9 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:40, 10 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:40, 10 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 9 pages (32 KB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

38

3D multi-scale scanning of the archaeological cave "les Fraux" in (France)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The archaeological cave « Les Fraux » (Saint-Martin-de-Fressengeas, Dordogne) forms a great network of galleries, characterized by the exceptional richness of its archaeological Bronze Age remains such as domestic fireplaces, ceramic and metal ... Keywords: PDF-3D, archaeology, bronze age, cave, close range, documentation, dordogne-france, high resolution, photogrammetry, scanarm, terrestrial laser scanner (TLS)

Pierre Grussenmeyer; Albane Burens; Emmanuel Moisan; Samuel Guillemin; Laurent Carozza; Raphaëlle Bourrillon; Stéphane Petrognani

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Additional studies of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, October 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field survey of three heating uses: snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating, and swimming pool heating in Mammoth was undertaken. Based on the results, monthly heating capacity factors were calculated and rough designs were prepared for hydronic district heating for each system. Capital cost estimates were prepared for snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating and swimming pool heating systems using LPG and geothermal district heating. It was determined that incorporation of the three additional heating uses in the District Heating System previously defined would require a capacity increase from 52 MWt to 60 MWt to meet peak demands. Energy sales would increase by about 40 percent to 127 million kwh(t) per year. The unit cost for delivered heat at 1977 price levels would decrease from 4.26 cents to 3.22 cents/kwh(t) for an investor owned District Heating System, or from 2.89 cents to 2.24 cents/kwh(t) for public ownership. The total heating costs, including annual costs of customer's heating equipment for a typical building in the Village with district heating, were compared with costs to heat the same building with electricity. The total annual costs for snow melting, jacuzzi heating and swimming pool heating using a 60 MWt District Heating System were compared with costs to heat with LPG. It was determined that 11 permits must be obtained prior to beginning construction of the District Heating System. A project schedule outlining regulatory, engineering, design, construction and operation activities for the District Heating System was prepared.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1978-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Additional studies of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, October 1977--March 1978  

SciTech Connect

A field survey of three heating uses: snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating, and swimming pool heating in Mammoth was undertaken. Based on the results, monthly heating capacity factors were calculated and rough designs were prepared for hydronic district heating for each system. Capital cost estimates were prepared for snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating and swimming pool heating systems using LPG and geothermal district heating. It was determined that incorporation of the three additional heating uses in the District Heating System previously defined would require a capacity increase from 52 MWt to 60 MWt to meet peak demands. Energy sales would increase by about 40 percent to 127 million kwh(t) per year. The unit cost for delivered heat at 1977 price levels would decrease from 4.26 cents to 3.22 cents/kwh(t) for an investor owned District Heating System, or from 2.89 cents to 2.24 cents/kwh(t) for public ownership. The total heating costs, including annual costs of customer's heating equipment for a typical building in the Village with district heating, were compared with costs to heat the same building with electricity. The total annual costs for snow melting, jacuzzi heating and swimming pool heating using a 60 MWt District Heating System were compared with costs to heat with LPG. It was determined that 11 permits must be obtained prior to beginning construction of the District Heating System. A project schedule outlining regulatory, engineering, design, construction and operation activities for the District Heating System was prepared.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1978-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

42

Fish Remains from Nahas Cave: Archaeological Evidence of Anadromous Fishes in Southwestern Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cave No. I, South- western Idaho. Tebiwa 10(2);63-72. (Fore-Explorations in South- western Idaho, American Antiquity 31(and 150 km. south of Boise, Idaho, in the Owyhee Uplands. A

Plew, Mark G

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal cave usage patterns were determined in an effort to understand the ecology of a bat colony at Shell Mountain Bat Cave in Fort Hood, Texas. Exit counts were conducted one night each month for 13 consecutive months to estimate the population and determine seasonal patterns. This cave was used as a maternity roost by a colony of cave myotis (myotis velifer) from March through October. Total colony size varies from month to month, becoming zero when bats leave during the winter. Old guano from two abandoned caves, Egypt and Tippet, on Fort Hood, and new guano from Shell Mountain was analyzed. Organochlorine residues showed higher levels of total chlordanes, endrin, dieldrin, mirex, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT in Egypt and Tippet caves; organophosphates showed higher amounts in the Shell Mountain guano. Organophosphates have never before been found in bat guano, and so what effects, if any, these amounts may indicate on the health of the colony are unknown. Some metals were also found in higher amounts in guano from Egypt and Tippet caves. Residue concentrations of organochlorines and metals in guano and carcasses collected from the three caves are low and probably of no concern. Comparisons among spring and fall guano smaples from Shell Mountain suggest that HCB, total chlordanes, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan II, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT are accumulated while the bats are at Fort Hood. Lindane appears to be the only chemical that increases while the bats are at Fort Hood. Organochlorines found in carcasses tended to show smallest amounts in a lactating female and largest amounts in nursing juveniles.

Land, Tarisha Ann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Characterization of Asian monsoon variability since the penultimate interglacial on orbital and sub-orbital timescales, Dongge Cave, China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation. January 2010. Major: Geology. Advisor:R. Lawrence Edwards. 1 computer file (PDF); xii, 221 pages, appendices 1-3. Dongge Cave, located in… (more)

Kelly, Megan Jean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE  

SciTech Connect

An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

Blokland, Willem [ORNL; Armstrong, Gary A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Distribution and speciation of trace elements in iron and manganese oxide cave deposits  

SciTech Connect

Fe and Mn oxide minerals control the distribution and speciation of heavy metals and trace elements in soils and aquatic systems through chemical mechanisms involving adsorption, incorporation, and electron transfer. The Pautler Cave System in Southwest Illinois, an analog to other temperate carbonate-hosted karst systems, contains Fe and Mn oxide minerals that form in multiple depositional environments and have high concentrations of associated trace elements. Synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) shows unique spatial distributions of Fe, Mn, and trace elements in mineral samples. Profile maps of Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings show Fe- and As-rich laminations, indicating dynamic redox conditions in the cave stream. {mu}-SXRF maps demonstrate that Ni, Cu, and Zn correlate primarily with Mn whereas As correlates with both Mn and Fe; As is more enriched in the Fe phase. Zn is concentrated in the periphery of Mn oxide stream pebble coatings, and may be an indication of recent anthropogenic surface activity. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements reveal that As(V) occurs as surface complexes on Mn and Fe oxides whereas Zn(II) associated with Mn oxides is adsorbed to the basal planes of phyllomanganates in a tetrahedral coordination. Co(III) and Se(IV) are also observed to be associated with Mn oxides. The observation of Fe, Mn, and trace element banding in Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings suggests that these materials are sensitive to and document aqueous redox conditions, similar to ferromanganese nodules in soils and in marine and freshwater sediments. Furthermore, speciation and distribution measurements indicate that these minerals scavenge trace elements and limit the transport of micronutrients and contaminants in karst aquifer systems while also potentially recording changes in anthropogenic surface activity and land-use.

Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

Well production system to prevent cave-in and sloughing in unconsolidated formations  

SciTech Connect

A well production system is disclosed for controlling ingress and egress of high pressure fluid through the annuli formed between the well and a screen support tube internally thereof. The screen support tube and an internal high pressure wash pipe with valves maintain constant high fluid pressure against the overburden during work in the well, as during drilling of an enlarged cavity therein for preventing cave-in and sloughing of the unconsolidated formation well walls until a sand pack is formed and the well producing.

Widmyer, R.H.

1982-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Accepted for publication, The Holocene,. 2008 1 Holocene variability of the East Asian summer monsoon from cave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monsoon from cave records: a re-assessment Maher, B.A. Centre for Environmental Magnetism of the East Asian summer monsoon, indicate gradual monsoon weakening for the last ~9,000 years, as also documented for the Indian monsoon. Coupled with high-precision dating, the speleothem proxy records have been

49

The Cave  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

las imágenes? las imágenes? El ejemplo de la caverna. Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Caverna Suponga que usted tiene la mala suerte de caer en una caverna sin una linterna. Una pelota de básket Pero sí tiene la suficiente suerte de tener un balde lleno de pelotas de básket que brillan en la oscuridad. De pronto, usted oye una respiración. ¿Será un oso hambriento de sangre, o sólo sus amigos haciéndole una broma? Para averiguarlo, usted lanza desesperadamente las pelotas en la dirección del sonido, y memoriza las posiciones de los lugares en que las pelotas golpean. Logra así descifrar rápidamente el siguiente perfil del objeto frente a usted: Rayos! como las pelotas de básket son tan grandes, cuando rebotan con el objeto frente a Ud., sólo le permiten determinar que lo que está frente a

50

High Level Waste Remote Handling Equipment in the Melter Cave Support Handling System at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Cold war plutonium production led to extensive amounts of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. Bechtel National, Inc. is building the largest nuclear Waste Treatment Plant in the world located at the Department of Energy's Hanford site to immobilize the millions of gallons of radioactive waste. The site comprises five main facilities; Pretreatment, High Level Waste vitrification, Low Active Waste vitrification, an Analytical Lab and the Balance of Facilities. The pretreatment facilities will separate the high and low level waste. The high level waste will then proceed to the HLW facility for vitrification. Vitrification is a process of utilizing a melter to mix molten glass with radioactive waste to form a stable product for storage. The melter cave is designated as the High Level Waste Melter Cave Support Handling System (HSH). There are several key processes that occur in the HSH cell that are necessary for vitrification and include: feed preparation, mixing, pouring, cooling and all maintenance and repair of the process equipment. Due to the cell's high level radiation, remote handling equipment provided by PaR Systems, Inc. is required to install and remove all equipment in the HSH cell. The remote handling crane is composed of a bridge and trolley. The trolley supports a telescoping tube set that rigidly deploys a TR 4350 manipulator arm with seven degrees of freedom. A rotating, extending, and retracting slewing hoist is mounted to the bottom of the trolley and is centered about the telescoping tube set. Both the manipulator and slewer are unique to this cell. The slewer can reach into corners and the manipulator's cross pivoting wrist provides better operational dexterity and camera viewing angles at the end of the arm. Since the crane functions will be operated remotely, the entire cell and crane have been modeled with 3-D software. Model simulations have been used to confirm operational and maintenance functional and timing studies throughout the design process. Since no humans can go in or out of the cell, there are several recovery options that have been designed into the system including jack-down wheels for the bridge and trolley, recovery drums for the manipulator hoist, and a wire rope cable cutter for the slewer jib hoist. If the entire crane fails in cell, the large diameter cable reel that provides power, signal, and control to the crane can be used to retrieve the crane from the cell into the crane maintenance area. (authors)

Bardal, M.A. [PaR Systems, Inc., Shoreview, MN (United States); Darwen, N.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

P450 aromatase alterations and DNA damage as avian pollution biomarkers in cliff and cave swallow breeding near the Rio Grande region, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The endocrine system, specifically relating to sex hormones, and genetic material can be targets of environmental contaminants. Environmental contaminants in the Rio Grande region may originate from industrial or agricultural processes and growing populations lacking proper water and sewage infrastructure. Cliff (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and cave (P. fulva) swallows breeding near the Rio Grande were selected to monitor aromatase activity alterations and DNA damage. Swallows were sampled at six sites along the Rio Grande from Brownsville to Laredo, and a reference site (Somerville) 350 miles north of the Rio Grande. DNA damage, based on nuclear DNA content, was determined by flow cytometry. A significantly larger mean half peak coefficient of variation (HPCV) of DNA content in contaminated sites compared to a reference site reflects possible chromosomal damage. No detectable HPCV differences were observed in cave swallows among locations, notwithstanding the presence of mutagenic contaminants. Selenium may provide a protective role against genetic damage. However, cliff swallows from Laredo had significantly higher HPCV values than those from Somerville. DNA damage could be attributed to metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons released near Laredo. Brains and gonads, two estrogen-dependent organs, were tested for aromatase activity with a tritiated water method. Brain aromatase activity was higher, though not always statistically, for male cave and male and female cliff swallows. Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) may play a role in the increased activity. Female cave swallows in Llano Grande appeared to have a greatly depressed brain aromatase activity, possibly attributed to past human use of toxaphene. Testicular and ovarian aromatase activity in cliff and cave swallows from Rio Grande was higher than in those from Somerville, though not always significantly. DDE, atrazine, sewage treatment plant contaminants (phthalates, alkylphenols, ethynylestradiol), metals, or other pollutants could play a role in the increased gonadal activity. Increased aromatase activity, in association with contaminants, may be easier to detect in testes of male birds which normally exhibit low levels of estrogen. Siterelated contaminants may be playing a role in DNA damage and aromatase alterations. This is the first known study which uses aromatase activity as an endocrine disruptor indicator in wild birds.

Sitzlar, Megan Annette

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geothermal modeling of Jackson Hole, Teton County Wyoming: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigated the possibility of high-temperature-heat sources (greater than 300/sup 0/C) in the area of Jackson Hole, northwestern Wyoming. Analytical and finite-difference numerical models describing conductive and convective terrestrial heat transport were utilized in an attempt to define the thermal regime of this area. This report presents data which were used as constraints for the analytic and numerical thermal models. These data include a general discussion of geology of the area, thermal spring information, subsurface temperature information, and hydrology of the area. Model results are presented with a discussion of interpretations and implications for the existence of high-temperature heat sources in the Jackson Hole area.

Heasler, H.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Teton County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -112.2717561° °, -112.2717561° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.9019946,"lon":-112.2717561,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Teton County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32°, -110.6314491° 32°, -110.6314491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.853632,"lon":-110.6314491,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Teton Coin Op Laundry: heat recovery unit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experience with a heat recovery unit using Freon 11 refrigerant as a transfer medium is reported. Heat exchangers were fabricated for use in dryer stacks and the waste heat was used in heating the water for the laundry. (MHR)

1984-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

Teton Village, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.587984°, -110.827989° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.587984,"lon":-110.827989,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Coordinator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell June 18, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis With the help of Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition, Mammoth Cave National Park was the first National Park fleet to use 100 percent alternative fuel. The Global Electric Motorcar (pictured above) is used by park rangers who need to travel between the Mammoth Cave Campground and the Visitor Center area. | Photo courtesy of Victor Peek Photography. With the help of Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition, Mammoth Cave National Park was the first National Park fleet to use 100 percent alternative fuel. The Global Electric Motorcar (pictured above) is used by park rangers who need

58

The use of agave, sotol, and yucca at Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas: reconstructing methods of processing through the formation of behavioral chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little research has focused on the analysis of plant macro-remains found in archaeological contexts in southwest Texas. This is a remarkable oversight considering the wealth of well-preserved plant remains found in rockshelters along the Rio Grande, Pecos and Devils Rivers. This study seeks to analyze the plant macro-remains from Hinds Cave, specifically lechuguilla (Agave lechuguilla), sotol (Dasylirion texanum) and yucca (Yucca spp.), in an effort to gain insight into the diet, methods of processing and material culture of mobile hunter-gatherers living in the Lower Pecos between 9,000 BP and 1,000 BP. Elucidation of the use of these desert evergreen genera will be aided with the use of a behavioral chain in which activities are organized into sequences of processing and the outputs recognized. By reference to ethnographic literature, demonstration of experimental activities and study of the archaeological remains three behavioral chains were constructed for each plant considered. By coordinating the outputs of the behavioral chain with the archaeological assemblage it was concluded that each species was physically processed in similar ways; however, each plant was unique in regard to its specific use in subsistence and/or incorporation in material culture. This uniqueness was evident by comparison of the actual archaeological assemblage and the proposed outputs of the behavioral chains themselves. Lechuguilla was processed for food and fiber (specifically in cordage and sandal manufacture), sotol leaves would have been used mainly in basketry and to a lesser extent as food. Yucca was processed for its fiber. Behavioral chains for lechuguilla, sotol and yucca were helpful in identifying those means by which the plants were processed and their uses as food, production of material culture or both.

Woltz, Ben vanDalsem

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Driving the National Parks Forward | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Driving the National Parks Forward Driving the National Parks Forward Driving the National Parks Forward June 19, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo courtesy of the National Parks Service. Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo courtesy of the National Parks Service. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What does this project do? The Energy Department is partnering with the National Park Service to increase alternative fuel use of vehicle fleets at national parks around the country. Describing America's National Parks, historian Wallace Stegnar once said they were "the best idea we ever had." But like any good idea, the parks are constantly adapting to meet the needs of the present. Clean Cities,

60

Clean Cities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Clean Cities Clean Cities Learn how Clean Cities coalitions all across the country are helping their communities get ready for plug-in electric vehicles. Learn how Clean Cities coalitions all across the country are helping their communities get ready for plug-in electric vehicles. Clean Cities works to reduce U.S. reliance on petroleum in transportation by establishing local coalitions of public- and private-sector stakeholders across the country. Featured Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell With the help of Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition, Mammoth Cave National Park was the first National Park fleet to use 100 percent alternative fuel. The Global Electric Motorcar (pictured above) is used by park rangers who need to travel between the Mammoth Cave Campground and the Visitor Center area. | Photo courtesy of Victor Peek Photography.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Virtual Reality Cave Next Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ESnet Network Measurement Current Status Joe Metzger Jan 24th 2008 ESCC meeting Energy Sciences ­ Regular scheduled bandwidth testing · Internal to ESnet IP & SDN Network · External to important peers, and ESnet sites that are interested ­ Dynamic end-user testing via · perfSONAR · ESnet Performance Center

62

Models of Tet-On System with Epigenetic Effects Russ Harmer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: this involves the artificial TF rtTA, activated by binding with doxycycline Doxi. Extracellular doxycycline Doxe simulation Fig. 1. Continuous (left) and pulse (right) stimulation with doxycycline. Fig. 1 shows of continuous and pulse4 stimula- tion with doxycycline. In [4], the authors demonstrate that the dynamics of TF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Schmitt and Madsen: Camels Back Cave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the north, mainly with the Blackfeet; technological changesinhibited expansion mto Blackfeet territory. The designa-

Arkush, Brooke S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Operation of Mammoth Pacific`s MP1-100 turbine with metastable, supersaturated expansions  

SciTech Connect

INEL`s Heat Cycle Research project continues to develop a technology base for increasing use of moderate-temperature hydrothermal resources to generate electrical power. One concept is the use of metastable, supersaturated turbine expansions. These expansions support a supersaturated working fluid vapor; at equilibrium conditions, liquid condensate would be present during the turbine expansion process. Studies suggest that if these expansions do not adversely affect the turbine performance, up to 8-10% more power could be produced from a given geothermal fluid. Determining the impact of these expansions on turbine performance is the focus of the project investigations being reported.

Mines, G.L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Case for the Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact Event: Mammoth, Megafauna and Clovis Extinction  

SciTech Connect

The onset of>1000 years of Younger Dryas cooling, broad-scale extinctions, and the disappearance of the Clovis culture in North America simultaneously occurred 12,900 years ago followed immediately by the appearance of a carbon-rich black layer at many locations. In situ bones of extinct megafauna and Clovis tools occur only beneath this black layer and not within or above it. At the base of the black mat at 9 Clovis-age sites in North America and a site in Belgium numerous extraterrestrial impact markers were found including magnetic grains highly enriched in iridium, magnetic microspherules, vesicular carbon spherules enriched in cubic, hexagonal, and n-type nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon containing Fullerenes and nanodiamonds, charcoal, soot, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The same impact markers were found mixed throughout the sediments of 15 Carolina Bays, elliptical depressions along the Atlantic coast, whose parallel major axes point towards either the Great Lakes or Hudson Bay. The magnetic grains and spherules have an unusual Fe/Ti composition similar to lunar Procellarum KREEP Terrane and the organic constituents are enriched in 14C leading to radiocarbon dates often well into the future. These characteristics are inconsistent with known meteorites and suggest that the impact was by a previous unobserved, possibly extrasolar body. The concentration of impact markers peaks near the Great Lakes and their unusually high water content suggests that a 4.6 km-wide comet fragmented and exploded over the Laurentide Ice Sheet creating numerous craters that now persist at the bottom of the Great Lakes. The coincidence of this impact, the onset of Younger Dryas cooling, extinction of the megafauna, and the appearance of a black mat strongly suggests that all these events are directly related. These results have unleashed an avalanche of controversy which I will address in this paper.

Firestone, Richard B.

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 18, 2013 June 18, 2013 With the help of Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition, Mammoth Cave National Park was the first National Park fleet to use 100 percent alternative fuel. The Global Electric Motorcar (pictured above) is used by park rangers who need to travel between the Mammoth Cave Campground and the Visitor Center area. | Photo courtesy of Victor Peek Photography. Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell As part of the blog series celebrating Clean Cities' 20th anniversary, we interviewed Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell to learn how she is helping transition Kentucky off oil. June 14, 2013 Nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions work to reduce petroleum use in communities across the country. Led by Clean Cities coordinators, coalitions are composed of businesses, fuel providers, vehicle fleets, state and local government agencies, and community organizations. These stakeholders come together to share information and resources, educate the public, help craft public policy, and collaborate on projects that reduce petroleum use. Click on a region for more information.

67

The Archaeology of Southcott Cave, Providence Mountains, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shape and dimensions of the jar. It was probably ca. 45 cm.diameter. The height of the jar is estimated to have JOURNAL5. Vessel No. 1, Tizon Brown jar. been about 50 cm. The body

Sutton, Mark Q; Donnan, Christopher B; Jenkins, Dennis L

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2012 19, 2012 Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo courtesy of the National Parks Service. Driving the National Parks Forward Clean Cities, in the Energy Department's Vehicle Technologies Program, is proud to help our parks find solutions to many of their most pressing challenges. June 19, 2012 Prepping Power Engineers for the Smart Grid Bonneville Power Administration and Washington State University have designed a special program that's preparing the power workforce for the nation's smarter energy future. June 18, 2012 Top 10 Tips to Save Energy and Money This Summer Summer is a great season to save energy and money in your home through lighting, energy efficiency measures in air conditioning, and landscaping.

69

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo courtesy of the National Parks Service. Driving the National Parks Forward Clean Cities, in the Energy Department's Vehicle Technologies Program, is proud to help our parks find solutions to many of their most pressing challenges. June 19, 2012 Prepping Power Engineers for the Smart Grid Bonneville Power Administration and Washington State University have designed a special program that's preparing the power workforce for the nation's smarter energy future. June 18, 2012 Top 10 Tips to Save Energy and Money This Summer Summer is a great season to save energy and money in your home through lighting, energy efficiency measures in air conditioning, and landscaping.

70

Clean Cities Coalitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital District Columbia-Willamette Central New York Vermont Maine Genesee Region Granite State Twin Cities Yellowstone-Teton Rogue Valley Treasure Valley Western New York...

71

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the citizen's group Stop Drilling, Save the Bridger-Teton expressed her opposition to fracking. Cooper claims there is no technological solution for this problem and no sensitivity...

72

CX-009709: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacements Along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn-Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton...

73

54.5 MPG and Beyond: Hybridization Moves Vehicles Forward | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Parks Initiative, Grand Teton National Park was able to purchase hybrid electric vehicles, which the park's Wildlife Brigade use to spark discussions about emission...

74

research papers Acta Cryst. (2012). D68, 14411449 doi:10.1107/S0907444912029459 1441  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 2012 PDB References: woolly mammoth haemoglobin, deoxy form, 3vre; carbon- monoxy form, 3vrf; met

Campbell, Kevin L.

75

Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Public Affairs At Idaho National Laboratory, engineers are walking into the core of nuclear reactors and rappelling down cliffs, all without ever leaving the office. Using a...

76

THE SALITRE CAVE KARST IN THE QUARTZITE ROCKS OF DIAMANTINA, MINAS GERAIS, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte-MG 2 UMR CNRS 5600 EVS-ENSMSE-Géosciences et Environnement F 42 Montes Claros, Pirapora-MG, 5 UMR 6143 CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie de l'Université de Rouen, France

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

A Review of Tele-Immersive Applications in the CAVE Research Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Tele-Immersion applications that have been built by collaborators around the world using the CAVERNsoft toolkit, and the lessons learned from building these applications. In particular the lessons learned are presented as a set of rules-of-thumb for developing tele-immersive applications in general.

Jason Leigh; Andrew E. Johnson; Thomas A. DeFanti; Maxine Brown; Mohammed Dastagir Ali; Stuart Bailey; Andy Banerjee; Pat Banerjee; Kevin Curry; Jim Curtis; Fred Dech; Brian Dodds; Ian Foster; Sarah Fraser; Kartik Ganeshan; Dennis Glen; Robert Grossman; Y Heil; John Hicks; Alan D. Hudson; Tomoko Imai; Mohammed Ali Khan; Abhinav Kapoor; Robert V. Kenyon; Kyoung Park; Bill Parod; Paul J. Rajlich; Mary Rasmussen; Maggie Rawlings; Danielh. Robertson; Samroeng Thongrong; Robert J. Stein; Steve Tuecke; Harlan Wallach; Hong Yee Wong; Glenh. Wheless

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sherpa Buddhists on a Regional Pilgrimage: The Case of Maritika Cave at Halase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and very complex social organization. Itmust be mentioned in !hiscontex!, however,!ha!, unlike !hose holy sites in remote areas connected wi!h mountain peaks and glacier lakes regarded as !he seat as well as the physical representation of !he regional prole... and watching their fellow pilgrims handling this seemingly unknown and dangerous crossing by boat the usual way of laughing and merry UlIlcing became tinged with a slight nervous overtone. For the duration of this undertaking especially old people both men...

Berg, Eberhard

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Workshop on HITRAP/CaveA Atomic Physics Experiments GSI, Nov 20-21, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMENTS FROM CUSTOMERS STAYING AT THE HOTEL. The Motion Sensor Nightlight helps save energy and provides bathrooms. Key next steps include: · Educate hotel and institutional owners/managers about energyTypically, hotel bathroom lights are left on between five to eight hours per occupied day

Rumolo, Giovanni

80

Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography applied to cave sustainability (Barbados) and groundwater exploration (Saint Lucia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we apply the method of two-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (2D time-lapse ERT) for two different problems. In the first problem, we monitor the structural stability of the roof of the ...

Agramakova, Yulia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bows and Arrows -- Part One: The Bow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One: The Bow One: The Bow Nature Bulletin No. 592 February 20, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist BOWS AND ARROWS: PART ONE THE BOW Primitive man, although at different times in various parts of the world, seems to have passed through three stages of development. During what is called the Old Stone Age he discovered how to make and use fire but had only clubs, stones and crudely shaped axes as weapons. During the Middle Stone Age he invented the spear, perhaps a throwing stick to hurl it, and finally the bow and arrow. Then man became a match for the mammoth, mastodon, cave bear, saber-toothed tiger or any predator. Then he was able to kill his food at a distance, or from a hiding place, with less risk of his life Then, too, he was enabled to ambush an enemy instead of meeting him in desperate hand-to-hand conflict.

82

politics factors into climate bill, too  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

06/2 - POLITICS FACTORS INTO CLIMATE BILL, TOO. In A 987-page bill, six committees with jurisdiction, a mammoth oil spill to consider, no bipartisan support, ...

83

thesis - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[18] W. Miller et al, Sequencing the nuclear genome of the extinct woolly mammoth, Nature 456 (2008), 387?390. [19] T. Faraut, Addressing chromosome  ...

84

EMAB Meeting - May 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BOARD Hotel on the Falls 475 River Parkway * Idaho Falls, ID 83402 TetonYellowstone Banquet Rooms Documents Available for Download EMAB Meeting Minutes for May 31, 2012 EMAB...

85

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL HEATING DISTRICT FOR THE TOWN OF MAMMOTH LAKES FINAL REPORT 2009 AUGUST 2009 CEC5002009082. Please cite this report as follows: Phelps, Richard D. Structuring a Direct Geothermal Heating District. Structuring a Direct Geothermal Heating District for the Town of Mammoth Lakes is the final report

86

Mono County geothermal activity  

SciTech Connect

Three geothermal projects have been proposed or are underway in Mono County, California. The Mammoth/Chance geothermal development project plans to construct a 10-MW geothermal binary power plant which will include 8 production and 3 injection wells. Pacific Lighting Energy Systems is also planning a 10-MW binary power plant consisting of 5 geothermal wells and up to 4 injection wells. A geothermal research project near Mammoth Lakes has spudded a well to provide a way to periodically measure temperature gradient, pressure, and chemistry of the thermal waters and to investigate the space-heating potential of the area in the vicinity of Mammoth Lakes. All three projects are briefly described.

Lyster, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Microsoft Word - CX-Drummond-MacksInn-WoodPoleReplacementFY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2012 29, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn- Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project Number: 2486 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: The project area is located in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Idaho Falls District. Project locations are listed below: Project Location Township Range Section(s) County Line Name Structures Use Ownership 3N 44E 28 Teton Swan Valley - Teton 10/6 Forest Forest Service 14S 5E 19 Fremont

88

A study of the fluid inclusion, stable isotope and mineralogical characteristics of the Denton fluorspar deposit, Cave-in-Rock, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district contains numerous vein type deposits and larger bedded replacement deposits containing fluorite with lesser amounts of sphalerite, galena and barite. Fluid inclusion, stable isotope and paragenetic studies were undertaken to determine the changes in depositional temperatures and salinities of the ore fluids responsible for mineralization at the Denton mine, and to combine these data with information from other deposits to help develop a picture of regional ore deposition. 38 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

Koellner, M.S.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

been imaged include Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera, Dixie Meadows NV, Fish Lake Valley NV, and Brady Hot Springs. Areas that are being imaged in the summer of...

90

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Thick Sulfide Mine, Pinal County, Arizona, MS thesis.of the San Manuel area, Pinal County, Arizona, Geol. Surveyof the Mammoth Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona, U.S. Geol.

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NATURAL AREAS ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION: OAK RIDGE RESERVATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Old home places. Largest known cave on the ORR. Uncommon animals; cave species. Geomagnetic research. Within BSR3-45. PP. CMA1. Grassy Creek Power Line Area (51a). Lower edge...

92

Robust Low-Frequency Spread-Spectrum Navigation System  

... reliable tracking and navigation in buildings, heavy foliage, urban terrain, caves, and underground with less interference than is currently available ...

93

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Aug. 2006, p. 55965609 Vol. 72, No. 8 0099-2240/06/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.00715-06  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(35 to 74 M) and detectable oxygen (2.6 to 12.6 M), suggesting that nitrate is effectively scavenged-rich aquifer emerge in the Frasassi cave system, where they mix with oxygen-rich percolating water and cave air interact with oxygen at the water table or at subterra- nean springs. The caves form as a result

Macalady, Jenn

94

Evaluating human-robot interaction during a manipulation experiment conducted in immersive virtual reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the main highlights of a Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) study conducted during a manipulation experiment performed in Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE). Our aim is to assess whether using immersive Virtual Reality (VR) for ... Keywords: CAVE, human-robot interaction, immersive virtual reality, manipulation, presence

Mihai Duguleana; Florin Grigorie Barbuceanu; Gheorghe Mogan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major campaign to quantify the magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwaters around Mammoth Mountain volcano in eastern California was carried out from 1996 to 1999. The total water flow from all sampled cold springs was >=1.8_107 m3/yr draining an area that receives an estimated

96

High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

CX-006813: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13: Categorical Exclusion Determination 13: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Targhee Substation Communication Equipment Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 10/12/2011 Location(s): Teton County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to upgrade communication equipment at its Targhee Substation in Teton County, Idaho. The proposed upgrades are required as part of a large multi-phase telecommunications project to relocate BPA?s affected telecommunications systems onto newly created digital microwave radio and fiber systems. BPA must vacate certain frequency bands to facilitate relocation of frequencies for cellular providers and advanced networks. Document(s) Available for Download CX-006813.pdf

98

54.5 MPG and Beyond: Hybridization Moves Vehicles Forward | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybridization Moves Vehicles Forward Hybridization Moves Vehicles Forward 54.5 MPG and Beyond: Hybridization Moves Vehicles Forward November 29, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis With help from the Clean Cities National Parks Initiative, Grand Teton National Park was able to purchase hybrid electric vehicles, which the park's Wildlife Brigade use to spark discussions about emission and fuel efficiency. | Photo courtesy of the National Park Service. With help from the Clean Cities National Parks Initiative, Grand Teton National Park was able to purchase hybrid electric vehicles, which the park's Wildlife Brigade use to spark discussions about emission and fuel efficiency. | Photo courtesy of the National Park Service. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program How do hybrids differ?

99

Microsoft Word - Targhee-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 12, 2011 October 12, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Rodger Thomas Project Manager - TECT-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Targhee Substation Communication Equipment Upgrades Budget Information: Work Order # 197237, Task 01 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.15 Siting, construction, and operation of support buildings and support structures within or contiguous to an already developed area... Location: Township 5 North, Range 4 East, Section 35, Teton County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to upgrade communication equipment at its Targhee Substation in Teton County, Idaho. The proposed upgrades are required as part of a large

100

Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development  

SciTech Connect

The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

Shropshire, David Earl; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Berrett, Sharon; Cobb, D. A.; Worhach, P.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BOOKS & MEDIA UPDATE Carbon Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry from fundamental and practical perspectives, applications in nanocomposites, sensors, electron et al. Wiley · 2006 · 200 pp ISBN: 3-527-30486-X $75 / £45 / 67.50 The fundamental concepts. Over six years in production, the Handbook of Materials Modeling represents a truly mammoth undertaking

Elliott, James

102

A comprehensive study of fracture patterns and densities in the Geysers geothermal reservoir using microearthquake shear-wave splitting tomography. Quarterly report for Sep-Dec 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We start organizing the computer programs needed for crack density inversion into an easy to follow scripts. These programs were collection of bits and pieces from many sources and we want to organize those separate programs into coherent product. We also gave a presentation (enclosed) in the Twenty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Stanford University on our Geyser and Mammoth results.

Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Bank was searched for appropriate acceptor proteins (scaf- folds) with backbone structural and of protein chains with more than 50 residues. MAMMOTH (38) was used to search for sequence and structural consequences of changing a sulfur atom to a methylene group in the M13Nle mutation in ribonuclease

Baker, David

104

The Astrophysical Journal, 730:69 (10pp), 2011 April 1 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/730/2/69 C 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Bank was searched for appropriate acceptor proteins (scaf- folds) with backbone structural and of protein chains with more than 50 residues. MAMMOTH (38) was used to search for sequence and structural consequences of changing a sulfur atom to a methylene group in the M13Nle mutation in ribonuclease

Kaiser, Ralf I.

105

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a cave, heating and cooling for thermal comfort in dwellingsthermal environment and residents' control behavior of coolingthermal preferences and the operation of the heating and cooling

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Register before September 15!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Xel-Ha is located 15 minutes from Tulum, where nature has created incredible caves, inlets and lagoons. Fish from the Caribbean take refuge in placid waters of .

107

Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hydrogeology of the Blautopf spring - Tracer tests in Blauhohle cave...

108

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cave aging with ground source heat pumps for cheese aging.along with a ground source heat pump to keep the cheese

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Professional Preface, 2 (1): Free Membership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Preparation, edited by J.W. Leonard III. Design and Operation of Caving and Sublevel Stoping Mines, edited by D.R. Stewart. Economics of Internationally  ...

110

0 1 2 Miles 2 Kilometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VALLEY FLINT RIDGE East Entranc e Road M AM M O TH CAVE RIDGE Flint Ridge Road ParkRi dge Road R Hunter

111

NEWTON's Environmental and Earth Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dissolving Rocks Eye of Hurricane Time Limit on Earthquake Aftershocks Oxygen in Underwater Cave Limnic Eruptions Extraterrestrial Plate Tectonics Earth's Core Hottest Layer...

112

Invaders from the South? Archaeological Discontinuities in the Northwestern Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number of Specimens Source Hanging Rock Shelter Last SupperSupper Hanging Rock Last Supper Source Cave Shelter ShelterSOURCE DETERMINATIONS FOR PROJECTILE POINTS FROM HANGING ROCK

Layton, Thomas N

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

New Equipment of Distinguishing Rock from Coal Based on Statistical Analysis of Fast Fourier Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new equipment of distinguishing rock from coal based on statistical analysis of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is invented which can be used in the mechanized caving coal locales. First, eight groups of sound signals which had been measured during caving ... Keywords: Threshold of Distinguishing Rock from Coal, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Frequency Energy Variance, Frequency Energy Ratio

Gu Tao; Li Xu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A tele-immersion environment for traditional Japanese crafting system over the Japan Gigabit Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a tele-immersion environment for the traditional Japanese crafting system, which uses a highly immersive system based on a Virtual Reality (VR) environment, such as multiple Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) ... Keywords: Japan, Japanese crafts, VR presentation, human sensibility, kansei, multimodal communication, sensitivity information processing, tele-immersion, traditional crafts, ultra high speed networks, virtual reality

Tomoyuki Ishida; Akihiro Miyakawa; Yoshitaka Shibata

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Microsoft Word - CX-CircuitBreakerReplacementsMultipleSubstationsFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2012 12, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Michael Gilchrist Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Power Circuit Breaker Replacement Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): Appendix B4.6, Additions and modifications to transmission facilities. Location: Tumwater, Thurston County, WA; Ravensdale, King County, WA; Silver Creek, Lewis County, WA; Shelton, Mason County, WA; Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA; Bandon, Coos County, OR; Toledo, Lincoln County, OR; Wilsonville, Washington County, OR; Gold Beach, Curry County, OR; Stayton, Marion County, OR; Swan Valley, Bonneville County, ID; Moose, Teton County, WY (ID); Gold Creek, Powell County, MT.

116

Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project. Pennsylvania Hydroelectric Development Corporation Flat Rock Dam: Project summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program was initiated in conjunction with the restoration of three power generating plants in Idaho Falls, Idaho, following damage caused by the Teton Dam failure on June 5, 1976. There were many parties interested in this project, including the state and environmental groups, with different concerns. This report was prepared by the developer and describes the design alternatives the applicant provided in an attempt to secure the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license. Also included are correspondence between the related parties concerning the project, major design alternatives/project plan diagrams, the license, and energy and project economics.

Gleeson, L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program was initiated in conjunction with the restoration of three power generating plants in Idaho Falls, Idaho, following damage caused by the Teton Dam failure on June 5, 1976. There were many parties interested in this project, including the state and environmental groups, with different concerns. This report was prepared by the developer and describes the design alternatives the applicant provided in an attempt to secure the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license. Also included are correspondence between the related parties concerning the project, major design alternatives/project plan diagrams, the license, and energy and project economics.

Gleeson, L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Property:Applicant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicant Applicant Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Applicant Property Type Page Pages using the property "Applicant" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + Alternative Earth Resources Inc + C CA-017-05-051 + Mammoth Pacific + CA-170-02-15 + Mammoth Pacific + CA-650-2005-086 + Robert A. Phinney, Deep Rose LLC + CA-670-2010-107 + Ormat Nevada, Inc. + CA-670-2010-CX + Ram Power + CA-96062042 + Calpine Corporation + D DOE-EA-1116 + Exergy, Inc. + DOE-EA-1621 + Oregon Institute of Technology + DOE-EA-1676 + US Geothermal Inc + DOE-EA-1733 + Calpine + DOE-EA-1759 + Naknek Electric Association + DOE-EA-1849 + Ormat Technologies Inc + DOE-EA-1961 + Bonneville Power Admin + DOE-EIS-0298 + CalEnergy Generation +

119

Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied to Targeting New Geothermal Resource Locations in the U.S. Basin and Range with a Focus on Dixie Meadows, NV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the work our collaboration is doing to increase the detailed mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We are imaging several large areas in the western US with high resolution airborne hyperspectral and satellite multispectral sensors. We have now entered the phase where the remote sensing techniques and tools we are developing are mature enough to be combined with other geothermal exploration techniques such as aeromagnetic, seismic, well logging and coring data. The imaging sensors and analysis techniques we have developed have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, altered minerals, subtle hidden faults. Large regions are being imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping hidden faults, high temperature altered mineralization, clays, hot and cold springs and CO2 effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California. The areas that have been imaged include Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera, Dixie Meadows NV, Fish Lake Valley NV, and Brady Hot Springs. Areas that are being imaged in the summer of 2003 are the south moat of the Long Valley Caldera, Mammoth Mountain western Pickles, Nash, Kasameyer, Foxall, Martini, Cocks, Kennedy-Bowdoin, McKnight, Silver, Potts, flanks, Mono Inyo chain north of Mammoth Mountain in CA, and the Humboldt Block in NV. This paper focuses on presenting the overview of the high-resolution airborne hyperspectral image acquisition that was done at Dixie Meadows NV in August 2002. This new imagery is currently being analyzed and combined with other field data by all of the authors on this paper. Results of their work up until the time of the conference will be presented in papers in the remote sensing session.

Pickles, W. L.; Nash, G. D.; Calvin, W. M.; Martini, B. A.; Cocks, P. A.; Kenedy-Bowdoin, T.; Mac Knight, R. B.; Silver, E. A.; Potts, D. C.; Foxall, W.; Kasameyer, P.; Waibel, A. F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Shallow-crustal magma zones in and south of Long Valley, California: Final report for the period 1 Sept 1986 to 30 April 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes our investigations of seismic data from the Long Valley caldera region based mainly on data obtained from the USGS-Doe seismic network. During the period several thousands of earthquakes were recorded and located, including the extensive aftershock sequence of the July 1986 Chalfant Valley. This contract has provided partial operating support for this network, including the establishment of the first permanently-recording wideband digital station in the Mammoth Lakes region. Results presented here unclude five manuscripts involving various aspects of the research. These manuscripts cover: (1) a general description of unusual seismic phase near Mammoth Lakes and their possible use in the delineation of shallow-crustal anomalous bodies, (2) a paper which pinpoints the location of a shallow-crustal anomaly about 6 km deep and 2 to 3 km in lateral near the south end of Hilton Creek fault, (3) the documentation of a strong lateral structural change in the vicinity of Inyo Craters, and (4) papers contributing to knowledge of the tectonics of the Mammoth Lakes area.

Peppin, W.A.

1988-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide: WHAT IS COAL? Coal looks like a shiny black rock. Coal has lots of energy in it. When it is burned, coal makes heat and light energy. Th e cave men used coal for...

122

Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 119 (1993) 71-83 71 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precipitates and altered basalts. The generality of this result may depend on the generality of off successfully logged most of the exposed basement at the bottom of the hole below the caving pipe

Fisher, Andrew

123

The Supreme Triumph of the Surgeon's Art': Narrative History of Endocrine Surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident as childrenis estimated that the Chernobyl fallout will produce 16,0002 Cave, A. J. E. , 34, 35 Chernobyl nuclear accident, 155

Zeiger, Martha A.; Shen, Wen T.; Felger, Erin A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

peter cave mining co. mine #1 martin 159 1504331 prep plant ... lincoln bank #88 3608106 t j mining inc t j #1 3608128 mt carmel co-gen, inc. mt. carmel co-gen culm ...

125

Definition: Caliper Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wells. The measurements that are recorded can be an important indicator of cave ins or shale swelling in the borehole, which can effect the results of other well logs.1 View on...

126

Comparison of Effectiveness of Sub-Slab Ventilation Systems for Indoor Radon Mitigation: A Numerical Study (in French)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gravier place sous plancher bas, I'amplitude de la pressionde gravier sous plancher bas ameliore de fa90n considerablede gravier sous plancher bas. La depression dans la cave est

Bonnefous, Y.C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Minutes Ops mtg 110811  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

experiment in the Beam Test Facility cave. The RWAAHD are in place. The ALS has an earthquake policy that if they can feel a quake, the operator does a radiation survey to ensure...

128

Solstice Observers and Observatories in Native California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

events in California rock art. Sources: a. Juniper Cave,events in California rock art. Sources: a, Hole- in-the-events in California rock art. Sources: Ker-17 (pictograph,

Hudson, Travis; Lee, Georgia; Hedges, Ken

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process described in detail in the Program Manual. July 12, 2013 Cavern Protection (Texas) It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under...

130

NETL: Releases & Briefs - In the Eye of the Beholder: NETL's...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

interact with it in very natural, multi-sensory ways," Halow said. In collaboration with Ames Laboratory, NETL is developing the CAVE-like facility into a science laboratory and...

131

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermal Regime of a Cold Air Trap in Central Pennsylvania, USA: the Trough Creek Ice Mine  

SciTech Connect

Air temperatures internal and external to a talus cave (‘ice mine’) in central Pennsylvania were measured hourly for three years. Despite its location near the base of a talus slope, the cave demonstrated the thermal characteristics of an apparently static cave, with limited connections to the external environment other than through the cave entrance. Congelation ice that lasted until late spring formed as drip or flowstone and ponded ice from the limited influx of infiltrating water during late winter/early spring. A closed period of thermal stratification and slow warming of cave air was followed by an open period in winter months during which the cave was cooled by the influx of cold dry air. Unlike the occasionally strong and localised cooling induced by the flow of cold air from vents at the base of talus slopes, static cold traps retain their cold air and have little apparent effect on surrounding biota, instead providing potential refugia for organisms that prefer colder temperatures. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Edenborn, Harry M.; Sams, James I.; Kite, Steven

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Use of Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes as a Method for Delineating Sources of Organic Matter in Anchialine Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submerged caves, locally referred to as cenotes, can be found throughout the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. These nutrient poor, aphotic “underground estuaries” lack photosynthetic primary productivity, but are often found underlying high primary productivity areas such as mangroves and tropical forests. Adjacent ecosystems contribute organic carbon to the cave systems via percolation, where it is then utilized by the obligate, cave-dwelling fish and invertebrates. Another potential pathway through which organic carbon can enter the cave food web is through chemosynthesis. Chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing or nitrifying bacteria have been found in the hydrogen sulfide layer or in the sediments of some anchialine caves. Our study utilizes 13C/12C and 15N/14N stable isotopes as well as 14C radiocarbon dating to determine and compare the sources of organic matter entering a coastal anchialine cave (Cenote Aak Kimin) versus an inland cave (Cenote Maya Blue) in the Yucatan Peninsula. Stable isotopes have long been employed in tropic investigations. This study, however, is the first to utilize radiocarbon isotopes in anchialine caves. The use of both stable and radiocarbon isotopes as source indicators provides greater discrimination in systems that contain numerous carbon sources or indistinct trophic levels, particularly to distinguish between chemoautotrophic versus photosynthetically derived carbon. Results indicate that chemosynthetically derived organic carbon contributes substantially to the diet of some crustaceans, such as the stygobitic shrimp Typhlatya, while other species remain dependent on detrital inputs. Depleted ?13C values and aged radiocarbon values (as low as -47.51‰ and 1840 yrs. for Typhlatya spp.) in comparison to particulate and sediment ?13C values (lowest -32.07‰ and -28.43‰, respectively). A comparison of isotopic values between Cenote Aak Kimin and Cenote Maya Blue suggests that the trophic web of the coastal cave incorporates more photosynthetic or detrital carbon, while the inland cave, with more depleted 13C and 14C values, relies more heavily on chemoautotrophic carbon. Within both systems, however, distinct photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic levels were identified. Water quality parameters, especially dissolved oxygen and pH, support the hypothesis of bacterial activity at the halocline. Anchialine systems in the Yucatan Peninsula are threatened due to increases in tourism, development, and pollution. Quantifying and qualifying the inputs of organic carbon is vital for the management and conservation of the area’s freshwater resources.

Neisch, Julie A

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A comprehensive study of fracture patterns and densities in the Geysers geothermal reservoir using microearthquake shear-wave splitting tomography [Quarterly progress report 06/16/1998 - 09/15/1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We completed the process of locating events and identifying shear-wave splitting in the mammoth area. A total of 2250 split shear wave observations were recorded in the four month period that our network was in place. Fast polarization direction map in Figure 1 shows that most of the stations in the mammoth area display consistent direction throughout the main field, between 300{degree} azimuth to 0{degree} azimuth. Some exemptions to the consistent crack alignment (fast polarization direction) can be seen in station M19, and some stations display inconsistent trend as can be observed in stations M25, M18, and M07. It is possible that station M19 was misaligned during installment. Figure 2 shows the cumulative rose diagram for all observations with a clear preferred direction. Figure 3 also shows that most of the observations of fast split shear wave are in the same direction and that those observation are distributed throughout the target area. If we treat measurements of polarization direction as a statistical process, same as deep of layer measurement, we can say that in the small area of the station we have aligned cracks. Figures 4 and 5 show results of the crack density inversion assuming regional crack azimuth of 340{degree}. Almost 2000 raypaths were used to perform this tomographic inversion. There is weak dependency of the results on the regional crack direction, but the main areas of high and low crack density are the same. The changes are mainly in the size of the anomalies. Since the amplitudes of those anomalies depend mainly on the damping parameter we use in the inversion, exact regional crack direction is not a critical parameter of the inversion. The map in figure 4 and cross-sections in Figure 5 show two areas of high crack density: one northeast of the Casa Diablo area at depth of 1 to 3 km, and one near the Mammoth airport and station 9 at depth of 2 to 3 km.

Malin, P.E.; Shalev, E.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

CA-170-02-15 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CA-170-02-15 CA-170-02-15 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: CA-170-02-15 EA at Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Basalt Canyon Slim Hole and Geothermal Well Exploration Projects General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Mammoth Pacific Consultant EMA Associates Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Drilling Methods, Exploration Drilling, Exploratory Well, Slim Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 77 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Central California District Office

137

Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California.

Pickles, W L; Kasameyer, P W; Martini, B A; Potts, D C; Silver, E A

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

CA-017-05-051 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CA-017-05-051 CA-017-05-051 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: CA-017-05-051 EA at Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field, Basalt Canyon Geothermal Pipeline Project Environmental Assessment and Draft Environmental Impact Report General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Mammoth Pacific Consultant Environmental Management Associates, Inc. Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Comments California Clearinghouse Number 2003092101 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Bishop Field Office

139

EIS-0399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental 399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. 230-kV Transmission Line Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. 230-kV transmission line project to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a 230-kV electric transmission line; Issuance of Presidential Permit for right-to-way grant in Cascade, Teton, Chouteau, Pondera, Toole and Glacier Counties Montana. Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of the Federal Draft Environmental Impact Statement and State of Montana Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line, DOE/EIS-0399 (February 2008) (73 FR 8869) More Documents & Publications

140

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Climate Zone 7B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 7 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 7A is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7B climate zones: Clear Creek County, Colorado Grand County, Colorado Gunnison County, Colorado Hinsdale County, Colorado Jackson County, Colorado Lake County, Colorado Lincoln County, Wyoming Mineral County, Colorado Park County, Colorado Pitkin County, Colorado Rio Grande County, Colorado Routt County, Colorado San Juan County, Colorado Sublette County, Wyoming Summit County, Colorado Teton County, Wyoming Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_7B&oldid=2161

142

Huckelberry Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huckelberry Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Huckelberry Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Huckelberry Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Huckelberry Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Grand Teton Nat'l Park, Wyoming Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

143

Title: An Advanced Solution for the Storage, Transportation and Disposal of Vitrified High Level Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at Global 99, Jackson, Wyoming, August 29 - September 2, 1999 Presented at Global 99, Jackson, Wyoming, August 29 - September 2, 1999 1 AN ADVANCED SOLUTION FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT FUEL AND VITRIFIED HIGH LEVEL WASTE William J. Quapp Teton Technologies, Inc. 860 W. Riverview Dr. Idaho Falls, ID 83401 208-535-9001 ABSTRACT For future nuclear power deployment in the US, certain changes in the back end of the fuel cycle, i.e., disposal of high level waste and spent fuel, must become a real options. However, there exists another problem from the front end of the fuel cycle which has until recently, received less attention. Depleted uranium hexafluoride is a by-product of the enrichment process and has accumulated for over 50 years. It now represents a potential environmental problem. This paper describes a

144

EMAB Meeting Agenda May 31, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hotel on the Falls Hotel on the Falls 475 River Parkway * Idaho Falls, ID 83402 Teton/Yellowstone Banquet Rooms May 31, 2012 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * Jim Ajello, EMAB Chair 9:15 a.m. EM Update * Tracy Mustin, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: Jim Ajello, EMAB Chair 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. Updates on the EMAB FY 2012 Work Plan Assignments * Mark Gilbertson, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: David Swindle, Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee Co-Chair 12:00 p.m. Lunch 1:30 p.m. EMAB 20 th Anniversary Presentation * David Swindle, EMAB Member 2:00 p.m. Idaho National Laboratory Citizens' Advisory Board Presentation

145

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 23870 of 28,905 results. 61 - 23870 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005393: Categorical Exclusion Determination Galesburg Water Plant Solar Photovoltaic Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/16/2011 Location(s): Galesburg, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005393-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Targhee Substation Communication Equipment Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 10/12/2011 Location(s): Teton County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006813-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006827: Categorical Exclusion Determination Central Vermont Biomass Recovery Facility; Vermont Technical College -

146

EIS-0399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. 230-kV Transmission Line Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. 230-kV transmission line project to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a 230-kV electric transmission line; Issuance of Presidential Permit for right-to-way grant in Cascade, Teton, Chouteau, Pondera, Toole and Glacier Counties Montana. Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of the Federal Draft Environmental Impact Statement and State of Montana Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line, DOE/EIS-0399 (February 2008) (73 FR 8869) More Documents & Publications

147

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Teton County, Wyoming Coordinates 43.853632°, -110.6314491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

148

EIS-0399: Final EIS for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-KV Transmission Line Comments/Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line VOLUME 2 COMMENT RESPONSE DOCUMENT September 2008 United States Department of Energy State of Montana Department of Environmental Quality COVER SHEET Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) are co-lead agencies; the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Department of the Interior, is a cooperating agency. Title: Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line (DOE/EIS-0399) Location: Cascade, Teton, Chouteau, Pondera, Toole, and Glacier counties, Montana. Contacts: For further information about this Final EIS, contact: Ellen Russell, Project Manager,

149

BPA/Lower Valley Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Summary Summary * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Affected Environment * Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the BPA/Lower Valley Transmission Project by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). BPA is the lead federal agency on this project and supervises the preparation of the EIS. The U.S. Forest Service is a cooperating agency and assists BPA in EIS preparation. The Targhee and Bridger-Teton National Forests are crossed by BPA's existing transmission line and some of the alternatives. S.1 Purpose and Need For Action S.1.1 BPA Lower Valley Power and Light, Inc. (LVPL) buys electricity from BPA and then supplies it to the residences, farms and businesses of the Jackson and Afton, Wyoming areas. Since the late 1980s,

150

Microsoft Word - CX-Drummond-MacksInn_WoodPoleReplacementFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2012 10, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn- Madison, and Targhee Tap 115-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project Number: 2191 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... Location: The project area is located in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Idaho Falls District. Project locations are listed below: Project Location Township Range Section(s) County Line Name Structures Use Ownership 4N 45E 11 Teton Targhee Tap 8/8 Agriculture Private 14N 44E 22 Fremont Macks Inn- Madison

151

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey performed at the Riverton, Wyoming site in July 1976, are presented. The average external gamma exposure rate at 1 m over the tailings pile was 56 ..mu..R/hr. The corresponding rate for the former mill area was 97 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles in a dry wash is evident; but it appears that, in general, the earth cover over the tailings pile has been effective in limiting both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra as a function of depth in 15 augered holes is presented graphically. A survey of the Teton Division Lumber Company property in Riverton showed a maximum external gamma exposure rate of 270 ..mu..R/hr.

Haywood, F.F.; Lorenzo, D.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Wyoming and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Wyoming, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 7 Lincoln Sublette Teton CLIMATE ZONE 6 Albany Fremont Park Big Horn Hot Springs Sheridan Campbell Johnson Sweetwater Carbon Laramie Uinta Converse Natrona Washakie Crook Niobrara Weston CLIMATE ZONE 5

153

BASE - Rad Effects - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects Effects About the BASE Facility The BASE Facility operates in conjunction with the 88-inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide beams of protons and heavy ions for radiation effects testing. When running, the facility is manned 24-hours a day with additional support on call. Assistance is available for shipping and receiving. Contact us for current hourly rates. Bragg curve plots, published papers, and other useful information are available here on our website. For information on the experiment approval process, beam time scheduling, or technical details on beamline setup and operation, contact Mike Johnson at (510) 486-4389 or MBJohnson@lbl.gov. More information is available here: Protons (Cave 4A) Heavy Ions (Cave 4B) Neutrons (Cave 0)

154

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, "cave" means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and includes or is synonymous with cavern, pit, pothole, well, sinkhole, and grotto. No person may excavate, remove, destroy, injure, alter in any significant manner, or deface any part of a cave owned by the State of Texas, unless the person

155

Geological and Geobotanical Studies of Long Valley Caldera, CA, USA Utilizing New 5m Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1989, a six month-long small magnitude earthquake swarm began beneath the Pleistocene-aged dacitic cumulovolcano Mammoth Mountain. The following year, increased mortality of trees in the Horseshoe Lake region was observed. Their deaths were initially attributed to the Sierran drought of the 1980's. In 1994 however, soil gas measurements made by the USGS confirmed that the kills were due to asphyxiation of the vegetation via the presence of 30-96 % CO{sub 2} in ground around the volcano[1]. Physiological changes in vegetation due to negative inputs into the ecological system such as anomalously high levels of magmatic CO{sub 2}, can be seen spectrally. With this phenomena in mind, as well as many other unanswered geological and geobotanical questions, seven lines of hyperspectral 5-meter HyMap data were flown over Long Valley Caldera located in eastern California on September 7, 1999. HyMap imagery provides the impetus to address geobotanical questions such as where the treekills are currently located at Mammoth and other locales around the caldera as well as whether incipient kills can be identified. The study site of the Horseshoe Lake treekills serves as a focus to the initial analyses of this extensive HyMap dataset due to both the treekill's geologically compelling origins and its status as a serious volcanic geohazard.

Martini, B.A.; Silver, E.A.; Potts, D.C.; Pickles, W.L.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

PHOENIX NATURAL GAS LIMITED PRICE DETERMINATION REFERENCE Disclosures of interest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Member disclosures Martin Cave (Group Chairman) is a joint academic director of a Brussels-based think tank on regulation called CERRE (www.cerre.eu). This has occupied about ten days per year, mostly attending seminars in Brussels with regulators and regulatees. Another joint academic director is Prof C Waddams. They have not collaborated on any research projects, but he has chaired a panel which she was on. He has co-written a general book, or textbook, on regulation, which includes chapters on price control. The index lists three brief references to energy regulation: Baldwin, Cave &

Richard Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

159

The Particle Adventure | How do we detect what's happening? | Wavelength -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

detect what's happening? > detect what's happening? > Wavelength - The cave Wavelength - The cave A Cave Pretend that you are unlucky enough to fall into a cave without a flashlight. A Basketball However, you are lucky enough to have a bucket of glow-in-the-dark basketballs. Suddenly, you hear a snuffling sound. Is it a blood-thirsty bear, or merely your friends playing a practical joke on you? To find out, you desperately toss the basketballs in the direction of the snuffling sound, and memorize where the basketballs hit. Thus, you rapidly figure out the following outline of the being in front of you: Yikes! Since your basketballs are so big, when they bounce off the thing in front of you, all you can learn about its shape is that it is wide and tall. A Tennis ball Fortunately, you ALSO brought a bag of glow-in-the-dark tennis balls. You toss these in the direction of the snuffling, and are rewarded with the following image:

160

A Surface Protective System  

SciTech Connect

Part of the design and development work connected with the erection of the chemistry "cave" in the "GP" Building entailed an investigation of various protective measures for materials of construction. This work was based on the observations and recommendations of personnel engaged in work at a similar installation at Argonne National Laboratory.

Brown, W. T.

1950-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A critical review of the "ladder of investment" approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''ladder of investment'' is a regulatory approach proposed by Cave (2006), which has been widely embraced by national regulatory authorities in the European telecommunications sector. The approach entails providing entrants, successively, with different ... Keywords: Facility-based competition, Ladder of investment, Telecommunications

Marc Bourreau; P?nar Do?an; Matthieu Manant

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

30 guide for applicants 2010 The study of engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goes back to his childhood when he would enjoy visiting mines and caves while on holidays around the UK Evolution of NZ and Antarctica GEOL 483 Coal & Petroleum Geology GEOL 490 Research Project A Special Topic critical assessment. GEOL483 Petroleum and Coal Geology Semester 2 The majority of the world's energy comes

Wagner, Stephan

163

Geological Sciences College of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

postgraduate studies in Engineering Geology. `From going to mines and quarries, looking at what the job entails to his childhood when he would enjoy visiting mines and caves while on holidays around the UK, learning Geological Evolution of NZ and Antarctica GEOL 483 Coal & Petroleum Geology GEOL488 Special Topics

Hickman, Mark

164

Application of discrete element method to the analysis of free-flow outlet of coal from high coals at underground coal mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical model is developed on the basis of the Discrete Elements Method for investigation of processes of gravitational flow of the granular materials. The problem about free-flow outlet of coal from high coals in sublevel caving systems is ... Keywords: discrete element modeling, granular medium, numerical simulation, powered support, rock massif, underground coal mining

Vladimir I. Klishin; Sergey V. Klishin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Archaeological data visualization in VR: analysis of lamp finds at the great temple of petra, a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of an evaluation of the ARCHAVE system, an immersive virtual reality environment for archaeological research. ARCHAVE is implemented in a Cave. The evaluation studied researchers analyzing lamp and coin finds throughout the excavation ... Keywords: archaeological data analysis, immersive virtual reality interfaces, scientific visualization

Daniel Acevedo; Eileen Vote; David H. Laidlaw; Martha S. Joukowsky

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Isotope hydrology of Geology and Palaeontology, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria 3 School

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Anoura caudifer (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) MONIK OPREA, LUDMILLA M. S. AGULIAR, AND DON E. WILSON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. caudifer to remain in energy balance, it requires about 4 h of foraging time, 800 floral visits, and in, Helversen and Reyer (1984) also calculated a daily energy expenditure of 310% the basal rate or 12.4 kcal coinhabiting caves with the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata

Hayssen, Virginia

168

Evolution and Cognition 1 2001, Vol. 7, No. 2 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. caudifer to remain in energy balance, it requires about 4 h of foraging time, 800 floral visits, and in, Helversen and Reyer (1984) also calculated a daily energy expenditure of 310% the basal rate or 12.4 kcal coinhabiting caves with the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd virus is a natural-born cheat that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. caudifer to remain in energy balance, it requires about 4 h of foraging time, 800 floral visits, and in, Helversen and Reyer (1984) also calculated a daily energy expenditure of 310% the basal rate or 12.4 kcal coinhabiting caves with the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata

Manapat, Michael

170

blue-c: a spatially immersive display and 3D video portal for telepresence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present blue-c, a new immersive projection and 3D video acquisition environment for virtual design and collaboration. It combines simultaneous acquisition of multiple live video streams with advanced 3D projection technology in a CAVE™-like ... Keywords: 3D Video, graphics hardware, real-time graphics, spatially immersive displays, virtual environments

Markus Gross; Stephan Würmlin; Martin Naef; Edouard Lamboray; Christian Spagno; Andreas Kunz; Esther Koller-Meier; Tomas Svoboda; Luc Van Gool; Silke Lang; Kai Strehlke; Andrew Vande Moere; Oliver Staadt

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Immersive Virtual Reality System Using BIM Application With Extended Vertical Field Of View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) model contains information about structural, architectural, MEP (Mechanical Electrical and Plumbing) and other numerous components of a building. Among these components, MEP constitutes about 50% of the project cost, and its design is relatively more complex because of the limited headroom available to locate these components. The coordination of these systems involves locating and routing several subcomponents in a manner that satisfies different types of constraints. The earlier version of BIM Computer Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE) did not have provisions to show the overhead components of a BIM model. Conventionally, models had to be tilted to visualize the overhead components. The process of tilting the models to look up is considered counterintuitive. Some of the popular CAVEs developed by leading Universities have a screen on top to show the overhead components but they have a major shortcoming with them. The BIM models had to be converted to a specific format before they can be visualized in the CAVE environments. This study is an attempt to address the shortcomings of the previous version of the BIM CAVE by suggesting a prototype setup with a 55" LCD screen on top of the existing three vertically placed LCD screens. The addition of one more screen on top increases the vertical field of view, that is, the extent to which the user can see vertically in a BIM model. The new BIM CAVE setup is run by a custom built application that makes use of the .Net API (Application Programming Interface) of the commercially available BIM application, Autodesk Navisworks 2012, to control the camera views for achieving an almost seamless semi-immersive virtual environment. The main objective of this research is to validate the effectiveness of the new setup suggested by using a qualitative research methodology called phenomenological study. Semi-structured informal interviews were conducted with the subject matter experts (SMEs) who are experienced in the field of BIM to know about the differences in the user experience after adding a screen on top of the earlier BIM CAVE setup. The main idea behind this qualitative research technique is to develop an understanding of how the SMEs perceived the idea of looking up to see the overhead components of the BIM model. This thesis explains the steps followed to develop the modified BIM CAVE setup in detail and findings of the qualitative study to know about the effectiveness of the suggested new setup.

Ganapathi Subramanian, Adithya

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Whole-rock oxygen isotope compositions of cores and cuttings from Long Valley exploration wells show that the Bishop Tuff has been an important reservoir for both fossil and active geothermal systems within the caldera. The deep Clay Pit-1 and Mammoth-1 wells on the resurgent dome

173

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References J. L. Lewicki, M. L. Fischer, G. E. Hilley (2008) Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Lewicki,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=508150" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

174

Phase 1 drilling operations at the Magma Energy Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Phase 1 drilling operations for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. An important part of the Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program, this well is designed to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degree}C, whichever comes first. There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart, with scientific investigations in the borehole between the drilling intervals. Phase 1 of this project resulted in a 20 inch cased hole to 2558 feet, with 185 feet of coring beyond that. This document comprises a narrative of the daily activities, copies of the daily mud and lithologic reports, time breakdowns of rig activities, inventories of lost circulation materials, temperature logs of the cored hole, and a strip chart mud log. 2 figs.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal power) Geothermal power) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

176

Hot Springs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Springs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hot Springs Dictionary.png Hot Springs: A naturally occurring spring of hot water, heated by geothermal processes in the subsurface, and typically having a temperature greater than 37°C. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park (reference: http://www.hsd3.org/HighSchool/Teachers/MATTIXS/Mattix%20homepage/studentwork/Laura%20Cornelisse%27s%20Web%20Page/Yellowstone%20National%20Park.htm) Hot springs occur where geothermally heated waters naturally flow out of the surface of the Earth. Hot springs may deposit minerals and spectacular

177

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the First Americas the First Americas Michael R. Waters Departments of Anthropology and Geography Center for the Study of the First Americans Texas A&M University Who were the first Americans? When did they arrive in the New World? Where did they come from? How did they travel to the Americas & settle the continent? A Brief History of Paleoamerican Archaeology Prior to 1927 People arrived late to the Americas ca. 6000 B.P. 1927 Folsom Site Discovery, New Mexico Geological Estimate in 1927 10,000 to 20,000 B.P. Today--12,000 cal yr B.P. Folsom Point 1934 Clovis Discovery Blackwater Draw (Clovis), New Mexico Folsom (Bison) Clovis (Mammoth) Ernst Antevs Geological estimate 13,000 to 14,000 B.P. Today 13,000 cal yr B.P. Search continued for sites older than Clovis. Most sites did not stand up to

178

NREL: News - NREL Solar Research Garners Two Prestigious R&D 100 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Printable Version Bookmark and Share Printable Version News Release NR-2810 NREL Solar Research Garners Two Prestigious R&D 100 Awards July 8, 2010 An etching technique that makes silicon wafers more efficient and a mammoth power generator that sets a new standard for the production of solar energy - both developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory - have been named among this year's most significant innovations by Research & Development (R&D) Magazine. The two prestigious awards, known in the research and development community as "the Oscars of Innovation," brings to 47 the number of R&D 100 awards that NREL has won since 1969, when the magazine launched the awards for the best new technologies from around the world.

179

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and steam located several miles deep into the Earth.[2][3]

180

Hot Creek Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Creek Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Creek Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Mammoth Lakes Park Area, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Resistivity Log At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Resistivity Log Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Lithologic and resistivity logs from wells drilled into areas of less than 20 ohm-m resistivity show clay mineralization resulting from hydrothermal alteration within the volcanic fill (Nordquist, 1987). Low resistivity in the vicinity of well 44-16, identified in wellbore geophysical logs and two dimensional MT modeling is restricted to the thermal-fluid reservoirs in the early rhyolite and Bishop Tuff (Nordquist, 1987; Suemnicht, 1987). The MT data suggest that the resistivity structure near Mammoth Mountain is

182

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal) Geothermal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

183

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 and O 2 MMV framework to quantify potential leaks from geo- sequestration: Technologies for detection for risk abatement Manvendra Dubey* (dubey@lanl.gov, 505-665-3128) Seth Olsen, Thom Rahn, Hari Viswanathan, Phil Staufer, Julianna Fessenden-Rahn Los Alamos National Laboratory Ralf Keeling University of California, San Diego Fifth Annual Conference of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Alexandra VA, May 9, 2006 Funding by ZERT at LANL U N C L A S S I F I E D Outline: MMV Framework for early detection and risk abatement * Potential CO 2 Leak Scenario - Scale, Leak Rate, Footprint, Constraints - Fluxes and foot-print: Implications for leaks * CO 2 Measurement Technologies (scales) - Chamber (m), Eddy Flux (10m-km), Remote (10kms-100kms) * Mammoth Mountain: Natural Analogue

184

Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Methods Drilling Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques CA-170-02-15 EA Mammoth Pacific Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area BLM BLM Central California District Office BLM Bishop Field Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration Drilling Methods

185

Outsourcing Logistics in the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply chain challenges that the Oil and Gas industry faces in material logistics have enlarged in the last few decades owing to an increased hydro-carbon demand. Many reasons justify the challenges, such as exploration activities which have moved to remote locations, not only increasing distances from supply houses and refineries but also escalating logistics costs. Mammoth costs of material unavailability drive the inefficiencies largely. The objectives of the study is to discover the logistics needs of oil and gas companies, the motivation, benefits and the requirements of outsourcing logistics. The study aims to identify the material supply chain inefficiencies in the industry and proposes solutions to solve them. In this study, Oil and Gas industry’s outsourcing practices in logistics are analyzed along with the trends of the third party logistics companies serving the industry. The participants of this study are from different companies in the Oil and Gas industry dealing with supply chain operations.

Herrera, Cristina 1988-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

Peng, F.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mammoth Lakes, California Coordinates 37.648546°, -118.972079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

188

CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L. [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Koss, Michael D. [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Fillies, Marion [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Gahl, Anja [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Scheeder, Martin R.L. [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Cardoso, M. Cristina [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Leonhardt, Heinrich [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Department of Biology II, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Geary, Nori [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Langhans, Wolfgang [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Leonhardt, Monika [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

A novel cell model to study the function of the adrenoleukodystrophy-related protein  

SciTech Connect

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the ABCD1 (ALD) gene. ALDRP, the closest homolog of ALDP, has been shown to have partial functional redundancy with ALDP and, when overexpressed, can compensate for the loss-of-function of ALDP. In order to characterize the function of ALDRP and to understand the phenomenon of gene redundancy, we have developed a novel system that allows the controlled expression of the ALDRP-EGFP fusion protein (normal or non-functional mutated ALDRP) using the Tet-On system in H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells. The generated stable cell lines express negligible levels of endogenous ALDRP and doxycycline dosage-dependent levels of normal or mutated ALDRP. Importantly, the ALDRP-EGFP protein is targeted correctly to peroxisome and is functional. The obtained cell lines will be an indispensable tool in our further studies aimed at the resolution of the function of ALDRP to characterize its potential substrates in a natural context.

Gueugnon, Fabien [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Volodina, Natalia [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Taouil, Jaoued Et [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Lopez, Tatiana E. [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Gondcaille, Catherine [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Grand, Anabelle Sequeira-Le [Plate-forme Commune de Cytometrie en Flux, Universite de Bourgogne, Faculte de Medecine-IFR100, 21000 Dijon (France); Mooijer, Petra A.W. [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Genetic Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Departments of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, and Clinical Chemistry, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kemp, Stephan [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Genetic Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Departments of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, and Clinical Chemistry, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wanders, Ronald J.A. [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Genetic Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Departments of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, and Clinical Chemistry, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Savary, Stephane [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France)]. E-mail: stsavary@u-bourgogne.fr

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Protons - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protons Protons The BASE Facility is capable of providing fluxes of up to 1E10 protons/cm2-sec (the limit of our standard, continuously reading ion chamber dosimetry), but works best in the 1E7 to 1E8 protons/cm2-sec range. Higher levels of flux are monitored using intermittent faraday cup readings. Standard proton energies include 13.5, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 55 MeV/nucleon. Energies below 13.5 MeV/nucleon can be run in vacuum in Cave 4B. All proton testing is performed in air. Shielding materials, laser alignment tools, and mounting fixtures are available. Holes are provided through the cave shielding blocks for connecting additional test equipment, with a distance of approximately 10 feet from the test bench to the top of the shielding block (10 BNC cables are permanently installed and available for use; additional cables can be added).

191

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

INL Cultural Resource Management Office

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Photo Galleries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo Galleries Photo Galleries /_assets/images/sitename_image_placeholder.jpg Photo Galleries High-quality photos speak more than a thousand words about our science and technology, community outreach, collaborations, careers, and much more. Community» The Lab» Careers» Environment» Science & Technology» Collaborations» Events» For Visitors» SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY IMAGES Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Astronomical simulation in the CAVE - 1 Astronomical simulation in the CAVE - 1 Scientist sees his reflection as he works on the Cibola satellite Scientist sees his reflection as he works on the Cibola satellite "Sniffing" bees trained for security

194

Dynamics of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate and model the dynamics of spatial patterns arising during the precipitation of calcium carbonate from a supersaturated shallow water flow. The model describes the formation of travertine deposits at geothermal hot springs and rimstone dams of calcite in caves. We find explicit solutions for travertine domes at low flow rates, identify the linear instabilities which generate dam and pond formation on sloped substrates, and present simulations of statistical landscape evolution.

Nigel Goldenfeld; Pak Yuen Chan; John Veysey

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method for rubblizing an oil shale deposit for in situ retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for rubblizing an oil shale deposit that has been formed in alternate horizontal layers of rich and lean shale, including the steps of driving a horizontal tunnel along the lower edge of a rich shale layer of the deposit, sublevel caving by fan drilling and blasting of both rich and lean overlying shale layers at the distal end of the tunnel to rubblize the layers, removing a substantial amount of the accessible rubblized rich shale to permit the overlying rubblized lean shale to drop to tunnel floor level to form a column of lean shale, performing additional sublevel caving of rich and lean shale towards the proximate end of the tunnel, removal of a substantial amount of the additionally rubblized rich shale to allow the overlying rubblized lean shale to drop to tunnel floor level to form another column of rubblized lean shale, similarly performing additional steps of sublevel caving and removal of rich rubble to form additional columns of lean shale rubble in the rich shale rubble in the tunnel, and driving additional horizontal tunnels in the deposit and similarly rubblizing the overlying layers of rich and lean shale and forming columns of rubblized lean shale in the rich, thereby forming an in situ oil shale retort having zones of lean shale that remain permeable to hot retorting fluids in the presence of high rubble pile pressures and high retorting temperatures.

Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anchialine blue holes found in the interior of the Bahama Islands have distinct fresh and salt water layers, with vertical mixing, and dysoxic to anoxic conditions below the halocline. Scientific cave diving exploration and microbiological investigations of Cherokee Road Extension Blue Hole on Abaco Island have provided detailed information about the water chemistry of the vertically stratified water column. Hydrologic parameters measured suggest that circulation of seawater is occurring deep within the platform. Dense microbial assemblages which occurred as mats on the cave walls below the halocline were investigated through construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries, finding representatives across several bacterial lineages including Chlorobium and OP8. In many blue holes, microbial metabolism of organic matter in the presence of seawater sulfate leads to anoxic and sulfidic conditions at or below halocline. Sunlight penetrating this sulfidic layer allows for in situ primary production to be dominated by bacterial anoxygenic phototrophs. Although water column chemistry and molecular genetic diversity of microbial mats in Cherokee Road Extension Blue Hole were investigated in this study, the full scope of the biogeochemistry of inland blue holes throughout the Bahamas Archipelago is complex and poorly understood. However, these microbial communities are clearly influenced by several factors including solar insolation, terrestrial and marine inputs of oxygen, carbon, and nutrients, water residence times, depth to the halo/chemocline, and cave passage geometry. The biogeochemistry of inland blue holes throughout the Bahamas is so distinctive which makes Abaco Island and the rest of the archipelago valuable as natural experiments, repositories of microbial diversity, and analogs for stratified and sulfidic oceans present early in Earth's history.

Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Switchgrass biomass and chemical composition for biofuel in eastern Canada  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is one of several warm-season grasses that have been identified as potential biomass crops in North America. A two-year field study was conducted, on a free-draining sandy clay loam (St. Bernard, Typic Hapludalf), to characterize the growth and evaluate changes in biomass accumulation and composition of switchgrass at Montreal, QC. Three cultivars, Cave-in-Rock, Pathfinder, and Sunburst, were grown in solid stands in a randomized complete block design. Canopy height, dry matter (DM) accumulation and chemical composition were monitored biweekly throughout the growing season. Average maximum canopy heights were 192.5 cm for Cave-in-Rock, 169.9 for Pathfinder, and 177.8 for Sunburst. The respective end-of-season DM yields were 12.2, 11.5, and 10.6 Mg/ha. Biomass production among cultivars appeared to be related to time of maturation. Nitrogen concentration of DM decreased curvilinearly from 25 g/kg at the beginning of the season to 5 g/kg DM at season's end. Both acid-detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral-detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations increased to a maximum early in the season, after which no changes were detected. The average maximum values of ADF and NDF were, respectively, 647.6 and 849.0 g/kg DM for Cave-in-Rock, 669.1 and 865.2 for Pathfinder, and 661.8 and 860.9 for Sunburst. Changes in canopy height, DM accumulation, and chemical composition could all be described by predictive regression equations. These results indicate that switchgrass has potential as a biomass crop in a short-season environment.

Madakadze, I.C.; Stewart, K.; Peterson, P.R.; Coulman, B.E.; Smith, D.L.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hybrid and Advanced Air Cooling Geothermal Lab Call Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Advanced Air Cooling Geothermal Lab Call Project and Advanced Air Cooling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Hybrid and Advanced Air Cooling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description Many geothermal power plants in the U.S. are air-cooled because of water limitations. NREL has worked with industry to explore various strategies for boosting the performance of air coolers in hot weather. Computer modeling and experimental measurements have been done on the use of evaporative media upstream of the air-cooled condensers at the Mammoth Lakes Power Plant. NREL has also analyzed the use of an air-cooled condenser in series with (i.e., upstream of) a water-cooled condenser and found that this can be beneficial for power cycles requiring desuperheating of the turbine exhaust vapor. Recently, the conventional power industry has developed an interest in operating water- and air-cooled condensers in parallel. This arrangement allows a small water cooler to reduce the heat transfer duty on the air cooler on hot summer days thereby allowing the condensing working fluid to make a much closer approach to the air dry bulb temperature.

200

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

An Efficient Analytical Solution to Thwart DDoS Attacks in Public Domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, an analytical model for DDoS attacks detection is proposed, in which propagation of abrupt traffic changes inside public domain is monitored to detect a wide range of DDoS attacks. Although, various statistical measures can be used to construct profile of the traffic normally seen in the network to identify anomalies whenever traffic goes out of profile, we have selected volume and flow measure. Consideration of varying tolerance factors make proposed detection system scalable to the varying network conditions and attack loads in real time. NS-2 network simulator on Linux platform is used as simulation testbed. Simulation results show that our proposed solution gives a drastic improvement in terms of detection rate and false positive rate. However, the mammoth volume generated by DDoS attacks pose the biggest challenge in terms of memory and computational overheads as far as monitoring and analysis of traffic at single point connecting victim is concerned. To address this problem, a distributed...

Gupta, B B; Misra, Manoj; 10.1145/1523103.1523203

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A numerical study of convection in a layered porous medium heated from below  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Magma Energy Project being pursued at Sandia National Laboratories, a drilling program has been initiated within the Long Valley caldera near Mammoth Lakes, California. Seismological evidence obtained in this region suggests the presence of a relatively shallow magma body. We have performed a numerical simulation for a simplified model of the Long Valley geothermal system in order to elucidate the nature of the large-scale thermal structure within the system and to assess implications for the drilling program. The two-dimensional model consists of three horizontal layers, the upper two of which are porous and saturated with a single phase fluid. The system is limited in horizontal extent and heated uniformly from below. An associated planar, natural convective flow is thus produced. The results of our simulation indicate the possibility of wide variations in vertical temperature profiles for the model system, depending on the location of the drilling operation. Thus it can be inferred that, during the early stages of drilling, the vertical temperature distribution is not a reliable indicator of the presence or absence of a magma body at depth. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Hickox, C.E.; Chu, Tze Yao.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-025 Ohio State.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 SECTION A. Project Title: Enhancement of Radiation Safety and Radiological Monitoring Systems for the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor SECTION B. Project Description The objective of this project is for the Ohio State University to upgrade outdated infrastructure critical to safe operation of the OSU Research Reactor and the OSU Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. This will be accomplished by purchasing replacement stainless steel benches and carts, a shielding cave, glove box, area radiation monitoring system, smear counter, survey meters, and fire extinguishers. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact Radioactive Material Use - The purchase of radiation safety equipment will include the purchase of calibration sources for use with

206

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-025 Ohio State.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 SECTION A. Project Title: Enhancement of Radiation Safety and Radiological Monitoring Systems for the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor SECTION B. Project Description The objective of this project is for the Ohio State University to upgrade outdated infrastructure critical to safe operation of the OSU Research Reactor and the OSU Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. This will be accomplished by purchasing replacement stainless steel benches and carts, a shielding cave, glove box, area radiation monitoring system, smear counter, survey meters, and fire extinguishers. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact Radioactive Material Use - The purchase of radiation safety equipment will include the purchase of calibration sources for use with

207

GRR/Section 11 - Cultural Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Cultural Resource Assessment - Cultural Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11 - Cultural Resource Assessment 11CulturalResourceAssessment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Advisory Council on Historic Preservation National Park Service Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs Regulations & Policies National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) - specifically, Section 106 36 CFR 800 - Protection of Historic Properties Native American Graves Protection Act Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act Archaeological Resource Protection Act American Indian Religious Freedom Act Paleontological Resources Preservation Act Federal Cave Resources Protection Act

208

Position estimation of transceivers in communication networks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a system and method using wireless communication interfaces coupled with statistical processing of time-of-flight data to locate by position estimation unknown wireless receivers. Such an invention can be applied in sensor network applications, such as environmental monitoring of water in the soil or chemicals in the air where the position of the network nodes is deemed critical. Moreover, the present invention can be arranged to operate in areas where a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available, such as inside buildings, caves, and tunnels.

Kent, Claudia A. (Pleasanton, CA); Dowla, Farid (Castro Valley, CA)

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)  

SciTech Connect

The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Hannah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mesolithic fishing and seafaring in the Aegean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melian obsidian and fish bones unearthed at Franchthi cave confirm the existence of seafaring in the Aegean Sea since the Late Paleolithic. By the Mesolithic, an increase in the quantity of obsidian occurs contemporaneously with the appearance of bones from bluefin tuna weighing up to 200 kg. Even though direct archaeological evidence which reflects the type of boats and fishing practices used to acquire these fish does not exist, evidence in the form of migration theory and fish preservation suggests that the Aegean sailors had a sophisticated technology capable of building planked hulls and preserving tuna.

Webb, Thanos Aronis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 18 Number 1 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dzogs., Chen. sPrul.sKu.Chos.Kyi.rDo.rJe, head of the famous rNying.Ma Monastery of rDzogs.Chen. Acting on !;lis advice, the mother had given birth in the nearby cave of Padmasambhava, called the "Lion Sky Castle". 6 Before the child's birth He disappeared... ' project and also gave their full rccognition and co.operations. While in France, His Holiness received an invitation from Pope John the XXIIIrd to visit Rome. His Holiness visited H.H.'s visit to Vatican the Vatican, staying for several days, during...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Crickets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crickets Crickets Nature Bulletin No. 125 October 4, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CRICKETS The hero of Charles Dickens' story, "Cricket on the Hearth", was the straw-colored house or domestic cricket. Imported from England, we frequently find it in our homes and hear it chirping cheerily at night. Crickets avoid light. With their long powerful legs for leaping, they are hard to catch and can become a pest -- eating holes in carpets and clothing. Some folks think they bring good luck Some folks keep them as pets, in tiny cages, for their singing. The large black crickets found out-of-doors under stones or logs or boards, and the small brown crickets found in thick grass or under fallen leaves, are some of the many native species. So is the cave cricket, or camel cricket, that lives in caves. So are the mole crickets, with their board shovel-like forelegs, that live in burrows in the ground. So is the Snowy Tree Cricket, also called the Temperature Cricket because, if you count the number of chirps in 15 seconds and add about 38 or 39, the answer will be the temperature Fahrenheit -- "about" because some crickets chirp more rapidly at a given temperature than others do.

213

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

214

Plant Design for the Production of DUAGG  

SciTech Connect

The cost of producing DUAGG is an important consideration for any interested private firm in determining whether DUCRETE is economically viable as a material of construction in next-generation spent nuclear fuel casks. This study analyzed this project as if it was a stand-alone project. The capital cost includes engineering design, equipment costs and installation, start up, and management; the study is not intended to be a life-cycle cost analysis. The costs estimated by this study are shown in Table ES.1, and the conclusions of this study are listed in Table ES.2. The development of DUAGG and DUCRETE is a major thrust of the Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Project. An obvious use of depleted uranium is as a shielding material (e.g., DUCRETE). DUCRETE is made by replacing the conventional stone aggregate in concrete with DUAGG. One objective of this project is to bring the development of DUCRETE to a point at which a demonstrated basis exists for its commercial deployment. The estimation of the costs to manufacture DUAGG is an important part of this effort. Paul Lessing and William Quapp developed DUAGG and DUCRETE as part of an Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) program to find beneficial uses for depleted uranium (DU). Subsequently, this technology was licensed to Teton Technologies, Inc. The DUAGG process mixes DUO{sub 2} with sintering materials and additives to form pressed briquettes. These briquettes are sintered at 1300 C, and the very dense sintered briquettes are then crushed and classified into gap-graded size fractions. The graded DUAGG is then ready to be used to make high-strength heavy DUCRETE. The DUCRETE shielding will be placed into an annular steel cask-shell mold, which has internal steel reinforcing bars. The objectives of this study are to (1) use previous DUAGG process developments to design a plant that will produce DUAGG at a baseline rate, (2) determine the size of the equipment required to meet the DUAGG production scale, (3) estimate the facility's capital and operating costs, and (4) perform a parametric sensitivity analysis on those elements of cost that most affect the total operating expenses. Because the study does not include preoperational, decontamination, decommissioning, and closure costs, it cannot be considered a complete life-cycle cost analysis. However, the purpose of this analysis is to establish the potential viability of the DUAGG process as a private commercial venture to meet a market demand for advanced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage and transport casks.

Ferrada, J.J.

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Locations Locations Clean Cities coalitions are primarily located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. Select the dots on the map for information about individual coalitions. See also the list of coalitions by designation date. United States map showing Clean Cities Coalition locations. Philadelphia State of Delaware Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Connecticut Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State State of Vermont Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Detroit Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) Central New York (Syracuse) Capital District (Albany) Empire Clean Cities State of Maryland Washington DC Metropolitan South Shore Western Riverside County Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Atlanta Alabama Denver Philadelphia State of Delaware Las Vegas Washington DC Metropolitan Massachusetts Clean Cities Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Austin) Southeast Florida Chicago Land of Enchantment Wisconsin-Southeast Area Southern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Long Beach Antelope Valley Utah Clean Cities State of Maryland Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership Coalition Rogue Valley State of West Virginia San Joaquin Valley San Francisco Columbia-Willamette St. Louis Central New York (Syracuse) Dallas/Ft. Worth Honolulu Central Arkansas Pittsburgh Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Los Angeles Coachella Valley Region Northern Colorado Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) Virginia Clean Cities Coalition San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition Greater Long Island Maine Clean Communities Tulsa Valley of the Sun (Phoenix) Western Riverside County New Jersey Genesee Region (Rochester) Western Washington Clean Cities (Seattle) Ocean State Connecticut Connecticut2 Kansas City Regional Coalition Greater Indiana Clean Cities Coalition Capital District (Albany) Tucson Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Alamo Area (San Antonio) Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill) Twin Cities Clean Fuels Ohio Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition Greater Lansing Palmetto State Houston-Galveston Middle Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition State of Iowa Treasure Valley Central Coast Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership Land of Sky Coalition

216

Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, E.K. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). By increasing the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy, the neutron spectra were shifted into lower energies by the scattering interactions of fast neutrons with the alloy. It is possible, therefore, by changing the alloy thickness, to produce distinctly different dose weighted neutron spectra inside the exposure cave of the FNIS. The calculated neutron spectra showed close agreement with the results of activation foil measurements, unfolded by SAND-II close to the cell window. However, there was a considerable less agreement for locations far away from the cell window. Even though the magnitude of values such as neutron flux and tissue kerma rates in air differed, the weighted average neutron energies showed close agreement between the MCNP and SAND-II since the normalized neutron spectra were in a good agreement each other. A paired ion chamber system was constructed, one with a tissue equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring, and another with graphite and argon for photon dose monitoring. Using the pair of detectors, the neutron to gamma ratio can be inferred. With the 20 cm-thick FNIS, the absorbed dose rates of neutrons measured with the paired ion chamber method and calculated with the SAND-II results were 13.7 ?? 0.02 Gy/min and 15.5 Gy/min, respectively. The absorbed dose rate of photons and the gamma contribution to total dose were 6.7??10-1 ?? 1.3??10-1 Gy/min and 4.7%, respectively. However, the estimated gamma contribution to total dose varied between 3.6 % to 6.6 % as the assumed neutron sensitivity to the graphite detector was changed from 0.01 to 0.03.

Jang, Si Young

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Intraspecific relationships among the stygobitic shrimp Typhlatya mitchelli, by analyzing sequence data from mitochondrial DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intraspecific relationships among the anchialine cave shrimp Typhlatya mitchelli were examined by sequencing a total of 1505 bp from portions of three mitochondrial DNA genes. Cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase I, and 16S rRNA were partially sequenced and analyzed for specimens from six different cenotes (water-filled caves) across the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The conspecific Typhlatya pearsei that is sympatric with T. mitchelli was also sequenced and used as the outgroup. Comparisons among specimens of T. mitchelli yielded low sequence divergence values (0-1.7%), with the majority being less than 0.4%. Phylogenetic tree topologies reconstructed with neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony were in agreement in regards of the resolution of deep branches. Also, there was no obvious geographic differentiation among the majority of T. mitchelli samples, with the exception of specimens from Cenote San Antonio Chiich (Yokdzonot, Yucatan, Mexico) which all clustered into an extremely well supported monophyletic group. The level of differentiation of this group, together with the nearly total absence of differentiation among T. mitchelli from distant cave systems, suggests that this is an Evolutionary Significant Unit (ESU), which may correspond to a new species. This unidentified Typhlatya from Cenote San Antonio Chiich was helpful in establishing a period in which the epigean ancestor colonized the cenotes. Based on pairwise distance data and previously published shrimp molecular clocks (Baldwin et al., 1998), T. mitchelli and the putative new Typhlatya species last shared a common ancestor between 3-5 million years ago (mya), during the mid-Pliocene era, while T. mitchelli and T. pearsei was approximately 7-10 mya (middle to late Miocene). The ancestor to T. mitchelli and the unidentified Typhlatya species abandoned its shallow coastal water existence in the early Pliocene and eventually expanded its range across the peninsula. Approximately 4 mya, Cenote San Antonio Chiich became isolated from the remaining gene pool thereby halting gene flow. As the regional water table fluctuated in response to the rise and fall of Pleistocene sea levels, T. mitchelli actively colonized the peninsula. The discovery of a single, continuous subterranean freshwater system provides for a better understanding of anchialine biogeography within the Yucatan Peninsula.

Webb, Michael Scott

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A tale of two cacti: studies in Astrophytum asterias and Lophophora williamsii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astrophytum asterias (star cactus) and Lophophora williamsii (peyote) are sympatric species in the Tamaulipecan thornscrub of South Texas and adjacent Mexico. Peyote has been excavated from two archaeological sites: Shumla Caves, Texas, and CM-79 in Coahuila. We report new radiocarbon dates: a mean of 5195 �± 20 14C years BP for the Shumla Caves specimens, and 835 �± 35 14C years BP for the CM-79 specimen. The Shumla Caves specimens were not intact peyote tops, but manufactured effigies thereof. Published data on the geographic ranges of L. williamsii and A. asterias are of varying quality and accuracy. We report the results of extensive research to document extant U.S. populations by county, drawing specific conclusions about where each species currently occurs, where its occurrence is uncertain and where it is unlikely, based on herbarium specimens, verifiable reports in the primary literature and interviews with knowledgeable individuals. Dwindling of populations of peyote is partly due to improper harvesting, namely cutting off the top of the plant so deeply below ground level that the plant is unable to regenerate new stems, and consequently dies. We describe the anatomy of the cactus shoot (stem) and root, and suggest how this new knowledge can be utilized to determine "how deep is too deep" to cut if harvesting of peyote is to be done sustainably. We report the first population genetics study on endangered A. asterias, with five microsatellite markers in populations sampled at four locations in South Texas. A battery of tests and measurements indicated that in most populations heterozygosity was high, F-statistics were low, and Nm was >1. With one exception, these populations appear not to be undergoing excessive inbreeding, despite small population sizes. Data from two L. williamsii microsatellite loci are presented. L. williamsii, which reproduces autogamously, exhibits a single homozygous genotype within a given population. West Texas L. williamsii plants differ from South Texas plants in the identity of the single allele (or single genotype) at each locus. The ability of microsatellite markers to separate West Texas from South Texas plants suggests utility of microsatellites for infraspecific taxonomic studies in Lophophora.

Terry, Martin Kilman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Immersive Representation of Building Information Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) is an emerging technology that utilizes 3D graphical representations to improve communication, collaboration, and data exchange. Immersive Visualization Environment (IVE) is another promising technology that enhances the 3D graphical representation to achieve a higher level of a sense of presence. The connection between the BIM technology that utilizes the 3D graphical representation and the IVE technology that enhances the 3D graphical representation has led many professionals to visualize BIM in immersive environments. This study is an attempt to overcome a systematic issue presented by available immersive visualization systems. The problem is that in order to visualize an information-rich BIM model from a commercial BIM application in an immersive visualization environment, the BIM model needs to pass through a tough conversion process and loss a large amount of its information. This research study utilizes the Application Programming Interface (API) of a commercially available BIM application to develop an immersive visualization environment. This approach was applied on Autodesk Navisworks software by developing a software program that utilizes Navisworks' API to control Navisworks' camera angle and generate an immersive visualization environment. A prototype of the approach was built in the Department of Construction Science at Texas A & M University and named BIM CAVE Prototype. The overall goal of this research was to prove that it is possible to transform a commercial BIM application into an immersive visualization system. A phenomenological study was utilized by interviewing subject matter experts from the construction industry. The intent of this effort was to explore and develop a phenomenological understanding of how research participants perceived the BIM CAVE system. The results show that the BIM CAVE can be considered an immersive visualization environment because it contains a majority of the immersive visualization environment features. However, a variety of technical limitations must be overcome before it can be called a fully immersive and functional visualization environment. Moreover, even though this investigation was to some extent successful, this research approach needs to be tested on other commercially available BIM applications before generalizations are made.

Nseir, Hussam

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump Basics Heat Pump Basics Geothermal Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis Text Version Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the earth as an exchange medium for heat. Although many parts of the country experience seasonal temperature extremes-from scorching heat in the summer to sub-zero cold in the winter-the ground a few feet below the earth's surface remains at a relatively constant temperature. Depending on the latitude, ground temperatures range from 45°F (7°C) to 75°F (21°C). So, like a cave's, the ground's temperature is warmer than the air above it during winter and cooler than the air above it in summer. Geothermal heat pumps take advantage of this by exchanging heat with the earth through a ground heat exchanger. Geothermal heat pumps are able to heat, cool, and, if so equipped, supply

222

Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c~-?i-- c~-?i-- I ,3-l Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) .Complex and the Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana ,Fie!d Laboratory, Chatsworth, California ..:'..~::Yerlette Gatl in, MA-232 I am attaching for entry into the Public Document Room, one copy of the N -23 subject documentat ion. These documents are the backup data for the certification that the facilfties are radiologically acceptable for b- unrestricted use as noted in the certification statement published in the &aney Federal Register. Inasmuch as the certification for unrestricted use is 9/2(/85 being published in the Federal Register, it is prudent that the attached documentation also be available to the public. These documents should be retained In accordance with DOE Order 1324.2--disposal schedule 25.

223

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Paleontological Resources Preservation Act 43 CFR 8365.1-5: Public Property and Resources 43 CFR 3620: Petrified Wood 16 USC 4301: Federal Cave Resources Protection Act 43 CFR 1610.7-2: Areas of Critical Environmental Concern Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

224

Method for manufacturing a well production and sand screen assembly  

SciTech Connect

A method for forming and assembling a well production and sand screen assembly in a well having a screen therein forming an outer annulus and a wash pipe internally of the screen forming an inner annulus comprising further (A) mounting a high pressure fluid pump means and a valve means on each wash pipe, inner annulus, and outer annulus, and (B) connecting the valve means in fluid communication with the high pressure fluid pump means for controlling the ingress and egress of the high pressure fluids and removed formation material for forming a sand pack in the well and simultaneously for applying and maintaining a positive fluid pressure against the overburden during work in the well for preventing cave-ins and sloughing of the unconsolidated formation well walls until the sand pack is formed.

Widmyer, R.H.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Reindeer and Caribou  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reindeer and Caribou Reindeer and Caribou Nature Bulletin No. 400-A December 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation REINDEER AND CARIBOU Clement Clarke Moore's only known poem is so familiar to American children that its opening words, "'Twas the night before Christmas ", instantly call up visions of a team of reindeer. Of all the animals in the world Santa Claus could not have picked a better one for whisking his sleigh load of toys down from the Far North on Christmas Eve. With their broad hoofs, speed and endurance no other draft animal can travel so far or so fast in the snow. Youngsters of the Old Stone Age must have dreamed about reindeer, too, because we find wonderful pictures of them drawn on the walls of caves, -- 30,000 years ago.

226

openhole_logging.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPENHOLE LOGGING WELL OPENHOLE LOGGING WELL Objective R MOTC has drilled a mostly vertical well that is specifi cally designat- ed for openhole logging tests. It was drilled to 5,400 feet and has approximately 2,350 feet of open hole to test a variety of openhole logging tools. The wellbore is drilled with an 8-1/2" drill bit. The well was originally drilled with a 3% KCL Polymer mud system that seems to work well for stabilizing sensitive shale zones. The lower formations are very compact and should be able to stay open without signifi - cant caving. RMOTC has the capability to recondition this wellbore with a variety of mud types if needed. The openhole section will pass through a variety of ages, formations, and lithologies common to the Rocky Mountain geologic province. The rocks encoun-

227

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Readings Readings No-Regrets Remodeling Selected excerpts from the book DIY from Home Energy magazine Roofs: Snowy and icy indicators of wasted money. Benchmarking: Compare a home's energy usage to that of similar homes. Air Sealing: Frozen pipe dilemnas. Refrigeration: Eight year olds burn a lot of energy. Walls and Windows: Sealing up a home's leaks. Energy Myths: Special web preview from Home Energy magazine Sept./Oct. 2001. Optimizing Your Ceiling Fan: Be more comfortable and save energy. Better Breathing: How to avoid mold, mildew, and that cave-like feeling. Beware the Closed Bedroom Door: It seems like such a simple act, but carbon monixde poisoning, smoke, and mold may follow. Sucking in Health Hazards: Does a house smell like a sewer? Energy Efficient Lighting: Can homes save money with compact

228

Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Wideband Radio-Wave Communications and ..... Speaker(s): Farid Dowla Date: June 1, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette (Complete seminar title is: Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Wideband Radio-Wave Communications and Radar Imaging, Radio-Frequency (RF) Tags and Tera-Hertz (THz) Standoff Detection Spectroscopy) In many remote sensing problems there is a critical need to detect and image objects through barriers, such as buildings, with high reliability and resolution and at long ranges. A related problem is the wireless communication and geolocation of transceivers in harsh RF environments, such as in urban areas and underground caves, where

229

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

230

Category:Federal Environmental Statutes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statutes Statutes Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Federal Environmental Statute You need to have JavaScript enabled to view the interactive timeline. Further results for this query.DECADEPaleontological Resources Preservation Act2007-01-010Year: 2007 Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 20032003-01-010Year: 2003 Oil Pollution Act1990-01-010Year: 1990 Native American Graves Protection Act1990-01-010Year: 1990 Federal Cave Resources Protection Act1988-01-010Year: 1988 Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program1986-01-010Year: 1986 Coastal Barrier Resources Act1982-01-010Year: 1982 Farmland Protection Policy Act1981-01-010Year: 1981 CERCLA1980-01-010Year: 1980 Archaeological Resources Protection Act1979-01-010Year: 1979 Archaeological Resource Protection Act1979-01-010Year: 1979

231

Useful Information for LR Users | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Information for LR Users Useful Information for LR Users Procedures Procedure for Alarms and Response at the Liquids Reflectometer, SNS-OPM 5.U-4B.1 (Y), August 2007 Sample Handling at the Liquids Reflectometer, SNS-OPM 7.U-4B.8.1, May 2007 Handling of Liquid/Solid Sample Cells at the Liquids Reflectometer, SNS-OPM 7.U-4B.8.2, April 2007 Operation of the Liquids Reflectometer User IPPS Panel, SNS-OPM 3.A-1.5.4B.2 (Y), August 2007 Sample Preparation Laboratory at the Liquids Reflectometer Training Document, June 2007 IPPS Demos (avi video) High Radiation Alarm (6 MB) Oxygen Deficiency Hazard Alarm-Inside Cave (2 MB) Oxygen Deficiency Hazard Alarm (5 MB) Radiation Alarm (7 MB) Oxygen Deficiency Hazard Detection System Failure Alarm (4 MB) Radiation Detection System Failure Alarm (3 MB)

232

Lightning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lightning Lightning Nature Bulletin No. 458-A May 20, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LIGHTNING Because we are so rapt up with our modern inventions, we forget that primitive man, ages before the beginnings of civilization, made one of the greatest discoveries of all time -- the use of fire. However, for thousands of years before he learned to kindle his own fires by friction or by striking sparks from flint, he snatched flaming firebrands from forest fires started by lightning. These he carried away and carefully fed with dry wood, year in and year out, to warm his cave, frighten away wild beasts and cook his food. Around the world, in every year, countless thousands of fires are started by lightning.

233

CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Categorical Exclusion Determination 45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves (HLC), A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs.

234

Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 22, 2010 October 22, 2010 Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs At Idaho National Laboratory, engineers are walking into the core of nuclear reactors and rappelling down cliffs, all without ever leaving the office. October 21, 2010 CX-004299: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Cutting Cheyenne Field Office Maintenance Area CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/21/2010 Location(s): Larimer, Colorado Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region October 20, 2010 CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/20/2010 Location(s): Boulder, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 5, 2010 Fostering a New Generation of Geothermal Workers

235

D::&'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D::&' D::&' 325,B CA . q -3 United States Government gjjq Department of Energy JUL 2 3 I!% NE-24 Federal Register Notice Regarding Certification for Unrestricted Use of the Sodium Reactor Experiment Complex (SRE) and Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Chatsworth, California William R. Voigt, Jr. Acting Director Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action I am attaching for your signature the Federal Register Notice of Unrestricted Use and the original DOE-AD-9 (1325.10) for the subject facilities (SRE and Bldg. 003). The SRE Facility at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in Ventura County, California, was built between 1955 and 1957. The 20-MWt sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal reactor was operated from April 1957 through

236

Energy San Francisco Operations Office  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Depariment of ' Depariment of ' Energy San Francisco Operations Office 1333 Broadway Oakland, California 94612 FEB 6 1984 Mr. c:c. canners Energy Systems Group Rockwell International Corporation Post Office BOX 309 Canoga Park Dear 8 a CA 91304 G ers : Remedial action was taken to decontaminate the Hot Cave (Building 003) and Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) under Contract No. DE-AT03-76SF75008. The report of the post remedial survey, performed by Argonne National Laboratory, indicates that the levels of contamination are below the decontamination criteria agreed to between the State of California and DOE/SAN. Based on- this report and the enclosed letter from J. E. Baublitz to Dr. Wynveen, DOE/SAN is releasing for unrestricted use Building 003 and the SRE. Sincerely,

237

The Particle Adventure | How do we detect what's happening? | Wavelength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wavelength and resolution explained Wavelength and resolution explained Wavelength and resolution explained Things with long wavelengths are analogous to the basketball in the cave story because neither can provide too much detail about what they hit. Things with short wavelengths are like the marbles in that they can provide you with fairly detailed information about what they hit. The shorter the probe's wavelength is, the more information you can get about the target. A good example of the wavelength vs. resolution issue is a swimming pool. If you have a swimming pool with waves which are 1 meter apart (a 1 meter wavelength) and push a stick into the water, the pool's waves just pass around the stick because the 1 meter wavelength means that the pool's waves won't be affected by such a tiny target.

238

Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho  

SciTech Connect

At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Numerical simulation and immersive visualization of hairpin vortices.  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the vortex dynamics of coherent structures in turbulent and transitional boundary layers, we consider direct numerical simulation of the interaction between a flat-plate-boundary-layer flow and an isolated hemispherical roughness element. Of principal interest is the evolution of hairpin vortices that form an interlacing pattern in the wake of the hemisphere, lift away from the wall, and are stretched by the shearing action of the boundary layer. Using animations of unsteady three-dimensional representations of this flow, produced by the vtk toolkit and enhanced to operate in a CAVE virtual environment, we identify and study several key features in the evolution of this complex vortex topology not previously observed in other visualization formats.

Tufo, H.M.; Fischer, P.F.; Papka, M.E.; Blom, K.

1999-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hairpin vortex formation, a case study for unsteady visualization.  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the vortex dynamics of coherent structures in turbulent and transitional boundary layers, we consider direct numerical simulation of the interaction between a flat-plateboundary-layer flow and an isolated hemispherical roughness element. Of principal interest is the evolution of hairpin vortices that form an interlacing pattern in the wake of the hemisphere, lift away from the wall, and are stretched by the shearing action of the boundary layer. Using animations of unsteady three-dimensional representations of this flow, produced by the vtk toolkit and enhanced to operate in a CAVE virtual environment, we identify and study several key features in the evolution of this complex vortex topology not previously observed in other visualization formats.

Fischer, P. F.; Papka, M. E.; Szymanski, M.; Tufo, H. M.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system, thus substantially reducing the number of cables required to power the sensors. The high gradient capacity of the 1.3 GHz cavities required a revision of the radiation shielding and interlocks. The cave was updated as per the recommendations of the radiation safety committee. The high pressure rinse system was updated with new adapters to assist the rinsing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities. Finally, a proposal for cold testing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities at A0 north cave was made to the small experiments approval committee, radiation safety committee and the Tevatron cryogenic safety sub-committee for an operational readiness clearance and the same was approved. The project was classified under research and development of single cell cavities (project 18) and was allocated a budget of $200,000 in FY 2007.

Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

243

CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This

244

Cultural Preservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultural Preservation Cultural Preservation Cultural Preservation The Laboratory strives to balance its continued growth with proactive and effective management of cultural resources. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos is rich with native antiquities Ceramic pottery sherds found at Tsirege Pueblo at TA-54. The pueblo, which dates to the Classic period of the Ancestral Pueblo cultural period, AD 1325-1600, consisted of hundreds of rooms. The Tsirege site also contains petroglyphs (ancient rock art) and cavates (small caves dug out of canyon walls, suitable for living). Contact Environmental Communications & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL cultural resource specialists evaluate impacts to cultural resources, assess ecological risk, and prepare environmental assessments and

245

Static Temperature Survey At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

246

Centipedes and Millipedes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centipedes and Millipedes Centipedes and Millipedes Nature Bulletin No. 244-A November 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CENTIPEDES AND MILLIPEDES Our dislike for things that crawl in dark damp places seems to have come down to us from the dim past; perhaps from the days when our ancestors shared caves with them. Many of us shudder when we come across one of these creatures in damp basements, in gardens, under rocks and rotting logs, or among leaves and trash. Among these dwellers in darkness, besides worms and slugs with no legs, insects with six legs, spiders and daddy-long-legs with eight, and pill bugs with fourteen, there are two sorts with a multitude of legs. These are the Centipedes and the Millipedes. They are not worms but are long slim animals with many legs and segmented bodies enclosed in jointed shells.

247

Rough and Ready Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Ready Biomass Facility and Ready Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rough and Ready Biomass Facility Facility Rough and Ready Sector Biomass Owner Rough and Ready Lumber Co. Location Cave Junction, Oregon Coordinates 42.1628912°, -123.6481235° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1628912,"lon":-123.6481235,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Preliminary study of the uranium favorability of the Jornada Del Muerto Basin and adjacent areas, South Central New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Data indicate that possible uranium host rocks include the Precambrian rocks, the Ordovician Bat Cave Formation and Cable Canyon Sandstone, the Permian Abo Formation, Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone, and the Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary McRae Formation. The Cenozoic sequence contains possible host beds; little is known, however, about its stratigraphy. Secondary uranium mineralization is found associated with faults in the Jornada area. All fault zones there are possible sites for uranium deposition. Possible sources for uranium in the Jornada del Muerto area include uraniferous Precambrian rocks, tuffaceous beds in the McRae Formation, and the Tertiary Datil and Thurman Formations. Hydrothermal solutions may have deposited the veinlike fluorite deposits, of which the purple varieties were found to be radioactive during this study.

Templain, C.J.; Dotterrer, F.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing. 3 figs.

Colgate, S.A.

1983-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development of In Vitro Systems for Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) - Final Report for 1992 to 2002  

SciTech Connect

Our project began on July 1, 1992, with the objective of developing systems that could be used in biotechnological approaches to switchgrass improvement. Within six months after initiation of the project, we had worked out protocols in which plants could be regenerated from callus cultures through both organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. Documentation for both modes of regeneration was provided in our progress reports and in publications. One thousand regenerated plants were established in the field during the first year. We found that Alamo (lowland type) was much more amenable to in vitro culture, and plants could be regenerated much more easily than from Cave-in-Rock (upland type). During the first three years of the project, we studied the influence of genotype, culture medium components, explant type, etc., on regeneration. As mentioned, we found that the lowland cultivars Alamo and Kanlow were much easier to regenerate than upland cultivars, such as Trailblazer, Blackwell, and Cave-in-Rock. For callus induction, we initially used mature caryopses, young leaf tissue, and portions of seedlings. We were successful in inducing callus and regenerating plants from all explants. Two other systems developed during the 4th to 6th year period of the project included multiple shoot formation initiated from germinated seedlings and regenerable suspension cultures. The latter were initiated from embryogenic calluses produced from in vitro developed inflorescences. An important factor for producing multiple shoots was the presence of thidiazuron in the medium. The shoots could be easily rooted and numerous plantlets produced. The last 3 to 4 years of the project focused on anther and microspore culture experiments to produce haploid plants and on genetic transformation. Although thousands of putative haploid plants were produced from a few anthers, they were very weak and difficult to keep alive. Chromosome counts revealed the gametic number in cells where it was possible to count chromosomes. The isolated microspore culture experiments were not successful.

Conger, B.V.

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

251

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

RECONNAISSANCE FOR URANIFEROUS LIGNITES IN NORTH DAKOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, MONTANA, AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

Detailed studies were made at Bullion and Sentinel Buttes, in Slope, Billings, and Golden Valley Counties, N. Dak. Investigations of these areas were followed by a general reconnaissance for uraniferous lignites in North Dakota, eastern Montana, north-central Wyoming, and northwestern South Dakota. Deposits of uraniferous lignites were discovered at Blue Buttes, eastern Montana; and at North Cave Hills, South Cave Hills, and at Slim Buttes in northwestern South Dakota. The only lignites that contain appreciable amounts of uranium are in the upper part of the Sentinel Butte shale member of the Fort Union formation in southwestern North Dakota and eastern Montana, and in the Ludlow formation in northwestern South Dakota. The uranium content of the individual lignite beds ranges from 0.002 to 0.033% uranium and after ignition the uranium content of the ash ranges from 0.010 to 0.091% uranium. Natural ash contains as much as 0.025% uranium; natural clinker or scoria and carbonuceous clay are lower grade than the lignites; and some spring waters contain as much as 0.09 ppm of uranium. The inferred reserves of uranlferous lignites in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana are estimated to be 163,320,000 short tons that contain a weighted average of 0.009% uranium. The potential energy and amount of material available for liquid fuel conversion in this quantity of lignite is very large. The inferred reserve of ash which would result from the burning of these uraniferous lignites is detail amount of uranium (metal) in the known uraniferous lignite in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana is estimated to be about 12,600 short tons. The prospect or finding additional radioactive lignite beds is believed to be good. (auth)

Beroni, E.P.; Bauer, H.L. Jr.

1952-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The use of explosives by the US Antarctic Program. Environmental report  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to assist principal investigators and others in complying with NEPA and the protocol on environmental protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Research activities and associated support operations in Antarctica sometimes require use of explosives. This report evaluates potential environmental impacts associated with such activities and possible methods for mitigating those impacts. The greatest single use of explosives, and the only type of blasting that will occur on the Polar Plateau (an exception is the rare use of explosives to cave in dangerous ice for safety reasons), is for seismic surveys. The charges for these are small-scale, are placed in or on the snow or ice, are distributed linearly over long distances, and present no potential impacts to soil or geological substrata. Impacts from those would be less than minor or transitory. Wherever possible, blasting holes in sea ice will be replaced by drilling by auger or melting. Other uses of explosives, such as in geologic research and construction, are discussed.

Ensminger, J.T.; Blasing, T.J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fluid mixing during deposition of bedded-replacement (BR) deposits in the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois-Kentucky(IK) district is unusual by comparison to other Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) districts in the central US in that it contains fluorspar mineralization primarily, with subordinate quantities of base metals. This mineralization occurs as vein, BR, and breccia-hosted deposits. A clearly discernible paragenetic sequence of color banded fluorite sulfides, carbonates, and sulfates is present in BR deposits in three sub-districts: Cave-in-Rock, Harris Creek, and Carrsville. Homogenization temperatures (T[sub b]) and salinities of fluids in fluorite show that BR deposits formed from at least three fluids, a lower temperature-higher salinity connate fluid (F1) and a higher temperature-lower salinity connate fluid (F2) that mixed at the site of deposition. These fluids were followed by a lower temperature-lower salinity meteoric dominated fluid (F3). The involvement of two distinct regional fluids: a lower temperature, more-saline fluid, and a warmer, less-saline fluid, during mineralization of MVT deposits has previously been recognized for Pb-Zn deposits in southeast Missouri (Shelton et al., 1992), and east Tennessee (Zimmerman and Kesler, 1981; Taylor et al. 1983).

Spry, P.G.; Fuhrmann, G.D. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Geological Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Defect scriber  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure describes a device for repeatably scribing a V-shaped scratch having sharply defined dimensions on the interior surface of a nuclear reactor fuel rod tube. A cutting tool having a V-shaped cutting tip is supported within the fuel rod tube so that the V-shaped cutting tip can be pivoted about an axis and scribe a scratch on the interior surface of the fuel rod tube. Lengthwise the scratch runs parallel to a line drawn through the axis of the fuel rod tube and is in the shape of an arc, and widthwise the scratch is V-shaped. This shape is used because the dimensions of the scratch can be plugged into appropriate formulas to calculate stress intensity of cracks in fuel rod tubes. Since the fuel rod tubes which are to be scribed may be radioactive, the scratching assembly is designed for use in a fixture which allows it to be operated in a cave by remote control handling devices.

Russell, Harold C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Beaver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Beaver Nature Bulletin No. 246-A November 26, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEAVER The beaver was the first hydraulic engineer. Back in the days when our ancestors were still living in caves, the beaver had been building elaborate dams across streams, digging canals, and sleeping safely in artificial-island homes for thousands of years. This had a profound effect on streams and stream valleys in Europe, Siberia and most of North America, literally changing the face of the earth. Their dams held back flood waters in wet seasons, maintained the flow of streams in times of drought, and built up ground water supplies. The ponds above these dams, which were occasionally more than 1000 feet long, allowed sediment to settle out of the water and form broad meadows which eventually were occupied by tracts of timber and, now, some of our finest farmland. Waterfowl, fish, and a host of other living things thrived here because of the beaver.

257

Mercom | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercom Mercom Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mercom Capital Group, llc Name Mercom Capital Group, llc Address 4611 Bee Caves Road, Suite 303 Austin, Texas 78746 Place Austin, Texas Zip 78746 Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "Global Communic ... and Smart Grid." is too long. Phone number 1.512.215.4452 Website http://mercomcapital.com/index Coordinates 30.305809°, -97.8177601° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.305809,"lon":-97.8177601,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Bats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bats Bats Nature Bulletin No. 147 March 20, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt of Conservation BATS Flying squirrels only glide. Bats are the only fur bearing animals that truly fly, and they've been doing it for at least 50 million years Twisting, looping and zig-zagging through the air, at dusk and dawn, they catch flying insects more skillfully than the swallow or the chimney swift. Each twist and turn means another insect caught, A bat can consume one-half its weight in insects in a single twilight. Harmful? No, We have one in Trailside Museum that likes to be handled and fed mealworms. They do not get in women's hair. They do not distribute our kind of bed bugs. They are not blind; even in daytime they see fairly well. But they can fly through timber or the narrow twisting passages of caves in total darkness because they have radar, Bats have large specialized ears, Their squeak is pitched so high that few people can hear it, As they fly they also make a supersonic squeak about 30 times per second and are guided by the echoes bouncing back from obstacles.

259

The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

Korosec, Michael A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

1983 temperature gradient and heat flow drilling project for the State of Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the Summer of 1983, a three-hole drilling program was carried out to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The general locations of the project areas are shown. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens - Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

Korosec, M.A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method of underground mining by pillar extraction  

SciTech Connect

A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method applied to the Study of Rock Fracturing Behavior in 3D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its introduction the combined finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM), has become an excellent tool to address a wide range of problems involving fracturing and fragmentation of solids. Within the context of rock mechanics, the FEM/DEM method has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques, rock blasting, seismic waves, packing problems, rock crushing problems, etc. In the real world most of the problems involving fracture and fragmentation of solids are three dimensional problems. With the aim of addressing these problems an improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM capability has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These capabilities include state of the art 3D contact detection, contact interaction, constitutive material models, and fracture models. In this paper, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) Brazilian experiments are simulated using this improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM approach which is implemented in LANL's MUNROU (Munjiza-Rougier) code. The results presented in this work show excellent agreement with both the SHPB experiments and previous 2D numerical simulations performed by other FEM/DEM research groups.

Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broom, Scott T. [Geomechanics Sandia National Laboratories; Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Munjiza, Ante [School of Engineering and Material Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London; Sussman, Aviva J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Robert P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Core hole drilling and the ''rain current'' phenomenon at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Two core holes have been completed on the flanks of Newberry Volcano, Oregon. Core hole Geo N-1 has a heat flow of 180 mW m/sup -2/, reflecting subsurface temperatures, sufficient for commerical exploitation of geothermally generated electricity. GEO N-3, which has a heat flow of 86 mW m/sup -2/, is less encouraging. We emphasize the ''rain curtain'' effect with the hope that a detailed discussion of this phenomenon at two distinct localities will lead to a better understanding of the physical processes in operation. Cole hole GEO N-1 was cored to a depth of 1387 m at a site located 9.3 km south of the center of the volcano. Core hole GEO N-3 was cored to a depth of 1220 m at a site located 12.6 km north of the center of the volcano. Both core holes penetrated interbedded pyroclastic lava flows and lithic tuffs ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite, basaltic andesite being the most common rock type. Potassium-argon age dates range up to 2 Ma. Caving and sloughing were encountered in both core holes at depths near the regional water table. Both core holes penetrate three distinct thermal regimes. The uppermost regime is isothemal at mean air temperature down to about 900-1000 m (the rain curtain).

Swanberg, C.A.; Walkey, W.C.; Combs, J.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Standard guide for general design considerations for hot cell equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 The intent of this guide is to provide general design and operating considerations for the safe and dependable operation of remotely operated hot cell equipment. Hot cell equipment is hardware used to handle, process, or analyze nuclear or radioactive material in a shielded room. The equipment is placed behind radiation shield walls and cannot be directly accessed by the operators or by maintenance personnel because of the radiation exposure hazards. Therefore, the equipment is operated remotely, either with or without the aid of viewing. 1.1.2 This guide may apply to equipment in other radioactive remotely operated facilities such as suited entry repair areas, canyons or caves, but does not apply to equipment used in commercial power reactors. 1.1.3 This guide does not apply to equipment used in gloveboxes. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This guide is intended for persons who are tasked with the planning, design, procurement, fabrication, installation, or testing of equipment used in rem...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

Brenda R. Pace

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Communication in hazardous environments  

SciTech Connect

Radios were investigated for use in hazardous environments where protective breathing equipment such as plastic suits and respirators interfere with communication. A radio system, manufactured by Communications-Applied technology (C-AT), was identified that was designed specifically for hazardous environment communications. This equipment had been used successfully by the US Army and NASA for several years. C-AT equipment was evaluated in plantwide applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) using temporary frequencies obtained by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR). Radios performed well in all applications, which included a tritium facility, high-level caves, a nuclear reactor building, tank farm, and a canyon building interior. Permanent frequencies were obtained by DOE-SR for two complete six-man C-AT systems at SRP. Because of the relatively short range of these systems, replicates will cover all applications of this type of equipment plantwide. Twelve radio systems are currently being used successfully in plantwide applications.

Rankin, W N; Herold, T R

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Difficult OptEase Filter Retrievals After Prolonged Indwelling Times  

SciTech Connect

PurposeThe OptEase vena cave filter (Cordis, Piscataway, NJ) is commercially available as a retrievable or permanent filter with short recommended indwelling time, presumably due to extensive contact of the filter side struts with the inferior vena cava wall and subsequent neointimal hyperplasia leading to incorporation. Our purpose was to evaluate OptEase filter retrievals with a long indwelling time period that required unconventional retrieval techniques.Materials and MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent OptEase filter retrieval with long undwelling times requiring additional maneuvers for retrieval. Techniques used included rigid endobronchial forceps dissection and wire-through-loop snare. Each patient underwent postretrieval venogram to evaluate for possible complications. In addition, patients had clinical follow-up 2 weeks after the retrieval procedure.ResultsThere were three patients (2 women, 1 man; average age 64 years) who underwent OptEase filter retrieval. The mean indwelling time was 6.4 months. The indwelling filters were successfully retrieved. There were no complications. Postprocedural follow-up showed no clinical pathology.ConclusionUnconventional techniques aided in the retrieval of OptEase filters with long indwelling times.

Van Ha, Thuong G., E-mail: tgvanha@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu; Kang, Lisa; Lorenz, Jonathan; Zangan, Steven; Navuluri, Rakesh; Straus, Christopher; Funaki, Brian [University of Chicago, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Survey of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation 1995 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses surveys of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. These surveys are important to help avoid or minimize potential impacts of projects on the ORR to species listed as threatened, endangered, or in need of management by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Currently, there are 69 species of federally or state-listed terrestrial vertebrates that may occur in Tennessee. Not all of these are expected to occur on the ORR, nor do resources permit comprehensive sampling for all of them over the entire ORR. To effectively organize sampling efforts, listed animal species that might be present were targeted using a prioritization system based on historical and recent sightings, species distributions, literature reviews, and personal communications. Sampling was conducted during the time of the year when each targeted species would most likely be encountered. Several trapping and surveying methods were used, including pitfall traps, Sherman traps, seining, artificial covers, and cave and avian surveys.

Vail, E.R.; Mitchell, J.M.; Webb, J.W.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Independent Analysis of Seismicity and Rock fall Scenarios for the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is located in the somewhat seismically active Basin and Range province. Future seismic activity is identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US National Academy of Sciences as a key scenario for safety assessment of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of its on-going program of conducting independent analyses of scientific and technical issues that could be important to the licensing of the Yucca Mountain repository, EPRI has conducted an analysis of the combined scenarios of seismic activity and stability of emplacement drifts with respect to the long-term repository safety. In this paper we present the results of 3D finite element simulations of both static and dynamic loading of a degraded waste package. For the static case, the expected maximum static load is determined by utilizing relationships between cave height and the bulking factor. A static load representing 30 meters of broken rock was simulated using the finite element model. For the dynamic case, block size and velocity data from the most recent Drift Degradation AMR are used. Based on this, a rock block with a volume of 3.11 m{sup 3} and with an impact velocity of 4.81 m/s was simulated using the finite element model. In both cases, the results indicate that the waste package remains intact. (authors)

Apted, M.J. [Monitor Scientific, 3900 S. Wadsworth Blvd., Denver, CO 80235 (United States); Kemeny, J.M. [University of Arizona, Dept. Mining and Geological Engineering, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Martin, C.D. [University of Alberta, Dept. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2 (Canada); James, R.J. [Anatech Corp., 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Questions on NEA program for OMB budget presentation  

SciTech Connect

The questions asked and answered include: Why was the program renamed from PNE (Peaceful Nuclear Explosives) to NEA? Why are storage cavities needed? Why can`t existing caves and mines be used? Isn`t a mined cavity safer for radioactive disposal? Why can`t one tolerate asymmetry between the US and USSR PNE capability? Why do we need PNE execution capability to support verification capability? Why shouldn`t the money go directly to verification? What is the priority of PNE research compared to other energy technology research? What is the US obligation under Article V of the NPT if it is determined that PNE`s are not worthwhile? What new information is available which shows that PNE`s will be politically acceptable? How much has been spent to develop PNE`s to date? What viable technology has resulted? The remainder of the paper discusses research programs being carried out on nuclear explosion technology and one technology that has resulted from the PNE program, namely, stimulation of oil and gas extraction.

Hodges, A.J.

1975-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bahamian ship graffiti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bahamian archipelago covers over 5,000 square miles of the Atlantic Ocean at the northwestern edge of the Caribbean Sea. In the Age of Sail, from the late 15th to early 20th centuries, these islands were on major sailing routes between the Caribbean, Central America, and Europe. Bahamians developed life-ways using their islands? location to their advantage. Archaeological evidence of the significance of shipping activity is quite lacking. This research aimed to help fill the void by documenting examples of ship graffiti throughout the Bahamas. Examples of ship graffiti were documented with photographs and tracings. The Bahamian examples all date to the 19th and 20th centuries, 100 years later than other examples from the Caribbean and North America. They are also unique in being incised into the stone surfaces of building walls, caves, stones on a hillside, even on a slate fragment. It is possible that ship graffiti were also engraved on wooden surfaces but these have not survived in the archaeological record. Images depict locally-built vessels such as sloops and schooners as well as larger, ocean-going vessels. Ship graffiti are at sites associated mainly with people of African heritage, another possible social grouping being persons of lower economic status. Graffiti details consistently indicate that the artists were familiar with ship construction and rigging. This analysis of ship graffiti gives some understanding of the significance of ships and shipping in the Bahamian economy.

Turner, Grace Sandrena Rosita

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geothermal Information Dissemination and Outreach  

SciTech Connect

Project Purpose To enhance technological and topical information transfer in support of industry and government efforts to increase geothermal energy use in the United States (power production, direct use, and geothermal groundsource heat pumps). Project Work GRC 2003 Annual Meeting. The GRC convened the meeting on Oct. 12-15, 2003, at Morelia's Centro de Convenciones y ExpoCentro in Mexico under the theme, International Collaboration for Geothermal Energy in the Americas. The event was also sponsored by the Comision Federal de Electricidad. ~600 participants from more than 20 countries attended the event. The GRC convened a Development of Geothermal Projects Workshop and Geothermal Exploration Techniques Workshop. GRC Field Trips included Los Azufres and Paricutin Volcano on Oct. 11. The Geothermal Energy Association (Washington, DC) staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Annual Meeting Opening Session was convened on Oct. 13, and included the governor of Michoacan, the Mexico Assistant Secretary of Energy, CFE Geothermal Division Director, DOE Geothermal Program Manager, and private sector representatives. The 2003 Annual Meeting attracted 160 papers for oral and poster presentations. GRC 2004. Under the theme, Geothermal - The Reliable Renewable, the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting convened on Aug. 29-Sept. 1, 2004, at the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort at Indian Wells, CA. Estimated total attendance (including Trade Show personnel, guests and accompanying persons) was ~700. The event included a workshop, Geothermal Production Well Pump Installation, Operation and Maintenance. Field trips went to Coso/Mammoth and Imperial Valley/Salton Sea geothermal fields. The event Opening Session featured speakers from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the private sector. The Geothermal Energy Association staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Geothermal Education Office staged its Geothermal Energy Workshop. Several local radio and TV station interviews were conducted during the event. Technical Program included 136 technical papers. All were published in Volume 28 of the GRC Transactions. Volume 28, GRC Transactions Pblished as a high-quality, durable casebound volume, Volume 28 of the Transactions published 119 out of 136 technical papers (692 pp) presented at the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting. The papers were submitted by geothermal experts and professionals from around the world. The papers were reviewed over a 2-day period by 25 volunteer (in-kind) geothermal experts from the private sector and DOE National Laboratories. GRC staff received and cataloged the papers, and maintained interaction with authors for revisions and corrections. DOE Geothermal Technologies Newsletter The Office of Geothermal Technologies quarterly newsletter, Geothermal Technologies, is produced at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This 2-color, 4- to 16-page newsletter summarizes federal geothermal research and development projects and other DOE geothermal news. The GRC receives newsletter disk copy and color-key proof from NREL for each newsletter, then follows through with print production and distribution. Circulation is 1,000 per issue (plus 300 copies of the newsletter shipped to NREL for internal and public distribution). During the project period, the GRC printed, stitched and bound the Geothermal Technologies newsletter into the Sept/Oct 2003, Jan/Feb 2004, and May/June 2004 editions of the GRC Bulletin. Multiple copies (300) of the newsletter sans magazine were provided to NREL for internal DOE distribution. GRC Geothermal Research Library The GRC has built the largest and most comprehensive library in the world devoted to geothermal energy. The GRC Geothermal Library provides rapid accessibility to the majority of technical literature crafted over the past 30 years, and preserves hard copy and on-line databases for future use by geothermal researchers and developers. A bibliography for over half of the physical library's citations is available through keyword search on the GRC web site (www.geothe

Ted J. Clutter, Geothermal Resources Council Executive Director

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

274

Heavy Ions - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ions Heavy Ions Heavy ions used at the BASE Facility are accelerated in the form of "cocktails," named because of the fact that several heavy ions with the same mass-to-charge ratio are sent into the Cyclotron, which accelerates the ions while acting as a precision mass separator. The Control Room Operator then uses Cyclotron frequency to select only the desired ion, a process that takes about 2 minutes. We provide four standard cocktails: 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV/nucleon. Depending on the cocktail, LETs from 1 to 100 MeV/(mg/cm^2) and flux levels of up to 1E7 ions/cm2-sec are available. Parts are tested in our vacuum chamber, and can be remotely positioned horizontally, vertically, or rotationally (y and z axes) with the motion table. An alignment laser is available to ensure the part is in the center of the beam. Mounting hardware is readily available. 12xBNC (F-F), 2x25-pin D (F-M or M-F), 4x40-pin flat ribbon (M-M), 4x50-pin flat ribbon (M-M), 12xSMA (F-F), and 2xEthernet vacuum feedthroughs are mounted upon request. (The 4x40-pin and 4x50-pin flat ribbon connectors are wired straight across, so you will need a F-F adapter to correct the pin numbers to normal.) Holes are provided through the cave shielding blocks for connecting additional test equipment, with a distance of approximately 10 feet from vacuum feedthrough to the top of the shielding block.

275

Selection and improvement of herbaceous energy crops for the southeastern USA  

SciTech Connect

The general aim of this research program was to screen herbaceous species and evaluate management practices for biomass production on marginal soils in Alabama and the southeastern USA. The program started with a 5 year evaluation of selected warm-cool season species rotations. Rainfall during the 5-year program was mostly below the long-term average, except in 1989 when it was above normal. Due to low rainfall yields of perennial species took longer than expected to reach full production potential, increasing each year throughout the 5-year program. Cave-in-Rock'' switchgrass, sericea lespedeza and johnsongrass provided the highest yields from the warm season perennial species. The most significant trend in biomass composition was the notably high lignin and nitrogen content of sericea lespedeza when compared to the perennial grass species. During the course of the program additional experiments were initiated which new species and additional varieties of switchgrass. Napiergrass and energy cane provided yields from 24 to 32 Mg biomass ha{sup {minus}1} in the second and third year after establishment, but sustainability of these yields are uncertain because no severely cold weather was experienced during the experimental period. In the second year after establishment Alamo'' switchgrass yielded 17.5 Mg biomass ha{sup {minus}1}. This progress represented a major improvement on yields and production costs when compared to the original experiments. If yields of this level can be sustained and possibly improved a little more it is likely that the production basis for an economically viable herbaceous biomass-to-biofuel industry will be achieved in another 5 years. Future work should concentrate on optimizing management factors such as row spacing and harvesting regime, and on improving yield by plant breeding and selection. 5 refs., 3 figs., 29 tabs.

Bransby, D.I.; Sladden, S.E.; Kee, D.E. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA). Dept. of Agronomy and Soils)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Coontail fluorite rhythmites of southern Illinois: evidence for episodic basin dewatering  

SciTech Connect

Stratiform coontail ore of the Cave-in-Rock fluorite district, southern Illinois, display conspicuous, rhythmic banded textures similar to those reported in many MVT deposits throughout the world (e.g., east Tennessee, USA; Silesian-Cracow Region, Poland; and northern Baffin Island, Canada). Banding is expressed by the rhythmic alteration of two types of layers: detrital layers of fluorite mottled with particulate gangue dolomite and quartz, and layers of clear, crystalline fluorspar. Both are now composed principally of fluorite but differ in color, fabric and outline. In the past, this rhythmic banding has generally been attributed to fine-scale replacement of a primary host rock stratification or to cyclic replacement of host carbonates by a fluid of oscillating chemistry. Detailed megascopic and microscopic studies of these ores and their carbonate host real that ore bands were not derived by fine-scale in situ limestone replacement. Detrital bands contain hydraulically transported, sorted and graded, allochthonous debris derived by dissolution and disaggregation of host limestone and overlying shale. The banded fabric thus represents a cyclic interplay of chemical and hydraulic processes active during hydrothermal ore mineralization. Coontail ore bodies evidently formed in a hydrothermal spelean system, whose laterally sinuous trace reflects localization of hydrothermal activity where feeder faults intersected relatively impermeable roof-rock shales. The banded nature of these ores testifies to the ability of Mississippi Valley-type hydrothermal solutions to both create and fill their own open spaces. Moreover, the rhythmic nature of coontail ores suggests a prolonged and pulsating mineralization best explained by episodic dewatering of the Illinois Basin.

Cowan, C.A.; Kelly, W.C.; Wilkinson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

Goranson, Colin

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Tropical Cyclones and Global Climate Change: A Post-IPCC Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The very limited instrumental record makes extensive analyses of the natural variability of global tropical cyclone activities difficult in most of the tropical cyclone basins. However, in the two regions where reasonably reliable records exist (the North Atlantic and the western North Pacific), substantial multidecadal variability (particularly for intense Atlantic hurricanes) is found, but there is no clear evidence of long-term trends. Efforts have been initiated to use geological and geomorphological records and analysis of oxygen isotope ratios in rainfall recorded in cave stalactites to establish a paleoclimate of tropical cyclones, but these have not yet produced definitive results. Recent thermodynamical estimation of the maximum potential intensities (MPI) of tropical cyclones shows good agreement with observations. Although there are some uncertainties in these MPI approaches, such as their sensitivity to variations in parameters and failure to include some potentially important interactions such as ocean spray feedbacks, the response of upperoceanic thermal structure, and eye and eyewall dynamics, they do appear to be an objective tool with which to predict present and future maxima of tropical cyclone intensity. Recent studies indicate the MPI of cyclones will remain the same or undergo a modest increase of up to 10%--20%. These predicted changes are small compared with the observed natural variations and fall within the uncertainty range in current studies. Furthermore, the known omissions (ocean spray, momentum restriction, and possibly also surface to 300-hPa lapse rate changes) could all operate to mitigate the predicted intensification. A strong caveat must be placed on analysis of results from current GCM simulations of the "tropical-cyc...

Henderson-Sellers Zhang Berz; A. Henderson-sellers; H. Zhang; G. Berz; K. Emanuel; W. Gray; G. Holl; J. Lighthill; S-l. Shieh; P. Webster; K. Mcguffie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

Alifano, P.; Tala, A.; Tredici, S. M. [Dipartimento Microbiologia, Di.S.Te.B.A., Universita del Salento, via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, C.P. 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Nassisi, V. [Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento and INFN-Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Siciliano, M. V. [Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento and INFN-Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, University of Salento, via Provinciale Lecce- Monteroni, C.P. 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "teton mammoth cave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Holocene paleoenviroments of northwest Iowa  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the biotic, sedimentary, geomorphic, and climatic history of the upper part of the Roberts Creek Basin, northeastern Iowa for the late-glacial and Holocene, and compares these records with a C-O isotopic sequence from Coldwater Cave, 60 km northwest of Roberts Creek. the biotic record (pollen, vascular plant and bryophyte macrofossils, and insects) is preserved in floodplain alluvium that underlies three constructional surfaces separated by low scarps. Each surface is underlain by a lithologically and temporally distinct alluvial fill. The highest surface is underlain by the Gunder Member of the Deforest Formation, dating from 11,000 to 4000 yr BP; beneath the intermediate level is the Roberts Creek Member, dating from 4000 to 400 yr BP; and the lowest level is underlain by the Camp Creek Member, deposited during the last 380 yr. Pollen and plant macrofossils in the alluvial fill show that a typical late-glacial spruce forest was replaced by Quercus and Ulmus in the early Holocene. This early-to-middle Holocene forest became dominated by medic elements such as Acer saccharum, Tila americana, Ostyra virginiana, and Carpinus caroliniana as late as 5500 yr BP; in contrast, the closest sites to the west and north were at their warmest and driest were covered by prairie vegetation between 6500 and 5500 yr BP. After 5500 yr BP, the forest in the roberts Creek area was replaced by prairie, as indicated by a rich assemblage of plant macrofossils, although only Ambrosia and Poaceae became abundant in the pollen record. The return of Quercus {approx} 3000 BP (while nonarboreal pollen percentages remained relatively high) indicates the oak savanna prevailed with little change until settlement time. 83 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Baker, R.G. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bettis, E.A. III [Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Iowa City, IA (United States); Schwert, D.P. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Distributed computing environment in the ESnet Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Community is undertaking an ambitious project to coordinate its distributed computing. A reasonable question is: ''Why Coordinate Distributed Computing?'' Without a coordinating element, the number of links for communicating between a number of nodes would grow with order N {sup 2}. Inserting an effective coordinating principle can reduce the number of independently managed links to order N while still leaving all of the links available for actual communications. A good example from telecommunications is the public phone system where one relies on central coordination of the phone numbers rather than having to personally negotiate the switching information with everyone with whom one wishes to communicate. The Internet's distributed system of name servers is another good example. The meta-question to the first question is: ''Why use distributed computing?'' The answer can be put in three parts: Individual end users require access to far more information and computational resources than they can acquire locally. For some applications, distributed computers are nearly as efficient as centralized computers and the total CPU resources available may be significant. Many resources are unique. They cannot easily be replicated. Some examples in the DOE community include research accelerators, fusion facilities, systems of virtual caves, and environmental laboratories. The overall response to the questions can be summarized in the concept of virtual laboratories. Humans want their resources responding within a second and at arm's length or closer. Using coordinated distributed computing, these requirements can be met by placing facilities on-line via Internet style technologies. Further, human communication is 10% verbal, 40% audio and 50% physiological. Using combinations of words, sounds and pictures including animation, virtual laboratory technologies can exploit all of these aspects of human communication. The human end user receives the benefit of virtual presence at on-line facilities and makes use of a rich collection of resources.

R. Roy Whitney

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Recent developments in atomic/nuclear methodologies used for the study of cultural heritage objects  

SciTech Connect

Archaeometry is an area established in the international community since the 60s, with extensive use of atomic-nuclear methods in the characterization of art, archaeological and cultural heritage objects in general. In Brazil, however, until the early '90s, employing methods of physics, only the area of archaeological dating was implemented. It was only after this period that Brazilian groups became involved in the characterization of archaeological and art objects with these methodologies. The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics, State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced, pioneered in 1994, Archaeometry and related issues among its priority lines of research, after a member of LFNA has been involved in 1992 with the possibilities of tomography in archaeometry, as well as the analysis of ancient bronzes by EDXRF. Since then, LFNA has been working with PXRF and Portable Raman in several museums in Brazil, in field studies of cave paintings and in the laboratory with material sent by archaeologists, as well as carrying out collaborative work with new groups that followed in this area. From 2003/2004 LAMFI/DFN/IFUSP and LIN/COPPE/UFRJ began to engage in the area, respectively with methodologies using ion beams and PXRF, then over time incorporating other techniques, followed later by other groups. Due to the growing number of laboratories and institutions/archaeologists/conservators interested in these applications, in may 2012 was created a network of available laboratories, based at http://www.dfn.if.usp.br/lapac. It will be presented a panel of recent developments and applications of these methodologies by national groups, as well as a sampling of what has been done by leading groups abroad.

Appoloni, Carlos Roberto [Departamento de Fisica, CCE, Universidade Estadual de Londrina - UEL, P.O.Box 6001, CEP 86055-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing for CO2 Storage Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project's goal is to develop remote sensing methods for early detection and spatial mapping, over whole regions simultaneously, of any surface areas under which there are significant CO2 leaks from deep underground storage formations. If large amounts of CO2 gas percolated up from a storage formation below to within plant root depth of the surface, the CO2 soil concentrations near the surface would become elevated and would affect individual plants and their local plant ecologies. Excessive soil CO2 concentrations are observed to significantly affect local plant and animal ecologies in our geothermal exploration, remote sensing research program at Mammoth Mountain CA USA. We also know from our geothermal exploration remote sensing programs, that we can map subtle hidden faults by spatial signatures of altered minerals and of plant species and health distributions. Mapping hidden faults is important because in our experience these highly localized (one to several centimeters) spatial pathways are good candidates for potentially significant CO2 leaks from deep underground formations. The detection and discrimination method we are developing uses primarily airborne hyperspectral, high spatial (3 meter) with 128 band wavelength resolution, visible and near infrared reflected light imagery. We also are using the newly available ''Quickbird'' satellite imagery that has high spatial resolution (0.6 meter for panchromatic images, 2.4 meters for multispectral). We have a commercial provider, HyVista Corp of Sydney Australia, of airborne hyperspectral imagery acquisitions and very relevant image data post processing, so that eventually the ongoing surveillance of CO2 storage fields can be contracted for commercially. In this project we have imaged the Rangely Colorado Oil field and surrounding areas with an airborne hyperspectral visible and near infrared reflected light sensor. The images were analyzed by several methods using the suite of tools available in the ENVI commercial hyperspectral image processing software. We have also begun to use the high resolution (0.6 meter) commercial satellite QuickBird in our technology development. This hyperspectral imaging project for CO2 leakage monitoring has focused on using the extensive hyperspectral imagery set that we acquired of the Rangely CO enhanced oil recovery field in August 2002. We have accomplished extensive analysis of this imagery. We have created highly detailed maps of soil types, plant coverages, plant health, local ecologies or habitats, water conditions, and manmade objects throughout the entire Rangely Oil field and surrounding areas. The results were verified during a field trip to Rangely CO in August 2003. These maps establish an environmental and ecological baseline against which any future CO2 leakage effects on the plants, plant habitats, soils and water conditions can be detected and verified. We have also seen signatures that may be subtle hidden faults. If confirmed these faults might provide pathways for upward CO2 migration if that occurred at any time during the future. We have found a result that was unexpected, new to us, and potentially very important to the task of monitoring for CO2 that has leaked to within the plant root depths near the surface. The discovery is that one of our analysis techniques has picked out finely detailed mapping of local ecologies. Some of which are found to extend across the entire Rangely oil field and into the surrounding areas. These ecologies appear to be made up of a fairly narrow range of percentage admixtures of two or three very specific plant types and soil types. It is likely that any large amounts of CO2 reaching the root depth near the surface would begin to modify the shapes of the habitats. These habitat changes will be easy to detect by repeat imaging of the area. The habitat modification signature is probably detectable earlier following the start of CO2 build up in the soil, than looking for individual plant stress. We strongly recommend a long term research effort that will establish what CO2 soil co

Pickles, W; Cover, W

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect

Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today  

SciTech Connect

In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas {sup 222}Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that {sup 222}Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected.Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's onwards a variety of radon measuring instruments were developed to assess the radon and radon decay product exposure to underground miners, workers at contaminated sites with uranium and radium tailings and to the general public in residential buildings. In the last twenty years, new instruments and methods were developed to measure radon by using grab, integrating and continuous modes of sampling. The most common are scintillation cell monitors, activated carbon collectors, electret ionization chambers, alpha track detectors, pulse and current ionization chambers and solid-state alpha detectors.

George, A. C. [201-27 26th Avenue Bayside NY 11360 (United States)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DRSPALL :spallings model for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2004 recertification.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a model to estimate the spallings releases for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment (WIPP PA). A spallings release in the context of WIPP PA refers to a portion of the solid waste transported from the subsurface repository to the ground surface due to inadvertent oil or gas drilling into the WIPP repository at some time after site closure. Some solid waste will be removed by the action of the drillbit and drilling fluid; this waste is referred to as cuttings and cavings. If the repository is pressurized above hydrostatic at the time of intrusion, solid waste material local to the borehole may be subject to mechanical failure and entrainment in high-velocity gases as the repository pressure is released to the borehole. Solid material that fails and is transported into the wellbore and thus to the surface comprise the spallings releases. The spallings mechanism is analogous to a well blowout in the modern oil and gas drilling industry. The current spallings conceptual model and associated computer code, DRSPALL, were developed for the 2004 recertification because the prior spallings model used in the 1996 WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) was judged by an independent peer review panel as inadequate (DOE 1996, 9.3.1). The current conceptual model for spallings addresses processes that take place several minutes before and after a borehole intrusion of a WIPP waste room. The model couples a pipe-flow wellbore model with a porous flow repository model, allowing high-pressure gas to flow from the repository to the wellbore through a growing cavity region at the well bottom. An elastic stress model is applied to the porous solid domain that allows for mechanical failure of repository solids if local tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the waste. Tensile-failed solids may be entrained into the wellbore flow stream by a fluidized bed model, in which case they are ultimately transported to the land surface comprising a release. In July 2003, DOE/SNL presented the spallings conceptual model to a independent peer review panel in accordance with NUREG 1297 guidelines (NRC, 1988). The panel ultimately judged the model as adequate for implementation in WIPP PA (Yew et al., 2003). This report documents the spallings model history from 1997 to the implementation of DRSPALL in the 2004 Compliance Recertification Application (CRA) (DOE, 2004). The scope of this report includes descriptions of the conceptual model, numerical model, verification and validation techniques, model sensitivity studies, and WIPP PA spallings results as presented in the 2004 CRA.

Gilkey, Amy P. (GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Hansen, Clifford W.; Schatz, John F. (John F. Schatz Research & Consulting, Inc., Del Mar, CA); Rudeen, David Keith (GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor operator in current US NPPs. In addition to the three workstations, information can be shared between the workstations and further displayed on a large-screen overview display or a panel mimic. An 82-inch high-definition display is commonly used for the overview display.

Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A common path forward for the immersive visualization community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Immersive visualization makes use of the medium of virtual reality (VR) - it is a subset of virtual reality focused on the application of VR technologies to scientific and information visualization. As the name implies, there is a particular focus on the physically immersive aspect of VR that more fully engages the perceptual and kinesthetic capabilities of the scientist with the goal of producing greater insight. The immersive visualization community is uniquely positioned to address the analysis needs of the wide spectrum of domain scientists who are becoming increasingly overwhelmed by data. The outputs of computational science simulations and high-resolution sensors are creating a data deluge. Data is coming in faster than it can be analyzed, and there are countless opportunities for discovery that are missed as the data speeds by. By more fully utilizing the scientists visual and other sensory systems, and by offering a more natural user interface with which to interact with computer-generated representations, immersive visualization offers great promise in taming this data torrent. However, increasing the adoption of immersive visualization in scientific research communities can only happen by simultaneously lowering the engagement threshold while raising the measurable benefits of adoption. Scientists time spent immersed with their data will thus be rewarded with higher productivity, deeper insight, and improved creativity. Immersive visualization ties together technologies and methodologies from a variety of related but frequently disjoint areas, including hardware, software and human-computer interaction (HCI) disciplines. In many ways, hardware is a solved problem. There are well established technologies including large walk-in systems such as the CAVE{trademark} and head-based systems such as the Wide-5{trademark}. The advent of new consumer-level technologies now enable an entirely new generation of immersive displays, with smaller footprints and costs, widening the potential consumer base. While one would be hard-pressed to call software a solved problem, we now understand considerably more about best practices for designing and developing sustainable, scalable software systems, and we have useful software examples that illuminate the way to even better implementations. As with any research endeavour, HCI will always be exploring new topics in interface design, but we now have a sizable knowledge base of the strengths and weaknesses of the human perceptual systems and we know how to design effective interfaces for immersive systems. So, in a research landscape with a clear need for better visualization and analysis tools, a methodology in immersive visualization that has been shown to effectively address some of those needs, and vastly improved supporting technologies and knowledge of hardware, software, and HCI, why hasn't immersive visualization 'caught on' more with scientists? What can we do as a community of immersive visualization researchers and practitioners to facilitate greater adoption by scientific communities so as to make the transition from 'the promise of virtual reality' to 'the reality of virtual reality'.

Eric A. Wernert; William R. Sherman; Patrick O'Leary; Eric Whiting

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bioenergy Crop Breeding and Production Research in the Southeast, Final Report for 1996 to 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a native grass species to much of the US. It has shown great potential for use in production of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass (Lynd et al., 1991). Work in Alabama demonstrated very high dry matter yields can be achieved with switchgrass (Maposse et al. 1995) in the southeastern US. Therefore, this region is thought to be an excellent choice for development of a switchgrass cropping system where farmers can produce the grass for either biomass or forage. Another report has shown success with selection and breeding to develop high yielding germplasm from adapted cultivars and ecotypes of switchgrass (Moser and Vogel 1995). In the mid 1990s, however, there was little plant breeding effort for switchgrass with a potential for developing a cultivar for the southeast region. The main goal of the project was to develop adaptive, high-yielding switchgrass cultivars for use in cropping systems for bioenergy production in the southeastern US. A secondary objective was to assess the potential of alternate herbaceous species such as bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.), bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge.), and napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) that may compete with switchgrass for herbaceous bioenergy production in the southeast. During the conduct of the project, another goal of developing molecular markers useful for genetic mapping was added. The ''lowland'' cultivars, Alamo and Kanlow, were found to be the highest yielding switchgrass cultivars. Although most summers during the project period were hot and dry, their annual dry matter yield continue to outperform the best ''upland'' cultivars such as Cave-in-Rock, Shawnee, NE Late, and Trailblazer. The use of a breeding procedure based on the ''honeycomb design'' and multi-location progeny testing, coupled with the solid heritability and genetic gain estimates for dry matter yield in lowland type switchgrass germplasm, indicated excellent potential to isolate parental genotypes for producing higher yielding synthetic cultivars. The four experimental synthetics produced thus far, and now in performance tests, could provide this cultivar. Initial performance results of these experimentals have been very promising demonstrating a 30% yield enhancement over Alamo and Kanlow. Future testing, including testing in other states, will be critical before a determination can be made to release one or more of these into the commercial seed trade. In the genetic mapping project, 42 genotypes of switchgrass were surveyed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes from different grass species. The different genotypes included 24 from Alamo, 15 from Kanlow, and 3 from ''Summer.'' A majority of the probes (87%) hybridized to the switchgrass DNA and 81% were polymorphic. Most of the polymorphism observed was between the cultivars. A mapping population consisting of 100 progeny from a cross between the most dissimilar Kanlow and Summer genotypes was produced during 2001. The parents and progeny population are now maintained at the University of Georgia and will be used to construct a map based on the polymorphic RFLP probes. When compared to ''Tifton 85'' bermudagrass, ''Tifton 9'' bahiagrass, and ''Merkron'' napier-grass, Alamo switchgrass was found to show poorer yields than Merkron and Tifton 85, but better yields than Tifton 9 in the coastal plain region. The exceptional performance of Tifton 85 bermudagrass is extremely noteworthy because this hybrid bermudagrass is also a variety of choice for many commercial hay producers in the lower south and would give any producers a very good option to produce either biomass for a biofuels initiative or sell as hay on the open market. Merkron has consistently showed the highest dry matter yields. However, there continues to be some winter damage each year on this species at the Athens location indicating its real potential lies mainly in the Gulf Coast region of the southeastern United States. The excellent characteristic of Tifton 85 and Merkron should therefore be enough to initi

Bouton, J.H.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z