Sample records for teton mammoth cave

  1. Cool CAVEs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Idaho National Laboratory's "CAVE" -- 3-D Computer-Assisted Virtual Environment –- allows scientists to literally walk into their data and look at it from multiple perspectives.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduce Operating CostsElectricMaine

  3. Scientific Investigations Report 20095160 Prepared in cooperation with Teton Conservation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Investigations Report 2009­5160 Prepared in cooperation with Teton Conservation District, Wyoming, by Using Heat as a Tracer U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;Front cover, Teton Conservation District. D; Teton Village cross section, Wyoming, December 20, 2005. Photograph

  4. Exploring the Possibilities: Mammoth-Pacific Seeks Cooling Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mammoth-Pacific Seeks Cooling Efficiency and More Steam for Geothermal Power Production in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  5. Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The

  6. Effects of Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River and its floodplain, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marston, Richard A.

    Effects of Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River and its floodplain, Grand Teton National Park In 1906, the Bureau of Reclamation created Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River in what later became Grand Teton National Park. The geomorphic, hydrologic and vegetation adjustments downstream of the dam have

  7. Silica Extraction at the Mammoth Lakes Geothermal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourcier, W; Ralph, W; Johnson, M; Bruton, C; Gutierrez, P

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop a cost-effective method to extract marketable silica (SiO{sub 2}) from fluids at the Mammoth Lakes, California geothermal power plant. Marketable silica provides an additional revenue source for the geothermal power industry and therefore lowers the costs of geothermal power production. The use of this type of ''solution mining'' to extract resources from geothermal fluids eliminates the need for acquiring these resources through energy intensive and environmentally damaging mining technologies. We have demonstrated that both precipitated and colloidal silica can be produced from the geothermal fluids at Mammoth Lakes by first concentrating the silica to over 600 ppm using reverse osmosis (RO). The RO permeate can be used in evaporative cooling at the plant; the RO concentrate is used for silica and potentially other (Li, Cs, Rb) resource extraction. Preliminary results suggest that silica recovery at Mammoth Lakes could reduce the cost of geothermal electricity production by 1.0 cents/kWh.

  8. Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History ViewMali[1]OpenEIEnergyMammoth

  9. An environmental assessment of Bermuda's caves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Darcy Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The current environmental status of the majority of Bermuda?s one hundred sixty-six known caves was investigated. This survey replicated a historical cave study performed in 1983, wherein each was analyzed for positive ...

  10. STRATIRGAPHY AND GEOCHRONOLOGY OF THE VERNOR MAMMOTH SITE, CLUTE, BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urista, Juan C.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Remains of a mammoth, other Pleistocene fauna, and a wooden bowl were recovered from the Vernor site located in Clute, Brazoria County on the Texas Gulf Coast. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochronology were used to establish the depositional...

  11. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Abstract CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09082006 to 10...

  12. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  13. Partitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    flow of spring water from the high-temperature to low-temperature facies. These results suggest of depositional facies models that correlate (1) the depth, velocity, temperature, and chemistry of waterPartitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot Springs

  14. An environmental assessment of Bermuda's caves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Darcy Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    selected caves, three from each class. Each sample was analyzed for nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia concentrations. The results were analyzed using multiple analysis of variance statistics. A significant difference between the nitrate concentrations...

  15. abauntz cave navarra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K. M. Mc Boyer, Elizabeth W. 146 P450 aromatase alterations and DNA damage as avian pollution biomarkers in cliff and cave swallow breeding near the Rio Grande region, Texas...

  16. Copyright 2001 by The National Speleological Society Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, December 2001 99 Mark J. Wetzel and Steven J. Taylor -First records of freshwater oligochaetes (Annelida, Clitellata) from caves in Illinois and Missouri, USA. Journ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    : Fogelpole Cave, Illinois Caverns, and Krueger-Dry Run Cave (all in Monroe County) and Stemler Cave (St (Gibert et al. 1994; Rodriguez 1996; Rodriguez & Coates 1996; Strayer 2001; Strayer et al. 1995

  17. Assessing the Impact of Groundwater Pollution from Marine Caves on Nearshore Seagrass Beds in Bermuda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cate, Jenipher R.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation characterized karstic and nearshore environments of Bermuda to describe 1) behavior and periodicity of cave springs; 2) submarine spring water quality; and 3) nearshore marine seagrass density. Caves can ...

  18. Analysis of the ecology of Anchialine Caves using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohlman, John William

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes were used to investigate the biogeochemical and ecological processes that govern anchialine cave ecosystems in the Yucatan Peninsula, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Anchialine caves are subterranean passages...

  19. Finite element visualization in the cave virtual reality environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaskacz, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kuhn, M.A. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the use of the post-processing software, Virtual Reality visualization (VRviz), and the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE), finite element representations can be viewed as they would be in real life. VRviz is a program written in ANSI C to translate the mathematical results generated by finite element analysis programs into a virtual representation. This virtual representation is projected into the CAVE environment and the results are animated. The animation is fully controllable. A user is able to translate the image, rotate about any axis and scale the image at any time. The user is also able to freeze the animation at any time step and control the image update rate. This allows the user to navigate around, or even inside, the image in order to effectively analyze possible failure points and redesign as necessary. Through the use of the CAVE and the real life image that is being produced by VRviz, engineers are able to save considerable time, money, and effort in the design process.

  20. Water column characterization of anchialine caves in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Brett Wayne

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and pH of the caves. Water columns were divided into three zones, brackish, transition, and saline, and a new method was employed to define these boundaries by using "best it" calculations and subsequent regression...

  1. Cave swallow (Petrochelidon fulva) nest reuse in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byerly, Margaret Elizabeth

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................................... 8 2 Number of Cave Swallow nests from each bridge used in analysis along with types and quantities of Barn, Cave, and Cliff Swallow nests present at all 19 study bridges during the 2003 breeding season... reuse, as Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonata) (Brown and Brown 1986), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) (Samuel 1971, Shields 1984, Barclay 1988), and Cave Swallows (P. fulva) (Kosciuch 2002) all may reuse their mud nests. Collias and Collias...

  2. Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Nipam H.

    Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus Meredith E. Protasa and the loss of eyes and pigmentation, have evolved multiple times in a diverse assemblage of cave animals to be involved in pigmen- tation, eye, and appendage development, was used to identify loci of large effect

  3. Water budgets and cave recharge on juniper rangelands in the Edwards Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Lucas Frank

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    throughfall and stemflow on the top axis and cave recharge on the bottom axis in mm per wetted area in 5 minute intervals.......................................... 54 12 Hydrograph from July 13, 2005 simulation showing throughfall... and stemflow on the top axis and surface runoff and cave recharge on the bottom axis in mm per wetted area in 5 minute intervals......................................................................................................... 56 13...

  4. Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan September 30, 2010 January 16, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    to reconstruct and contextualize damaged cave temples The University of Chicago's Smart Museum of Art. Once home to a magnificent array of sculptures--monumental Buddhas, elaborate attendant figures market. After years of intensive research, it is now possible to digitally envision much of the caves

  5. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  6. Interactions and reproductive success of sympatric Barn and Cave Swallows in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosciuch, Karl Leonard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sympatrically with Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) and Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonata) under bridges and in culverts. I investigated the interactions and reproductive biology of Cave and Barn Swallows nesting sympatrically under eight bridges in Brazos...

  7. Assessing the Impact of Groundwater Pollution from Marine Caves on Nearshore Seagrass Beds in Bermuda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cate, Jenipher R.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    changing environment suitable for a mixture of seagrass species. Higher dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations were associated with locations lacking seagrass. This study found 1) cave springs connected groundwater and nearshore seagrass ecosystems...

  8. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is rethinking how low cost, high performance solar cells are made. June 19, 2012 Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo...

  9. We collected mosquitoes from six caves and found Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, Cx. territans, A. punctipennis, A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    Discussion We collected mosquitoes from six caves and found Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, Cx, not in the pipiens complex, could not be identified to species level, and on specimen is intermediate between Cx. pipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus based on molecular analysis. Individual caves harbored from one to five

  10. VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA --Much of the previous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    49 NOTES VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA mortality (Beale 1978, Barrett 1984, Gregg et al. 2001) and social behavior (Kitchen 1974, Autenrieth. The pronghorn was reintroduced into Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in 1914 and thus, has been maintained

  11. The diet of Hinds Cave (41 VV 456), Val Verde County, Texas: the coprolite evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Janet Ann

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the longevity of this adaptive 'nunting and gathering lifeway include: -ag'e Cave (Ross 1965); Fate Eeli Shelter (Parsons 1965); Arenosa Shelter (Dibble 1967); Baker Cave (Hester 1978); the Devil's Mouth Site (Johnson 1964) and the Devil' s Rockshelter... was excavated in 1975 and was chosen for excavation in order to determine the depth of cultural deposits in this area of the site (field notes 1975). Radiocarbon dates on charcoal from Area D, level 7 have produced dates of 6230 + 110 B. C. (TX2737) and 6330...

  12. Unified Treatment of Heterodyne Detection: the Shapiro-Wagner and Caves Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Landolfi; G. Ruggeri; G. Soliani

    2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study is performed on two heterodyne systems of photon detectors expressed in terms of a signal annihilation operator and an image band creation operator called Shapiro-Wagner and Caves' frame, respectively. This approach is based on the introduction of a convenient operator $\\hat \\psi$ which allows a unified formulation of both cases. For the Shapiro-Wagner scheme, where $[\\hat \\psi, \\hat \\psi^{\\dag}] =0$, quantum phase and amplitude are exactly defined in the context of relative number state (RNS) representation, while a procedure is devised to handle suitably and in a consistent way Caves' framework, characterized by $[\\hat \\psi, \\hat \\psi^{\\dag}] \

  13. A MEDIEVAL WARM PERIOD l)13 C RECORD FROM THE GAURA CU MUSCA CAVE, SW ROMANIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forray, Ferenc

    A MEDIEVAL WARM PERIOD l)13 C RECORD FROM THE GAURA CU MUSCA CAVE, SW ROMANIA Bogdan P. ONAC1 · 2, Romania (2) School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., NES 107, Tampa, FL and Romania. B. Geological map of the region {modified fromlancu et al., 1995). The mapof the Gaura cu Musca

  14. New cave-dwelling pseudocyclopiids (Copepoda, Calanoida, Pseudocyclopiidae) from the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ; anchialine caves; Balearic Islands; Canary Islands; Philippines. INTRODUCTION Calanoids in the family on the Canary Islands is also reported and discussed. The swimming habits of the latter spe- cies are concisely the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos Damiŕ Jaume, Audun Fosshagen & Thomas M. Iliffe Jaume D

  15. Research Note Effects of Sarcoptic Mange on Coyotes at Wind Cave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Note Effects of Sarcoptic Mange on Coyotes at Wind Cave National Park JAMIE M. CHRONERT,1 Collins, CO 80525, USA JENNY G. POWERS, National Park Service, Biological Resource Management Division). In 2003 and 2004, 2 of 17 (12%) and 5 of 9 (56%) coyotes, respectively, were infected with sarcoptic mange

  16. Relating carrion breakdown rates to ambient resource level and community structure in four cave stream ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    into ecosystems vary in quantity and quality (e.g., plant litter vs carrion). Variability in detrital quantity and quality potentially affects consumer biomass and rates of organic matter (OM) breakdown. We used cave streams to test 2 linked hypotheses regarding the influence of total detrital inputs on consumer biomass

  17. Hemp in ancient rope and fabric from the Christmas Cave in Israel: talmudic background and DNA sequence identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Terence M.; Ben-Yehuda, Nahum; Taylor, R.E.; Southon, John R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cambridge. Modern Sources Allegro, J.M. , 1965. Search inthe day on which it was discovered by John Allegro in1960 (Allegro, 1965, pp. 6e15). In 2007, the cave was

  18. Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally adapted Poecilia mexicana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally are characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of hydrogen sulphide (H2S): deep-sea hydrothermal vents, hydrocarbon seeps, as well as intertidal zones, salt marshes, mudflats and sewage outfalls, where hydrogen

  19. Teton Operating Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe niceOpenWyoming: Energy

  20. The use of agave, sotol, and yucca at Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas: reconstructing methods of processing through the formation of behavioral chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woltz, Ben vanDalsem

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas AgiM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December 1998 Major Subject: Anthropology THE USE OF AGAVE, SOTOL AND YUCCA AT HINDS CAVE, VAL VERDE COUNTY, TB3DB: RECONSTRUCTING METHODS... of Committee) C. Schmidt (Member) J n mber) V. M. Bryant (Head of ~t) December 1998 Major Subject: Anthmpology ABSTRACT The Use of Agave, Sotol and Yucca at Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas: Reconstructing Methods of Processing Through...

  1. Investigations of late archaic coprolites: pollen and macrofossil remains from Hinds Cave (41VV456), Val Verde County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Sherrian Kay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KAY EDWARDS Approved as to style and content by: aughn M. Bryant, J (+air of Comm' te r &) Merrill H. Sweet (Member) p' Vaughn M. Br ant, J (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Investigations of Late Archaic Coprolites: Pollen... and Macrofossil Remains from Hinds Cave (41VV456), Val Verde County, Texas. (May 1990) Sherrian Ray Edwards, B. A. , University of Texas Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Vaughn M. Bryant, Jr. The analysis of desiccated human fecal material (coprolites) left...

  2. BlenderCAVE: Easy VR Authoring for Multi-Screen Displays Jorge Gascn Jos M. Bayona Jos M. Espadero and Miguel A. Otaduy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otaduy, Miguel A.

    support for CAVE or Powerwall-type displays. The framework is implemented in a distributed manner, and it contains a virtual camera setup to control the display output, and a lightweight network communication-screen display systems. It consists of a set of extensions to the open-source Blender Game Engine (BGE

  3. Mammoth Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History ViewMali[1]OpenEI Reference

  4. Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOEMak-BanMaliMambucal GEPP

  5. Bedrock channel response to tetonic, climatic and eustatic forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Noah P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of bedrock channels to external forcings is investigated in this thesis. The approach is to test and constrain a theoretical model for bedrock-channel incision based on shear stress using field data. The primary ...

  6. Analysis of macroscopic fractures on Teton anticline, Northwestern Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Steven W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1817 &UNCONFORMITY 174 &UNCONFORMITY 366 &UNCONFORMITY 286 &UNCONFORMITY 1536 &UNCONFORMITY 2100 Figure 4. Stratigraphy of the Sawtooth thrust province. these rocks from the thinner, shallow-marine Devonian carbonate ~ocks above. Another... minor unconformity separates the Devonian from the Lower Mississippian (Kinderhookian and Osagean series). Mississippian rocks represent a stable shelf environment with the oresence of 366 meters of shallow marine dolomites and limestones in the area...

  7. Teton County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe niceOpen

  8. Teton County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe niceOpenWyoming: Energy Resources

  9. Teton County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources9019946°, -112.2717561° Show Map

  10. Teton Village, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources9019946°, -112.2717561° Show

  11. Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitsitt, Philip Mark

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Sawmill Creek (SC), Half Dome Crag (HDC), Morningstar Mountain (MM), Mount Field (MF), Gateway Pass (GP), North Fork of Dupuyer Creek (NFD), South Fork of Dupuyer Creek (SFD), Volcano Reef (VR), North Fork of Teton River (NFT), Teton River (TR), Cave...SHALLOW METEORIC ALTERATION AND BURIAL DIAGENESIS OF MASSIVE DOLOM I TE I N THE CASTLE REEF FORMAT I ON ~ NORTHWEST MONTANA A Thesis by PHILIP MARK WHITSITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  12. The prehistoric diet and subsistence of the lower Pecos region, as reflected in coprolites from Baker Cave, Val Verde County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobolik, Kristin Dee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by KRISTIN DEE SOBOLIK Approved as to style and content by: V ughn M. Bryant, (Chair of Committee) D. ntry tee e (Membe ) Dav J. Schmidly (Member) Har Shafer (M er) V hn M. Bryan Jr. Head of Department) August 1988 ABSTRACT The Prehistoric Diet... and Subsistence of the Lower Pecos Region, as Reflected in Coprolites from Baker Cave, Val Verde County, Texas (August 1988) Kristin Dee Sobolik, B. S. , The University of iowa Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Vaughn N. Bryant, Jr. The lower Pecos area...

  13. Glaciation and saline-freshwater mixing as a possible cause of cave formation in the eastern midcontinent region of the United States: A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Bourcier, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a hypothesis for the formation of caves and associated karst features near the southern margins of the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins. Spatial and temporal relations among intracratonic basins, karstic terrain, and continental glaciation suggest that Pleistocene glaciation may have initiated the discharge of saline waters from the margins of these basins. Glaciation-induced discharge of saline waters could result from the consolidation of sediments due to the overlying pressure of glacial ice, and flushing of underlying aquifers as a result of bottom melting in recharge areas of basic aquifers. The upward migration of basin-derived saline waters into near-surface aquifers would result in the mixing of saline waters with infiltrating glacial meltwater and meteoric water. The development of a vertically restricted zone of mixing of saline and fresh water in limestone aquifers would result in the dissolution of limestone; this mechanism could be responsible for the formation, or at least the initiation of, some caves and associated karst features in the midcontinent region.

  14. A mammoth of a project: the conservation of a columbian mammoth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Shanna LaRea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -72, Butvar 98, Starbond EM-02, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS), Paleo-bond, and Rhoplex (Primal) WS24. Stability, strength, and appearance were evaluated by measurable observations. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Environmental Scanning...

  15. Ormat Becomes Sole Owner of the Mammoth Complex in Mammoth Lakes,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformation OrganisationFoundationOpenJump

  16. Microbial Populations in CAVES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal34 for5

  17. Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG-80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining, site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Bee Caves Armory property, the requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. Of concern is the potential for hazardous waste to be present on the property as a result of the former Nike Missile Base operations or in the form of original construction materials. Environmentally sensitive operations associated with the property from that period include (1) underground fuel storage, (2) hazardous materials storage/use, (3) disposal of hazardous waste and (4) release of hazardous waste water.

  18. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagstrum, Jonathon T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. X—ray ?uorescence (XRF) spectra showing the compositionalMS) and X-ray ?uorescence (XRF). These analyses con?rm themicroscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show

  19. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extension of the youthful Mono-Inyo volcanic chain, which last erupted 500 to 600 years ago, point to a magmatic source for the modest but persistent influx of strain energy...

  20. Update on Mammoth Pacific, LP Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy) Redirect page JumpCorpUniversityLP Operations

  1. Mammoth Geothermal, A Development History | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History ViewMali[1]OpenEI

  2. Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History ViewMali[1]OpenEIEnergy

  3. Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOEMak-BanMaliMambucal GEPP Jump

  4. Mammoth Pacific II Power Plant Details | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOEMak-BanMaliMambucal GEPP JumpAdditional

  5. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California: An Initial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, searchLook at the 4 May

  6. Exploring the Possibilities: Mammoth-Pacific Seeks Cooling Efficiency and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to: navigation,Information 7 -Open Jump

  7. Models of Tet-On System with Epigenetic Effects Russ Harmer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : this involves the artificial TF rtTA, activated by binding with doxycycline Doxi. Extracellular doxycycline Doxe and activa- tion of fluorescence: this includes transcription, translation and GFP activation. Doxe Deff --- Doxe + Doxi (1) Doxi Deff --- (2) rtTA + Doxi kf2 ---- kr2 rtTA · Dox (3) rtTA · Dox Sm -- rtTA · Dox

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition is offering a rebate for original equipment...

  9. Pleistocene lagomorphs from Cathedral Cave, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jass, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for critical reviews. AER PW-PIR PW-PER LITERATURE CITEDposterointernal re- entrant (PW-PIR), and posterior wall of

  10. Studies on the Cave- Spider Family Leptonetidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledford, Joel M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nov. Distribution. Central to West Texas (Figs. 3, 56- 61).Sierra del Vidrio” in West Texas. Diagnosis. T. vidrio mayfrom Northern Mexico to West Texas (Fig. 3A), united by

  11. Studies on the Cave- Spider Family Leptonetidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledford, Joel M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    105. Prolateral; 106. Bulb, prolateral; 107. Accessory81. Prolateral; 82. Bulb, retrolateral; 83. Accessory87. Prolateral; 88. Bulb, retrolateral; 89. Accessory

  12. Mammoth dams, lean neighbours: assessing the bid to turn Ethiopia into East Africa's powerhouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta-Fernández, Iván

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter sets out to discuss the main features of the undergoing Ethiopian electrification programme as well as the key steps towards its implementation. Doing so also allows its potentialities and pitfalls to be ...

  13. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance CO2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbHKentucky:SinosolSitalcea srl Jump

  14. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcioEthanol LLCSitka Hot

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuels Vehicle Rebate - Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition is offering a rebate of up to 3,000 towards the purchase...

  16. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamic coupling of source CO 2 flow to meteorological processes.processes on measured fluxes. Finally, potential dynamic coupling

  17. Development Wells At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Holt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ben Holt, Richard G. Campbell (1984) Mammoth Geothermal Project Environmental Science Associates (1987) Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III...

  18. alum cave bluff: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 54 Scaling properties of two-dimensional turbulence in wakes behind bluff bodies B. Protas,1,2,* S. Goujon-Durand,2,3, Mathematics Websites Summary: Scaling properties of...

  19. Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    syntax: * Display map Temperature No Data Listed Flow No Data Listed Capacity 1.00x106 Btuhr 0.300 MWt Annual Generation 7.00x109 Btuyr 2.10 GWhyr Load Factor 0.80 Contact...

  20. Federal Cave Resources Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°, -89.4742177° Show Map

  1. File:CaveProtectionLaw.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of this preview:File Edit with form

  2. Bee Cave, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBay County,SouthCity County,New York: Energy ResourcesBee

  3. Federal Cave Protection Act of 1988 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to:FASFMI-HDFREDJumpInformation

  4. DEPOSITIONAL FACIES AND AQUEOUS-SOLID GEOCHEMISTRY OF TRAVERTINE-DEPOSITING HOT SPRINGS (ANGEL TERRACE, MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, U.S.A.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    include hot spring travertine (precipitates from high-temperature springs, also called carbonate sinters spring water in the higher-temperature (-50-73°C) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine from waters in low- to high- * Present Address: Department of Geology, Arizona State University, Box

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    vehicles for Wyoming. Your Clean Cities coordinator at Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition can provide you with information about grants and other opportunities. You...

  6. Jan 28 Primary Productivity: Controls, Patterns, Consequences Yucatan, Mexico, Dry Subtropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    coming around to better integrate energy flow into thinking on population and community ecology History Central Surinam Reserve, Wet Tropical Grand Teton NP, Wyoming, Temperate Coniferous #12;Primary

  7. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California The Mammoth geothermal field is a single–phase, liquid–dominated field with a 40 MW power plant.

  8. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  9. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 117 Prescribed Fire, Elk, and Aspen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 117 Prescribed Fire, Elk, and Aspen in Grand Teton--InGrandTetonNationalPark,alandscape-scaleassessmentofregeneration in aspen has assisted park managers in identifying aspen stands that may be at risk due to a number of interrelated factors, including ungulate browsing and suppression of wildland fire. The initial aspen survey

  10. EIS-0267: BPA/Lower Valley Transmission System Reinforcement Project, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA and LVPL proposal to construct a new 115-kV line from BPA’s Swan Valley Substation near Swan Valley in Bonneville County, Idaho about 58 km (36 miles) east to BPA’s Teton Substation near Jackson in Teton County, Wyoming.

  11. Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land, Tarisha Ann

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Female Male Female Male Female Reproductive Data Lactatin 22 Each sample was placed in a chemically cleaned glass jar and sealed with paraffin tape and transported to GERG for analysis. RESULTS Residue values listed as I = &mdl, I... in the United States since 1986, prior to which it was used as a pesticide to control insects, rodents, and birds. Compared to other organochlorines, endrin has a relatively short half-life in tissues of mammals (Cole et aL 1970, Brooks 1974). Lethal endrin...

  12. Small mammal faunal stasis in Natural Trap Cave (Pleistocene-Holocene), Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Daniel Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (100 ka-recent) that spans the last glacial cycle, large portions of which are replicated in local rockshelters, which is used here to test for local causes of stasis. The Quaternary fauna of North America is relatively well sampled and dated, so...

  13. Stygologia 2 (112) 1986, E. J. Brill, Leiden MESOZOIC RELICTS IN MARINE CAVES OF BERMUDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    .S.A. 2, Bermuda Biological Station, Ferry Reach 1-15, Bermuda. #12;lava tube in the Canary Islands (Yager, 1981) and later found in the same lava tube containing Munidopsis in the Canary Islands (Iliffe, occurring primarily on oceanic islands. One aspect of the findings of these and related, earlier studies has

  14. Pollen and plant macrofossil vegetation record recovered from Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dering, James Philip

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    line between the Edwards Plateau to the eas t and the S+ockton Plateau to the west. Biog, . ograyhers traditionally have used the pecos River ss a boundry line between the biota adapt d to wetter -cooler clime"- in & entral and eas+ern Texas... and the regions to the west whj, ch has become known as the Trans-Pecos (Bray, 1&401}, As the Peco" River enters the Pio C. . endo embayment 'n southern Val Verde County reli. ef becomes more yronour&ced snd canyons more numerous, narrower and deeper...

  15. Sperm production in an extremophile fish, the cave molly (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae, Teleostei)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    sulfide (H2S) is acutely toxic and therefore unambiguously an extreme environmental factor for all animal effects of H2S for long periods and thus perma- nently inhabit sulfidic habitats. A unique freshwater system that is rich in H2S was described in southern Mexico. This sulfidic system is located about 30 km

  16. Particulate Scrubbing Performance of the High Level Caves Off-Gas System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, G.T.

    2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance tests were conducted at the ETF using off-gas from the Small Cylindrical Melter (SCM) -2. The purpose of these tests was to develop data for comparing small and full scale equipment performance. This reports discusses those test results.

  17. Archaeological Investigations at Pintwater Cave, Nevada, During the 1963-64 Field Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Paul E; DuBarton, Anne

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pological Papers No. 93, Beatley, J. C, 1976 Vascular PlantsDesert scrub communities (Beatley 1976; Brown et al. 1979).

  18. Hominid Cave at Thomas Quarry I (Casablanca, Morocco): Recent findings and their context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Tanya M.

    -MS dating combining the ESR and U-series data for the modelling of the U-uptake has given an US/ESR age for sediments immediately above the dated tooth and 391 Ć 32 ka below. Nevertheless, biostratigraphy to a contribution to the Acheulean dispersion at the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene. However, Al Maghreb Al

  19. A Hydrological Model of Harrington Sound, Bermuda and its Surrounding Cave Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffer, Jonathan L

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    delay and dampening the tidal range to 35% of those on the coast. By comparing the tidal amplitude and surface area of Harrington Sound, tidal exchange can be determined. Past research has shown Flatts Inlet only supplies the Sound with about half of its...

  20. Photo of the Week: The CAVE at LANL | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCO OCHCOControlGuide to aEnergy Living Large --SatelliteThe

  1. Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo, Maryland:Glenwillow, Ohio:| Open Energy

  2. Revision and Phylogenetic Analysis of the North American Antlion Genus Paranthaclisis Banks (Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diehl, Benjamin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    : Emery, Garfield, Grand, Juab, Kane, Salt Lake, San Juan, Uintah, Washington; Washington: Benton, Chelan, Douglas, Grant, Okanogan; Wyoming [New State Record]: Park or Teton (“Yellowstone Park”). MEXICO: Baja California [Norte]: Ensenada, Mexicali...

  3. EIS-0399: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and connect a 230-kV electric transmission line; Issuance of Presidential Permit for right-to-way grant in Cascade, Teton, Chouteau, Pondera, Toole and Glacier Counties Montana....

  4. More Good, Bad, and Ugly than A Clint Eastwood Movie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuhmann, Robert A.; Skopek, Tracy A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    economic picture including oil and gas related jobs as welltion and mining, mainly oil and gas. Teton County also sawby increased employment in the oil and gas industry. As this

  5. Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on recent successes in mapping hidden faults, high temperature altered mineralization, clays, hot and cold springs and CO2 effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain...

  6. Molecular Ecology (2008) 17, 598610 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03595.x 2007 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaternary climate change had a strong impact on the geographical distribution and demographic history Ecology, Ural Division of RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russia, World Museum of Mammoth, Yakutsk 677007, Russia

  7. Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to exist beneath the western moat, perhaps beneath Mammoth Mountain. Authors Brian M. Smith and Gene A. Suemnicht Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal...

  8. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  9. Carbon Dioxide and Helium Emissions from a Reservoir of Magmatic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide and Helium Emissions from a Reservoir of Magmatic Gas Beneath Mammoth...

  10. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Framework for Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1988, Santa Barbara and Ventura Basins: Coast Geol. Soc.to the Rio Vista Gas Field, Ventura Oil Field, and Mammoth16 4.2 Ventura Oil

  11. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Moose, WY Grand Teton National Park's rugged landscape and stunning array of wildlife attract nearly three million visitors every year, making it one of our most popular national parks. A new Grand Teton National Park visitor center near the park's headquarters north of Jackson, Wyoming, replaces an outdated building, educates an increased number of visitors, and inspires further exploration of this extraordinary landscape. The project site is located along the Snake River, between a riparian forest and a sagebrush meadow.

  12. Cave and cliff swallows as indicators of exposure and effects of environmental contaminants on birds from the Rio Grande, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musquiz, Daniel

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    concentrations in tissues and somatic chromosomal damage in blood of lesser scaups (Aythya affinis). A recent study suggests that TCDDs and specific mixtures of TCDD, 2,3,7,8- pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) and PCB 126 result in dose-dependent increases...

  13. Folding Protein-Like Structures with Open Gemma B. Danks, Susan Stepney, and Leo S. D. Caves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    protein is a strong indicator of its function in the cell. The mechanisms involved in protein folding. The protein folding process may be viewed as an emergent phenomenon, a result of underlying physics. In this spirit we present a model for investigating protein folding using open L-systems, local rewriting rules

  14. Testing Stratigraphic Integrity of Upper and Middle Paleolithic Deposits in Vindija Cave (Croatia): A Chipped Stone Refitting Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Kale

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    : the wide-ranging Aurignacian techno-complex (Brantingham et al 2004a, Hays and Thacker 2001). The stratigraphic integrity and interpretation of the cultural materials and human skeletal remains from Level G1 at Vindija is a source of debate (d?Erico et... al 1998, Zilh?o and d?Erico 1999a, Karavani? and Smith 2000, Straus 1999). Artifacts from Level G1 include both Middle and Upper Paleolithic stone tool types (Karavani? 1995, Karavani? and Smith 1998) including a bifacial foliate point of possible...

  15. The role of macroalgal species as bio-indicators of water quality in bermudian karstic cave pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Bridget Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Cryptonemia sp. had low but positive growth. A significant decrease in biomass occurred with C. racemosa and C. sertularioides. Primary productivity was measured using the traditional light dark bottle method. Differences in net productivity and respiration...

  16. Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At Idaho National Laboratory, engineers are walking into the core of nuclear reactors and rappelling down cliffs, all without ever leaving the office.

  17. Hemp in ancient rope and fabric from the Christmas Cave in Israel: talmudic background and DNA sequence identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Terence M.; Ben-Yehuda, Nahum; Taylor, R.E.; Southon, John R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopy: ?ax, nettle/ramie, hemp, jute. UltramicroscopyL. Journal of the International Hemp Association. 5, 80e92.analysis of an archaeological hemp (Cannabis sativa L. ) DNA

  18. An Ecological and Biogeochemical Characterization of a Subterranean Estuary in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haukebo, Sepp Leif

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    physicochemical boundaries characterize anchialine caves, a subset of subterranean estuaries. This study serves as a biogeochemical and ecological characterization of Sistema Crustacea, an anchialine cave in the Yucatan Peninsula with dense populations of cave...

  19. IGSHPA AnnualIGSHPA Annual Manufacturers UpdateManufacturers Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Cooling Towers & Domestic Boilers 14 #12;Systems In The Geothermal Market New Frontier ­ The Mammoth Mech In The Geothermal Market Industry Shift ­ Larger Tonnage/Fewer Units Water-to-Water Mechanical Room 9 #12;Systems In The Geothermal Market Industry Shift ­ Larger Tonnage/Fewer Units Governair Penthouse Sherman Hospital · Mammoth

  20. Sustainability in Research: Geology Researcher Title Respective Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Annkatrin

    -scale biologically deposited minerals as unconventional tracers of sewage contamination and industrial runoff in cave

  1. Quantifying Relationships Between Bird And Butterfly Community Shifts And Environmental Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.; VanNimwegen, Ron E.; Jakubauskas, Mark E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and butterflies. We did not sample larger areas in larger meadows, but focused solely on a constant total area for both our satellite data analysis and ecological community data. To streamline the process, we used Erdas Imagine ver- sion 8.2 (Leica Geosystems...] 5 1148, mean 5 3.21 ha). NDVI and climate trends The Gallatins showed more among-year variability in the NDVI than the Tetons, as evidenced by their F ratios (Gallatins, F 5 1.87, df 5 3, 96, P 5 0.140; Tetons, F 5 1.02, df 5 3, 96, P 5 0...

  2. P450 aromatase alterations and DNA damage as avian pollution biomarkers in cliff and cave swallow breeding near the Rio Grande region, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitzlar, Megan Annette

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Juarez; Presidio/Ojinaga; Del Rio/Ciudad Acuna; Eagle Pass/Piedras Negras; Laredo/Nuevo Laredo; McAllen-Edinburg-Mission/Reynosa; and Brownsville-Harlingen-San Benito/Matamoros (TNRCC 2002). Projected growth from counties that contain... that ever stood. She taught me to always stand strong, no matter how many axes swung my way. She instilled in me listening to Nature would educate me more than being the babbling brook itself. vi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I couldn?t have made...

  3. Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in a fumarole on the north side of Mammoth Mountain from 1989-1990, during which time helium isotope values increased from 3.6 x Ra to 5.5 x Ra from July to October 1989, and then...

  4. annual update volumes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water-to-Air Heat Pump for Space Conditioning 20 12;Systems In The Geothermal Market New October 9, 2013 12;Howard Newton HVAC System EngineerHVAC System Engineer Mammoth Water...

  5. Where the Sky Is the Right Color: Scale and Air Pollution in the Big Bend Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donez, Francisco Juan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a coal-fired power plant in Coahuila, Mexico. AlthoughNegras, Mexico: the towering smokestacks of a mammoth coal-the large coal deposits there. However, Mexico had strong

  6. Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Casa Diablo Hot Spring:...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Composition of Casa Diablo Hot Spring: Magmatic CO2 near Mammoth Lakes, CA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Chemical and...

  7. An Overview of Yellowstone Geologic Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and southwestern Montana. Located along the continental divide within the Middle Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone is on a high plateau averaging 8,000 feet in elevation. The mountain ranges that encircle Yellowstone vary from Mountains to the north; the Absaroka Mountains on the eastern border; and the Teton Range, within Grand

  8. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Upper Snake­Rock, Portneuf, Blackfoot, Willow, Teton, Beaver­Camas, and the Upper and Lower Henrys Fork province. (Source: ICBEMP 1997.) Major Hydrologic Unit (Watershed)a Snake Headwaters Subbasin Relative province. (Source GAP II, Scott et al. 2002) Focal Habitat Type High Low Medium Very High Very Low Riparian

  9. May 15, 2014 Patricia A. Beddows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    British Geomorphological Research Group, Student Opportunity Grant Ł 200 200002 University of Bristol Parau Award, Science Research Fund, British Cave Research Association, Ł 900 199698 Graduate, USA patricia@earth.northwestern.edu PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS Carbonate geology, karst, and caves

  10. Cavern Protection (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, “cave” means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and...

  11. The Holarctic Hacklemesh Spider Genus Callobius (Araneae: Amaurobiidae): Morphology, Systematics, and Population Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Stephen Ellis

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of terminals from Mt. Ashland in Josephine County, Oregon, a6 Not recovered Not recovered Mt. Ashland Not recovered Cave2.02, Cave Junction, Mt. Ashland). All of these exemplars

  12. Cordage Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veldmeijer, André J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "rope cave" at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis. (Submitted to Journalfound in Cave 5 at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis. Photo courtesy ofExpedition at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis. Figure 5. Various types of

  13. International Student Services Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of the West Indies at Cave Hill Belgium Université Libre de Bruxelles* Solvay Brussels School

  14. '-> print _ profile VIRTUAL DA VINCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    ? Are the caves just about fancier videogames, or better cyber-porn? Well sure. As with most technological

  15. In the name of GodIn the name of God Porosity Development inPorosity Development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Halocline (R. Palmer, 1985; Mylroie, 1988)(R. Palmer, 1985; Mylroie, 1988) nn Mixing zoneMixing zone (Smart et al., 1988; Sanford and Konikow, 1989)(Smart et al., 1988; Sanford and Konikow, 1989) #12;This zone al., 1991 (volume in cubic meter)1991 (volume in cubic meter) nn Caves point West caveCaves point

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Michael Tobler Ingo Schlupp Katja U. Heubel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    ) that is rich in highly toxic H2S. We compared the water chemistry and fish communities of the cave and several nearby surface streams. Our study revealed high con- centrations of H2S in the cave and its outflow (El Azu- fre). The concentrations of H2S reach more than 300 lM inside the cave, which are acutely toxic

  17. METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN 3D SCANNING AND MODELLING OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL FRENCH HERITAGE SITE : THE BRONZE AGE PAINTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN 3D SCANNING AND MODELLING OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL FRENCH HERITAGE SITE: Documentation of World Heritage Sites KEY WORDS: Cultural Heritage, painted cave, TLS, Photogrammetry, Close Age painted cave, registrered in the French Historical Monuments. The archaeological cave of Les Fraux

  18. GEOSCIENCE INFORMATION SERVICES: “Peak” Performances - Proceedings of the 45th Meeting of the Geoscience Information Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoScience Information Society

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , library grant program. As a historic university-based col- lection, MGS publications were a priority for dig- itization and upload in the newly formed UDC. Once in the UDC, the text was indexed and made full-text searchable. The monographic series avail... Teton Range. Photograph courtesy of U.S. National Park Service. Pages 152-153, Earthquake Information Bulletin, v.10, no.4. ID. Earthquake Information Bulletin 121 eib00121. U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library. Image file: http...

  19. The utilization of genetic markers to resolve modern management issues in historic bison populations: implications for species conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbert, Natalie Dierschke

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Niobrara NWR; 50 ? Theodore Roosevelt NP (TRS) 1983 20 ? Colorado National Monument (unknown origin) Fort Niobrara NWR (FN) Nebraska 1913 6 ? private ranch, Nebraska; 2 ? Yellowstone NP 1935 4 ? Custer State Park 1937 4 ? Custer State Park...Peak from Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge; Steve Cain and Lee Jones from Grand Teton National Park; Lindy Garner and David Wiseman from the National Bison Range; Nancy Gilbertson from Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge; Michael Oehler and Russell...

  20. Modern stalagmite oxygen isotopic composition and its implications of climatic change from a high-elevation cave in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau over the past 50 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appeared in southern China, where solar insolation decreaseddicate that the solar radiation in China monsoon regions isdownwelling surface solar radiation in China from National

  1. Now we're going to talk about one of a problem that has fascinated humans since we were cave dwellers. No, not how to make a decent club to thump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutsch, Josh

    . Eventually technology progressed to the time of Tycho Brahe, where he convinced the king of Denmark

  2. analyse des niveaux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Grotte Materials Science Websites Summary: of stratigraphic levels and pedogenesis (Angel Cave, Spain) A. Djerrab1, I. Hedley2, P. Camps3, S. Abdessadok4, C magntique,...

  3. anthonomus grandis coleoptera: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Microcreagris grandis, the millipede Idagona lehmanensis, and the harvest- man Cyptobunus ungulatus ungulatus species found in lower-elevation caves, such...

  4. How to ,,calibrate" speleothem proxy data: a critical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Ometeoric ppt Soil Limestone Atmosphere Cave CO2(atm) CaCO3 CaCO3 Biosphere DICseepage water CO2(soil gas

  5. Hydrologic and Aquatic Species Implications of the Proposed Pebble Mine, Bristol Bay, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cundy, Fiona

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction  Limits    (Source:  Northern  Dynasty  Minerals,  The  mineral  deposits  sought  for  extraction  occur  at  minerals  with  relatively   low  grade  orebodies  are  extracted  by  caving  and  extraction.    

  6. Multiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    ://www.global-sci.com/ Global Science Preprint #12;2 Field Scale Meso-Scale Micro-Scale Field Scale Meso-Scale Micro-Scale Caves

  7. 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering | Free-Day Excursion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Integrated Nanotechnologies Bandelier Cave dwelling at Bandelier National Monument... - Image courtesy of J. Rhyne (former LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering Co-Director)...

  8. Designs Mutually unbiased bases 2-designs from bases Open problems Optimal complex projective designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Peter

    . Theorem (Renes, Blume-Kohout, Scott, Caves '03) For any finite X , 1 |X|2 u,vX |u v|2t d + t - 1 t -1

  9. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boat representation. Wadi Abu Subeira. Photograph by thein the Eastern Desert. Wadi Barramiya. Probably Naqada II.hand stencils from Wadi el-Obeiyd Cave. Farafra Oasis.

  10. HYDROMECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION FOR SITE SELECTION IN CO2 PERMANENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politčcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    -BarcelonaTech), Barcelona, Spain 3 Energy City Foundation (CIUDEN), Spanish Government CO2 Geological Storage Programme (Vilarrasa et al., 2011, Energy Procedia) Trees killed by CO2 leakage in Mammoth Mountains (Farrar et al EQUATIONS Mass conservation equation Darcy's law Momentum balance Effective stress Hooke's law (linear

  11. Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Bernard

    this death rate compares to that of hunter-gatherers going after woolly mammoths, but it is not comforting or transplants. Less dramatic, but nevertheless impactful, say in the United States, are "western diet" related another outbreak of food borne disease with some hospitalizations and deaths. This time it is Escherichia

  12. Breeding Experiments with Blackberries and Raspberries.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, H. (Helge)

    1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -pollination of the Dallas was made with pollen from Mammoth, April 16th and 17th, 1909. The resulting fruit was gathered May the 24th, and the seed sown June 19th. On February 28th, thirty-one plants were potted. Of these, thirteen plants lived to be transplanted...

  13. Partition Based Cascaded Generator Scheduling with Constraints for Large Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    must be revisited. In this paper, we focus on the generator scheduling problem in smart grid comprehensive view for planning in the smart grid. Given the mammoth size of the power networks, we propose]. In addition, the smart grid vision in- corporates consumer-driven and regulator-driven policies

  14. Scott Nooner Work Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nooner, Scott

    radiation damage in alkali halide crystals, 7/94 to 6/96 · Lab Assistant, Hendrix College Physics Dept., 8 · 7/00 Installation of a Fiber Optic Infrasound Sensor, Pinyon Flats, CA · 9/00 Gravity survey of Long Valley Caldera, Mammoth Lakes, CA · 7/01 Installation of a Fiber Optic Borehole Strainmeter in the LVEW

  15. Research Article Survival of Pronghorns in Western South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , cause-specific mortality, predation, pronghorn, South Dakota, survival, Wind Cave National Park, SD 57007, USA DANIEL E. RODDY, Wind Cave National Park, 26611 United States Highway 385, Hot Springs of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA ABSTRACT Survival and cause-specific mortality of pronghorns (Antilocapra

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Survival in an extreme habitat: the roles of behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    ) inhabiting a limestone cave in Mexico. Several springs inside the cave are rich in toxic H2S. We demonstrate was low even at comparatively low H2S concentrations. Further- more, we show that food limitation affects the survival of P. mexicana pointing to energetically costly physiological adaptations to detoxify H2S

  17. School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with rate and pressure transient data to understand reservoir properties of caved and fractured strata. Caving results in fracturing and relaxation of the overlying strata, which is called "gob." Due to its highly fractured nature, gob contains many flow paths for gas migration. Therefore

  18. White paper on "Speleothem-based climate proxy records" Dominik Fleitmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2002). 2. Oxygen (!18 O) isotope ratio: interpreted as variations in cave temperature and properties downstream of the source caused by equilibration of aqueous CO2 with cave air is also recognised, and in some in speleothem-based research. This has led to focused and high-quality research that has utilised many

  19. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy

  20. Clean Energy Education and Empowerment Women's Initiative | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-Teton Clean

  1. Clean Energy Manufacturing Federal Resource Guide | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-Teton CleanEnergy

  2. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-TetonClean Energy

  3. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-TetonCleanPartnerships

  4. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-TetonCleanPartnershipsClean

  5. The Method of Distributed Volumetric Sources for Forecasting the Transient and Pseudo-steady State Productivity of Multiple Transverse Fractures Intersected by a Horizontal Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Diangeng

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    from 9/1/2007 .........................................................64? 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 General Background In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing gas from unconventional sources is the next... In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing gas from unconventional sources is the next level of the fossil-fuel recovery challenge. 6 The mammoth volume and long-term potential of coalbed methane (CBM), tight gas...

  6. Core reduction sequences from El-Masloukh, and Acheuleo-Yabrudian site in Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Karisa

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) characterizes this phase as a period of exploration and unsystematic excavations. Turville- Petre (1927) was a major contributor to research during this period. At the sites of Emireh and Zuttiyeh in Israel, Turville-Petre demonstrated that fossil hominids... Cave (Garrod and Bate 1937; Jelinek 1982) and Zuttiyeh Cave (Turville-Petre 1927) in Israel, Adlun Caves (Roe 1983) in Lebanon, and Yabrud I (Rust 1950; Solecki and Solecki 1987-88) and El Kowm Basin (Copeland and Hours 1983) in Syria. Absolute ages...

  7. Reversible immortalization of Nestin-positive precursor cells from pancreas and differentiation into insulin-secreting cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Pei; Li, Li; Qi, Hui [The Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, 518020 Shenzhen (China)] [The Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, 518020 Shenzhen (China); Zhou, Han-xin [Department of General Surgery, First Hospital (Shenzhen Second People's Hospital) of Shenzhen University, 518020 Shenzhen (China)] [Department of General Surgery, First Hospital (Shenzhen Second People's Hospital) of Shenzhen University, 518020 Shenzhen (China); Deng, Chun-yan [The Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, 518020 Shenzhen (China)] [The Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, 518020 Shenzhen (China); Li, Fu-rong, E-mail: frli62@yahoo.com [The Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, 518020 Shenzhen (China) [The Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medical College (Shenzhen People's Hospital), Jinan University, 518020 Shenzhen (China); Shenzhen Institution of Gerontology, 518020 Shenzhen (China)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NPPCs from mouse pancreas were isolated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tet-on system for SV40 large in NPPCs was used to get RINPPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RINPPCs can undergo at least 80 population doublings without senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RINPPCs can be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of GLP-1 and sodium butyrate promoted the differentiation process. -- Abstract: Pancreatic stem cells or progenitor cells posses the ability of directed differentiation into pancreatic {beta} cells. However, these cells usually have limited proliferative capacity and finite lifespan in vitro. In the present study, Nestin-positive progenitor cells (NPPCs) from mouse pancreas that expressed the pancreatic stem cells or progenitor cell marker Nestin were isolated to obtain a sufficient number of differentiated pancreatic {beta} cells. Tet-on system for SV40 large T-antigen expression in NPPCs was used to achieve reversible immortalization. The reversible immortal Nestin-positive progenitor cells (RINPPCs) can undergo at least 80 population doublings without senescence in vitro while maintaining their biological and genetic characteristics. RINPPCs can be efficiently induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells that contain a combination of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and sodium butyrate. The results of the present study can be used to explore transplantation therapy of type I diabetes mellitus.

  8. Survey of glaciers in the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana and Wyoming; Size response to climatic fluctuations 1950-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatelain, E.E. [Valdosta State Univ., GA (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial survey of Northern Rocky Mountain glaciers in Montana and Wyoming was conducted in late summer of 1996. The Flathead, Swan, Mission, and Beartooth Mountains of Montana were covered, as well as the Teton and Wind River Ranges of Wyoming. Present extent of glaciers in this study were compared to limits on recent USGS 15 and 7.5 topographic maps, and also from selected personal photos. Large cirque and hanging glaciers of the Flathead and Wind River Ranges did not display significant decrease in size or change in terminus position. Cirque glaciers in the Swan, Mission, Beartooth and Teton Ranges were markedly smaller in size; with separation of the ice body, growth of the terminus lake, or cover of the ice terminus with rockfalls. A study of annual snowfall, snowdepths, precipitation, and mean temperatures for selected stations in the Northern Rocky Mountains indicates no extreme variations in temperature or precipitation between 1950-1996, but several years of low snowfall and warmer temperatures in the 1980`s appear to have been sufficient to diminish many of the smaller cirque glaciers, many to the point of extinction. The disappearance of small cirque glaciers may indicate a greater sensitivity to overall climatic warming than the more dramatic fluctuations of larger glaciers in the same region.

  9. area transit authority: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idea of essay My essay is about caves and karst areas. I deal with our work at the JZD, enviroment and importance of this topics. Places Moravian Karst is the biggest karst...

  10. adolescentes mexicanas influencia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Translocation of cave fish (Poecilia mexicana) within and between natural habitats along a Environmental Sciences...

  11. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology | Vol. 32, No. 1 (2012) | pp. 4764 Chemical Composition, Mineralogy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition, Mineralogy, and Physical Structure of Pigments on Arrow and Dart Fragments from Gypsum Cave), and electron microprobe (EM) to determine their chemical composition, mineralogy, and physical structure pigments. Although variation in composition and mineralogy suggests some degree of experimentation

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Genetic diversity in a reintroduced swift fox population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State University, Brookings, SD 57006, USA G. M. Schroeder Wind Cave National Park, 26611 U.S. Highway depression and subsequent reduced fecundity, increased mortality, reduced adaptability, and physical

  13. Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Anchialine blue holes found in the interior of the Bahama Islands have distinct fresh and salt water layers, with vertical mixing, and dysoxic to anoxic conditions below the halocline. Scientific cave diving exploration and microbiological...

  14. The Supreme Triumph of the Surgeon's Art': Narrative History of Endocrine Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiger, Martha A.; Shen, Wen T.; Felger, Erin A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident as childrenis estimated that the Chernobyl fallout will produce 16,0002 Cave, A. J. E. , 34, 35 Chernobyl nuclear accident, 155

  15. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as a probable reservoir and disperser; however, the co-infection of bats with both of these microorganisms has found in bat guano accumulated in confined spaces such as caves and abandoned mines and buildings

  16. Species Revision and Generic Systematics of World Rileyinae (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Michael William

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fco Morazán, Hond. 32km E Teg. , El Zamorano, Rec: Cave,2 cal plc dor spr sss not teg Figure 4. Composite chalcidoidRileyinae mlm not no 1 spr llm teg ax sct sss lpa axl frl

  17. Hypogenic contribution to speleogenesis in a predominant epigenic karst system: A case study from the Venetian Alps, Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    the Venetian Alps, Italy Nicola Tisato a, , Francesco Sauro b , Stefano M. Bernasconi a , Rolf H.C. Bruijn Frasassi, Monte Cucco and Acqua santa Terme caves (Galdenzi and Menichetti, 1995; Galdenzi, 1997

  18. Research Scholarship, Collaboration, and Outreach at Northwestern University ISEN Collaborates to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    and smart-grid technology. 28 Connecting Caves to Coral Reefs Patricia Beddows, left, is exploring. 16 Solving the Last Mile The integration of traffic congestion and predictive modeling has positioned

  19. Entangled Roots: Race, Historical Literature, and Citizenship in the Nineteenth-Century Americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genova, Thomas Francis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Print. Cave, Damien. “Haiti’s Founding Document FoundGlasse, Jennifer. “Haiti’s Declaration of Independence Foundof the Independence of Haiti. 1804. nationalarchives.gov.uk.

  20. Jonah Unbound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Leonid Vladimir

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    being placed on a caved-in BMW, the remaining evidence of aaround until he could see her BMW pulling out of its parkingthe driveway, the same white BMW they'd taken to Playa del

  1. The Use of Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes as a Method for Delineating Sources of Organic Matter in Anchialine Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neisch, Julie A

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in the sediments of anchialine caves, activity 5 within redox gradients of the water column halocline is suspected to be of greater ecological importance (Pohlman 2011). Organic matter can be trapped in the halocline due to the density change between..., and in order to survive this harsh environment, stygobites have evolved complex sensory appendages, slowed their metabolism, and even have reduced (or completely lost) pigment and eyes (Iliffe and Bishop 2007). While most crustaceans living outside of caves...

  2. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

  3. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  4. HAPPENING THIS WEEK NEWSLETTER FOR OCTOBER 14th -OCTOBER 21st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    aNd BiOdiESEL, diSCUSSiNg aLTERNaTiVE FUEL USE iN COLd CLimaTES. ThE paNEL WiLL iNCLUdE: maTThEW Shi OF SOLaR ENERgy -Wednesdays frOm 2:30 pm tO 4:30 pm betWeen Oct 22 and nOV 19. $62.50 WOnderLUst membersOdiESEL JESSE ThERiEN, FULL CiRCLE BiOdiESEL aLiCia COx, yELLOWSTONE-TETON CLEaN ENERgy COaLiTiON, ExECUTiVE di

  5. Science and technology review: June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE`s Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO{sub 2} mystery and osteoporosis are also included.

  6. Vertebrate fossils from late Cenozoic deposits of central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, C. W.

    1952-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    -ternal re-entrant angle is smooth and not crenulatedas in L. californicus GRAY, nor is the anterior part of the tooth narrow as in L. townsendii cam panius HOLLISTER. The tooth has an antero-posterior di-ameter of 3.7 mm. and a transverse width of 3.0 mm.... The molar has an over-all length of 187.0 mm. The greatest width is across the second loph from the anterior end, which is 96.2 mm. The border of the tooth is smooth and not rugose. A molar of a Columbian mammoth taken from this pit was examined. Mammuthus...

  7. PAWTUCKETSTREET B R OA DWAY S T R E E T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    PAWTUCKETSTREET B R OA DWAY S T R E E T MA R G INA L S T R E E T PAW TUC K E T B LVD. R T. 113 MAMMOTH R OAD UNIVE R S ITY AVE TO E A S T ME A DOW L A NE S C HOOL S T R E E T S C HOOL S TR E E T S AL E M S TR E E T V F W HIG HWAY R IVER SID E ST. F R . MOR IS S E T T E B LVD PE R K INS S T

  8. Temperatures and Natural Gamma-Ray Logs Obtained in 1986 from Shady Rest

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, Mammoth Lakes, Mono

  9. Temperatures at the Base of the Seismogenic Crust Beneath Long Valley

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, Mammoth Lakes,

  10. Template:Citation incomplete | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, Mammoth Lakes,incomplete

  11. Template:Cite | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, Mammoth

  12. Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, MammothContentAssist Jump

  13. Template:Definition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, MammothContentAssist

  14. Increases in 3He/4He in Fumarolic Gas Associated with the 1989 Earthquake

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New EnergyIT PowerImagine EnergySwarm Beneath Mammoth

  15. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  16. Arubolana Botosaneanu and Stock, 1979: a genus of stygobitic cirolanid isopods, with description of a new species from the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    of a new species from the Dominican Republic Lazare BOTOSANEANU(1) and Thomas M. ILIFFE(2) (1) Zoölogisch cave in the Dominican Republic. The species of Arubolana are well characterized by shared characters. Key words: stygobitic Cirolanidae; Arubolana; Dominican Republic; colonization of stygal habitats

  17. 3D Graph Visualization with the Oculus Rift Virtual Graph Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wismath, Stephen

    reality environment such as a CAVE, or · printed as a physical model with a 3D printer. Early studies3D Graph Visualization with the Oculus Rift Virtual Graph Reality Farshad Barahimi, Stephen Wismath regarding three- dimensional (3D) representations of graphs. However, the actual usefulness of such 3D

  18. Bio-inspired MEMS Pressure and Flow Sensors for Underwater Navigation and Object Imaging "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for artificial lateral line applications," Master's thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, September 2011 the biological neuromasts on the body of many fish. For instance, the blind cave fish, Astyanax mexicanus Kayak Testing: Commercial vs. MEMS Pitching Test Power Spectrum of Pitching Test A photograph of blind

  19. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 16, EGU2014-14313-1, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forray, Ferenc

    (s) 2014. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Paleoclimate record from Zidita Cave (Romania) using guano-derived 13,3) (1) Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, (2) School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA, (3) "Emil Racovi¸ta" Institute of Speleology, Cluj-Napoca, Romania In this study, we

  20. LEAGUE A LEAGUE B LEAGUE C Delta Chi 5 0 Sigma Chi 5 0 Lambda Chi Alpha 5 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Rain 2 3 A-7 1 4 Straight Shooters 1 4 Notorious 1 4 Team Diesel 0 5 Pugh St. Bullies 0 5 Chuff Law 0 5 No Refunds 4 1 Grad Jawns 4 1 Click 3 2 Off in the Corner 3 2 Bad Latitudes 3 2 McKean Squad 2 3 Bear Cave 2

  1. James C. M. Ahern Department of Anthropology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    Vindija Cave, Croatia: a biased sample? The late Neandertal sample from Vindija (Croatia) has been described as transitional between the earlier Central European Neandertals from Krapina (Croatia) and modern.0586 Available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on Introduction Northwestern Croatia has yielded many sig

  2. Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Evan

    Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb, sinkholes and other drainage features control the temporal and spatial pattern of sediment storage across storage function of sinkholes and caves has not been investigated using a sediment budget approach

  3. Echolocation in scorpions? pg 1 of 8 Seismic echolocation: do scorpions use this novel method of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    to the high speeds at which sound travels through most solid media (Brownell 1984). Sound waves traveling too, however, transmit sound at speeds of less than 150 m/s, less even than the speed #12;Echolocation and whales, and a few species of cave-dwelling birds possess the ability to echolocate through a liquid

  4. A study of the effect of mineralized cotton-seed meal on the growth of Albino rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huebel, Leon William

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. evicionos 2Mct ooy 10 per is a fscxto? Xn tho basil~ cd hceep~b~ indccpu~ of oopper~ but the latter plays a pccrt in oonvorting inorgenio iron into ho'. xoglobin Titus, Cave, anx( ~ stets that ~ee is benefioicl fox' hcexo globin buklning in rats etuxn...

  5. Moving the Massachusetts Masses: Boston's Subway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    inexpensive, the cars were slow and overcrowded. Seven dif- ferent horsecar companies converged on downtown End Street Railway Company with Henry M. Whitney as its president. By 1893 both Whitney and city of timber brac- es. The braces kept the excavated walls from caving in. #12;power. Although the electric

  6. Zoologica Scripta, Vol. 27, No.1,pp, 1-15, 1998 Elsevier ScienceLtd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    Cueva del Agua, a shallow cave on Tenerife, Canary Islands (Huys 1988~).The Superornatiremidae comprises Atlanticcaves on Bermuda and the Canary Islands (Huys 1996).The recent discovery of these genera in the Balearic Islands (Jaume, 1997) provides evidence that the family assumes an Amphi

  7. Myodocopid Ostracoda (Halocypridina, Cladocopina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    in the Bahamas, Canary Islands, and Mexico Louis S. Kornicker and Thomas M. Iliffe SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS (Halocypridina, Cladocopina)fromAnchialine Caves in the Bahamas, Canary Islands, and Mexico. Smithsonian, 1995, from a lava tube in Lanzarote, Canary Islands. One specimen of the cladocopid Polycopiellafromthe

  8. And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca Terry, PhD'08 drop their bones on the cave floor or (in the case of owls) ex- pel them in the form of pellets

  9. 5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/5/547/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions Papers published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  10. Distinct element modelling and mining induced subsidence: Influence of the major faults Modelisation des affaissements miniers :Influence des faules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Nancy, France ABSTRACT :This study examines the subsidence due to Underground mining works in a coal mine in France. Coal is mined at a depth reaching 1000 m, according to longwall face method with caving. The seam ranges between 2 and 3.4 m in thickness. The dip strata does not exceed 10°. As predicted

  11. Detection and monitoring of high stress concentration zones induced by coal mining using numerical and microseismic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1). In the zone investigated, the seams worked lie in two clusters: lower and upper of soft coal of the site The Irma coal seam is worked using the longwall caving method. The width of the working face2001-55 Detection and monitoring of high stress concentration zones induced by coal mining using

  12. VRDD: Applying virtual reality visualization to protein docking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Zhiping

    the levels of atomic overlap and interac- tion energy. The stunning VR graphics immerse users in the scene. Keywords: virtual reality, computer graphics, CAVE, mo- lecular docking, binding free energy calculations molecular docking aided by automatic docking and side chain confor- mational search. Binding free energies

  13. Abstract This paper presents a six-legged, sprawl-tuned autonomous robot (STAR). This novel robot has a variable leg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    and energy consumption, the robot is fitted with radially spoked legs which can perform almost like regularAbstract² This paper presents a six-legged, sprawl-tuned autonomous robot (STAR). This novel robot advantages over wheeled vehicles for off-road locomotion, such as in caves and collapsed buildings

  14. Male mating behavior and costs of sexual harassment for females in cavernicolous and extremophile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    by physicochemical stressors, such as toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S), or the fish occur in lightless subterranean (cave) habitats. Using five different populations from surface habitats with or without H2S, and from a sulfidic with at least one physicochemical stressor present (H2S or absence of light), a reduction in male sexual

  15. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Evolutionary Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    adapted to extreme environmental conditions [i.e., darkness in caves and/or toxic hydrogen sulphide (H2S predictor for the evolutionary reduction of aggressiveness, especially when combined with presence of H2S indicating evolved mechanisms to better cope with H2S. 1. Introduction 1.1. Ecological Speciation. Divergent

  16. 22. Kasting, J. F., Pollack, J. B. & Ackerman, T. P. Response of Earth's atmosphere to increases in solar flux and implications for loss of water from Venus. Icarus 57, 335355 (1984).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    ............................................................................................................................................................................. The highly endangered solenodons, endemic to Cuba (Solenodon cubanus) and Hispaniola (S. paradoxus), comprise as tectonic forces separated Cuba and Hispaniola3,4 . Efforts to prevent extinction of the two surviving and Hispaniola to elevations of 2,000 m, and shelter in caves, crevices, logs and extensive tunnel networks

  17. Chapter Eight Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    ) Coating Description Carbonate skin Coating composed primarily of carbonate, usually calcium carbonate; the agent may be manganese, sulphate, carbonate, silica, iron, oxalate, organisms, or anthropogenic Dust, cyanobacteria, algae Nitrate crust Potassium and calcium nitrate coatings on rocks, often in caves and rock

  18. Highlights 160 Semana 15-19 de Noviembre, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Barton realized her premonition was right. Everywhere she looked, bat bodies were covered with white, it was just a brown, sludgy mass." AFFLICTED A little brown bat in a New York cave exhibits white fungus that produced the ash cloud that halted European air traffic last April had been active intermittently for about

  19. Abstracts EuroDendro 2004 [P] Poster [L] Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in written sources. One of the major items of the celebration program is the reconstruction of the Vilnius sylvestris L. Mature trees were preferred. An average length of tree ring sequences of the measured samples establishing dating and cross-dating of the coffins. Ban Bo Kri Cave and Ban Rai Rock shelters were the study

  20. Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 , Susan Stepney1 and Leo Caves1 1 University-like structures. Models of protein folding vary in complexity and the amount of prior knowledge they contain). The energy landscape theory of protein folding (Onuchic et al., 1997) predicts a rugged funnel-like energy

  1. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    -wing vehicles that can monitor atmospheric data without using fossil fuels. J. Sean Humbert tests autonomous varieties of autonomous aerial vehicles, and new ways of utilizing them, offer the potential for making for autonomous bio-inspired micro-vehicles capable of penetrating caves and tunnels, and of reducing the human

  2. Architecture is frozen music. Bragdon This publication accompanies the traveling exhibition Pulse Dome Project: Art &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    a form of sustainable architecture that was in harmony with natural processes--a structure he calledpulse dome #12;Architecture is frozen music. Bragdon #12;This publication accompanies the traveling architecture, wombs, and such natural forms as caves, tunnels, and volcanoes to learn what had been done

  3. Brazil 2 Chapada Diamantina and Rio de Janeiro Chapada Diamantina Happy Trekking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    Brazil 2 ­ Chapada Diamantina and Rio de Janeiro Chapada Diamantina ­ Happy Trekking The plateau offers a terrific natural shower with no water pressure problems ­ is a happy trekking experience. Enough, Valley, Cave, Mountain - in this order Day 3 - The Very Very Wet Mosquito Fall and the Paridas Rock Day 4

  4. Investigating the Forcing and Response in Proxy Records of Multi-Decadal Scale Climate Variability PP33A-1003 Kristine L. DeLong (kdelong@marine.usf.edu), Terrence M. Quinn, Richard Z. Poore and Gary T. Mitchum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida, University of

    ) and those observed in solar output records. We first investigated the impact of age control on frequency, changes in solar irradiance, and episodes of explosive volcanism. We are investigating the links in multi Grissino-Mayer for providing El Malpais data and Yongjin Wang and coauthors for providing Dongge Cave data

  5. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  6. Phase 1 drilling operations at the Magma Energy Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Phase 1 drilling operations for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. An important part of the Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program, this well is designed to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degree}C, whichever comes first. There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart, with scientific investigations in the borehole between the drilling intervals. Phase 1 of this project resulted in a 20 inch cased hole to 2558 feet, with 185 feet of coring beyond that. This document comprises a narrative of the daily activities, copies of the daily mud and lithologic reports, time breakdowns of rig activities, inventories of lost circulation materials, temperature logs of the cored hole, and a strip chart mud log. 2 figs.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  8. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  10. Preliminary report on LLNL mine seismicity deployment at the Twentymile Coal Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Hunter, S.L.; Glenn, L.A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a just completed experiment at the Twentymile Coal Mine, operated by the Cyprus Amax Coal Company near Oak Creek, CO. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain local and regional seismic data from roof caves associated with long-wall mining activities and to use this data to help determine the effectiveness with which these events can be discriminated from underground nuclear explosions under a future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  11. The potential use of biogeochemistry in the detection of petroleum microseepage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusman, R.W.; Saeed, M.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States)); Abu-Ali, M.A. (Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry was applied to the indirect detection of petroleum microseepage in the vicinity of Eagle Springs oil field, Railroad Valley, Nevada, and Cave Canyon field, Paradox basin, Utah. Trace elements were measured in native vegetation over and surrounding areas of production at the test sites. The oxidation of microseepage in the upper part of the soil column is postulated to cause an increase in plant uptake of transition trace elements such as iron, manganese, and vanadium, and a decrease in plant uptake of alkaline earth elements such as calcium, strontium, and barium. Compared to nonproductive areas, an increase in uptake of transition trace elements and a decrease in alkaline earth elements was observed in Fourwing salt-bush over Eagle Springs field. The postulated increase in uptake of transition trace elements and decrease in alkaline earth elements was not as apparent in Big sage-brush nor in Utah juniper over the Cave Canyon field. The observation of the postulated effects on vegetation at Eagle Springs may be due to the relatively large rates of microseepage independently observed using other methods, and the extensive faulting in Railroad Valley. The weaker response observed at Cave Canyon may reflect the lack of faulting and the retention of light hydrocarbons in the reservoir. Another possible reason for weal response is that the available plant species at Cave Canyon do not exhibit the effect at the lower soil pH measured in the area. At low pH and low Eh, the solubility of transition elements in soil pore waters and plant uptake is increased. Due to the high soil pH of the Railroad Valley area, the uptake of alkaline earth elements should be decreased where microseepage is occurring because of crystallization of carbonate minerals.

  12. Potential for the use of biogeochemistry in the detection of petroleum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusman, R.W.; Saeed, M.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States)); Abu-Ali, M.A. (ARAMCO, Golden, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry was applied to the indirect detection of petroleum microseepage in the vicinity of the Eagle Springs oil field, Railroad Valley, Nevada and Cave Canyon field, Paradox basin, Utah. Trace elements were measured in native vegetation over and surrounding areas of production at the test sites. The oxidation of microseepage in the upper part of the soil column is postulated to cause an increase in plant uptake of transition trace elements such as iron, manganese, vanadium, and a decrease in plant uptake of alkaline earth elements such as calcium, strontium, and barium. An increase in uptake of transition trace elements and a decrease in alkaline earth elements was observed in Fourwing saltbush over the Eagle Springs field. The postulated increase in uptake of transition trace elements and decrease in alkaline earth elements was not observed in Big Sagebrush nor in Utah juniper over the Cave Canyon field. The observation of the postulated effects at Eagle Springs may be due to the relatively large rates of microseepage independently observed using other methods, or the loss of the light hydrocarbons and extensive faulting in Railroad Valley. The apparent failure to observed the same effect at Cave Canyon may reflect the lack of faulting and the retention of light hydrocarbons in the reservoir. Another possibility is that the available plant species at Cave Canyon do not exhibit the effect at the lower soil pH measured in the area. The theory predicts that the increased uptake of transition elements and decreased uptake of alkaline earth elements will be enhanced at high soil pH.

  13. Healthy Stocker and Feeder Calves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, H. T.; Maddox, L. A. Jr.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is often shorter than the meandering journey from farm to feedyard or pasture; some calves arrive sick. Others exposed to infection enroute sicken soon after arrival. Rapid breathing, depression, scouring, coughing, lacrirna tion and nasal discharge... antibiotics, sulfonamides, detoxicants and antidiarrheals is usually good. A certain percentage of the calves treated (perhaps 2 or 3 percent), do not recover. They eat little, cough a little, scour a little, stand around tucked up and caved in laterally...

  14. Historical and Modern Perspectives on Group Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esses, Victoria M.; Dovidio, John F.; Danso, Henry A.; Jackson, L. M.; Semenya, Antoinette

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., Aronson, J., & Steele, C. M. (2000). When beliefs yield to evidence: Reducing biased evaluation by affirming the self. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 1151-1164. Danso, H. A. & Esses, V. M (2001). Black experimenters..., 1986; LeVine & Campbell, 1972; Sherif, 1966; Sherif & Sherif, 1953; for reviews see Brown, 1995; Jackson, 1993; Taylor & Moghaddam, 1994). Perhaps the most well- known study supporting Realistic Group Conflict Theory is the Robbers Caves experiment...

  15. An examination of biological variation in Lower Pecos and Central Texas human populations: the odontometric evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailloux, Jennifer Lynn

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are documented exclusively in the Human Osteology files. Muertos Cave deposits yielded a minimum of two burials and one partial cremation. An additional individual, recovered near Langtry along the Pecos River, was donated to the laboratory by a private... W. Rowe offered guidance and patience throughout the process. Additionally, thanks go to Laura Nightengale and Carolyn Spock for providing access to the Human Osteology Lab and Records at the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory. Thanks are due...

  16. Construction of Blaze at the University of Illinois at Chicago: A Shared, High-Performance, Visual Computer for Next-Generation Cyberinfrastructure-Accelerated Scientific, Engineering, Medical and Public Policy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Maxine D. [Acting Director, EVL; Leigh, Jason [PI

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters petascale computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energy’s Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for “Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE),” enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.

  17. Hole cleaning requirements with seabed returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordt, David Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of different non-Newtonian fluids 56 INTRODUCTION A drilling fluid is used for removing cuttings from the hole, controlling subsurface pressures, preventing caving-in of the formations, suspension of cuttings, weighting materials, and many other uses... of the hole. The drilling problems related to hole cleaning can occur at low as well as high annular velocities. Cuttings can travel no faster than the fluid in which they are transported; however, they can travel more slowly. Their fall (slip) rate...

  18. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVE SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE 105 K EAST ION EXCHANGE COLUMN MONOLITH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOCHEN, R.M.

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-K East (KE) Basin Ion Exchange Column (IXC) cells, lead caves, and the surrounding vault are to be removed as necessary components in implementing ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (Ecology et al. 2003) milestone M-034-32 (Complete Removal of the K East Basin Structure). The IXCs consist of six units located in the KE Basin, three in operating positions in cells and three stored in a lead cave. Methods to remove the IXCs from the KE Basin were evaluated in KBC-28343, ''Disposal of K East Basin Ion Exchange Column Evaluation''. The method selected for removal was grouting the six IXCs into a single monolith for disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Grout will be added to the IXC cells, IXC lead caves containing spent IXCs, and in the spaces between the lead cave walls and metal skin, to immobilize the contaminants, provide self-shielding, minimize void space, and provide a structurally stable waste form. The waste to be offered for disposal is the encapsulated monolith defined by the exterior surfaces of the vault and the lower surface of the underlying slab. This document presents summary of the data quality objective (DQO) process establishing the decisions and data required to support decision-making activities for the disposition of the IXC monolith. The DQO process is completed in accordance with the seven-step planning process described in EPA QA/G-4, ''Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process'', which is used to clarify and study objectives; define the appropriate type, quantity, and quality of data; and support defensible decision-making. The DQO process involves the following steps: (1) state the problem; (2) identify the decision; (3) identify the inputs to the decision; (4) define the boundaries of the study; (5) develop a decision rule (DR); (6) specify tolerable limits on decision errors; and (7) optimize the design for obtaining data.

  19. Paleoenvironment of Fort Union Formation, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, C.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocks of Paleocene age are represented in the Cave Hills of northwestern South Dakota by the Ludlow, Cannonball, and Tongue River members of the Fort Union Formation. The Cave Hills are situated within the southern margin of the Williston basin, 80 mi (130 km) north of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Numerous fine-grained, fining-upward sedimentary sequences comprise the Ludlow Member and are attributed to meandering streams occupying a low-gradient lower alluvial to upper deltaic plain. The Cannonball Member is 130 ft (40 m) thick in the North Cave Hills and is represented by two fine-grained, coarsening-upward sandstone mudstone sequences. A distinct vertical succession of sedimentary facies occur within each sequence representing offshore/lower shoreface through upper shoreface/foreshore depositional environment. A north to northeast depositional strike for the Cannonball shoreline is inferred from ripple crest and cross-bed orientations. The basal part of the Tongue River consists of approximately 40 to 50 ft (12 to 15 m) of lenticular sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, thin-bedded lignite, and kaolinite beds representing thin broad channels, point-bar, levee, overbank, and nearshore swamp depositional environments. Massive fluvial channel sandstones measuring several tens of ft in thickness overlie the fine-grained basal Tongue River lithologies. These channel sandstones represent the continued progradation of continental/fluvial/coastal plain depositional environments eastward over the marine sandstones of the Cannonball Member.

  20. Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

  1. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE 105K EAST BASIN ION EXCHANGE COLUMN MONOLITH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOCHEN, R.M.

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-K East (KE) Basin Ion Exchange Column (IXC) cells, lead caves, and the surrounding vault are to be removed as necessary components in implementing ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order'' (Ecology et al. 2003) milestone M-034-32 (Complete Removal of the K East Basin Structure). The IXCs consist of six units located in the KE Basin, three in operating positions in cells and three stored in a lead cave. Methods to remove the IXCs from the KE Basin were evaluated in KBC-28343, ''Disposal of K East Basin Ion Exchange Column Evaluation''. The method selected for removal was grouting of the six IXCs into a single monolith for disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Grout will be added to the IXC cells, IXC lead caves containing spent IXCs, and in the spaces between to immobilize the contaminants, provide self-shielding, minimize void space, and provide a structurally stable waste form. The waste to be offered for disposal is the encapsulated monolith defined by the exterior surfaces of the vault and the lower surface of the underlying slab. This document presents a summary of the data quality objective (DQO) process establishing the decisions and data required to support decision-making activities for disposition of the IXC monolith. The DQO process is completed in accordance with the seven-step planning process described in EPA QA/G-4, ''Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process'', which is used to clarify and study objectives; define the appropriate type, quantity, and quality of data; and support defensible decision-making. The DQO process involves the following steps: (1) state the problem; (2) identify the decision; (3) identify the inputs to the decision; (4) define the boundaries of the study; (5) develop a decision rule (DR); (6) specify tolerable limits on decision errors; and (7) optimize the design for obtaining data.

  2. A Critical Edition of Donne's "The Indifferent," "Love's Usury," "The Will," "The Funerall," "The Primerose," and "The Dampe" and a Digital Edition of "To his Mistress Going to Bed"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLawhorn, Tracy Elizabeth

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Metropolitan Archives LM1 ACC 1360.528 (Clitherow ms.) LP London Public Record Office LP1 State Papers Miscellaneous S.P. 9/51 NY New York Public Library NY1 Arents Collection, Cat. No. S191 (John Cave ms.) O Bodleian Library, Oxford O20..., and the parent-child pair O20-SP1), Group II (the parent -child pairs CT1-B7 and DT1-H4), Group III (B46, H5, and the sibling pair C9 and H6), and Group IV (NY3); each g roup (except for Group IV, which is 7 and A can be linked more specifically to C2...

  3. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  4. India in 'Dzam-Gling Rgyas-Bshad'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhaldi, Lama Sherab

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these mountains from the south to the north. In the rainy season. it flows with thickness of human size with muddy water. In winter and spring. at the time of rare rain it disappean in sand. However if one dip anywhere in the sand. there'wiU be fresh water... Dan (Vajrlsana) there is a forest called Buddhavana. aDd a cave known as Oaurakhsh Oupha etc. When one passes through all these places one reaches rGyal-Po'i-Khab (Rajagriha) afterabout three days journey. That city is surrounded by mountains like a fort...

  5. Position estimation of transceivers in communication networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, Claudia A. (Pleasanton, CA); Dowla, Farid (Castro Valley, CA)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a system and method using wireless communication interfaces coupled with statistical processing of time-of-flight data to locate by position estimation unknown wireless receivers. Such an invention can be applied in sensor network applications, such as environmental monitoring of water in the soil or chemicals in the air where the position of the network nodes is deemed critical. Moreover, the present invention can be arranged to operate in areas where a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available, such as inside buildings, caves, and tunnels.

  6. Optical Devices based on Limit Cycles and Amplification in Semiconductor Optical Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamerly, Ryan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At strong pump powers, a semiconductor optical cavity passes through a Hopf bifurcation and undergoes self-oscillation. We simulate this device using semiclassical Langevin equations and assess the effect of quantum fluctuations on the dynamics. Below threshold, the cavity acts as a phase-insensitive linear amplifier, with noise $\\sim 5\\times$ larger than the Caves bound. Above threshold, the limit cycle acts as an analog memory, and the phase diffusion is $\\sim 10\\times$ larger than the bound set by the standard quantum limit. We also simulate entrainment of this oscillator and propose an optical Ising machine and classical CNOT gate based on the effect.

  7. Pumping characteristics of chopped sorghum slurries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Shichuan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simultaneously in a pipeline. Classification of Solids Durand and Condolios (1953) published the following classification of particles in which each mode of particle transport was associated with a specific range of particle size. 1. Particles of a size less... is the settled-bed velocity, or deposition velocity. This is the mean velocity for the pipeline below which solids will settle on the bottom of the pipe (Cave and McElvain, 1983). It is important to know what the settled-bed velocity for a particular slurry...

  8. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Çelik, Gültekin, E-mail: gultekin@selcuk.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Selçuk University, Campus 42049 Konya (Turkey); Gökçe, Yasin; Y?ld?z, Murat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Karaman (Turkey)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model theory (WBEPMT). We have employed numerical non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for expectation values of radii and the necessary energy values have been taken from the compilation at NIST. The results obtained with the present method agree very well with the Coulomb approximation results given by Caves (1975). Moreover, electric quadrupole transition probability values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using the WBEPMT.

  9. Survey of Ilex crenata along the Callaway Gardens Holly Trail: summer 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labega, Adrienne L

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    * Ilex crenata cv. Fortune 53-F-016-005 X NOT FOUND; DR 1953 Ilex crenata cv. Foster 41 54-F-006 NOT FOUND; DR 1954 Ilex crenata cv. Foster 42 54-F-007-001 Y Poor condition; Remove; DR 1954 Ilex crenata cv. Frierson 53-F-001 Fair condition... Bradshaw IJex opaca cv Brillance IJex opaca cv Brown ?7 IJex opaca cv Canary IJex opaca cv Cardinal I/ex opaca cv Cardinal Hedge IJex opaca cv Carolina IJex opaca cv Carolina ?2 IJex opaca cv Cave Hill ?3 41 I/ex opaca cv Cecil I/ex opaca cv...

  10. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2)storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE)risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on theassumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basiccharacteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential forprimary containment by the target formation, (2) the potential forsecondary containment if the primary formation leaks, and (3) thepotential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primaryformation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework isimplemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scoresrepresenting expert opinions or general information available frompublished materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate thethree basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites.Application of the framework to the Rio Vista Gas Field, Ventura OilField, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements andextensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or modelresults in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improvethe approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and testedby colleagues and collaborators.

  11. Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

  12. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Dominance of a corporate institutional elite: the extended power of energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purdy, D.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to outline the patterns whereby large corporations may exert extensive influence over various aspects of socio-political-economic life. By focusing on the largest sector of the economy, energy corporation - and one on which all other sectors are at least partially dependent - the structure through which this corporate influence can be exercised is examined. Results demonstrate the extreme dominance of the entire energy field by the 20 largest petroleum corporations and intrusion of the petroleum industry's vast number of tenacles into all other sectors of the economy. In addition, the excessive number of interconnections between the largest petroleum corporations provide an extensive communication network among so-called competitors. Two major conclusions reached from this analysis were: (1) that within the fragile technostructure of modern America, the energy industry has reached approximate parity with the banking industry concerning its importance to society; and (2) that America during the latter half of the twentieth century has undergone a transition from social rule by a wealthy, social elite class to that of a corporate elite class through their interconnected roles on behalf of the mammoth corporations.

  14. Magnetic stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Piacenzian (Upper Pliocene) at Monte San Nicola (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Channell, J.E.T.; Sprovieri, R.; Di Stefano, E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Neogene, the Mediterranean was a rather unique biogeographic province. For this reason, first and last occurrences of Neogene species recorded in the Mediterranean region may not be synchronous with those recorded in the open oceans. This has important implications as most of the Neogene stage boundaries are defined on the basis of Mediterranean type sections. The most direct way to determine the relative timing of Mediterranean and open ocean datums is through correlation with the polarity time scale. Such correlations are not available for the Mediterranean Pliocene. The Trubi pelagic limestones and Monte narbone marls which characterize the SicilianPliocene are not ideal for magnetic stratigraphy due to weak remnant intensities and an ubiquitous normal polarity overprint. However, at Monte San Nicola, a magnetic stratigraphy has been resolved by stepwise demagnetization in small temperature increments. The upper and lower bounds of the Gauss Epoch, and the Mammoth and Kaena polarity events can be correlated to well defined planktonic foraminiferal and calcareous nannofossil datums. Hence the synchronism of these datums between the Mediterranean and the open ocean can be tested. The most notable discrepancy is in the last occurrence of G. margaritae which occurs at the base of the Gauss in most open marine sections, but is found at the top of the Gilbert at Monte San Nicola.

  15. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Stuart F [Colorado School of Mines; Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  16. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6–4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  17. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2) the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks; and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scores representing expert opinions or general information available from published materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate the three basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites. Application of the framework to the Rio Visa Gas Field, Ventura Oil Field, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or model results in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improve the approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and tested by colleagues and collaborators.

  18. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hals, Ingrid K., E-mail: ingrid.hals@ntnu.no [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)] [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpen, Frank [Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)] [Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)] [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Grill, Valdemar [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway) [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the positive findings. A fourfold induction of UCP-2 was required to exert minor metabolic effects. These findings question an impact of moderately elevated UCP-2 levels in beta cells as seen in diabetes.

  19. Plant Design for the Production of DUAGG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of producing DUAGG is an important consideration for any interested private firm in determining whether DUCRETE is economically viable as a material of construction in next-generation spent nuclear fuel casks. This study analyzed this project as if it was a stand-alone project. The capital cost includes engineering design, equipment costs and installation, start up, and management; the study is not intended to be a life-cycle cost analysis. The costs estimated by this study are shown in Table ES.1, and the conclusions of this study are listed in Table ES.2. The development of DUAGG and DUCRETE is a major thrust of the Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Project. An obvious use of depleted uranium is as a shielding material (e.g., DUCRETE). DUCRETE is made by replacing the conventional stone aggregate in concrete with DUAGG. One objective of this project is to bring the development of DUCRETE to a point at which a demonstrated basis exists for its commercial deployment. The estimation of the costs to manufacture DUAGG is an important part of this effort. Paul Lessing and William Quapp developed DUAGG and DUCRETE as part of an Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) program to find beneficial uses for depleted uranium (DU). Subsequently, this technology was licensed to Teton Technologies, Inc. The DUAGG process mixes DUO{sub 2} with sintering materials and additives to form pressed briquettes. These briquettes are sintered at 1300 C, and the very dense sintered briquettes are then crushed and classified into gap-graded size fractions. The graded DUAGG is then ready to be used to make high-strength heavy DUCRETE. The DUCRETE shielding will be placed into an annular steel cask-shell mold, which has internal steel reinforcing bars. The objectives of this study are to (1) use previous DUAGG process developments to design a plant that will produce DUAGG at a baseline rate, (2) determine the size of the equipment required to meet the DUAGG production scale, (3) estimate the facility's capital and operating costs, and (4) perform a parametric sensitivity analysis on those elements of cost that most affect the total operating expenses. Because the study does not include preoperational, decontamination, decommissioning, and closure costs, it cannot be considered a complete life-cycle cost analysis. However, the purpose of this analysis is to establish the potential viability of the DUAGG process as a private commercial venture to meet a market demand for advanced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage and transport casks.

  20. Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing. 3 figs.

  1. Isotope Trace Studies of Diffusion in Silicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. G. J. Wasserburg

    2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past year we have competed two studies of Os concentration and isotopic composition in rivers from the Himalayan uplift and in hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Both of these studies have been published. We have completed a study of paleo-climate in Soreq Cave, Israel, and have expanded our studies of the transport of U-Th through riverine and estuarine environments. We are completing two studies of weathering and transport in the vadose in two very different environments--one a tropical regime with a deep laterite profile and the other a northern arboreal forest with only a thin weathering zone. We have begun a new study of U-Th in aquifers with low water velocity.

  2. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes in aqueous systems using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program has moved ahead with success in several areas. The isotopic composition of osmium in seawater and in some rivers was directly determined for the first time. The concentration of osmium was first estimated in both seawater and rivers. A major effort was directed toward the transport of the U,Th series nuclides in a watershed in Sweden. A serious effort was directed at developing a transport model for the U,Th series nuclides in aquifers. A detailed study of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th dating of a cave in Israel was carried out collaboratively. The Os-Re fractionation between silicate and sulfide melts were determined in MORB basalts and glasses and the isotopic composition of Os was measured in sulfide samples.

  3. Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification. [STEALTH Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R.T.; Trent, B.C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two computer codes compare surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite-difference code are shown to match equivalent, implicit finite-element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite-difference continuum rigid-block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. Numerical techniques agree qualitatively with empirical studies but, so far, underpredict ground surface displacement. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together. It is recommended that the thermal characteristics of coal measure rock be investigated and that additional calculations be carried out to longer times so that cooling influences can be modeled.

  4. Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

  5. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system, thus substantially reducing the number of cables required to power the sensors. The high gradient capacity of the 1.3 GHz cavities required a revision of the radiation shielding and interlocks. The cave was updated as per the recommendations of the radiation safety committee. The high pressure rinse system was updated with new adapters to assist the rinsing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities. Finally, a proposal for cold testing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities at A0 north cave was made to the small experiments approval committee, radiation safety committee and the Tevatron cryogenic safety sub-committee for an operational readiness clearance and the same was approved. The project was classified under research and development of single cell cavities (project 18) and was allocated a budget of $200,000 in FY 2007.

  6. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable Web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange Ramos, Bruno; The ATLAS collaboration; Pommes, Kathy; Pavani Neto, Varlen; Vieira Arosa, Breno; Abreu Da Silva, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Technical Coordination disposes of 17 Web systems to support its operation. These applications, whilst ranging from supporting the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring radiation levels in the equipment at the cave, are constantly prone to changes in requirements due to the collaborative nature of the experiment and its management. In this context, a Web framework is proposed to unify the generation of the supporting interfaces. Fence assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of JSON configuration files. It relies vastly on Glance, a technology that was set forth in 2003 to create an abstraction layer on top of the heterogeneous sources that store the technical coordination data. Once Glance maps out the database modeling, records can be referenced in the configuration files by wrapping unique identifiers around double enclosing brackets. The deployed content can be individually secured by attaching clearance attributes to their description thus ensuring that vi...

  7. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate in switchgrass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somleva, Mariya N.; Snell, Kristi D.; Beaulieu, Julie; Peoples, Oliver P.; Garrison, Bradley; Patterson, Nii

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transgenic plants, plant material, and plant cells for synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates, preferably poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (also referred to a as PHB) are provided. Preferred plants that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB include plants that do not normally produce storage products such as oils and carbohydrates, and plants that have a C.sub.4 NAD-malic enzyme photosynthetic pathway. Such plants also advantageously produce lignocellulosic biomass that can be converted into biofuels. An exemplary plant that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB and produce lignocellulosic biomass is switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L. A preferred cultivar of switchgrass is Alamo. Other suitable cultivars of switchgrass include but are not limited to Blackwell, Kanlow, Nebraska 28, Pathfinder, Cave-in-Rock, Shelter and Trailblazer.

  8. X-Band deflecting cavity design for ultra-short bunch length measurement of SXFEL at SINAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Hao Tan; Qiang Gu; Wen-Cheng Fang; De-Chun Tong; Zhen-Tang Zhao

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For the development of the X-ray Free Electron Lasers test facility (SXFEL) at SINAP, ultra-short bunch is the crucial requirement for excellent lasing performance. It's a big challenge for deflecting cavity to measure the length of ultra-short bunch, and higher deflecting gradient is required for higher measurement resolution. X-band travelling wave deflecting structure has features of higher deflecting voltage and compact structure, which is good performance at ultra-short bunch length measurement. In this paper, a new X-band deflecting structure has been designed operated at HEM11-2pi/3 mode. For suppressing the polarization of deflecting plane of the HEM11 mode, two symmetrical caves are added on the cavity wall to separate two polarized modes. More details of design and simulation results are presented in this paper.

  9. Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent, B.C.; Langland, R.T.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two computer codes compare surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite-difference code are shown to match equivalent, implicit finite-element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite-difference continuum rigid-block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. Numerical techniques agree qualitatively with empirical studies but, so far, underpredict ground surface displacement. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together. It is recommended that the thermal characteristics of coal measure rock be investigated and that additional calculations be carried out to longer times so that cooling influences can be modeled.

  10. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  11. Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing.

  12. Development of In Vitro Systems for Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) - Final Report for 1992 to 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conger, B.V.

    2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Our project began on July 1, 1992, with the objective of developing systems that could be used in biotechnological approaches to switchgrass improvement. Within six months after initiation of the project, we had worked out protocols in which plants could be regenerated from callus cultures through both organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. Documentation for both modes of regeneration was provided in our progress reports and in publications. One thousand regenerated plants were established in the field during the first year. We found that Alamo (lowland type) was much more amenable to in vitro culture, and plants could be regenerated much more easily than from Cave-in-Rock (upland type). During the first three years of the project, we studied the influence of genotype, culture medium components, explant type, etc., on regeneration. As mentioned, we found that the lowland cultivars Alamo and Kanlow were much easier to regenerate than upland cultivars, such as Trailblazer, Blackwell, and Cave-in-Rock. For callus induction, we initially used mature caryopses, young leaf tissue, and portions of seedlings. We were successful in inducing callus and regenerating plants from all explants. Two other systems developed during the 4th to 6th year period of the project included multiple shoot formation initiated from germinated seedlings and regenerable suspension cultures. The latter were initiated from embryogenic calluses produced from in vitro developed inflorescences. An important factor for producing multiple shoots was the presence of thidiazuron in the medium. The shoots could be easily rooted and numerous plantlets produced. The last 3 to 4 years of the project focused on anther and microspore culture experiments to produce haploid plants and on genetic transformation. Although thousands of putative haploid plants were produced from a few anthers, they were very weak and difficult to keep alive. Chromosome counts revealed the gametic number in cells where it was possible to count chromosomes. The isolated microspore culture experiments were not successful.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  14. Consolidation and shear failure leading to subsidence and settlement. Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. We have also investigated the shear failure characteristics of crushed tuff that may lead to subsidence. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bontonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on our current field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems in general and on biombarriers in particular.

  15. Consolidation and shear failure leading to subsidence and settlement. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeele, W.; Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Drennon, B.J.; Lopez, E.A.; Herrera, W.J.; Langhorst, G.J.; Martinez, J.L.; Trujillo, G.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. We have also investigated the shear failure characteristics of crushed tuff that may lead to subsidence. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bentonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. We finally discuss our field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems in general and on biobarriers in particular. The share of the produced cavities is compared with cavities produced by idealized voids in an idealized environment. Study of root penetration at subsidence sites gives us an indication of the remaining degree of integrity. 30 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  17. National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

  18. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  19. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  1. Cold fusion verification. Final report for period ending 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, M.H.; Mastny, G.F.; Wesley, E.J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work to verify and reproduce experimental observations of Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The method was to start with the original report and add such additional information as became available to build a set of operational electrolytic CNF cells. Verification was to be achieved by first observing cells for neutron production, and for those cells that demonstrated a nuclear effect, careful calorimetric measurements were planned. The authors concluded, after laboratory experience, reading published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater. The neutron detector used for these tests was a completely packaged unit built into a metal suitcase that afforded electrostatic shielding for the detectors and self-contained electronics. It was battery-powered, although it was on charge for most of the long tests. The sensor element consists of He detectors arranged in three independent layers in a solid moderating block. The count from each of the three layers as well as the sum of all the detectors were brought out and recorded separately. The neutron measurements were made with both the neutron detector and the sample tested in a cave made of thick moderating material that surrounded the two units on the sides and bottom.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  3. Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

  4. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  5. Perspective technologies for equipment and liquidation of working faces with heavy mechanized supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavliska, J.; Polak, J. [VSB-Technical Univ., Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ostrava-Karvind coal mines (OKD) situated at the south part of the Silesian basin near the boarder with Poland is the biggest Czech basin with underground mining. It produced both coke and energetic coal with maximum output of 24 mil. t in 1980. Since then the output has been dropping down to 14 mil. t from 10 collieries with 39,000 underground workers in 1993. The only mining method is longwall mining with caving or less commonly with packs. Last year 79% of coal was extracted from faces equipped by mechanized supports and shearer loaders or ploughs. The face complex also involves face and gathering chain conveyors, breaker and hydraulic and power supply units with wirings. 1,500--4,000 t of material is necessary to transport to the face, to assemble there, and after its exploitation to move it back to the surface or to the another prepared face. Most of equipment is transported to the face from the surface. The labor requirement for the process is very high and depends mainly on the technical equipment of transport routes. The methods of coal seams exploitation in OKD under geologically sophisticated conditions only very seldom allows preparation of faces with a sufficient length and life. That is why 40% of 70 working faces are in the phase of equipping or liquidation. Those non-productive stages shorten machine available time of very expensive mining complexes and therefore it is desirable to prepare and implement them to ensure the shortest time possible, the lowest labor requirements and the highest output.

  6. R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayran, D.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

  7. Use of a constant electrode-separation resistivity survey to locate buried cavities associated with regolith-collapse sinkholes in southern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weibel, C.P.; Panno, S.V.; Heigold, P.C.; Reed, P.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three regolith-collapse sinkholes formed near a school and a church in the southern Illinois village of Dongola (Union County) during the spring of 1993. The appearance of the sinkholes over a 3-month period coincided with development of a new municipal well, which was drilled through clay-rich, valley-fill sediment into karstified limestone bedrock. The piezometric surface of the limestone aquifer is above land surface, indicating an upward hydraulic gradient in the valley and that the valley-fill is acting as a confining unit. Pumping during development of the well lowered the piezometric surface of the limestone aquifer to an elevation below the base of the valley-fill. It is hypothesized that drainage of water from the sediments, the resulting loss of both hydrostatic pressure and buoyant force in overlying sediments, increased intergranular pressure, and the initiation of ground-water flow toward the well resulted in rapid sediment transport, subsurface erosion, and subsequent collapse of the valley-fill sediment. The sinkholes follow an approximately east-west alignment, which is consistent with one of the two dominant alignments of nearby joint-controlled caves. A constant electrode-separation resistivity survey of the school playground was conducted to locate areas that might contain incipient sinkholes. The survey revealed a linear, positive resistivity anomaly, between 5 and 10 m wide, and with a trend that either intersects or is immediately adjacent to the three sinkholes. The anomaly is interpreted to be a series of pumping-induced cavities in the valley-fill sediments that formed over a pre-existing crevice in the karstified bedrock limestone.

  8. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  9. Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

    1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

  10. Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

  11. Copper transfer and influence on a marine food chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edding, M.; Tala, F. [Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo (Chile)] [Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo (Chile)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper is an essential element, required for normal growth by all plants and animals; and a regular constituent in the environment (Lewis and Cave 1982; Lewis 1994). This heavy metal is an essential micronutrient that at higher concentrations can be deleterious to algae and other aquatic biota (Chang and Sibley 1993). Copper toxicity to algae depends upon the individual species, their physiological and environmental conditions, and the chemical forms of metal in the medium (Sunda and Gullard 1976). When copper is accumulated by phytoplankton it can be transferred and may produce toxic effects on zooplankton (Wikfors and Ukeles 1982). Different species of microalgae present different capacities of resistance to copper. Cyanophyceae pre-cultured in a Cu-enriched medium (635 {mu}gCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1}) showed an EC{sub 50} that could reach 318 {mu}gCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} for Plectonema radiosum and 339 {mu}gCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} in Phormidium sp. (Takamura et al. 1990). Scenedesmus, Selenastrum and Chlorella were reported able to accumulate copper and other metal ions with an efficiency of 67-98% (Brady et al. 1994). Also, Dunaliella resisted concentrations form 0.38 mgCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} (D. minuta) up to 50.8 mgCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} (D. acidophila), depending on the pH of the medium (Grimmler et al. 1991). One the microalgae are copper-enriched, the copper that is part of the cell can be transferred to the surrounding water and to its predator producing uncertain effects. This study observed the effect of copper on the growth of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Isochrysis galbana that are currently used as food for hatchery-grown scallop larvae (Argopecten purpuratus). We observed the path of copper form the water column into the microalgal cell and the effect of copper-enriched food on the scallop larvae. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor operator in current US NPPs. In addition to the three workstations, information can be shared between the workstations and further displayed on a large-screen overview display or a panel mimic. An 82-inch high-definition display is commonly used for the overview display.

  13. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  14. A common path forward for the immersive visualization community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric A. Wernert; William R. Sherman; Patrick O'Leary; Eric Whiting

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immersive visualization makes use of the medium of virtual reality (VR) - it is a subset of virtual reality focused on the application of VR technologies to scientific and information visualization. As the name implies, there is a particular focus on the physically immersive aspect of VR that more fully engages the perceptual and kinesthetic capabilities of the scientist with the goal of producing greater insight. The immersive visualization community is uniquely positioned to address the analysis needs of the wide spectrum of domain scientists who are becoming increasingly overwhelmed by data. The outputs of computational science simulations and high-resolution sensors are creating a data deluge. Data is coming in faster than it can be analyzed, and there are countless opportunities for discovery that are missed as the data speeds by. By more fully utilizing the scientists visual and other sensory systems, and by offering a more natural user interface with which to interact with computer-generated representations, immersive visualization offers great promise in taming this data torrent. However, increasing the adoption of immersive visualization in scientific research communities can only happen by simultaneously lowering the engagement threshold while raising the measurable benefits of adoption. Scientists time spent immersed with their data will thus be rewarded with higher productivity, deeper insight, and improved creativity. Immersive visualization ties together technologies and methodologies from a variety of related but frequently disjoint areas, including hardware, software and human-computer interaction (HCI) disciplines. In many ways, hardware is a solved problem. There are well established technologies including large walk-in systems such as the CAVE{trademark} and head-based systems such as the Wide-5{trademark}. The advent of new consumer-level technologies now enable an entirely new generation of immersive displays, with smaller footprints and costs, widening the potential consumer base. While one would be hard-pressed to call software a solved problem, we now understand considerably more about best practices for designing and developing sustainable, scalable software systems, and we have useful software examples that illuminate the way to even better implementations. As with any research endeavour, HCI will always be exploring new topics in interface design, but we now have a sizable knowledge base of the strengths and weaknesses of the human perceptual systems and we know how to design effective interfaces for immersive systems. So, in a research landscape with a clear need for better visualization and analysis tools, a methodology in immersive visualization that has been shown to effectively address some of those needs, and vastly improved supporting technologies and knowledge of hardware, software, and HCI, why hasn't immersive visualization 'caught on' more with scientists? What can we do as a community of immersive visualization researchers and practitioners to facilitate greater adoption by scientific communities so as to make the transition from 'the promise of virtual reality' to 'the reality of virtual reality'.

  15. SPATIALLY-EXPLICIT BAT IMPACT SCREENING TOOL FOR WIND TURBINE SITING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Versar, Inc.; Exponent, Inc.

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. seeks to increase energy production from renewable energy sources, development of wind power resources continues to grow. One of the most important ecological issues restricting wind energy development, especially the siting of wind turbines, is the potential adverse effect on bats. High levels of bat fatality have been recorded at a number of wind energy facilities, especially in the eastern United States. The U.S. Department of Energy contracted with Versar, Inc., and Exponent to develop a spatially-explicit site screening tool to evaluate the mortality of bats resulting from interactions (collisions or barotrauma) with wind turbines. The resulting Bat Vulnerability Assessment Tool (BVAT) presented in this report integrates spatial information about turbine locations, bat habitat features, and bat behavior as it relates to possible interactions with turbines. A model demonstration was conducted that focuses on two bat species, the eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) and the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). The eastern red bat is a relatively common tree-roosting species that ranges broadly during migration in the Eastern U.S., whereas the Indiana bat is regional species that migrates between a summer range and cave hibernacula. Moreover, Indiana bats are listed as endangered, and so the impacts to this species are of particular interest. The model demonstration used conditions at the Mountaineer Wind Energy Center (MWEC), which consists of 44 wind turbines arranged in a linear array near Thomas, West Virginia (Tucker County), to illustrate model functions and not to represent actual or potential impacts of the facility. The turbines at MWEC are erected on the ridge of Backbone Mountain with a nacelle height of 70 meters and a collision area of 72 meters (blade height) or 4,071 meters square. The habitat surrounding the turbines is an Appalachian mixed mesophytic forest. Model sensitivity runs showed that bat mortality in the model was most sensitive to perceptual range and flying height. The BVAT model demonstration found that after 30 model iterations, Red bats suffered greater rates of mortality (i.e., 2.5 times the number of bats killed per 10-day period) than Indiana bats, primarily resulting from the higher flying height of the red bat. The model described in this report is a first release. There are opportunities to expand and enhance the model in the future. For example, additional focus on the model experience would include adding project level saving/loading, integrating the outputs (trajectory mapping) into the main output window, and providing tools for preparing habitat maps. In addition to the model framework, the actual modeling options could be enhanced by adding associative learning (including additional behavioral states), adding additional movement models, and exploring the information transfer among bats. Ultimately, this standalone model could be integrated into ArcGIS as a plugin.

  16. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages from three middle Holocene sites located in the Bodega Dunes, and from three late Holocene sites, including Kili (CASON-299), the oldest known village site in the region. Bodega Bay (38 degrees 19 minutes N, 123 degrees 03 minutes W) is situated about 90 km north of San Francisco Bay, California (Figure 1). The Pacific, in conjunction with prominent geomorphological features, has given rise to a series of coastal habitats (e.g. semi-protected and protected shorelines) around Bodega Bay that are rather unique for the unprotected, surf swept rocky shores of northern California. This stretch of coastline also lies within a zone of particularly strong seasonal upwelling between Point Reyes Peninsula and Cape Mendocino; a region characterized by high Ekman transport (Huyer 1983), and high coastal concentrations of the nutrients silica and phosphate (van Geen and Husby 1996). The interaction between land and sea results in a productive marine ecosystem that has attracted hunter-gatherers for much of the Holocene.

  17. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Chuansheng [IALR; Nowak, Jerzy [VPISU; Seiler, John [VPISU

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently