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  1. Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce...

  2. Cool CAVEs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Idaho National Laboratory's "CAVE" -- 3-D Computer-Assisted Virtual Environment –- allows scientists to literally walk into their data and look at it from multiple perspectives.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I

  4. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    dioxide beneath Mammoth Mountain, California, Seismol. Res.unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California, J. Volcanol.emission at Mammoth Mountain, California, Earth Planet. Sci.

  5. Exploring the Possibilities: Mammoth-Pacific Seeks Cooling Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploring the Possibilities: Mammoth-Pacific Seeks Cooling Efficiency and More Steam for Geothermal Power Production in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains Jump to: navigation,...

  6. Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5Transport ProjectsI Geothermal Facility JumpMammoth,

  7. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Abstract Mammoth Mountain is a 50,000- to 200,000-year-old cumulovolcano standing on the southwestern rim of Long Valley in eastern California. On 4 May 1989, two M ...

  8. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of carbon dioxide emission at Mammoth Mountain,Howle (1998), Magmatic carbon dioxide emissions at MammothHausback (1998), Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a

  9. Six-week time series of eddy covariance CO2 flux at Mammoth Mountain, California: performance evaluation and role of meteorological forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    2 emission at Mammoth Mountain as a sign of magmatic unrest.emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California. U.S. Geologicalfrom soils of a Mammoth Mountain tree kill: Horseshoe Lake,

  10. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

    2010-02-03

    We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

  11. Update on Mammoth Pacific, LP Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: Energy ResourcesPark--UnspecifiedMammoth

  12. STRATIRGAPHY AND GEOCHRONOLOGY OF THE VERNOR MAMMOTH SITE, CLUTE, BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urista, Juan C.

    2010-01-16

    Remains of a mammoth, other Pleistocene fauna, and a wooden bowl were recovered from the Vernor site located in Clute, Brazoria County on the Texas Gulf Coast. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochronology were used to ...

  13. EOLSS ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES PAGE 1 ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    EOLSS ­ ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES PAGE 1 ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES Thomas M. Iliffe, Department of Marine Biology, Texas A&M University at Galveston, USA Renée E. Bishop, Department of caves will result in their extinction. 1. Introduction 1.1 Definition of anchialine and marine caves

  14. Pleistocene lagomorphs from Cathedral Cave, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jass, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    ed. ). Late Quaternary Paleoecology in the Bonneville Basin.paleontology and paleoecology of Crystal Ball Cave, Millard

  15. CESNET Technical Report 23/2008 CAVE to CAVE: Communication in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havran, Vlastimil

    CESNET Technical Report 23/2008 CAVE to CAVE: Communication in Distributed Virtual Environment increasingly important with the technological advances in presentation technologies. is report de- scribes 1Gb 3PC Cluster (Lw & Mw & Rw) 2PC Cluster (Le & Re) CAVE2 video channels 6 video channels Passive

  16. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2014-06-09

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  17. An environmental assessment of Bermuda's caves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Darcy Ann

    2005-02-17

    , an extremely old wooden torch was discovered cemented by calcite to a slab of flowstone that was located a considerable distance into the cave (Figure 3). This relict revealed how, prior to the days when more reliable light sources became an essential part... of caving, early explorers were not deterred and ventured deep into some of the more complex and physically challenging caves. 4 Figure 3. Old wooden torch in Jane?s Cave. Because of the beauty of the island and its high standard of living...

  18. Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  19. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  20. Extremely acidic, pendulous cave wall biofilms from the Frasassi cave system, Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    on either side of the Frasassi gorge. Based on uranium series dating of carbonate speleothems, the highest deposits throughout the upper levels of the cave are analogous to gypsum crusts currently forming and depositing in the lowest level, sug- gesting a similar mode of cave formation throughout the history

  1. The Cave 'To Kleisidi' near Myrtos in Southern Crete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1977-01-01

    This short account describes a cave visited by the author and Bernd Kaiser (died 15 Sept 1974) in the summer of 1974; the cave seems to have been used in EM II....

  2. Assessing the Impact of Groundwater Pollution from Marine Caves on Nearshore Seagrass Beds in Bermuda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cate, Jenipher R.

    2010-01-14

    ) and fecal bacteria (Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli) were measured in each cave. To qualify a link between terrestrial pollution and the nearshore environment, seagrass density within 100 m from cave entrances were measured. Bermuda caves were tidally...

  3. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States)] Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States)] Farrar, C.D. [U.S. Geological Survey, Carnelian Bay, California (United States)] Hainsworth, L.J. [Chemistry Department, Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia (United States)] Hausback, B. [Geology Department, California State University, Sacramento

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N{sub 2}/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  4. Water column characterization of anchialine caves in Quintana Roo, Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Brett Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Water column characteristics of three coastal cave systems in Quintana Roo, Mexico on the Yucatan Peninsula were profiled from January 1996 to July 1997. A Hydrolab Data Sonde 3 Multiprobe Logger was used to acquire in ...

  5. Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land, Tarisha Ann

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal cave usage patterns were determined in an effort to understand the ecology of a bat colony at Shell Mountain Bat Cave in Fort Hood, Texas. Exit counts were conducted one night each month for 13 consecutive months ...

  6. Small mammal faunal stasis in Natural Trap Cave (Pleistocene-Holocene), Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Daniel Ryan

    2009-01-01

    , the cave fauna covers the last glacial cycle (~100 ka?present). There are no major taphonomic breaks within the fauna, the small mammals were primarily accumulated by owls, diurnal raptors, and mammalian carnivores in the immediate vicinity of the cave..., the cave fauna covers the last glacial cycle (~100 ka?present). There are no major taphonomic breaks within the fauna, the small mammals were primarily accumulated by owls, diurnal raptors, and mammalian carnivores in the immediate vicinity of the cave...

  7. Relating carrion breakdown rates to ambient resource level and community structure in four cave stream ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    . Cave systems that are well connected to the surface (e.g., via entrances and sinkholes) can receive

  8. Sea level controls sedimentation and environments in coastal caves and sinkholes Peter J. van Hengstum a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sea level controls sedimentation and environments in coastal caves and sinkholes Peter J. van karst basins (caves, cenotes, sinkholes, blueholes, etc.) generally focuses on analyzing isotopes) on carbonate platforms, such as sinkholes, cenotes, blueholes, and caves, all of which have been repeatedly

  9. Human skeletal remains of the ancient Maya in the caves of Dos Pilas, Guatemala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minjares, Amador, Jr.

    2004-09-30

    are associated with the site of Dos Pilas; the sixth cave (Cueva de Los Quetzales) is located beneath the site of Las Pacayas. The cave is an important aspect of the Maya worldview, as evidenced in the artifactual and skeletal material found in caves...

  10. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the HorseshoeLake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-11-20

    We investigate spatio-temporal relationships between soilCO2 flux (FCO2), meteorological variables, and topography over a ten-dayperiod (09/12/2006 to 09/21/2006) at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill,Mammoth Mountain, CA. Total CO2 discharge varied from 16 to 52 t d-1,suggesting a decline in CO2 emissions over decadal timescales. Weobserved systematic changes in FCO2 in space and time in association witha weather front with relatively high wind speeds from the west and lowatmospheric pressures. The largest FCO2 changes were observed inrelatively high elevation areas. The variations in FCO2 may be due todynamic coupling of wind-driven airflow through the subsurface and flowof source CO2 at depth. Our results highlight the influence of weatherfronts on volcanic gas flow in the near-surface environment and how thisinfluence can vary spatially within a study area.

  11. Cave and City: A Procedural Reconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on the Maeander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldana, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Perspective. Elsevier. Saldaña, M. , and Johanson, C. (of Philosophy in Architecture by Marie Saldaña © Copyrightby Marie Saldaña ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Cave and City:

  12. Genesis of folia in a non-thermal epigenic cave (Matanzas, Cuba) Ilenia Maria D'Angeli a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    . 1. Introduction Folia are relatively rare speleothems resembling inverted rimstone dams (also 31 caves globally, but the number of these locations is likely to increase. To the list of 25 caves

  13. BIOLOGY OF UNDERWATER CAVES by Tom IlifJe, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , Canary Islands and Western Australia. 63 #12;· Thermosbaenaceans - small (4 mm or less), eyeless or eye and volcanic caves, mostly on islands, around the Caribbean, Med- iterranean and Indo-Pacific. Seven of the ten marine, oxygen-deficient waters in caves in the Bahamas, Caicos Islands, Cuba, Yucatan Pen- insula

  14. Subjective Usefulness of CAVE and Fish Tank VR Display Systems for a Scientific Visualization Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    Subjective Usefulness of CAVE and Fish Tank VR Display Systems for a Scientific Visualization usefulness of two virtual reality (VR) display systems, a CAVE and a Fish Tank VR display, for a scientific. Most of the users preferred the Fish Tank display because of perceived dis- play resolution, crispness

  15. Designing user models in a virtual cave environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.; Hudson, R.; Gokhale, N.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the results of a first study into the use of virtual reality for human factor studies and design of simple and complex models of control systems, components, and processes are described. The objective was to design a model in a virtual environment that would reflect more characteristics of the user`s mental model of a system and fewer of the designer`s. The technology of a CAVE{trademark} virtual environment and the methodology of Neuro Linguistic Programming were employed in this study.

  16. Federal Cave Protection Act of 1988 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,ErosionNewCoalFarmland ProtectionInformationCave

  17. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  18. Driving the National Parks Forward | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parks Forward Driving the National Parks Forward June 19, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Propane shuttle buses used to transport visitors at Mammoth Cave National Park. | Photo...

  19. Water budgets and cave recharge on juniper rangelands in the Edwards Plateau 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Lucas Frank

    2006-08-16

    Increasing demand for water supplies in semi-arid regions, such as San Antonio, has sparked an interest in potential recharge management through brush control. Two shallow caves under woody plant cover in northern Bexar ...

  20. Henrikson: Prehistoric Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeological Investigations at Bobcat Cave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Dennis L

    1997-01-01

    Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeologicaland Owl Cave on the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Reported toresponses to it in the Snake River Plain re- gion. This

  1. The Impact of Isolated Visual Representation Of A 3D Model in the BIM Cave 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandregula, Swarochisa

    2015-05-12

    The BIM CAVE (Computer Aided Virtual Environment for Building Information Modeling) system at Texas A&M University enables users to walk through Building Information Models (BIM) created using commercially available BIM software, such as Navisworks...

  2. University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus, P.O. Boa: 64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus, P.O. Boa: 64 Barbados. West Indies Bellairs Resea previously (Fbr- ward 1974) in a Sherer! environmental chamber (Model CEL-44) on a 14:10 LD cycle

  3. Evidence of NAO control on subsurface ice accumulation in a 1200 yr old cave-ice sequence, St. Livres ice cave, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    . Livres ice cave, Switzerland Markus Stoffel a,b,c, , Marc Luetscher d,e , Michelle Bollschweiler b Sciences, University of Geneva, Site de Batelle, chemin de Drize 7, CH-1227 Carouge-Geneva, Switzerland b, Baltzerstrasse 1+3, CH-3012 Berne, Switzerland c Department of Geosciences, Geography, University of Fribourg

  4. BOHOLINA, A NEW GENUS (COPEP0DA:CALANOIDA) WITH TWO NEW SPECIES FROM AN ANCHIALINE CAVE IN THE PHILIPPINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    IN THE PHILIPPINES SARSIA FOSSHAGEN,AUDUN& THOMASM. ILIFFE1989 11 15. Boholina, a new genus (Copepoda: Calanoida) with two new species from an anchialine cave in the 'Philippines. - Sarsia 74: 201-208. Bergen. ISSN. In a survey of marine'caves in the Philippines faunal assemblages simila~to those in Bermuda were found

  5. We collected mosquitoes from six caves and found Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, Cx. territans, A. punctipennis, A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    Discussion We collected mosquitoes from six caves and found Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, Cx, not in the pipiens complex, could not be identified to species level, and on specimen is intermediate between Cx. pipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus based on molecular analysis. Individual caves harbored from one to five

  6. A Chinese cave links climate change, social impacts, and human adaptation over the last 500 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Liangcheng; Cai, Yanjun; An, Zhisheng; Cheng, Hai; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Gao, Yongli; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Zhang, Haiwei; Du, Yajuan

    2015-08-13

    :12284 | DOI: 10.1038/srep12284 www.nature.com/scientificreports A Chinese cave links climate change, social impacts, and human adaptation over the last 500 years Liangcheng Tan1,2, Yanjun Cai1,3, Zhisheng An1,3, Hai Cheng3,4, Chuan-Chou Shen5, Sebastian F... of societal crises and proxy-based climate events. Here, we present a comparison of ancient inscriptions in Dayu Cave from Qinling Mountains, central China, which described accurate times and detailed impacts of seven drought events during the period...

  7. Alice Boner and the Geometry of Temple Cave Art of India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Robert Vaughan

    Alice Boner and the Geometry of Temple Cave Art of India Robert V. Moody Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G1 Introduction Alice Boner (1889 1936 until 1978. Her passion was oriental art, particularly the art of India. India's rich cultural

  8. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  9. Aquaporin-mediated changes in hydraulic conductivity of deep tree roots accessed via caves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    to measure in situ fine root hydraulic conductiv- ity (FRHC) and aquaporin contribution to FRHC (AQPCAquaporin-mediated changes in hydraulic conductivity of deep tree roots accessed via caves ANDREW J. JACKSON4 1 USDA-ARS, Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit, Department of Viticulture and Enology

  10. Primary Research Paper A new Stygonitocrella Petkovski (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) from a cave in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    in Northern Mexico with comments on the taxonomy of the genus E. Sua´ rez-Morales1,2,* & T.M. Iliffe3 1 El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Unidad Chetumal, A.P. 424 Chetumal, Quintana Roo 77000, Mexico 2, troglobitic, invertebrate taxonomy Abstract The cave-dwelling harpacticoid copepod fauna of Mexico is still

  11. New cave-dwelling pseudocyclopiids (Copepoda, Calanoida, Pseudocyclopiidae) from the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ; anchialine caves; Balearic Islands; Canary Islands; Philippines. INTRODUCTION Calanoids in the family on the Canary Islands is also reported and discussed. The swimming habits of the latter spe- cies are concisely the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos Damià Jaume, Audun Fosshagen & Thomas M. Iliffe Jaume D

  12. Sperm production in an extremophile fish, the cave molly (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae, Teleostei)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    Potsdam, Germany 123 Aquat Ecol (2008) 42:685­692 DOI 10.1007/s10452-007-9128-9 #12;invest more energySperm production in an extremophile fish, the cave molly (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae, Teleostei, reproductive efforts may be reduced in environments where additional energy is required for somatic maintenance

  13. Six-week time series of eddy covariance CO2 flux at Mammoth Mountain, California: performance evaluation and role of meteorological forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer; Lewicki, J.L.; Fischer, M.L.; Hilley, G.E.

    2007-10-15

    CO{sub 2} and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO{sub 2} emission rates. EC CO{sub 2} fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (mean = 1346 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}). Using footprint modeling, EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were compared to CO{sub 2} fluxes measured by the chamber method on a grid repeatedly over a 10-day period. Half-hour EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were moderately correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.42) with chamber fluxes, whereas average-daily EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were well correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.70) with chamber measurements. Average daily EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were correlated with both average daily wind speed and atmospheric pressure; relationships were similar to those observed between chamber CO{sub 2} fluxes and the atmospheric parameters over a comparable time period. Energy balance closure was assessed by statistical regression of EC energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) against available energy (net radiation, less soil heat flux). While incomplete (R{sup 2} = 0.77 for 1:1 line), the degree of energy balance closure fell within the range observed in many investigations conducted in contrasting ecosystems and climates. Results indicate that despite complexities presented by the HLTK, EC can be reliably used to monitor background variations in volcanic CO{sub 2} fluxes associated with meteorological forcing, and presumably changes related to deeply derived processes such as volcanic activity.

  14. Analysis of the ecology of Anchialine Caves using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohlman, John William

    1995-01-01

    are coastal and defined, in part, by the halocline that bisects the passages. Objects appearing in the figure are not drawn to scale. Page 2 Map of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico showing the locations of cave systems where samples were collected. The n... (Holthius 1973). The second anchialine habitat described by Illife (1992a) is coastal tectonic faults penetrating below sea level. These fissures are common to the Galapagos Islands, have been identified on the island of Niue in the Central Pacific...

  15. Distribution and speciation of trace elements in iron and manganese oxide cave deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

    2012-10-24

    Fe and Mn oxide minerals control the distribution and speciation of heavy metals and trace elements in soils and aquatic systems through chemical mechanisms involving adsorption, incorporation, and electron transfer. The Pautler Cave System in Southwest Illinois, an analog to other temperate carbonate-hosted karst systems, contains Fe and Mn oxide minerals that form in multiple depositional environments and have high concentrations of associated trace elements. Synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) shows unique spatial distributions of Fe, Mn, and trace elements in mineral samples. Profile maps of Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings show Fe- and As-rich laminations, indicating dynamic redox conditions in the cave stream. {mu}-SXRF maps demonstrate that Ni, Cu, and Zn correlate primarily with Mn whereas As correlates with both Mn and Fe; As is more enriched in the Fe phase. Zn is concentrated in the periphery of Mn oxide stream pebble coatings, and may be an indication of recent anthropogenic surface activity. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements reveal that As(V) occurs as surface complexes on Mn and Fe oxides whereas Zn(II) associated with Mn oxides is adsorbed to the basal planes of phyllomanganates in a tetrahedral coordination. Co(III) and Se(IV) are also observed to be associated with Mn oxides. The observation of Fe, Mn, and trace element banding in Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings suggests that these materials are sensitive to and document aqueous redox conditions, similar to ferromanganese nodules in soils and in marine and freshwater sediments. Furthermore, speciation and distribution measurements indicate that these minerals scavenge trace elements and limit the transport of micronutrients and contaminants in karst aquifer systems while also potentially recording changes in anthropogenic surface activity and land-use.

  16. Depositional facies and aqueous-solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing hot springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, B.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J.; Pratt, L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Burns, P.C.; Discipulo, M.K.

    2000-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of travertine-depositing hot springs at Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, have been used to define five depositional facies along the spring drainage system. Spring waters are expelled in the vent facies at 71 to 73 C and precipitate mounded travertine composed of aragonite needle botryoids. The apron and channel facies (43--72 C) is floored by hollow tubes composed of aragonite needle botryoids that encrust sulfide-oxidizing Aquificales bacteria. The travertine of the pond facies (30--62 C) varies in composition from aragonite needle shrubs formed at higher temperatures to ridged networks of calcite and aragonite at lower temperatures. Calcite ice sheets, calcified bubbles, and aggregates of aragonite needles (fuzzy dumbbells) precipitate at the air-water interface and settle to pond floors. The proximal-slope facies (28--54 C), which forms the margins of terracette pools, is composed of arcuate aragonite needle shrubs that create small microterracettes on the steep slope face. Finally, the distal-slope facies (28--30 C) is composed of calcite spherules and calcite feather crystals. Despite the presence of abundant microbial mat communities and their observed role in providing substrates for mineralization, the compositions of spring-water and travertine predominantly reflect abiotic physical and chemical processes. Vigorous CO{sub 2} degassing causes a +2 unit increase in spring water pH, as well as Rayleigh-type covariations between the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and corresponding {delta}{sup 13}C. Travertine {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O are nearly equivalent to aragonite and calcite equilibrium values calculated from spring water in the higher-temperature ({approximately}50--73 C) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine precipitating in the lower-temperature (<{approximately}50 C) depositional facies exhibits {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values that are as much as 4% less than predicted equilibrium values. This isotopic shift may record microbial respiration as well as downstream transport of travertine crystals. Despite the production of H{sub 2}S and the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbes, preliminary {delta}{sub 34}S data do not uniquely define the microbial metabolic pathways present in the spring system. This suggests that the high extent of CO{sub 2} degassing and large open-system solute reservoir in these thermal systems overwhelm biological controls on travertine crystal chemistry.

  17. In the Womb of the Earth: Sex in the Maya Cave Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffa, Sarah Nicole

    2009-08-28

    pyramid, which is the largest complex at the ancient Maya site of Dos Pilas, was constructed on a heavily modified hil, the highest hil in the area (Brady, et al. 24 The Maya term ch?en refers to ?a hole...:357). The common appropriation of the great natural caves by public and elite architecture, like the El Duende pyramid, at Dos Pilas also demonstrated ?the state?s claim to direct and unequaled aces to the sources of supernatural power? (Brady, et al. 1997...

  18. Sherpa Buddhists on a Regional Pilgrimage: The Case of Maritika Cave at Halase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Eberhard

    1990-01-01

    there pilgrims oblain the realization of their very individual goal. What can they expect from going on pilgrimage to Maratika cave? According to the texts it seems to guarantee fairly much to the devote pilgrim. Alexander MacDonald (p.9) cites a guide... of their acting as pIlgrIms on the road, however, resulted also in a social effectofanother son: communication with people ofdiverse origin other than Sherpa meton their way.to the holy center like poners, traders, local villagers etc. seemed to be restncted...

  19. Photo of the Week: The CAVE at LANL | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codesPhiladelhia Gas WorksAugust 3,PhotoPhoto ofCAVE at

  20. Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally adapted Poecilia mexicana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally-mail: ruedigerriesch@web.de ª 2 0 1 0 T H E A U T H O R S . J . E V O L . B I O L . 2 4 ( 2 0 1 1 ) 5 9 6 ­ 6 0 6 596 J

  1. Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally adapted Poecilia mexicana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally-mail: ruedigerriesch@web.de ª 2 0 1 0 T H E A U T H O R S . J . E V O L . B I O L . J O U R N A L O F E V O L U T I O N

  2. The use of agave, sotol, and yucca at Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas: reconstructing methods of processing through the formation of behavioral chains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woltz, Ben vanDalsem

    1998-01-01

    , Pecos and Devils Rivers. This study seeks to analyze the plant macro-remains from Hinds Cave, specifically lechuguilla (Agave lechuguilla), sotol (Dasylirion texanum) and yucca (Yucca spp.), in an effort to gain insight into the diet, methods...

  3. P450 aromatase alterations and DNA damage as avian pollution biomarkers in cliff and cave swallow breeding near the Rio Grande region, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitzlar, Megan Annette

    2006-04-12

    populations lacking proper water and sewage infrastructure. Cliff (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and cave (P. fulva) swallows breeding near the Rio Grande were selected to monitor aromatase activity alterations and DNA damage. Swallows were sampled at six sites...

  4. Teton Operating Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: Energy Resources Jump to:Operating

  5. The role of macroalgal species as bio-indicators of water quality in bermudian karstic cave pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Bridget Marie

    2009-05-15

    to the unique world of both terrestrial and submarine caves in Bermuda. I very much enjoyed the months I was able to spend on this beautiful archipelago learning about the natural environment and the local culture. Dr. Quigg, I appreciate your guidance... as my nonacademic editor. Your invaluable insights showed me the significance of my project. Mom and Dad, I would like thank you for always believing in me. Your never-ending patience and guidance motivated me each and every day. My importance...

  6. Mammoth Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing the GHG Impacts

  7. High Level Waste Remote Handling Equipment in the Melter Cave Support Handling System at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardal, M.A. [PaR Systems, Inc., Shoreview, MN (United States); Darwen, N.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Cold war plutonium production led to extensive amounts of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. Bechtel National, Inc. is building the largest nuclear Waste Treatment Plant in the world located at the Department of Energy's Hanford site to immobilize the millions of gallons of radioactive waste. The site comprises five main facilities; Pretreatment, High Level Waste vitrification, Low Active Waste vitrification, an Analytical Lab and the Balance of Facilities. The pretreatment facilities will separate the high and low level waste. The high level waste will then proceed to the HLW facility for vitrification. Vitrification is a process of utilizing a melter to mix molten glass with radioactive waste to form a stable product for storage. The melter cave is designated as the High Level Waste Melter Cave Support Handling System (HSH). There are several key processes that occur in the HSH cell that are necessary for vitrification and include: feed preparation, mixing, pouring, cooling and all maintenance and repair of the process equipment. Due to the cell's high level radiation, remote handling equipment provided by PaR Systems, Inc. is required to install and remove all equipment in the HSH cell. The remote handling crane is composed of a bridge and trolley. The trolley supports a telescoping tube set that rigidly deploys a TR 4350 manipulator arm with seven degrees of freedom. A rotating, extending, and retracting slewing hoist is mounted to the bottom of the trolley and is centered about the telescoping tube set. Both the manipulator and slewer are unique to this cell. The slewer can reach into corners and the manipulator's cross pivoting wrist provides better operational dexterity and camera viewing angles at the end of the arm. Since the crane functions will be operated remotely, the entire cell and crane have been modeled with 3-D software. Model simulations have been used to confirm operational and maintenance functional and timing studies throughout the design process. Since no humans can go in or out of the cell, there are several recovery options that have been designed into the system including jack-down wheels for the bridge and trolley, recovery drums for the manipulator hoist, and a wire rope cable cutter for the slewer jib hoist. If the entire crane fails in cell, the large diameter cable reel that provides power, signal, and control to the crane can be used to retrieve the crane from the cell into the crane maintenance area. (authors)

  8. A mammoth of a project: the conservation of a columbian mammoth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Shanna LaRea

    2009-05-15

    ...................................................... 62 4.11 The first stages of cleaning after removing the marked pieces from the top portion of the left mandible............................. 63 4.12 The left mandible after gluing but before adding a mold to help stabilize the upper jaw... xi LIST OF TABLES TABLES Page 1 The before and after weight, stoichiometry length, width, and depth of each sample to evaluate any changes, such as distortion or shrinkage, that occurred during conservation...

  9. Ormat Becomes Sole Owner of the Mammoth Complex in Mammoth Lakes,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpen Energy

  10. Glaciation and saline-freshwater mixing as a possible cause of cave formation in the eastern midcontinent region of the United States: A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Bourcier, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We present a hypothesis for the formation of caves and associated karst features near the southern margins of the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins. Spatial and temporal relations among intracratonic basins, karstic terrain, and continental glaciation suggest that Pleistocene glaciation may have initiated the discharge of saline waters from the margins of these basins. Glaciation-induced discharge of saline waters could result from the consolidation of sediments due to the overlying pressure of glacial ice, and flushing of underlying aquifers as a result of bottom melting in recharge areas of basic aquifers. The upward migration of basin-derived saline waters into near-surface aquifers would result in the mixing of saline waters with infiltrating glacial meltwater and meteoric water. The development of a vertically restricted zone of mixing of saline and fresh water in limestone aquifers would result in the dissolution of limestone; this mechanism could be responsible for the formation, or at least the initiation of, some caves and associated karst features in the midcontinent region.

  11. Bedrock channel response to tetonic, climatic and eustatic forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Noah P

    2001-01-01

    The response of bedrock channels to external forcings is investigated in this thesis. The approach is to test and constrain a theoretical model for bedrock-channel incision based on shear stress using field data. The primary ...

  12. Teton County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Opensource HistoryTerraWattTesting user form HomeMontana:

  13. Teton Village, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Opensource HistoryTerraWattTesting user form

  14. Teton County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  15. Teton County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: Energy Resources Jump to:

  16. Microbial Populations in CAVES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillionStockpileEqual Employment Opportunity DataMicrobial

  17. Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG-80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining, site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Bee Caves Armory property, the requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. Of concern is the potential for hazardous waste to be present on the property as a result of the former Nike Missile Base operations or in the form of original construction materials. Environmentally sensitive operations associated with the property from that period include (1) underground fuel storage, (2) hazardous materials storage/use, (3) disposal of hazardous waste and (4) release of hazardous waste water.

  18. Estimation of microbial cover distributions at Mammoth Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    library information from travertine-forming hot springs in Yellowstone Na- tional Park to provide to be obtained in a va- riety of environments ranging from geothermal hot springs to the oral cav- ity. Clone

  19. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California: An Initial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |Information 5th congressionalNIESLook at the 4 May Through

  20. Mammoth Pacific I Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5Transport ProjectsI Geothermal Facility Jump to:

  1. Mammoth Pacific II Power Plant Details | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5Transport ProjectsI Geothermal Facility Jump

  2. Exploring the Possibilities: Mammoth-Pacific Seeks Cooling Efficiency and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion FlumeEvent PlanningBirds

  3. Mammoth Geothermal, A Development History | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing the GHG ImpactsGeothermal, A

  4. Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing the GHG ImpactsGeothermal,

  5. Mammoth Pacific II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing the GHG ImpactsGeothermal,II

  6. LANDSLIDE SOILS AND GEOMORPHOLOGY IN CAMP DAVIS QUADRANGLE, BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zung, Ashley B.

    2008-07-31

    quadrangle. Landslide activity level was characterized based on geomorphic features. Landslide soil characteristics including texture, shrink-swell potential, clay mineralogy and horizonation were studied. The results show that landslides are catastrophic...

  7. Studies on the Cave- Spider Family Leptonetidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledford, Joel M.

    2011-01-01

    N. capilla, Harrison’s Sinkhole, Tamaulipas, Mexico (samplede La Mina, Harrison’s Sinkhole, and the surface of Cueva deTamaulipas Harrison Sinkhole Lep 5 D8/ Neoleptoneta

  8. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) against available energy (net radiation, less soil heat flux). While incomplete (R2 0.77 for 1:1 line), the degree of energy balance...

  9. Mammoth dams, lean neighbours: assessing the bid to turn Ethiopia into East Africa's powerhouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta-Fernández, Iván

    2015-01-01

    This chapter sets out to discuss the main features of the undergoing Ethiopian electrification programme as well as the key steps towards its implementation. Doing so also allows its potentialities and pitfalls to be ...

  10. The Case for the Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact Event: Mammoth, Megafauna and Clovis Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B

    2011-01-01

    26345-26366. Melton F.A. & Schriever W. (1933) Geology 41:impacts (Melton and Schriever, 1933) but when no meteorites

  11. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance CO2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de Provence SASSinemSissonville, West

  12. The State Energy Program: A Modest Investment ƒ A Mammoth Return

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternational Affairs,Department of EnergyPROGRAM The State Energy Program: A

  13. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH Jump to:Idaho-Utah |Renovables

  14. WiELD-CAVE: Wireless Ergonomic Lightweight Device for use in the CAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris Jr., Frederick C.

    transmitter, the device is powered by a rechargeable lithium ion battery, all of the inputs utilize force

  15. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    3. Maps of the fraction change F CO2 between (a) 09/12/2006and 09/21/2006. Fraction change F CO2 was calculated by

  16. Hot-spring Systems Geobiology: abiotic and biotic influences on travertine formation at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    ) is being propelled by Sedimentology (2011) 58, 170­219 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3091.2010.01209.x 170 Ó 2010 developed for optical, mineralogical, structural, chemical, hydrological and sedimentological analyses at

  17. cave of forgotten dreams 1 3D PICTUREHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , in its immersive sensory pleasures and cinematic journey of discovery, more closely resembles an ecstatic

  18. Anchialine Cave Environments: a novel chemosynthetic ecosystem and its ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakes, Michal Joey

    2013-01-01

    food web and intraspecific diet variation Abstract Dark caveweb in anchialine systems and intraspecific differences in diet within macrofauna sampled. Introduction Until recently, dark

  19. Anchialine Cave Environments: a novel chemosynthetic ecosystem and its ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakes, Michal Joey

    2013-01-01

    Science 272:1953–1955. Seymour JR, Humphreys WF, MitchellSoc. Microbiol. News 66, 531–539. Seymour JR, Humphreys WF,Biol. 214, 3138–3153. Seymour JR, Humphreys WF, Mitchell JG.

  20. File:CaveProtectionLaw.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdf Jump to: navigation,Boiler

  1. Federal Cave Resources Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello Geothermal Power StationIndiana:Business

  2. Bee Cave, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation Beaufort County, SouthBeckerPark, Illinois:

  3. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01

    California The Mammoth geothermal field is a single–phase, liquid–dominated field with a 40 MW power plant.

  4. The structure of mammalian food-webs: interpreting, predicting, and informing estimates of species interactions in paleontological and modern communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeakel, Justin Douglas

    2012-01-01

    biogeochemistry and the paleoecology of the mammoth steppe129. [72] D. M. Hopkins, Paleoecology of Beringia, Academic

  5. Taphonomy and paleoecology of asphaltic Pleistocene vertebrate deposits of the western Neotropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Emily Leigh

    2013-01-01

    paleontology,  geology,  and  paleoecology:  Mammoth  Site  taphonomy  and   paleoecology:  University  of  Chicago  Gregory.  (2005).  Paleoecology  of  extinct  xenarthrans  

  6. Cave and City: A Procedural Reconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on the Maeander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldana, Marie

    2015-01-01

    P. (2001). The Historical Topography of Ephesos. In UrbanismReconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on theReconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on the

  7. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ...........................................................2 Mycorrhizae........................................................3 Microbes............................................................9 Mycorrhizae.......................................................10 Microbes..........................................................21 Mycorrhizae.......................................................24 Microbes

  8. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography applied to cave sustainability (Barbados) and groundwater exploration (Saint Lucia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agramakova, Yulia

    2011-01-01

    In this work we apply the method of two-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (2D time-lapse ERT) for two different problems. In the first problem, we monitor the structural stability of the roof of the ...

  9. A Hydrological Model of Harrington Sound, Bermuda and its Surrounding Cave Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffer, Jonathan L

    2013-04-23

    ). 6 1.3 Inland Waters and Harrington Sound The waters surrounding Bermuda are host to a diverse marine landscape, supporting great expanses of coral reefs, and are thus a hot spot of biodiversity requiring environmental protection. In 2008, about... 7%, or 294.74 km2, of the waters surrounding Bermuda were designated as protected coral reefs (Bermuda Department of Statistics, 2009). The majority of Bermuda?s reefs are in the North Lagoon, a large area north of the island encompassing...

  10. Fish Remains from Nahas Cave: Archaeological Evidence of Anadromous Fishes in Southwestern Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plew, Mark G

    1980-01-01

    of the sucker family, Catostomidae, possibly Catostomusof the sucker family, Catostomidae. Steward (1938: 168)

  11. IN THIS ISSUE: Using LiDAR to locate cave openings, geography and geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    DAR system was used to generate a 1 m resolution, bare-earth digital elevation model (DEM) from and mythological importance in addition to functioning as shelters. They were sites of rituals, ceremonies

  12. Stygologia 2 (112) 1986, E. J. Brill, Leiden MESOZOIC RELICTS IN MARINE CAVES OF BERMUDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    .S.A. 2, Bermuda Biological Station, Ferry Reach 1-15, Bermuda. #12;lava tube in the Canary Islands (Yager, 1981) and later found in the same lava tube containing Munidopsis in the Canary Islands (Iliffe, occurring primarily on oceanic islands. One aspect of the findings of these and related, earlier studies has

  13. Source and genesis of sulphate and phosphatesulphate minerals in a quartz-sandstone cave environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    table mountains, Venezuela. © 2014 The Authors. Sedimentology © 2014 International Association of Sedimentologists 1433 Sedimentology (2014) 61, 1433­1451 doi: 10.1111/sed.12103 #12;INTRODUCTION Over 300 secondary

  14. Stable isotope study of cave percolation waters in subtropical Brazil: Implications for paleoclimate inferences from speleothems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Laboratorio de Ecologia Isotopica, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo

  15. Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio: EnergyGlenwillow, Ohio:Amendments|

  16. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  17. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Jenkins, Dennis 2012 NGBPP Research at the Paisley Caves.pages.uoregon.edu/ftrock/paisley_caves_description.php

  18. Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to exist beneath the western moat, perhaps beneath Mammoth Mountain. Authors Brian M. Smith and Gene A. Suemnicht Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal...

  19. Development Wells At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Associates...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to about 610 m depth in a deep fault zone on the east side of the field. References Environmental Science Associates (1987) Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects:...

  20. Geek-Up[10.22.2010]: Exploring the CAVE, Electrical Links to Living Cells, and Energy Execs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At Idaho National Laboratory, engineers are walking into the core of nuclear reactors and rappelling down cliffs, all without ever leaving the office.

  1. 834 BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS Brinkhof, M. W. G., A. J. Cave, F. J. Hage, and S. Verhulst. 1993.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Kim

    . Syst. 7:347­391. Lack, D. 1950. The breeding seasons of European birds. Ibis 92: 288­316. Landa, K, E., R. Langvatn, M. C. Forchhammer, and N. C. Stenseth. 1999a. Environmental variation shapes sexual dimorphism in red deer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 96:4467­4471. Post, E., R. O. Peterson, N. C. Stenseth

  2. Cave and cliff swallows as indicators of exposure and effects of environmental contaminants on birds from the Rio Grande, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musquiz, Daniel

    2004-11-15

    in Burleson County, 320 miles north of the nearest site of the Rio Grande. Blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, a technique that allows the detection of DNA damage in blood and other tissues. Plasma samples were analyzed for thyroid hormones using...

  3. An oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari) from the Oxford Clay (Jurassic: Upper Callovian) of South Cave Station Quarry, Yorkshire, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selden, Paul A.; Baker, Anne S.; Phipps, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    in mar- ine strata: evidence from the British Jurassic, including a review of the allochthonous vertebrate assemblage from the marine Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Great Britain. 47–83. In COLECTIVO ARQUEOLO´GICO-PALEON- TOLO´GICO SALENSE...

  4. Examining possible foraging differences in urban and rural cave cricket populations: Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    entering through sinkholes, pits, soils, and epikarst (Simon et al. 2007), this is not the case for many

  5. Folding Protein-Like Structures with Open Gemma B. Danks, Susan Stepney, and Leo S. D. Caves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Folding Protein-Like Structures with Open L-systems Gemma B. Danks, Susan Stepney, and Leo S. D501@york.ac.uk Abstract. Proteins, under native conditions, fold to specific 3D struc- tures according protein is a strong indicator of its function in the cell. The mechanisms involved in protein folding

  6. CX-006813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Targhee Substation Communication Equipment UpgradesCX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 10/12/2011Location(s): Teton County, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. inSightstheEarthScope newsletter Participants in the EarthScope San Andreas interpretive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    River Plain-Teton region September 9-12 in Jackson, WY. Information and an online application form.earthscope.org/workshops/ fault_slip10). Attend the EarthScope workshop for interpretive professionals in theYellowstone-Snake

  8. CX-011174: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Swan Valley-Teton Number 1 and Number 2 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Moose, WY Grand Teton National Park's rugged landscape and stunning array of wildlife attract nearly three million visitors every year, making it one of our most popular national parks. A new Grand Teton National Park visitor center near the park's headquarters north of Jackson, Wyoming, replaces an outdated building, educates an increased number of visitors, and inspires further exploration of this extraordinary landscape. The project site is located along the Snake River, between a riparian forest and a sagebrush meadow.

  10. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOTHERMAL HEATING DISTRICT FOR THE TOWN OF MAMMOTH LAKES FINAL REPORT 2009 AUGUST 2009 CEC5002009082. Please cite this report as follows: Phelps, Richard D. Structuring a Direct Geothermal Heating District. Structuring a Direct Geothermal Heating District for the Town of Mammoth Lakes is the final report

  11. The effects of Quaternary environmental changes on Microtus distribution and morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Jennifer Lynn

    2010-01-01

    M. californicus V-78027 (6) Paisley Cave 35LK3400 (7) Palosfossil specimen is found in Paisley Caves in south-centralcomm. , Dennis L. Jenkins). Paisley Cave is not projected to

  12. The social implications of ritual behavior in the Maya Lowlands : a perspective from Minanha, Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwake, Sonja Andrea

    2008-01-01

    single and compound sinkholes, and numerous caves foundpresent level. The numerous sinkholes that now exist on mid-single and compound sinkholes, and numerous caves found

  13. Consigalo: Multi-user Face-to-face Interaction on Immaterial Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    then, numerous interactive large display systems have been presented, such as the CAVE [4], Powerwall

  14. BAHAMA ISLANDS Christian JUBERTHIE* and Thomas M. ILIFFE**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , encouraging karst erosion. There are numerous caves and sinkholes, occasionally reaching depths of 100 m

  15. IntroductIon Occasional Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Scott C.

    of Barbuda provides ample roosting sites and access to freshwater in caves, bluff faces, and sinkholes

  16. Department of Mathematics and Statistics Colloquium Modeling Geophysical Fluid Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    , caves, sinkholes, fissures, etc. Because of this, water can flow through conduits or pipes in addition

  17. Affective Cartographies: Transnational Labor and the Spectacularization of Suffering in Globalized Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    body. In Dubai and in Mammoth, the Third World body is madeplace such as Dubai, already a First World-ed space, in theWorld through representations of emotive suffering, Dubai’s

  18. Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the (Unocal) Mammoth-1 well at Casa Diablo. This low resistivity region is unusually deep, extending into the pre-caldera basement to the northwest, and is roughly aligned with...

  19. Home University: KJ SIMSR, Mumbai Host University: DHBW, Stuttgart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroetmann, Karl

    Home University: KJ SIMSR, Mumbai Host University: DHBW, Stuttgart Baden and Research, Mumbai for the `mammoth' work done to ensure that the exchange program is a success. I also

  20. Increases in 3He/4He in Fumarolic Gas Associated with the 1989...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Increases in 3He4He in Fumarolic Gas Associated with the 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  1. Avian influenza as the Cause of Late Pleistocene Mammalian Megafaunal Extinctions in the Americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Scott

    . A logistic regression of estimated level of water contamination, mass, and reproductive rate against; disruption of habitat maintenance resulting from loss of key megaherbivores such as mammoths and mastodons

  2. Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Casa Diablo Hot Spring:...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Casa Diablo Hot Spring: Magmatic CO2 near Mammoth Lakes, CA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  3. The prehistoric diet and subsistence of the lower Pecos region, as reflected in coprolites from Baker Cave, Val Verde County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobolik, Kristin Dee

    1988-01-01

    1 1 i f ormes Anguillidae An uilla rostrata Longnose gar American eel Clupeiformes Clupeidae Dorosoma ce edianum a~ere e e e a e Cypri niformes Cyprinidae Cam ostoma anomalum Dionda diabo i a~credo a G~ila a dora H bo nathus nuchalis H...

  4. The Pit locality within Porcupine Cave, Park County, Col-orado, spans at least two glacial-interglacial cycles, the upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnosky, Anthony D.

    ; Longinelli, 1984; Luz et al., 1984; Koch et al., 1989). Luz et al. (1984) and Koch et al. (1989) suggested markers of paleo- climate. Similarly, Luz et al. (1984) suggested that the mam- mals best suited

  5. 172 Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, December 1998 D.W. Webb, L.M. Page, S.J. Taylor and J.K. Krejca-The Current Status and Habitats of the Illinois Cave Amphipod, Gammarus acherondytes Hubricht and Mackin (Crustacea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    , rural dwellings, and several small communities. Throughout the area, small woodlots containing sinkholes

  6. An Overview of Yellowstone Geologic Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and southwestern Montana. Located along the continental divide within the Middle Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone is on a high plateau averaging 8,000 feet in elevation. The mountain ranges that encircle Yellowstone vary from Mountains to the north; the Absaroka Mountains on the eastern border; and the Teton Range, within Grand

  7. Correspondences Mitochondrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pääbo, Svante

    Sidrón cave (Asturias, North of Spain) and was radiocarbon dated to around 43,000 years of age [9 of Neandertals. El Sidrón cave is a karstic system in Asturias (Northern Spain), where some Neandertal bones were

  8. May 15, 2014 Patricia A. Beddows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    British Geomorphological Research Group, Student Opportunity Grant £ 200 200002 University of Bristol Parau Award, Science Research Fund, British Cave Research Association, £ 900 199698 Graduate, USA patricia@earth.northwestern.edu PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS Carbonate geology, karst, and caves

  9. Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    are represented herein, including closely related species inhabiting caves on opposite sides of the Earth, thus of fishes, lobster, and mysidaceans seek shelter within marine caves but must venture out into open waters

  10. 2. Ancient and Modern Genetic Variation in the Americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    in the Paisley Caves in southern Oregon. A secondary migration or expansion of humans, perhaps from the same

  11. Distributed Rendering for Scalable Displays Greg Humphreys Ian Buck Matthew Eldridge Pat Hanrahan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    such as the PowerWall [12] and CAVE [4] support resolutions well beyond the common desktop but are limited

  12. 1. Introduction The evolution of human-computer interaction has led to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Alberto

    centers to have access to immersive systems such as Caves and PowerWalls. On the other hand, the diversity

  13. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ANALYSES OF THE BACTERIAL FAUNA AND WATER, SEDIMENT, AND AMPHIPOD TISSUE CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    ). The numerous sinkholes, springs, and caves of the Salem Plateau all play an important role in the flow of water

  14. Growth and Stewardship: Frank Zwart's Four Decades at UC Santa Cruz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwart, Frank; Reti, Irene

    2012-01-01

    as karst, characterized by sinkholes, caves, streams thatsurface lead into the sinkholes and karst systems on campus,

  15. '-> print _ profile VIRTUAL DA VINCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    ? Are the caves just about fancier videogames, or better cyber-porn? Well sure. As with most technological

  16. 5 October 1982 PROC. BIOL. SOC. WASH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    5 October 1982 PROC. BIOL. SOC. WASH. 95(3), 1982, pp. 509-514 MESONERILLA PROSPERA, A NEW of Archiannelida, Mesonerilla prospera, is described from inland marine caves of Bermuda. This new species the Walsingham Caves, Bermuda. Mesonerilla prospera, new species Fig. 1 Material.-Walsingham Caves, Hamilton

  17. www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/337/6091/223/DC1 Supplementary Materials for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Stemmed Projectile Points and Human Coprolites at the Paisley Caves Dennis L. Jenkins,* Loren G. Davis The 14 C geochronology of Paisley Caves is based on four dating series: 1) non- provenienced in situ and from stratigraphic cross sections. The definitive chronostratigraphy for Paisley Caves

  18. THE DISTRIBUTED SPACECRAFT ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher D.

    . Virginia Tech has developed a unique new facility comprised of two spherical air-bearing platforms & State University ABSTRACT Virginia Tech has developed a testbed comprised of two independent spherical DSACSS with Virginia Tech's Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE). Further, the CAVE can be used

  19. The utilization of genetic markers to resolve modern management issues in historic bison populations: implications for species conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbert, Natalie Dierschke

    2005-02-17

    Abbreviation Description BNP Badlands National Park CSP Custer State Park EINP Elk Island National Park GT Grand Teton National Park MBS Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary MSGR Maxwell State Game Refuge NBR National Bison Range NS... and his entire operation of 85 bison was purchased by James ?Scotty? Philip in 1901 (Coder 1975; Zontek 1995). In 1914, 36 bison from the Philip herd were used to found the Custer State Park (CSP) population in South Dakota (Garretson 1938). Jones...

  20. A Test for Airborne Dispersal of Thermophilic Bacteria from Hot Springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    colonization Mammoth Hot Springs thermophile 2 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK Hot Springs complex of Yellowstone National Park. The trapped steam was analyzed for the presence exist between hot springs in close proximity to each other, even springs within a particular geothermal

  1. ScholarsLane Ranchers Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    "Street ·|}þ99 Emigrant Pass·|}þ59 Starbucks/Promenade Center SeeInsetM ap forCam pusStops Mammoth Lakes Rd:39 McKee Rd "Yosemite Church" SOD SOD SOD SOD Starbucks/Promenade Center 7:22 9:26 11:40 1:44 Merced

  2. Simulation of snow mass and extent in general circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Simulation of snow mass and extent in general circulation models Zong-Liang Yang,1,2* Robert E Scheme (BATS) snow submodel was conducted, both in a stand-alone mode and within the National Center Union and from Mammoth Mountain, California. The BATS snow scheme reproduces well the seasonal evolution

  3. Whirlwind's BROTHER IT'S a 2-to-1 bet that your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -made hurricane five times as ferocious as any Na- ture ever cooked up. Engineers call it a steam turbine-gen- erator. A steam turbine is a kind of cross between a mammoth windmill and a giant's spinning top. And the steam takes the turbine rotor for such a dizzy ride that if it were turned loose on the Atlantic

  4. ScholarsLane Ranchers Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    " to 40404 Walmart Transit Stop kj Spring E1 Line Downtown Loop: Saturday-Sunday AM PM Mammoth Lakes Rd. 11:07 9:40 10:53 Walmart on Loughborough across from "Pier One" 11:54 1:27 2:40 4:13 5:46 6:59 8:12 9

  5. Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Bernard

    this death rate compares to that of hunter-gatherers going after woolly mammoths, but it is not comforting or transplants. Less dramatic, but nevertheless impactful, say in the United States, are "western diet" related another outbreak of food borne disease with some hospitalizations and deaths. This time it is Escherichia

  6. SANFRANCISCO MokelumneCamanche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petaluma Napa Novato San Francisco Oakland San Mateo OakdaleTracy Manteca Lodi Rio Vista Galt Elk Grove Hawthorne Mammoth Lakes Benton TonopahSan Jose Morgan Hill Santa Clara Klamath Cedarville Paynes Creek Scotia Leggett Rancho Cordova Lincoln Loomis Coloma Volcano Mokelumne Hill Chinese Camp June Lake

  7. Running Head: Correlation of Microbial Communities with Caclium Carbonate1 (Travertine) Mineral Precipitation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Precipitation2 3 4 Correlation of Microbial Communities with Calcium Carbonate (Travertine)5 Mineral Precipitation at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA6 George T. Bonheyo1, 3 , Jorge Frias-Lopez1 of changing environmental conditions and associated calcium carbonate mineral18 precipitation along the spring

  8. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, David Earl; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Berrett, Sharon; Cobb, D. A.; Worhach, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  9. CAES Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FAQs Affiliated Centers Research Core Capabilities Laboratories and Equipment Technology Transfer Visualization CAVE Working in CAES Newsroom Publications In the News Archive...

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Cave aging with ground source heat pumps for cheese aging.along with a ground source heat pump to keep the cheese

  11. CAES Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAES Home Home About Us Contact Information Our CAES Building FAQs Affiliated Centers Research Core Capabilities Laboratories and Equipment Technology Transfer Visualization CAVE...

  12. JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 13(1): 142-164. 1993 THALASSOCYPRIDINE OSTRACODA FROM ANCHIALINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , sinkholes, and wells of Jamaica, three species of the paracypridine tribe Thalassocypridini dominate, there are anchialine caves, sinkholes, fissures, and wells that contain tidal, brackish waters having subterranean

  13. Underground Identity, Memory, and Political Spaces: Archaeological Investigations of the Classic Period Maya Ceremonial Karstscape in the Pacbitun Region, Cayo District, Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spenard, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Pacbitun region. Crevice cave Sinkhole Blind vertical shaftand may lack a ceiling. Sinkholes are sunken features formedsurface and subsurface sinkholes. Surface sinkholes are the

  14. Old Oyo Influences on the Transformation of Lucumí Identity in Colonial Cuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Henry B.

    2012-01-01

    in Caribbean History. Barbados: Caribbean University Press,conference. Cave Hill, Barbados. “Bàtá Drums and Old Oyo inin Caribbean History (Barbados: Caribbean University Press,

  15. DOE/EIS-0485 Draft Environmental Impact Statement Grande Prairie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    epidemic that has caused mass mortality of cave-dwelling bats in the Northeastern United States since its discovery in February 2006. In January 2012, the USFWS estimated...

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE-EA-1599 Draft 2008-06-11--rjk dc - accepted...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cave, Kentucky, 135 miles (217 kilometers) east of the site (DOE 1999b). The largest air pollution sources near the Paducah area include the United States Enrichment...

  17. Figure 1 (a) Gatewing imagery, nest collectors longhouse, Gomantong. (b) Gatewing imagery draped over reconstructed digital surface model, Gomantong Hill.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarlane, Donald A.

    AND AUTONOMOUS DRONE SURFACE-HOTOGRAMMETRY AT GOMANTONG CAVES, SABAH, MALAYSIA D. A. McFarlane1 , M. Buchroithner, by integrating aerial photogrammetry using an autonomous drone, three-dimensional cave laser scanning over the site using a Gatewing X100 autonomous drone (http://www.gatewing. com/X100), an aerial vehicle

  18. Functional Programming SS12 Solution -Exam (V3M) 15.08.2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Tunnel food | Branch (HamsterCave food) (HamsterCave food) deriving Show 1 #12;Functional Programming SS12Tunnel (FoodTunnel Grain)) (Branch (FoodTunnel Nuts) (Branch EmptyTunnel EmptyTunnel)) a) Implement a function tunnel, the second argument the function for the case of the food tunnel, and the third argument

  19. Functional Programming SS12 Solution -Exam (V3B) 15.08.2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Tunnel food | Branch (HamsterCave food) (HamsterCave food) deriving Show 1 #12;Functional Programming SS12Tunnel (FoodTunnel Grain)) (Branch (FoodTunnel Nuts) (Branch EmptyTunnel EmptyTunnel)) a) Implement a function tunnel, the second argument the function for the case of the food tunnel, and the third argument

  20. It all began when women set out to fool their men with a dab of make-up. Kate Douglas pictures the dawning of human culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    . The artefact was found at the Blombos Cave, 30 metres above the sea on the coast of South Africa, and the cave a threefold increase in brain size. That, Aiello points out, would have made a more energy-rich diet essential been forced to gradually adopt new strategies to find food, particularly meat. Even with a change

  1. JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 25(1): 8194, 2005 NEW SPECIES OF THE GENUS TYPHLATYA (DECAPODA: ATYIDAE) FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    : ATYIDAE) FROM ANCHIALINE CAVES IN MEXICO, THE BAHAMAS, AND HONDURAS Fernando Alvarez, Thomas M. Iliffe Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Apartado Postal 70-153, Me´xico 04510 D.F., Me´xico (FA, correspondence caves in Mexico (T. dzilamensis), the Bahamas (T. kakuki), and Honduras (T. utilaensis) are described

  2. ESTABLISHING BASELINE DATA ON SEASONAL PHYSIOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GAMMARUS ACHERONDYTES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    (averaging 8.8 mgL-1 in caves of Illinois' sinkhole plain [Taylor et al. 2000]) than in the hyporheos. Many. Clair counties (USFWS 1998, 2002). This area is characterized by high density of sinkholes (> 90 sinkholes km-2 ) (Panno et al. 2003), losing streams, caves, and springs. Shallow conduit flow in this karst

  3. White paper on "Speleothem-based climate proxy records" Dominik Fleitmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2002). 2. Oxygen (!18 O) isotope ratio: interpreted as variations in cave temperature and properties downstream of the source caused by equilibration of aqueous CO2 with cave air is also recognised, and in some in speleothem-based research. This has led to focused and high-quality research that has utilised many

  4. The geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Hutchinson, R.A. (US National Park Service (US))

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone Caldera, one of the largest volcanic features of its type in the world. Hydrothermal activity may have been continuous for {gt}100,000 years B.P. Norris Basin includes the highest erupting geyser of recent water types, colors of organisms and inorganic precipitates, frequent changes in activity and chemistry, and very high subsurface temperatures ({gt}240{degrees}C). Norris Basin is only a part of the Norris-Mammoth Corridor that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. Norris Basin has a heat flow roughly 10 percent of that of the Yellowstone Caldera and requires an estimated 0.01 km{sup 3} of rhyolitic magma per year-a quantity far greater than the corridor's rate of eruption.

  5. Bellevue Road Santa Fe Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Pass ·|}þ59 Starbucks/Promenade Center kj kj SeeInsetM ap forCam pusStops kj Mammoth Lakes Rd. Student:13 5:20 6:47 7:54 9:01 10:08 11:35 Starbucks/Promenade Center 6:21 7:28 8:55 10:02 11:09 12:16 1:43 2

  6. Materials collected by the southern branch of the UC Africa Expedition with a report on previously unpublished Plio-Pleistocene fossil localities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monson, Tesla A; Brasil, Marianne F; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2015-01-01

    Fig. 1 V4738 Pit # Iscor Lime Boetsap Witkrans 2 WitkransGladysvale * Boetsap Iscor Lime Total Grey Bird Pit Witkransin an unroofed cave carved out in lime built out from the

  7. Visual communication of mood through an establishing shot 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirunarayanan, Radhika

    2006-04-12

    Visual storytelling has come a long way since primitive man began creating colorful, narrative cave paintings. In this new age of technology, motion pictures have become a prevalent medium for visual storytelling throughout the developed world...

  8. Blue Bonnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Anchialine blue holes found in the interior of the Bahama Islands have distinct fresh and salt water layers, with vertical mixing, and dysoxic to anoxic conditions below the halocline. Scientific cave diving exploration and microbiological...

  9. Computer Science 1 Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Louis

    , networks, and robots ­ In every industry ­ In every size business ­ In every size team #12;Computer Science and Activities ­ The CAVE ­ Hack-R-Space ­ HackRU ­ HackHers ­ Code Red . . . See www

  10. Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis Vol. 1, No. 3 (2009) 407424

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    to cave in mining,1,2 creation of geothermal energy Corresponding author. 407 #12;408 Z. Chen & R. G in the rock mass, which is important in determining and optimizing well or borehole layout and fracture

  11. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    % hydroelectric and 12% renewable). With the exception of nuclear, geothermal and tidal power, almost every other of a cave and perhaps a natural blowhole, they drilled two large-diameter vertical shafts from the cliff top

  12. CSers develop new 3-D design tool Haydar Taygun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    Painting," the old model for 3-D drawing at the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment in 2001, Keefe worked reality. Media Credit: Courtesy of Daniel Keefe A team of Brown computer scientists has developed "Drawing

  13. Morphological diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in Scottish agricultural land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribera, Ignacio

    investigations on the relationships between their morphology and life traits, as well as on the relationships a few adaptations to special environments have been found, among them digging, tree-dwelling, or cave

  14. Framing the Past: How Virtual Experience Affects Bodily Description of Artefacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, Paola Di Giuseppantonio Di; Matthews, Justin L.; Matlock, Teenie

    2015-01-01

    might include other media, such as 3D immersive systems (Powerwall and CAVE), Haptic Interface and Force Feedback. Three-dimensional immersive systems are stereoscopic interactive visualization system used to visualize the 3D models, which use camera (or...

  15. Designing Large High-Resolution Display Workspaces Alex Endert, Lauren Bradel, Jessica Zeitz, Christopher Andrews, Chris North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    powerwalls capable of presenting large amounts of information at a high level of detail (Figure 2). Their form factors vary from tabletop displays, to immersive caves, to powerwalls. The computers driving

  16. Inferring Plio-Pleistocene Southern African Biochronology From Facial Affinities in Parapapio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Rebecca Rogers

    , and between Parapapio and other Plio-Pleisto- cene taxa (Dinopithecus ingens, Papio angusticeps, Papio izodi to the caves. Theropithecus darti, Dinopithecus ingens, Papio angusticeps, Pp. whitei from Bolt's Farm (BF 43

  17. Immersive Virtual Reality System Using BIM Application With Extended Vertical Field Of View 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathi Subramanian, Adithya

    2012-10-19

    of constraints. The earlier version of BIM Computer Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE) did not have provisions to show the overhead components of a BIM model. Conventionally, models had to be tilted to visualize the overhead components. The process of tilting...

  18. Discuss this paper at http://blogs. nature.com/nature/journalclub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    culturing. PLANETARY SCIENCE Martiancoldtraps Icarus doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2010.03.039 (2010) On Earth, caves can shelter ice, allowing it to persist all year round, even when temperatures outside rise above

  19. Infrastructure for 3D model reconstruction of marine structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurniawati, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    3D model reconstruction of marine structures, such as dams, oil-rigs, and sea caves, is both important and challenging. An important application includes structural inspection. Manual inspection of marine structures is ...

  20. A standard unit for monitoring recruitment of fishes to coral reef rubble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Donald L.

    Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados Received 30 January 2006; received in revised form 8 May 2006 coast of Barbados, West Indies. These rubble SMURFs are inexpensive to construct and permit newly

  1. Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    had severe hole-caving problems. The tight-hole drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to...

  2. The Use of Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes as a Method for Delineating Sources of Organic Matter in Anchialine Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neisch, Julie A

    2013-05-08

    Submerged caves, locally referred to as cenotes, can be found throughout the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. These nutrient poor, aphotic “underground estuaries” lack photosynthetic primary productivity, but are often found underlying high primary...

  3. HFIR Plant Maintenance - August

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion limited reaction of U3O8 to UO3. * TGA analysis of the oxidation of actual used fuel under a controlled atmosphere, conducted in REDC Cave B, correlated well with models....

  4. Tracking Changes in Early Paleoindian Technology and Adaptations on the Southern Plains Periphery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Thomas

    2012-07-16

    (Goebel et al. 2008). Recently, Waters et al. (2009) have suggested that the proposed artifacts were produced naturally. The second group of sites includes Meadowcroft Rockshelter, Schaefer, Hebior, Page-Ladson, and Paisley Caves. These sites are two... with battered 5 and cut mastodon remains. Finally, human coprolites from Paisley Cave date to about 14,100 BP (Gilbert et al. 2008; Jenkins 2007). Two important points, however, emerge from the preceding discussion. First, evidence is mounting for human...

  5. Workshop: Analysis and Concepts to Address Electric Infrastructure Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .hahn@nypa.gov 19. Steve Foltyn LANL sfoltyn@lanl.gov 20. Julian Cave Hydro Quebec cave.julian@ireq.ca 21. Soo Yeau DOE roland.george@ee.doe.gov 35. Masaki Suenaga BNL mas@bnl.gov 36. Mike Crews Duke Energy mrcrews@duke-energy@istec.or.jp 41. Robb Turner Arclight Capital rturner@archlightcapital.com 42. William V. Hassenzahl Adv. Energy

  6. Breeding Experiments with Blackberries and Raspberries. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, H. (Helge)

    1925-01-01

    Donald \\ blackberry. 4 BULLETIN 326 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION The seeds of this variety were sown in seedling trays (flat boxes) in November, 1909. In the following spring, two thousand of them were transplanted from pots into the field, where...-pollination of the Dallas was made with pollen from Mammoth, April 16th and 17th, 1909. The resulting fruit was gathered May the 24th, and the seed sown June 19th. On February 28th, thirty-one plants were potted. Of these, thirteen plants lived to be transplanted...

  7. A core hole in the southwestern moat of the Long Valley caldera: Early results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; White, A.F.; Flexser, S.; Bartel, L.C.

    1986-12-01

    A continuously cored hole penetrated 715m into the southwestern moat of the Long Valley caldera. Temperatures in the post-caldera deposits increase rapidly with depth over the upper 335m to 202/sup 0/C, then remain nearly isothermal into the Bishop Tuff to the bottom of the hole. The depth to the Bishop is the shallowest, and the temperatures observed are among the highest in holes drilled in the caldera. The hole identifies a potential geothermal resource for the community of Mammoth Lakes, constrains the position of the principal heat source for the caldera's hydrothermal system, and serves as access for monitoring changes in water level, temperatures, and fluid chemistry.

  8. Science and technology review: June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.

    1996-06-01

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE`s Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO{sub 2} mystery and osteoporosis are also included.

  9. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Lorenzo, D.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    Results of a radiological survey performed at the Riverton, Wyoming site in July 1976, are presented. The average external gamma exposure rate at 1 m over the tailings pile was 56 ..mu..R/hr. The corresponding rate for the former mill area was 97 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles in a dry wash is evident; but it appears that, in general, the earth cover over the tailings pile has been effective in limiting both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra as a function of depth in 15 augered holes is presented graphically. A survey of the Teton Division Lumber Company property in Riverton showed a maximum external gamma exposure rate of 270 ..mu..R/hr.

  10. Geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. The dominant quartz sand is hydrothermally cemented by chalcedony and is extremely hard, thereby justifying the term hydrothermal quartzite. The fundamental water type in Norris Basin is nearly neutral in pH and high in Cl and SiO/sub 2/. Another common type of water in Norris Basin is high in SO/sub 4/ and moderately high in Cl, with Cl/SO/sub 4/ ratios differing considerably. This study provides no new conclusive data on an old problem, the source or sources of rare dissolved constitutents. An important part of this paper consists of examples of numerous changes in behavior and chemical composition of most springs and geysers, to extents not known elsewhere in the park and perhaps in the world. Hydrothermal mineralogy in core samples from three research holes drilled entirely in Lava Creek Tuff to a maximum depth of -331.6 m permits an interpretation of the hydrothermal alteration history. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations.

  11. THE EXTENT OF PLEISTOCENE ICE CAP, GLACIAL DEPOSITS AND GLACIOKARST IN THE ALADAGLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    holes, ice caves, glacial melt-water streams, stone circles and girlands represent glacialTHE EXTENT OF PLEISTOCENE ICE CAP, GLACIAL DEPOSITS AND GLACIOKARST IN THE ALADAGLAR MASSIF between 1100 m and 3756 m of altitudes. Many of the glacial landforms, such as moraines and ice

  12. Micro-Macro and Rheology in sheared Granular Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    at the Multi Scale Mechanics (MSM) group of the Faculty of Science and Technology of the University of Twente from http ://goo.gl/bf5nNH. Publisher : Abhinendra Singh, Multi Scale Mechanics, University of Twente, but did not cave in Made me think soil is solid ! Growing older one day, I read about the Leaning Tower

  13. LONG-AND SHORT-TERM PRODUCTION SCHEDULING AT LKAB'S KIRUNA MINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LKAB's Kiruna mine is an underground sublevel caving mine located above the Arctic circle in northern scheduling, underground mining, applications Introduction and Background LKAB's Kiruna mine, located above quantities at four ore post-processing plants, or mills. The ore products are classified according

  14. Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Resonant Seismic Emission Valeri Korneev*, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    when no accurate information about source initiation time is needed and strong direct and primary as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits etc) are capable of generating strong primary scattered waves, which are customly recognized as a main information carrying signals. However, detection and interpretation of those

  15. A 350 mK, 9 T scanning tunneling microscope for the study of superconducting thin films on insulating substrates and single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Rd., Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India 2 Excel Instruments, 28, Sarvodaya Industrial Premises, Off Mahakali Caves Road, Andheri (East), Mumbai resolution imaging and spectroscopy on NbSe2 single crystal and spec- troscopic maps obtained

  16. Separating endogenous ancient DNA from modern day contamination in a Siberian Neandertal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pääbo, Svante

    Separating endogenous ancient DNA from modern day contamination in a Siberian Neandertal Pontus is the presence of contaminating modern human DNA molecules in many fossil samples and laboratory reagents present day sources. We apply this approach to a contaminated Neandertal specimen from Okladnikov Cave

  17. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    BA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I · ART 324 Renaissance Art · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Third Year · ART 328 Art of Greece & Rome

  18. A Downtown Denver Law Firm Leverages Tenant Improvement Funds to Cut Operating Expenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Bryan Cave HRO (formerly Holme Roberts & Owen LLP, headquartered in Denver, Colorado), an international law firm, partnered with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus pre-retrofit energy use as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  19. The Effect of Ashe Juniper Removal on Groundwater Recharge in the Edwards Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazan, Roberto

    2011-02-22

    in response to simulated rainfall events. In 2004, simulations were conducted over the cave to measure recharge rates with a dense Ashe juniper canopy. The data and observations from the initial simulations were used to establish a baseline with the juniper...

  20. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    · ART 3/4xx (Art History) · Elective(s) (advisor approval) and/or LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · ART(s) and/or LSP coursework Spring--Fourth Year · ART 437 Senior Thesis II OR ART 3/4xx (Art HistoryBA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals

  1. Caveual ExperCence Automa rCUal Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenyon, Robert V.

    / ----.-....__ \\ #12;Caveual ExperCence Automa rCUal Environment he CAVE Is a new virtual reality reality systems and can be constructed from currently available technology. Suspenslon of ulsbellef arose from fllm crltlclsm and Is defined as the ablllty to give In to a slmulatlon-to Ignore Its medium

  2. Recognition of Objects and Their Component Parts: Responses of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oram, Mike

    of object recognition (Marr and Ni- shihara, 1978; Biederman, 1987), the results indicate view that the processing of an object's parts plays an im- portant role in the initial stages of recognition (Marr and Nishihara, 1978; Marr, 1982; Biederman, 1987). Re- cently, however, Baker Cave and Kosslyn (1993) have

  3. Judy Loven, Animal Damage Managament Specialist Bats are among Indiana's most interesting and unique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    chance of someone contacting a rabid bat, although the great majority of house-infesting bats in Indiana in caves, hollow trees and other natural shelters. A few species, however, commonly roost and breed within During the first warm days of spring, the brown bats leave their overwintering sites and enter structures

  4. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  5. MORE RELATED ARTICLES: Certain Microbes Annihilate Oil Spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MORE RELATED ARTICLES: Certain Microbes Annihilate Oil Spills Ancient Microbes Evolved in Caves Great Lakes Reveal Bizarre Lifeforms Microbes Found Living in the Harshest Conditions Life May Still Sci Pry Microbes Turn Current, Water, CO2 into Methane Without even generating hydrogen By Tudor Vieru

  6. Ancient DNA Chronology within Sediment Deposits: Are Paleobiological Reconstructions Possible and Is DNA Leaching a Factor?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    Ancient DNA Chronology within Sediment Deposits: Are Paleobiological Reconstructions Possible reported the successful extraction of ancient DNA (aDNA) from both frozen and nonfrozen sediments (even sediments up to 3300 years old at 2 cave sites in the North Island of New Zealand. These sites are ideal

  7. A photo of a stream taken at the Duna kanyar in Hungary. Credit: Adam Krajcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmann, Chris

    participating in the program will be part of a short, student-produced documentary film that capture and edit a documentary film about the project. APPLICATIONS The application deadline is March 1, 2006 on a field workshop in Port Aransas. ESI filming of "Caves: A Window Into the Edwards Aquifer." Research

  8. Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 , Susan Stepney1 and Leo Caves1 1 University-like structures. Models of protein folding vary in complexity and the amount of prior knowledge they contain). The energy landscape theory of protein folding (Onuchic et al., 1997) predicts a rugged funnel-like energy

  9. Rock mechanics aspects of blowout self-containment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbarnejad Nesheli, Babak

    2009-06-02

    pressure is high, bridging can be a very effective method for blowout containment. In this method, the formation caves into the open hole or onto the casing and stops the flow of the formation's fluid, either naturally or intentionally. This method can...

  10. INO response to the 2nd article by Mr. V.T. Padmanabhan appeared in countercurrents.org on 24 October, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    ] is an underground laboratory coming up under the hills in Idukki-Theni districts of Kerala and Tamil Nadu of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, stored in 12 dams, all within 50 km of the caves. This could have been a radio. Incidentally when this issue was broached by Shri VS Achuthanandan, the opposition leader of Kerala on 16 th

  11. Reconstruction of regional atmospheric circulation features during the late Pleistocene in subtropical Brazil from oxygen isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    in subtropical Brazil from oxygen isotope composition of speleothems F.W. Cruz Jr. a,b,, S.J. Burns a , I, CEP 05508-080, São Paulo-SP, Brazil c Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge Road, Berkeley, CA of speleothems from caves located in subtropical Brazil provide a broad view of regional climate variations

  12. And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    And how to use owl pellets to do it. By the standards of paleontology, Rebecca Terry, PhD'08 drop their bones on the cave floor or (in the case of owls) ex- pel them in the form of pellets

  13. Adaptive Evolution of Eye Degeneration in the Mexican Blind Cavefish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Antónia

    Adaptive Evolution of Eye Degeneration in the Mexican Blind Cavefish W. R. JEFFERY Department degeneration in cave-adapted animals have not been resolved. Opposing hypotheses invoking neural mutation-dwelling forms (cavefish), which shed new light on this problem. The manner of eye development and degeneration

  14. The Condor 108:721730 # The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emslie, Steve

    FROM NEW MEXICO REBECKA L. BRASSO AND STEVEN D. EMSLIE1 Department of Biology and Marine Biology Pleistocene avifaunas from New Mexico, recovered from Sandia Cave during archaeological excavations by F), and Micrathene whitneyi (Elf Owl) from New Mexico. Two new radiocarbon dates on fossil G. californianus from

  15. Adapting Event-Based Applications for Synchronization in VR Clusters Dmitri K. Lemmerman Andrew S. Forsberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    , they cannot readily support an event-based paradigm. Our method helps resolve this dilemma. 1 Introduction our 4-walled Cave [3] utilize such a model. These applications were originally developed for a multi-pipe. Regardless of architectural approach, drawing to multiple displays requires some mechanism of sharing

  16. Chana Tilevitz Prof. F. Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    to the rocky desert, with its sheltering caves and tunnels. But he wasn't quick enough, because on his way to incidentally become royalty by being more blue-blooded than any family on Earth, it had to be when I was dying

  17. Fauna Troglobia Acuatica de la Peninsula de Yucatin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    Peninsula de Yucathn. pp 673-686 In Biodiversidad Marina y Costera de Mhico. S.I. Salazar-Vallejoy N.E.Gonzilez (4s.). Com. Nal. Biodiversidad y CIQRO, Mhiw, 865 pp. Vast networks of submerged cave systems extend

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Relationship between African dust carried in the Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    the daily concentrations of dust measured in on-shore Trade Winds at Barbados and pediatric asthma Scott Polyclinic, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Barbados, West Indies R. Naidu :H. Thani Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados, West Indies R. Naidu :H. Thani

  19. Proceedings of the 11th International Coral Reef Symposium, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, 7-11 July 2008 Session number 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Donald L.

    and Chemical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados (W.I.) Abstract. Studies species. We concurrently monitored density on three reefs in Barbados (West Indies) for 3-3.5 months differences. During a year-round study on the west coast of Barbados, West Indies (Vallès et al. 2008), we

  20. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Donald L.

    patterns in the recruitment of coral-reef fishes in Barbados Henri Vallès1,*, Donald L. Kramer1 , Wayne Campus, University Drive, Cave Hill, St. Michael, Barbados (West Indies) ABSTRACT: We monitored of the west coast of Barbados, using benthic standard monitoring units of recruitment of fishes (SMURFs

  1. Updated January 2, 2015 Page 1 of 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Francisco de Quito All Undergraduate and Graduate Exchange Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados University of the West Indies at Mona, Jamaica All Academic Cooperation Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados University of the West Indies at Cave Hill, Barbados All Undergraduate and Graduate Exchange Mexico CETYS Universidad All

  2. For permission to copy, contact editing@geosociety.org 2006 Geological Society of America 65

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    in Harrison's Cave, Barbados, West Indies. Only some of the plate 13 C values and none of the plate 18 O and Holocene speleothem calcite from Barbados, sampled temporally along the growth axis, shows similar positive, oxygen isotopes, carbon isotopes, non- equilibrium, Barbados. INTRODUCTION The geochemistry

  3. Myodocopid Ostracoda (Halocypridina, Cladocopina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    in the Bahamas, Canary Islands, and Mexico Louis S. Kornicker and Thomas M. Iliffe SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS (Halocypridina, Cladocopina)fromAnchialine Caves in the Bahamas, Canary Islands, and Mexico. Smithsonian, 1995, from a lava tube in Lanzarote, Canary Islands. One specimen of the cladocopid Polycopiellafromthe

  4. Zoologica Scripta, Vol. 27, No.1,pp, 1-15, 1998 Elsevier ScienceLtd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    Cueva del Agua, a shallow cave on Tenerife, Canary Islands (Huys 1988~).The Superornatiremidae comprises Atlanticcaves on Bermuda and the Canary Islands (Huys 1996).The recent discovery of these genera in the Balearic Islands (Jaume, 1997) provides evidence that the family assumes an Amphi

  5. Design of a Lateral-Line Sensor for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    ) are trying to build an artificial lateral-line sensor by replicating the hair cells using MEMS technologyDesign of a Lateral-Line Sensor for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Nora Martiny, Stefan Sosnowski Anoptichthys jordani, underwater sensors 1. INTRODUCTION Just after hatching the blind Mexican cave fish (Anop

  6. Vol. 34, No. 2, MarchApril 2004, pp. 124134 issn 0092-2102 eissn 1526-551X 04 3402 0124

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweden, produces about 24 million tons of iron ore yearly using an underground mining method known as sublevel caving. To efficiently run the mills that process the iron ore, the mine must deliver planned employs about 3,000 workers, and the Kiruna Mine produces approximately 24 million tons of iron ore per

  7. Board for Graduate Schools: Minutes December 2008 1 U N I V E R S I T Y O F Y O R K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pumfrey, David

    of training modules offered at York, Sheffield and Leeds. The Board requested details of the procedures. Action: Dr Caves The Board noted that a high proportion of the training modules offered at York were Dr Jennifer Winters, Graduate Training Unit Ms Gillian Lindsey, Registry Services, SAS

  8. TEXAS MEMORIAL MUSEUM Speleological Monographs, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Andrew V.

    TEXAS MEMORIAL MUSEUM Speleological Monographs, Number 7 Studies on the CAVE AND ENDOGEAN FAUNA Science Research Laboratory Museum of Texas Tech University, 3301 4th Street Lubbock, Texas 79409 U.S.A. Email: james.cokendolpher@ttu.edu and James R. Reddell Texas Natural Science Center The University

  9. Secondary Sulfate Mineralization and Basaltic Chemistry of Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho: Potential Martian Analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Lindsay J. McHenry; J. Michelle Kotler; Jill R. Scott

    2012-05-01

    Secondary deposits associated with the basaltic caves of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) in southern Idaho were examined using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The secondary mineral assemblages are dominated by Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) with a small fraction of the deposits containing minor concentrations of Na-carbonate minerals. The assemblages are found as white, efflorescent deposits in small cavities along the cave walls and ceilings and as localized mounds on the cave floors. Formation of the deposits is likely due to direct and indirect physiochemical leaching of meteoritic water through the overlying basalts. Whole rock data from the overlying basaltic flows are characterized by their extremely high iron concentrations, making them good analogs for martian basalts. Understanding the physiochemical pathways leading to secondary mineralization at COM is also important because lava tubes and basaltic caves are present on Mars. The ability of FTICR-MS to consistently and accurately identify mineral species within these heterogeneous mineral assemblages proves its validity as a valuable technique for the direct fingerprinting of mineral species by deductive reasoning or by comparison with reference spectra.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Protoplanetary Igor Novikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froebrich, Dirk

    medium with the PPN stellar wind model. The properties of investigated post-AGB outflows are dependent Jørgensen, Javier Eguidazu, Joern Foertsch, Josh Cave, Merlin Urban, Myles O'Donoghue, Niklas Scholz, Rob Mc to mass loss in the form of high velocity, collimated winds which shock and shape the ejected shell

  11. VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR GEOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION: POTENTIAL AND CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    /biological model of currents, wind, salinity, temperature, and other variables (Wheless, et al., 1996 Modeling Language (VRML), through high-end systems such as immersive workbenches, CAVEs, or Power Walls such as urban planning (Verbree et al. 1999), natural resources management (Bishop and Karadaglis 1994

  12. ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Computational Methods in Tunnelling (EURO:TUN 2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    , R. Carbonell, and A. Pérez-Estaún 2 1 INTRODUCTION One of the most important problems of drilling realis- tic corrective measures, and high number of accidents and contingencies (caves, stop drill- ing...). These issues can imply high costs in the quarry, insecurity and also social alarm. At present, the increase

  13. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Technology Innovations in unmanned varieties of autonomous aerial vehicles, and new ways of utilizing them, offer the potential for making aerial vehicles autonomous and capable of penetrating tunnels, caves, and buildings, so that surveillance

  14. A dressed TDDFT treatment of the 21 of butadiene and hexatriene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kieron

    A dressed TDDFT treatment of the 21 Ag states of butadiene and hexatriene Robert J. Cave a,*, Fan present results for the vertical absorption energy for the 21 Ag states of butadiene and hexatriene, and the vertical fluorescence and 0­0 transitions for the 21 Ag state of butadiene. Ó 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area, Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the National Park Service, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory was initiated in 1988 to determine the effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA), Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. The study addressed three principal issues: (1) the sources of thermal water in the hot springs at Mammoth, La Duke, and Bear Creek; (2) the degree of subsurface connection between these areas; and (3) the effects of geothermal development in the Corwin Springs KGRA on the Park's thermal features. The authors investigations included, but were not limited to, geologic mapping, electrical geophysical surveys, chemical sampling and analyses of waters and rocks, determinations of the rates of discharge of various thermal springs, and hydrologic tracer tests.

  16. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  17. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Walker

    2014-03-05

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  18. Phase 1 drilling operations at the Magma Energy Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the Phase 1 drilling operations for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. An important part of the Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program, this well is designed to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degree}C, whichever comes first. There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart, with scientific investigations in the borehole between the drilling intervals. Phase 1 of this project resulted in a 20 inch cased hole to 2558 feet, with 185 feet of coring beyond that. This document comprises a narrative of the daily activities, copies of the daily mud and lithologic reports, time breakdowns of rig activities, inventories of lost circulation materials, temperature logs of the cored hole, and a strip chart mud log. 2 figs.

  19. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  1. Construction of Blaze at the University of Illinois at Chicago: A Shared, High-Performance, Visual Computer for Next-Generation Cyberinfrastructure-Accelerated Scientific, Engineering, Medical and Public Policy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Maxine D.; Leigh, Jason

    2014-02-17

    The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters petascale computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energy’s Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for “Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE),” enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.

  2. The potential use of biogeochemistry in the detection of petroleum microseepage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusman, R.W.; Saeed, M.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States)); Abu-Ali, M.A. (Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1992-06-01

    Biogeochemistry was applied to the indirect detection of petroleum microseepage in the vicinity of Eagle Springs oil field, Railroad Valley, Nevada, and Cave Canyon field, Paradox basin, Utah. Trace elements were measured in native vegetation over and surrounding areas of production at the test sites. The oxidation of microseepage in the upper part of the soil column is postulated to cause an increase in plant uptake of transition trace elements such as iron, manganese, and vanadium, and a decrease in plant uptake of alkaline earth elements such as calcium, strontium, and barium. Compared to nonproductive areas, an increase in uptake of transition trace elements and a decrease in alkaline earth elements was observed in Fourwing salt-bush over Eagle Springs field. The postulated increase in uptake of transition trace elements and decrease in alkaline earth elements was not as apparent in Big sage-brush nor in Utah juniper over the Cave Canyon field. The observation of the postulated effects on vegetation at Eagle Springs may be due to the relatively large rates of microseepage independently observed using other methods, and the extensive faulting in Railroad Valley. The weaker response observed at Cave Canyon may reflect the lack of faulting and the retention of light hydrocarbons in the reservoir. Another possible reason for weal response is that the available plant species at Cave Canyon do not exhibit the effect at the lower soil pH measured in the area. At low pH and low Eh, the solubility of transition elements in soil pore waters and plant uptake is increased. Due to the high soil pH of the Railroad Valley area, the uptake of alkaline earth elements should be decreased where microseepage is occurring because of crystallization of carbonate minerals.

  3. Potential for the use of biogeochemistry in the detection of petroleum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusman, R.W.; Saeed, M.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States)); Abu-Ali, M.A. (ARAMCO, Golden, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Biogeochemistry was applied to the indirect detection of petroleum microseepage in the vicinity of the Eagle Springs oil field, Railroad Valley, Nevada and Cave Canyon field, Paradox basin, Utah. Trace elements were measured in native vegetation over and surrounding areas of production at the test sites. The oxidation of microseepage in the upper part of the soil column is postulated to cause an increase in plant uptake of transition trace elements such as iron, manganese, vanadium, and a decrease in plant uptake of alkaline earth elements such as calcium, strontium, and barium. An increase in uptake of transition trace elements and a decrease in alkaline earth elements was observed in Fourwing saltbush over the Eagle Springs field. The postulated increase in uptake of transition trace elements and decrease in alkaline earth elements was not observed in Big Sagebrush nor in Utah juniper over the Cave Canyon field. The observation of the postulated effects at Eagle Springs may be due to the relatively large rates of microseepage independently observed using other methods, or the loss of the light hydrocarbons and extensive faulting in Railroad Valley. The apparent failure to observed the same effect at Cave Canyon may reflect the lack of faulting and the retention of light hydrocarbons in the reservoir. Another possibility is that the available plant species at Cave Canyon do not exhibit the effect at the lower soil pH measured in the area. The theory predicts that the increased uptake of transition elements and decreased uptake of alkaline earth elements will be enhanced at high soil pH.

  4. Historical and Modern Perspectives on Group Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esses, Victoria M.; Dovidio, John F.; Danso, Henry A.; Jackson, L. M.; Semenya, Antoinette

    2005-01-01

    ., Aronson, J., & Steele, C. M. (2000). When beliefs yield to evidence: Reducing biased evaluation by affirming the self. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 1151-1164. Danso, H. A. & Esses, V. M (2001). Black experimenters..., 1986; LeVine & Campbell, 1972; Sherif, 1966; Sherif & Sherif, 1953; for reviews see Brown, 1995; Jackson, 1993; Taylor & Moghaddam, 1994). Perhaps the most well- known study supporting Realistic Group Conflict Theory is the Robbers Caves experiment...

  5. The geology of North Fredonia area, McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosteller, Stanley Alfred

    1957-01-01

    " structure VI ~ Topographic beach developed oa Point Peak shale 35 VI I. Weathered surface of the lisestoae facies ot' the lower Blleaburger . ~ . . . ~ . . . . , . . ~ . . ~ V III. Typical !:. Ilsaburger dolomite topography snd small caves... Ordoviciaa age, consists of gray liwestoae aad grassier doloaite. Rocks of Early Peaasylvaaiaa ege crop out oa the dowathrowa side ef the Fredoaia faalt near the eastern boundary of the area. North to northeast trending aorwal faults disrupt the strata...

  6. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVE SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE 105 K EAST ION EXCHANGE COLUMN MONOLITH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOCHEN, R.M.

    2007-08-02

    The 105-K East (KE) Basin Ion Exchange Column (IXC) cells, lead caves, and the surrounding vault are to be removed as necessary components in implementing ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (Ecology et al. 2003) milestone M-034-32 (Complete Removal of the K East Basin Structure). The IXCs consist of six units located in the KE Basin, three in operating positions in cells and three stored in a lead cave. Methods to remove the IXCs from the KE Basin were evaluated in KBC-28343, ''Disposal of K East Basin Ion Exchange Column Evaluation''. The method selected for removal was grouting the six IXCs into a single monolith for disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Grout will be added to the IXC cells, IXC lead caves containing spent IXCs, and in the spaces between the lead cave walls and metal skin, to immobilize the contaminants, provide self-shielding, minimize void space, and provide a structurally stable waste form. The waste to be offered for disposal is the encapsulated monolith defined by the exterior surfaces of the vault and the lower surface of the underlying slab. This document presents summary of the data quality objective (DQO) process establishing the decisions and data required to support decision-making activities for the disposition of the IXC monolith. The DQO process is completed in accordance with the seven-step planning process described in EPA QA/G-4, ''Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process'', which is used to clarify and study objectives; define the appropriate type, quantity, and quality of data; and support defensible decision-making. The DQO process involves the following steps: (1) state the problem; (2) identify the decision; (3) identify the inputs to the decision; (4) define the boundaries of the study; (5) develop a decision rule (DR); (6) specify tolerable limits on decision errors; and (7) optimize the design for obtaining data.

  7. Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

    2012-02-14

    in the interior of the island (Raeisi and Mylroie, 1995). This mixing of water masses has aggressive dissolutional properties and aids in the forming of karstic features such as flank margin caves. Mylroie et al., (2001) proposed and developed the ?Carbonate... towards the geologic development and glacial eustatic events on the island. 10 Anchialine Environment Anchialine habitats are known to exist throughout the world often underground, forming a halocline where freshwater mixes with the intruding...

  8. An Examination of Aurignacian Technology: Levels L and M at Termo-Pialat (Dordogne, France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Melinda Marie

    2007-12-05

    Asia was the location for the origin of the Aurignacian. Scholars also view other areas of Asia as the origin for the Aurignacian (Kozlowski and Otte 1994, 2000; Olszewski and Dibble 1996; Otte 2004). Evidence from sites in the Zagros has some... from Baradostian to the Zagros Aurignacian (Olszewski and Dibble 1994: 68). Yafteh Cave, another site in the Zagros with "Baradostian" materials, produced nine radiocarbon dates ranging from 40,000-29,400 BP. The Anuy River basin in Siberia also...

  9. Method of pollination and heritability for seedling vigor in switchgrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez de Leon, Hector

    2005-08-29

    ................................................................................................ 45 5. Mean weight for six repetitions and overall mean weight for Frio buffelgrass, Alamo switchgrass, and the means of Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 under growth chamber conditions at College Station, TX, at 14 days after seedling emergence... cultivars include ?Blackwell?, ?Caddo?, and ?Cave-in-Rock? while ?Alamo? and ?Kanlow? are cultivars of the lowland ecotype (Alderson and Sharp, 1994). In addition to its importance as a forage grass, the U.S. Department of Energy has identified...

  10. April 2005 79 E N T E R T A I N M E N T C O M P U T I N G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Michael

    April 2005 79 E N T E R T A I N M E N T C O M P U T I N G Published by the IEEE Computer Society C will be publicly available in the fall of 2005, supports real-time spa- tial tracking and stereographic imaging. It is currently installed and working in the SAS-Cube (www.alterne.info/ techn_platform.html), a CAVE-like display

  11. Quantum Noise in Conventional Optical Heterodyne Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dechao He; Boya Xie; Yu Xiao; Sheng Feng

    2014-10-31

    By invoking the quantum theory of optical coherence, we theoretically show that the quantum noise in conventional optical heterodyne devices, which were previously identified as usual phase-insensitive amplifiers with additional quantum noise, is similar to that in optical homodyne devices, as verified by experimental data. Albeit more study is demanded to understand this result, it is certain that neither the uncertainty principle nor Caves's theorem for quantum noise of linear amplifiers sets a limit to the quantum noise of heterodyne devices.

  12. Pleistocene and Recent environments of the Central Great Plains. Edited by Wakefield Dort, Jr., and J. Knox Jones, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1970-01-01

    , these grass­ lands occupy a region stretching from southern Canada to northern Mexico and from the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in the west to beyond the Mississippi River in the east. The natural setting of this vast area long has interested natural... is an unusual record preserved in a lava cave on the Snake River Plain of Idaho (Butler, 1968; Dort, 1968). Here, exca­ vations by archaeologists revealed a se­ quence of laminated silts that had been periodically augmented by windblown sediment...

  13. Dynamics of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigel Goldenfeld; Pak Yuen Chan; John Veysey

    2006-05-26

    We formulate and model the dynamics of spatial patterns arising during the precipitation of calcium carbonate from a supersaturated shallow water flow. The model describes the formation of travertine deposits at geothermal hot springs and rimstone dams of calcite in caves. We find explicit solutions for travertine domes at low flow rates, identify the linear instabilities which generate dam and pond formation on sloped substrates, and present simulations of statistical landscape evolution.

  14. Bat habitat research. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, B.L.; Bosworth, W.R.; Doering, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes activities over the current reporting period to characterize the habitats of bats on the INEL. Research tasks are entitled Monitoring bat habitation of caves on the INEL to determine species present, numbers, and seasons of use; Monitor bat use of man-made ponds at the INEL to determine species present and rates of use of these waters; If the Big Lost River is flowing on the INEL and/or if the Big Lost River sinks contain water, determine species present, numbers and seasons of use; Determine the habitat requirement of Townsend`s big-eared bats, including the microclimate of caves containing Townsend`s big-eared bats as compared to other caves that do not contain bats; Determine and describe an economical and efficient bat census technique to be used periodically by INEL scientists to determine the status of bats on the INEL; and Provide a suggestive management and protective plan for bat species on the INEL that might, in the future, be added to the endangered and sensitive list;

  15. Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

  16. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Stuart F; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Dobson, Patrick

    2013-05-20

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  18. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6–4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  19. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  20. Pumping characteristics of chopped sorghum slurries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Shichuan

    1986-01-01

    simultaneously in a pipeline. Classification of Solids Durand and Condolios (1953) published the following classification of particles in which each mode of particle transport was associated with a specific range of particle size. 1. Particles of a size less... is the settled-bed velocity, or deposition velocity. This is the mean velocity for the pipeline below which solids will settle on the bottom of the pipe (Cave and McElvain, 1983). It is important to know what the settled-bed velocity for a particular slurry...

  1. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Çelik, Gültekin; Gökçe, Yasin; Y?ld?z, Murat

    2014-05-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model theory (WBEPMT). We have employed numerical non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for expectation values of radii and the necessary energy values have been taken from the compilation at NIST. The results obtained with the present method agree very well with the Coulomb approximation results given by Caves (1975). Moreover, electric quadrupole transition probability values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using the WBEPMT.

  2. True Stories For Fictional Children to Tell in the Dark 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsellino, M.

    2007-01-01

    him even in the middle of the cave. It's like he gives off an aura of utter normalcy, canceling out anything odd in the situation around him. Jason wonders briefly how a guy ends up learning how to do that. "And what's that supposed... travel to look like they're not ridiculously expensive. Some guy from a shelter comes by and offers everybody coffee and soup, but Jason's not really hungry and he's already feeling kinda strung out and jittery even without caffeine. It's been a while...

  3. 'El teatro me ha dejado a mí': Una entrevista con Antón Arrufat"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph, Nancy

    1999-04-01

    SPRING 1999 143 "El teatro me ha dejado a mí": Una entrevista con Antón Arrufat Nancy Christoph [Antón Arrufat nació en Santiago de Cuba en 1935. Además de ser dramaturgo, es poeta y narrador. Su obra dramática incluye: El cave se investiga... con el teatro. Hace años que no escribo teatro. Recibí muy males reacciones. El teatro me creó problemas de carácter político, y dejé de escribirlo.1 Era un género que escribía con mucha facilidad, y que me gustaba hacer. Es el que menos trabajo me...

  4. Position estimation of transceivers in communication networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, Claudia A. (Pleasanton, CA); Dowla, Farid (Castro Valley, CA)

    2008-06-03

    This invention provides a system and method using wireless communication interfaces coupled with statistical processing of time-of-flight data to locate by position estimation unknown wireless receivers. Such an invention can be applied in sensor network applications, such as environmental monitoring of water in the soil or chemicals in the air where the position of the network nodes is deemed critical. Moreover, the present invention can be arranged to operate in areas where a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available, such as inside buildings, caves, and tunnels.

  5. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  6. Photo of the Week: The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codesPhiladelhia Gas WorksAugust 3,PhotoPhoto ofCAVE

  7. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  8. Comparative biosedimentology of some terraced travertine deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J. (NASA, Moffett Field, CA (United States). Ames Research Center)

    1992-01-01

    The authors have compared several travertine spring systems representing a range of thermal regimes and geological settings. The goal is to derive a facies model for terraced travertine deposits that integrates biological influences on sedimentary fabric and microstructure. The springs chosen for comparison include Asta Spring (Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone; [le] 85 C), Angel Terrace (Mammoth Group, Yellowstone; [le] 72 C), and Big Horn Spring, Wyoming ([le] 56 C). At the highest temperatures microbial mats are absent and primary structures are dense, botryoidal masses of calcite exhibiting radial acicular fabrics. At intermediate temperatures a variety of mat types and associated sedimentary fabrics were observed, their distribution being correlated with temperature and flow velocity. Two types of current-oriented streamer fabrics were observed, a type at 72--74 C formed by the precipitation of aragonite on surfaces of a finely-filamentous bacterial species resembling Thiothrix, and a second type at 45--55 C, formed by aragonite blades associated with thin microbial mats dominated by Spirulina that appear to bind small dumbell-shaped crystals of aragonite. In quiet water at 45--50 C, microbial mats dominated by species of Phormidium formed tufted mats associated with ridged networks and open fenestral fabrics. At Big Horn Spring, a filamentous eukaryotic alga forms mats in lower terracette ponds at < 40 C. Moving down the system, algal-coated pisoids up to 1 cm. became abundant. Algal filaments were able to retain mm-sized pisoids on spillways, where they had become embedded in terracette faces. All of the biogenic fabrics noted above survive early diagenesis, and have been identified in Holocene and Pleistocene travertines.

  9. Yellowstone National Park as an opportunity for deep continental drilling in thermal regions. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera represnets the most intense magnatic and thermal anomaly within the conterminous United States. Voluminous rhyolite ash flows, accompanied by formation of huge calderas, occurred approximately 2.0, 1.3, and 0.6 My B.P. Although the last lava flow was about 70,000 B.P., much evidence suggests that magma may still be present at relatively shallow depth. The evidence from gravity and magnetic lows, magnetotelluric soundings, seismic wave velocities, maximum depths of earthquake foci, significant recent uplift of the caldera floor, and exceptionally high heat flux suggest that magmatic temperatures may be attained 5 to 10 km beneath much of the caldera. Most of the hot-spring and geyser activity occurs within the caldera and along a fault zone that trends north from the caldera rim through Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs. The thermal waters and gases have been extensively sampled and analyzed over a period of 100 years. The chemical, isotopic, and hydrologic data obtained from natural discharges and from shallow wells drilled in thermal areas, enable formulation of models of the hydrothermal system. No previous intermediate-depth drilling has been conducted at Yellowstone to help select the best location for a deep drill hole, and because Yellowstone is a National Park, no commercial drilling will be available for add-on experiments. Also, a deep drill hole in Yellowstone would have to be sited with great regard to environmental and ecological considerations. Nevertheless, the large amount of existing data is sufficient to formulate testable models. The Yellowstone thermal anomaly is so extensive and scientifically interesting that almost any suitable drilling site there may be superior to the best drilling site in any other silicic caldera complex in the United States.

  10. Physicists band together to support a new megaproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flam, F.

    1993-07-23

    As the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) flirts with death in the congressional budget process for a second year, another mammoth science project is coming to life. Just a few days after the House voted to kill the $10 billion particle accelerator last month, it approved next year's funding for a megaproject that is a little cheaper and a lot less familiar: a $2.7 billion nuclear reactor known as the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), to be built at Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a national facility for probing materials with beams of neutrons. The project's success in the House is a sign that physicists can still make a case for big science-at least when the project has a broad scientific constituency and plausible links to national competitiveness. When the facility is completed in 2002, it will be the world's most powerful neutron source, delivering 10 times the flux of neutrons produced by its nearest competitor, at the Institute Lau-Langevin in Grenoble, France. For now, designs call for a reactor about one-tenth the size of a power reactor, says project director West. Fission in the reactor core will send out a steady stream of neutrons. Slowed by heavy water to little more than walking speed, the neutrons will be carried through guides that work like fiber optic cables-by reflecting the neutrons internally, like tennis balls ricocheting down a pipe-to experiments tens or hundreds of meters away. There the neutrons will probe the atomic-scale structure of materials in a way that depends on quantum mechanical quality. Like any subatomic particles, neutrons can be thought of as waves as well as particles. When they bombard matter, their wave nature comes into play. The slow neutrons from the ANS will have a wavelength about equal to the spacing between atoms in a typical solid, making the neutrons especially sensitive to atom-by-atom architecture.

  11. A comparison of hydrocarbon gases from springs and seeps of varied geologic provinces of the northwestern US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The northwestern US hosts a remarkable quantity and variety of thermal springs and seeps. Although many studies have dealt with the liquids and non-hydrocarbon gases emanating from these sources, few have focused on hydrocarbon gases. methane in particular is now recognized as an important reactive trace gas in the earth's atmosphere. To understand better the magnitude and occurrence of natural sources of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere, the authors have begun a survey of these gases throughout the northwestern US. This area encompasses a number of different tectonic regimes: the Yellowstone Hot Spot, the northern Basin and Range province, the Cascade volcanic arc, and the Cascadia subduction complex. Methane is present in each area at concentration levels ranging from about 2 ppmv (parts per million by volume) to 99.9% (by volume). Hydrothermal activity in the Yellowstone area produces spring gases containing less than 4% methane, with CO[sub 2] as the balance gas. The Teton area has a wide variety of gas compositions with either methane, carbon dioxide, or nitrogen as the primary gas component. In the northern Great Basin, thermal springs and seeps typically occur along fault zones at the base of mountain ranges. Methane concentrations range from 0.2 to 47%, with HMW HC concentrations from 0 to 3,100 ppmv. Areas covered by the Cenozoic Columbia River basalts and the basalts of the Snake River Plain continue to have high heat flow and produce thermal springs and seeps, usually along fault zones. Gases from the southern Cascade volcanic arc (Mt. Shasta and Mt. Lassen) are composed typically of carbon dioxide, with minor amounts of methane (less than 0.2%); however some fumaroles at Mt. Lassen have minor quantities of HMW HC. Along the Pacific coast, melanges of the Cascadia subduction complex host many seeps and springs. In some seeps the gas consists almost exclusively of methane (94.3 to 99.9%) with amounts of HMW HC ranging from about 5 ppmv to 3.5%.

  12. Plant Design for the Production of DUAGG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2003-02-04

    The cost of producing DUAGG is an important consideration for any interested private firm in determining whether DUCRETE is economically viable as a material of construction in next-generation spent nuclear fuel casks. This study analyzed this project as if it was a stand-alone project. The capital cost includes engineering design, equipment costs and installation, start up, and management; the study is not intended to be a life-cycle cost analysis. The costs estimated by this study are shown in Table ES.1, and the conclusions of this study are listed in Table ES.2. The development of DUAGG and DUCRETE is a major thrust of the Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Project. An obvious use of depleted uranium is as a shielding material (e.g., DUCRETE). DUCRETE is made by replacing the conventional stone aggregate in concrete with DUAGG. One objective of this project is to bring the development of DUCRETE to a point at which a demonstrated basis exists for its commercial deployment. The estimation of the costs to manufacture DUAGG is an important part of this effort. Paul Lessing and William Quapp developed DUAGG and DUCRETE as part of an Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) program to find beneficial uses for depleted uranium (DU). Subsequently, this technology was licensed to Teton Technologies, Inc. The DUAGG process mixes DUO{sub 2} with sintering materials and additives to form pressed briquettes. These briquettes are sintered at 1300 C, and the very dense sintered briquettes are then crushed and classified into gap-graded size fractions. The graded DUAGG is then ready to be used to make high-strength heavy DUCRETE. The DUCRETE shielding will be placed into an annular steel cask-shell mold, which has internal steel reinforcing bars. The objectives of this study are to (1) use previous DUAGG process developments to design a plant that will produce DUAGG at a baseline rate, (2) determine the size of the equipment required to meet the DUAGG production scale, (3) estimate the facility's capital and operating costs, and (4) perform a parametric sensitivity analysis on those elements of cost that most affect the total operating expenses. Because the study does not include preoperational, decontamination, decommissioning, and closure costs, it cannot be considered a complete life-cycle cost analysis. However, the purpose of this analysis is to establish the potential viability of the DUAGG process as a private commercial venture to meet a market demand for advanced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage and transport casks.

  13. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  14. The Crystallization Behavior of Porous PLA Prepared by Modified Solvent Casting/Particulate Leaching Technique for Potential Use of Tissue Engineering Scaffold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Huang; Xiaomin Zhu; Haiyan Tu; Ajun Wan

    2014-04-14

    The porous PLA foams potential for tissue engineering usage are prepared by a modified solvent casting/particulate leaching method with different crystallinity. Since in typical method the porogens are solved in the solution and flow with the polymers during the casting and the crystallinity behavior of PLA chains in the limited space cannot be tracked, in this work the processing is modified by diffusing the PLA solution into a steady salt stack. With a thermal treatment before leaching while maintaining the stable structure of the porogens stack, the crystallinity of porous foams is made possible to control. The characterizations indicate the crystallization of porous foams is in a manner of lower crystallibility than the bulk materials. Pores and caves of around 250{\\mu}m size are obtained in samples with different crystallinity. The macro-structures are not much impaired by the crystallization nevertheless the morphological effect of the heating process is still obvious.

  15. Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-01-25

    A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing. 3 figs.

  16. STATUS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING RF FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, Daniel S [ORNL] [ORNL; Assadi, Saeed [ORNL] [ORNL; Campisi, Isidoro E [ORNL] [ORNL; Casagrande, Fabio [ORNL] [ORNL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; DeVan, Bill [ORNL] [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL] [ORNL; Henderson, Stuart D [ORNL] [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL] [ORNL; Geng, Xiaosong [ORNL] [ORNL; Stone Jr, William C [ORNL] [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Derrick C [ORNL] [ORNL; Wright, Paul Alan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project was completed with only limited superconducting RF (SRF) facilities installed as part of the project. A concerted effort has been initiated to install the infrastructure and equipment necessary to maintain and repair the superconducting Linac, and to support power upgrade research and development (R&D). Installation of a Class10/100/10,000 cleanroom and outfitting of the test cave with RF, vacuum, controls, personnel protection and cryogenics systems is underway. A horizontal cryostat, which can house a helium vessel/cavity and fundamental power coupler for full power, pulsed testing, is being procured. Equipment for cryomodule assembly and disassembly is being procured. This effort, while derived from the experience of the SRF community, will provide a unique high power test capability as well as long term maintenance capabilities. This paper presents the current status and the future plans for the SNS SRF facilities.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Beutenbergia cavernae type strain (HKI 0122T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Land, Miriam; Pukall, Rudiger; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Beutenbergia cavernae (Groth et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. cavernae HKI 0122T is a Gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from a cave in Guangxi (China). B. cavernae grows best under aerobic conditions and shows a rod-coccus growth cycle. Its cell wall peptidoglycan contains the diagnostic L-lysine - L-glutamate interpeptide bridge. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the poorly populated micrococcineal family Beutenbergiaceae, and this 4,669,183 bp long single replicon genome with its 4225 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Quantum interference within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chia-Chun Chou; Angel S. Sanz; Salvador Miret-Artes; Robert E. Wyatt

    2010-05-26

    Quantum interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. As shown in a previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 250401 (2009)], complex quantum trajectories display helical wrapping around stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near vortical tubes, these structures being prominent features of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. Here, we further analyze the divergence and vorticity of the quantum momentum function along streamlines near poles, showing the intricacy of the complex dynamics. Nevertheless, despite this behavior, we show that the appearance of the well-known interference features (on the real axis) can be easily understood in terms of the rotation of the nodal line in the complex plane. This offers a unified description of interference as well as an elegant and practical method to compute the lifetime for interference features, defined in terms of the average wrapping time, i.e., considering such features as a resonant process.

  19. Chooz A, First Pressurized Water Reactor to be Dismantled in France - 13445

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucau, Joseph [Westinghouse Electric Company, 43 rue de l'Industrie, Nivelles (Belgium)] [Westinghouse Electric Company, 43 rue de l'Industrie, Nivelles (Belgium); Mirabella, C. [Westinghouse Electric France, Orsay (France)] [Westinghouse Electric France, Orsay (France); Nilsson, Lennart [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vaesteraas (Sweden)] [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vaesteraas (Sweden); Kreitman, Paul J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Lake Bluff, IL 60048 (United States)] [Westinghouse Electric Company, Lake Bluff, IL 60048 (United States); Obert, Estelle [EDF - DPI - CIDEN, Lyon (France)] [EDF - DPI - CIDEN, Lyon (France)

    2013-07-01

    Nine commercial nuclear power plants have been permanently shut down in France to date, of which the Chooz A plant underwent an extensive decommissioning and dismantling program. Chooz Nuclear Power Station is located in the municipality of Chooz, Ardennes region, in the northeast part of France. Chooz B1 and B2 are 1,500 megawatt electric (MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) currently in operation. Chooz A, a 305 MWe PWR implanted in two caves within a hill, began operations in 1967 and closed in 1991, and will now become the first PWR in France to be fully dismantled. EDF CIDEN (Engineering Center for Dismantling and Environment) has awarded Westinghouse a contract for the dismantling of its Chooz A reactor vessel (RV). The project began in January 2010. Westinghouse is leading the project in a consortium with Nuvia France. The project scope includes overall project management, conditioning of the reactor vessel (RV) head, RV and RV internals segmentation, reactor nozzle cutting for lifting the RV out of the pit and seal it afterwards, dismantling of the RV thermal insulation, ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) forecast to ensure acceptable doses for the personnel, complementary vacuum cleaner to catch the chips during the segmentation work, needs and facilities, waste characterization and packaging, civil work modifications, licensing documentation. The RV and RV internals will be segmented based on the mechanical cutting technology that Westinghouse applied successfully for more than 13 years. The segmentation activities cover the cutting and packaging plan, tooling design and qualification, personnel training and site implementation. Since Chooz A is located inside two caves, the project will involve waste transportation from the reactor cave through long galleries to the waste buffer area. The project will end after the entire dismantling work is completed, and the waste storage is outside the caves and ready to be shipped either to the ANDRA (French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) waste disposal facilities - (for low-level waste [LLW] and very low-level waste [VLLW], which are considered short lived) - or to the EDF Interim Storage Facility planned to be built on another site - (for low- and intermediate-level waste [LILW], which is considered long lived). The project has started with a detailed conceptual study that determines the step-by-step approach for dismantling the reactor and eventually supplying the packed containers ready for final disposal. All technical reports must be verified and approved by EDF and the French Nuclear Safety Authority before receiving the authorization to start the site work. The detailed conceptual study has been completed to date and equipment design and manufacturing is ongoing. This paper will present the conceptual design of the reactor internals segmentation and packaging process that will be implemented at Chooz A, including the planning, methodology, equipment, waste management, and packaging strategy. (authors)

  20. Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1983-01-01

    A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing.

  1. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable Web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange Ramos, Bruno; The ATLAS collaboration; Pommes, Kathy; Pavani Neto, Varlen; Vieira Arosa, Breno; Abreu Da Silva, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Technical Coordination disposes of 17 Web systems to support its operation. These applications, whilst ranging from supporting the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring radiation levels in the equipment at the cave, are constantly prone to changes in requirements due to the collaborative nature of the experiment and its management. In this context, a Web framework is proposed to unify the generation of the supporting interfaces. Fence assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of JSON configuration files. It relies vastly on Glance, a technology that was set forth in 2003 to create an abstraction layer on top of the heterogeneous sources that store the technical coordination data. Once Glance maps out the database modeling, records can be referenced in the configuration files by wrapping unique identifiers around double enclosing brackets. The deployed content can be individually secured by attaching clearance attributes to their description thus ensuring that vi...

  2. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system, thus substantially reducing the number of cables required to power the sensors. The high gradient capacity of the 1.3 GHz cavities required a revision of the radiation shielding and interlocks. The cave was updated as per the recommendations of the radiation safety committee. The high pressure rinse system was updated with new adapters to assist the rinsing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities. Finally, a proposal for cold testing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities at A0 north cave was made to the small experiments approval committee, radiation safety committee and the Tevatron cryogenic safety sub-committee for an operational readiness clearance and the same was approved. The project was classified under research and development of single cell cavities (project 18) and was allocated a budget of $200,000 in FY 2007.

  3. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate in switchgrass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somleva, Mariya N.; Snell, Kristi D.; Beaulieu, Julie; Peoples, Oliver P.; Garrison, Bradley; Patterson, Nii

    2013-07-16

    Transgenic plants, plant material, and plant cells for synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates, preferably poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (also referred to a as PHB) are provided. Preferred plants that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB include plants that do not normally produce storage products such as oils and carbohydrates, and plants that have a C.sub.4 NAD-malic enzyme photosynthetic pathway. Such plants also advantageously produce lignocellulosic biomass that can be converted into biofuels. An exemplary plant that can be genetically engineered to produce PHB and produce lignocellulosic biomass is switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L. A preferred cultivar of switchgrass is Alamo. Other suitable cultivars of switchgrass include but are not limited to Blackwell, Kanlow, Nebraska 28, Pathfinder, Cave-in-Rock, Shelter and Trailblazer.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  6. Switchgrass Cultivar/Ecotype Selection and Management for Biofuels in the Upper Southeast USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lemus, Rocky; Parrish, David J.; Wolf, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial warm-season grass indigenous to the eastern USA, has potential as a biofuels feedstock. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of upland and lowland switchgrass cultivars under different environments and management treatments. Four cultivars of switchgrass were evaluated from 2000 to 2001 under two management regimes in plots established in 1992 at eight locations in the upper southeastern USA. Two management treatments included 1) a single annual harvest (in late October to early November) and a single application of 50?kg N/ha/yr and 2) two annual harvests (in midsummer andmore »November) and a split application of 100?kg?N/ha/yr. Biomass yields averaged 15?Mg/ha/yr and ranged from 10 to 22?Mg/ha/yr across cultivars, managements, locations, and years. There was no yield advantage in taking two harvests of the lowland cultivars (Alamo and Kanlow). When harvested twice, upland cultivars (Cave-in-Rock and Shelter) provided yields equivalent to the lowland ecotypes. Tiller density was 36% lower in stands cutting only once per year, but the stands appeared vigorous after nine years of such management. Lowland cultivars and a one-cutting management (after the tops have senesced) using low rates of applied N (50?kg/ha) are recommended. « less

  7. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  8. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more »or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3? anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  9. Reworked eolianites: Bahaman highstand anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, M.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Eolianites, presumably formed during the last sea level lowstand, rise more than 40 m above the present-day highstand. These carbonate dune are being reworked by wave action to form sediment bodies (highstand conglomerates) with settings, geometries, internal structures, compositions, and textures that may be similar to those of lowstand conglomerates. The setting of these reworked eolianites is the windward platform edge. The geometry is a belt parallel to the platform edge, that may thin both platformward and basinward. Internal structure should include some large-scale foresets with chaotic dip directions and some evidence of tilted and overturned beds. Composition consists of marine bioclastic carbonate sand in boulder to sand-size clasts. If remnants of the carbonate dunes are preserved in the geologic record, highstand conglomerates should be recognizable on the basis of their association with these eolianites. The original eolianites are confirmed to a belt on the windward margins of the carbonate platform up to 7 km wide. Their geometry consists of linear sand waves or ridges composed of spillover lobes. Internal structure predominantly includes large-scale foresets dipping toward the platform interior. Composition is indistinguishable from that of associated highstand conglomerates with the possible exception that the latter might contain some high-magnesium calcite or aragonite marine cement. Whole marine fossils are absent in the eolianites. Red-weathered zones are common on dune exposure surface. Solution brecciation and cave deposition further complicate the diagenetic history of the eolianites, their associated highstand conglomerates, and their lowstand conglomeratic facies.

  10. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  11. Master Equation Approach for Quantum Noise in Phase-Insensitive Linear Amplifier based on Resonant Atomic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Minchuan; Shahriar, Selim M

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we had proposed a white-light-cavity signal-recycling (WLC-SR) scheme incorporating a negative dispersive medium (NDM) in the SR cavity and showed an enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. For specific atomic systems, the single channel Caves model (SC-CM) that we used for the quantum noise (QN) due to amplification or absorption in the NDM may not apply. In this paper, we show that for a two-level atomic system, the SC-CM applies only when pure absorption or amplification exists. When the transmission profile of a four-level system has an absorption dip on top of a broad gain peak that results in perfect transparency at the center, the net QN is non-zero but a large, finite value. We also prove that in a Lambda-type EIT system, the QN at zero detuning is zero while the system is in the dark state. Therefore, we propose a Gain-EIT (GEIT) gain system, which has a negative dispersion needed for the WLC-SR scheme, but with nearly vanishing noise at the center.

  12. Effectiveness of solar heating and lighting in an underground concrete and glass dwelling high in the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Div. of Design Technology)

    1993-01-01

    Solar heating and daylighting are two primary design features which can have a major impact on occupant perceptions of an underground living environment. A quantitative design analysis and evaluation of these features has been conducted for an energy conserving earth covered dwelling in a cold climate at high altitude in the Rocky Mountains. For this example, because of the solar contribution, a heating load reduction greater than 45 percent has been calculated and demonstrated on an operational basis, compared to the same earth sheltered construction without solar. The building envelope also has an effective time lag of several months which further increases the annual effectiveness. Also, depending on the sky conditions, the portion of exterior daylight reaching deep into the interior spaces easily exceeds 10 percent in the winter and can reach up to 50 percent or more. Thus, both heating and lighting by natural means are shown to be available in ample quantities in this cave-like structure. Pertinent design features to enhance such performance are highlighted.

  13. Resolution dependence in modeling extreme weather events.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.; Larson, J.

    2001-04-13

    At Argonne National Laboratory we have developed a high performance regional climate modeling simulation capability based on the NCAR MM5v3.4. The regional climate simulation system at Argonne currently includes a Java-based interface to allow rapid selection and generation of initial and boundary conditions, a high-performance version of MM5v3.4 modified for long climate simulations on our 512-processor Beowulf cluster (Chiba City), an interactive Web-based analysis tool to facilitate analysis and collaboration via the Web, and an enhanced version of the CAVE5d software capable of working with large climate data sets. In this paper we describe the application of this modeling system to investigate the role of model resolution in predicting extreme events such as the ''Hurricane Huron'' event of 11-15 September 1996. We have performed a series of ''Hurricane Huron'' experiments at 80, 40, 20, and 10 km grid resolution over an identical spatiotemporal domain. We conclude that increasing model resolution leads to dramatic changes in the vertical structure of the simulated atmosphere producing significantly different representations of rainfall and other parameters critical to the assessment of impacts of climate change.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  15. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  16. Quantum Noise Limits in White-Light-Cavity-Enhanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minchuan Zhou; Zifan Zhou; Selim M. Shahriar

    2015-09-03

    Previously, we had proposed a gravitational wave detector that incorporates the white light cavity (WLC) effect using a compound cavity for signal recycling (CC-SR). Here, we first use an idealized model for the negative dispersion medium (NDM), and use the Caves model for phase-insensitive linear amplifier to account for the quantum noise (QN) from the NDM, to determine the upper bound of the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. We calculate the quantum noise limited sensitivity curves for the CC-SR design, and find that the broadening of sensitivity predicted by the classical analysis is also present in these curves, but is somewhat reduced. Furthermore, we find that the curves always stay above the standard quantum limit (SQL). To circumvent this limitation, we modify the dispersion to compensate the non-linear phase variation produced by the opto-mechanical (OM) resonance effects. We find that the upper bound of the factor by which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is increased, compared to the highest sensitivity result predicted by Bunanno and Chen [Phys. Rev. D 64, 042006 (2001)], is ~14. We also present a simpler scheme (WLC-SR) where a dispersion medium is inserted in the SR cavity. For this scheme, we found the upper bound of the enhancement factor to be ~18. We then consider an explicit system for realizing the NDM, which makes use of five energy levels in M-configuration to produce Gain, accompanied by Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (the GEIT system). For this explicit system, we employ the rigorous approach based on Master Equation (ME) to compute the QN contributed by the NDM, thus enabling us to determine the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product definitively rather than the upper bound thereof. Specifically, we identify a set of parameters for which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is enhanced by a factor of 17.66.

  17. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-06-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  18. Recent developments in atomic/nuclear methodologies used for the study of cultural heritage objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2013-05-06

    Archaeometry is an area established in the international community since the 60s, with extensive use of atomic-nuclear methods in the characterization of art, archaeological and cultural heritage objects in general. In Brazil, however, until the early '90s, employing methods of physics, only the area of archaeological dating was implemented. It was only after this period that Brazilian groups became involved in the characterization of archaeological and art objects with these methodologies. The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics, State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced, pioneered in 1994, Archaeometry and related issues among its priority lines of research, after a member of LFNA has been involved in 1992 with the possibilities of tomography in archaeometry, as well as the analysis of ancient bronzes by EDXRF. Since then, LFNA has been working with PXRF and Portable Raman in several museums in Brazil, in field studies of cave paintings and in the laboratory with material sent by archaeologists, as well as carrying out collaborative work with new groups that followed in this area. From 2003/2004 LAMFI/DFN/IFUSP and LIN/COPPE/UFRJ began to engage in the area, respectively with methodologies using ion beams and PXRF, then over time incorporating other techniques, followed later by other groups. Due to the growing number of laboratories and institutions/archaeologists/conservators interested in these applications, in may 2012 was created a network of available laboratories, based at http://www.dfn.if.usp.br/lapac. It will be presented a panel of recent developments and applications of these methodologies by national groups, as well as a sampling of what has been done by leading groups abroad.

  19. R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayran, D.

    2010-02-01

    The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

  20. Master Equation Approach for Quantum Noise in Phase-Insensitive Linear Amplifier based on Resonant Atomic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minchuan Zhou; Zifan Zhou; Selim M. Shahriar

    2015-07-23

    Previously, we had proposed a white-light-cavity signal-recycling (WLC-SR) scheme incorporating a negative dispersive medium (NDM) in the SR cavity and showed an enhancement by a factor of 18 in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. For specific atomic systems, the single channel Caves model (SC-CM) that we used for the quantum noise (QN) due to amplification or absorption in the NDM may not apply. In this paper, we show that for a two-level atomic system, the SC-CM applies only when pure absorption or amplification exists. When the transmission profile of a four-level system has an absorption dip on top of a broad gain peak that results in perfect transparency at the center, the net QN is non-zero but a large, finite value. We also prove that in a Lambda-type EIT system, the QN at zero detuning is zero while the system is in the dark state. Therefore, we propose a Gain-EIT (GEIT) gain system, which has a negative dispersion and also close-to-zero noise at the center. The noise from the GEIT system at the bottom of the dip in the gain profile is not exactly zero and can be characterized by the Transparency Induced Noise Reduction Factor (TINREF), which represents the ratio of the noise in the GEIT system to that in the four-level system at the bottom of the dip in the gain profile. We show that the GEIT system with a small enough TINREF can be used as the NDM in the WLC-SR.

  1. Use of a constant electrode-separation resistivity survey to locate buried cavities associated with regolith-collapse sinkholes in southern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weibel, C.P.; Panno, S.V.; Heigold, P.C.; Reed, P.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Three regolith-collapse sinkholes formed near a school and a church in the southern Illinois village of Dongola (Union County) during the spring of 1993. The appearance of the sinkholes over a 3-month period coincided with development of a new municipal well, which was drilled through clay-rich, valley-fill sediment into karstified limestone bedrock. The piezometric surface of the limestone aquifer is above land surface, indicating an upward hydraulic gradient in the valley and that the valley-fill is acting as a confining unit. Pumping during development of the well lowered the piezometric surface of the limestone aquifer to an elevation below the base of the valley-fill. It is hypothesized that drainage of water from the sediments, the resulting loss of both hydrostatic pressure and buoyant force in overlying sediments, increased intergranular pressure, and the initiation of ground-water flow toward the well resulted in rapid sediment transport, subsurface erosion, and subsequent collapse of the valley-fill sediment. The sinkholes follow an approximately east-west alignment, which is consistent with one of the two dominant alignments of nearby joint-controlled caves. A constant electrode-separation resistivity survey of the school playground was conducted to locate areas that might contain incipient sinkholes. The survey revealed a linear, positive resistivity anomaly, between 5 and 10 m wide, and with a trend that either intersects or is immediately adjacent to the three sinkholes. The anomaly is interpreted to be a series of pumping-induced cavities in the valley-fill sediments that formed over a pre-existing crevice in the karstified bedrock limestone.

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

  3. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor operator in current US NPPs. In addition to the three workstations, information can be shared between the workstations and further displayed on a large-screen overview display or a panel mimic. An 82-inch high-definition display is commonly used for the overview display.

  4. R&D ERL: 5 Cell 704 MHz SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrill, A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the key components for the superconducting RF Energy Recovery Linac, (ERL) under development in the Collider Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is the Linac cavity and cryomodule. The cavity is a 5 cell accelerating cavity designed to operate at 703.75 MHz, and to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the photoinjector up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make a single pass around the ERL loop and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the beam dump. This cavity was designed by Rama Calaga and Ilan Ben-Zvi at BNL and fabricated by Advanced Energy Systems in Medford, NY. The cavity was then delivered to Thomas Jefferson Laboratory in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly of the hermetic string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL. Once at BNL it was built into a complete cryomodule, installed in the ERL test facility and commissioned. This paper will review the key components of the cavity and cryomodule and discuss the present status of the cryomodule commissioning. The BNL 5 cell accelerating cavity has been designed for use in our high average current Energy Recovery Linac, a proof of principle machine to demonstrate key components necessary for the future upgrades to RHIC as well as applications for future ampere class high current, high brightness ERL programs. The cavity has been tested at greater than 20 MV/m with a Q{sub 0} of 1e{sup 10}, meeting the design specifications for use at full energy in the ERL. This paper will review the cavity design and specifications as well as the RF measurements that have been made both in the VTA at Jefferson Lab as well as during the commissioning in the ERL test cave at BNL. Finally the future plan for cavity testing and measurements prior to its use in ERL operations will be reviewed. The general physics parameters for the cavity can be found in table 1, and the reader is referred to Rama Calaga's Thesis for a much more detailed review of the cavity geometry and design. There are several different parameters that make this cavity design very unique. The first is the 17 cm diameter cavity iris and 24 cm diameter beampipe. The geometry, along with the cavity design, results in a cavity with no trapped higher order modes, and a BBU threshold is > 2 amperes. Another feature of the geometry of this particular cavity is the fact that the lowest mechanical resonance is at {approx}200 Hz, thus making it much less susceptible to microphonics.

  5. DECOMMISSIONING OF SHIELDED FACILITIES AT WINFRITH USED FOR POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF NUCLEAR FUELS & OTHER ACTIVE ITEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.D.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the approaches used in the clearing, cleaning, decontamination and decommissioning of a very large suite of seven concrete shielded caves and other facilities used by UKAEA at Winfrith Technology Centre, England over a period of about 30 years for the postirradiation examination (PIE) of a wide range of nuclear fuels and other very active components. The basic construction of the facilities will first be described, setting the scene for the major challenges that 1970s' thinking posed for decommissioning engineers. The tendency then to use large and heavy items of equipment supported upon massive steel bench structures produced a series of major problems that had to be overcome. The means of solving these problems by utilization of relatively simple and inexpensive equipment will be described. Later, a further set of challenges was experienced to decontaminate the interior surfaces to allow man entries to be undertaken at acceptable dose rates. The paper will describe the types of tooling used and the range of complementary techniques that were employed to steadily reduce the dose rates down to acceptable levels. Some explanations will also be given for the creation of realistic dose budgets and the methods of recording and continuously assessing the progress against these budgets throughout the project. Some final considerations are given to the commercial approaches to be adopted throughout this major project by the decommissioning engineers. Particular emphasis will be given to the selection of equipment and techniques that are effective so that the whole process can be carried out in a cost-effective and timely manner. The paper also provides brief complementary information obtained during the decommissioning of a plutonium-contaminated facility used for a range of semi-experimental purposes in the late 1970s. The main objective here was to remove the alpha contamination in such a manner that the volume of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (P CM) was minimized and to clean the whole facility to a free-breathing state such that it would be available for other work or subsequent demolition.

  6. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  7. SPATIALLY-EXPLICIT BAT IMPACT SCREENING TOOL FOR WIND TURBINE SITING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Versar, Inc.; Exponent, Inc.

    2013-10-28

    As the U.S. seeks to increase energy production from renewable energy sources, development of wind power resources continues to grow. One of the most important ecological issues restricting wind energy development, especially the siting of wind turbines, is the potential adverse effect on bats. High levels of bat fatality have been recorded at a number of wind energy facilities, especially in the eastern United States. The U.S. Department of Energy contracted with Versar, Inc., and Exponent to develop a spatially-explicit site screening tool to evaluate the mortality of bats resulting from interactions (collisions or barotrauma) with wind turbines. The resulting Bat Vulnerability Assessment Tool (BVAT) presented in this report integrates spatial information about turbine locations, bat habitat features, and bat behavior as it relates to possible interactions with turbines. A model demonstration was conducted that focuses on two bat species, the eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) and the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). The eastern red bat is a relatively common tree-roosting species that ranges broadly during migration in the Eastern U.S., whereas the Indiana bat is regional species that migrates between a summer range and cave hibernacula. Moreover, Indiana bats are listed as endangered, and so the impacts to this species are of particular interest. The model demonstration used conditions at the Mountaineer Wind Energy Center (MWEC), which consists of 44 wind turbines arranged in a linear array near Thomas, West Virginia (Tucker County), to illustrate model functions and not to represent actual or potential impacts of the facility. The turbines at MWEC are erected on the ridge of Backbone Mountain with a nacelle height of 70 meters and a collision area of 72 meters (blade height) or 4,071 meters square. The habitat surrounding the turbines is an Appalachian mixed mesophytic forest. Model sensitivity runs showed that bat mortality in the model was most sensitive to perceptual range and flying height. The BVAT model demonstration found that after 30 model iterations, Red bats suffered greater rates of mortality (i.e., 2.5 times the number of bats killed per 10-day period) than Indiana bats, primarily resulting from the higher flying height of the red bat. The model described in this report is a first release. There are opportunities to expand and enhance the model in the future. For example, additional focus on the model experience would include adding project level saving/loading, integrating the outputs (trajectory mapping) into the main output window, and providing tools for preparing habitat maps. In addition to the model framework, the actual modeling options could be enhanced by adding associative learning (including additional behavioral states), adding additional movement models, and exploring the information transfer among bats. Ultimately, this standalone model could be integrated into ArcGIS as a plugin.

  8. A common path forward for the immersive visualization community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric A. Wernert; William R. Sherman; Patrick O'Leary; Eric Whiting

    2012-03-01

    Immersive visualization makes use of the medium of virtual reality (VR) - it is a subset of virtual reality focused on the application of VR technologies to scientific and information visualization. As the name implies, there is a particular focus on the physically immersive aspect of VR that more fully engages the perceptual and kinesthetic capabilities of the scientist with the goal of producing greater insight. The immersive visualization community is uniquely positioned to address the analysis needs of the wide spectrum of domain scientists who are becoming increasingly overwhelmed by data. The outputs of computational science simulations and high-resolution sensors are creating a data deluge. Data is coming in faster than it can be analyzed, and there are countless opportunities for discovery that are missed as the data speeds by. By more fully utilizing the scientists visual and other sensory systems, and by offering a more natural user interface with which to interact with computer-generated representations, immersive visualization offers great promise in taming this data torrent. However, increasing the adoption of immersive visualization in scientific research communities can only happen by simultaneously lowering the engagement threshold while raising the measurable benefits of adoption. Scientists time spent immersed with their data will thus be rewarded with higher productivity, deeper insight, and improved creativity. Immersive visualization ties together technologies and methodologies from a variety of related but frequently disjoint areas, including hardware, software and human-computer interaction (HCI) disciplines. In many ways, hardware is a solved problem. There are well established technologies including large walk-in systems such as the CAVE{trademark} and head-based systems such as the Wide-5{trademark}. The advent of new consumer-level technologies now enable an entirely new generation of immersive displays, with smaller footprints and costs, widening the potential consumer base. While one would be hard-pressed to call software a solved problem, we now understand considerably more about best practices for designing and developing sustainable, scalable software systems, and we have useful software examples that illuminate the way to even better implementations. As with any research endeavour, HCI will always be exploring new topics in interface design, but we now have a sizable knowledge base of the strengths and weaknesses of the human perceptual systems and we know how to design effective interfaces for immersive systems. So, in a research landscape with a clear need for better visualization and analysis tools, a methodology in immersive visualization that has been shown to effectively address some of those needs, and vastly improved supporting technologies and knowledge of hardware, software, and HCI, why hasn't immersive visualization 'caught on' more with scientists? What can we do as a community of immersive visualization researchers and practitioners to facilitate greater adoption by scientific communities so as to make the transition from 'the promise of virtual reality' to 'the reality of virtual reality'.

  9. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages from three middle Holocene sites located in the Bodega Dunes, and from three late Holocene sites, including Kili (CASON-299), the oldest known village site in the region. Bodega Bay (38 degrees 19 minutes N, 123 degrees 03 minutes W) is situated about 90 km north of San Francisco Bay, California (Figure 1). The Pacific, in conjunction with prominent geomorphological features, has given rise to a series of coastal habitats (e.g. semi-protected and protected shorelines) around Bodega Bay that are rather unique for the unprotected, surf swept rocky shores of northern California. This stretch of coastline also lies within a zone of particularly strong seasonal upwelling between Point Reyes Peninsula and Cape Mendocino; a region characterized by high Ekman transport (Huyer 1983), and high coastal concentrations of the nutrients silica and phosphate (van Geen and Husby 1996). The interaction between land and sea results in a productive marine ecosystem that has attracted hunter-gatherers for much of the Holocene.

  10. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  11. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Chuansheng; Nowak, Jerzy; Seiler, John

    2014-10-24

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently