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1

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Final Test Results on 80% Service Test and Implementation Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current practice within the nuclear power industry is to use performance discharge tests for condition monitoring to determine when a battery has reached 80% of its rated capacity, which is considered the end of its service life. A service test is now used every refueling outage to verify that a battery can satisfy its design basis function as defined by the battery duty cycle. A modified performance test is used at ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

3

Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine sensitivity test results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NASA Lewis Research Center has been testing a 1 kW (1.33 hp) free-piston Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis test facilities. The tests performed over the past several years have been on a single cylinder machine known as the RE-1000. The data recorded were to aid in the investigation of the dynamics and thermodynamics of the free-piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be used primarily for computer code validation. NASA reports TM-82999, TM-83407, and TM-87126 give initial results of the engine tests. The tests were designed to investigate the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations on the mean pressure of the working space, the working fluid used, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass and displacer dynamics. These tests have now been completed at NASA Lewis. This report presents some of the detailed data collected in the sensitivity tests. In all, 781 data points were recorded. A complete description of the engine and test facility is given. Many of the data can be found in tabular form, while a microfiche containing all of the data points can be requested from NASA Lewis.

Schreiber, J.G.; Geng, S.M.; Lorenz, G.V.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Review of Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAC004 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Review of Test Results Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

7

Final Results from the High-Current, High-Action Closing Switch Test Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24 thousand shots. Typical of high-energy systems, particularly multi-module systems, the primary parameters of interest related to the switch are: (1) reliability, meaning absence of both pre-fires and no-fires, (2) total switch lifetime or number of shots between maintenance, and (3) cost. Cost was given lower priority at this evaluation stage because there are great uncertainties in estimating higher-quantity prices of these devices, most of which have been supplied before in only small quantities. The categories of switches tested are vacuum discharge, high-pressure discharge, and solid-state. Each group varies in terms of triggering ease, ease of maintenance, and tolerance to faults such as excess current and current reversal. We tested at least two variations of each technology group. The total number of shots on the switch test facility is about 50 thousand. We will present the results from the switch testing. The observed lifetime of different switches varied greatly: the shortest life was one shot; one device was still operating after six thousand shots. On several switches we measured the voltage drop during conduction and calculated energy dissipated in the switch; we will show these data also.

Savage, M.E.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Undulator Transportation Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

Wolf, Zachary

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

In-situ biological treatment test at Kelly Air Force Base. Volume 2. Field test results and cost model. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 May 1987  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this effort was to field test in-situ biodegradation to treat aquifer contaminants. In-situ biodegradation is enhanced by stimulating in indigenous subsurface microbial population by the addition of nutrients and an oxygen source to promote degradation of organic contaminants. In-situ treatments affects contaminants with a mixture of organic and inorganic chemicals. The treatment system consisted of an array of nine pumping wells and four infiltration wells. These wells circulated groundwater and transported the treatment chemical s throughout the 2800-square-feet treatment area. Oxygen was supplied by means of a hydrogen peroxide solution. Nutrients were principally ammonium and phosphate salts. The system was operated for 9 months. Data showed evidence of both aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation. Decreases in tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene concentrations in groundwater correlate with anaerobic microcosm tests. Aerobic biodegradation was indicated by acid and carbon dioxide production, and increases in petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in groundwater, However, any biodegradation of these hydrocarbons was too small to be quantified. The study confirms that indigenous bacteria can be enhanced to degrade organic contaminants. The problems with in situ treatment are primarily those of delivery of chemicals and minimizing adverse reactions between injection chemicals and subsurface minerals.

Wetzel, R.S.; Durst, C.M.; Davidson, D.H.; Sarno, D.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

final results 2011_turkey.pptx  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FINAL RESULTS RESCUE ROBOT LEAGUE 1ST iRAP_JUDY (Thailand) 835 25 2ND MRL (Iran) 430 13 3RD STABILIZE (Thailand) 405 11 ...

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2005 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dwelling contests winner Solar Decathlon 2005 Final Results The overall winners of the Solar Decathlon and the winners of the ten contests are listed here. For more information...

12

SINGLE HEATER TEST FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Single Heater Test is the first of the in-situ thermal tests conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its program of characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site for a proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) contained an extensive plan of in-situ thermal tests aimed at understanding specific aspects of the response of the local rock-mass around the potential repository to the heat from the radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. With the refocusing of the Site Characterization Plan by the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan'' (DOE 1994), a consolidated thermal testing program emerged by 1995 as documented in the reports ''In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (DOE 1995) and ''Updated In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (CRWMS M&O 1997a). The concept of the Single Heater Test took shape in the summer of 1995 and detailed planning and design of the test started with the beginning fiscal year 1996. The overall objective of the Single Heater Test was to gain an understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are anticipated to occur in the local rock-mass in the potential repository as a result of heat from radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. This included making a priori predictions of the test results using existing models and subsequently refining or modifying the models, on the basis of comparative and interpretive analyses of the measurements and predictions. A second, no less important, objective was to try out, in a full-scale field setting, the various instruments and equipment to be employed in the future on a much larger, more complex, thermal test of longer duration, such as the Drift Scale Test. This ''shake down'' or trial aspect of the Single Heater Test applied not just to the hardware, but also to the teamwork and cooperation between multiple organizations performing their part in the test.

J.B. Cho

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Binary module test. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to design and test a binary loop module representative of and scaleable to commercial size units. The design was based on state-of-the-art heat exchanger technology, and the purpose of the tests was to confirm performance of a supercritical boiling cycle using isobutane and a mixture of isobutane and isopentane as the secondary working fluid. The module was designed as one percent of a 50 MW unit. It was installed at Magma Power's East Mesa geothermal field and tested over a period of approximately 4 months. Most of the test runs were with isobutane but some data were collected for hydrocarbon mixtures. The results of the field tests are reported. In general these results indicate reasonably good heat balances and agreement with overall heat transfer coefficients calculated by current stream analysis methods and available fluid property data; however, measured pressure drops across the heat exchangers were 20 percent higher than estimated. System operation was stable under all conditions tested.

Schilling, J.R.; Colley, T.C.; Pundyk, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

SciTech Connect

U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

MITG test procedure and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elements and modules for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator have been performance tested since the inception of the RTG program. These test articles seldom resembled flight hardware and often lacked adequate diagnostic instrumentation. Because of this, performance problems were not identified in the early stage of program development. The lack of test data in an unexpected area often hampered the development of a problem solution. A procedure for conducting the MITG Test was developed in an effort to obtain data in a systematic, unambiguous manner. This procedure required the development of extensive data acquisition software and test automation. The development of a facility to implement the test procedure, the facility hardware and software requirements, and the results of the MITG testing are the subject of this paper.

Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Vaccine refrigerator testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

For the Central American Health Clinic Project initiated in 1986, Sandia National Laboratories and the Florida Solar Energy Center recognized the need for a test and evaluation program for vaccine refrigeration systems. At the Florida Solar Energy Center, side-by-side testing of three photovoltaic powered vaccine refrigerators began in 1987. The testing was expanded in 1988 to include a kerosene absorption refrigerator. This report presents observations, conclusions, and recommendations derived from testing the four vaccine refrigeration systems. Information is presented pertaining to the refrigerators, photovoltaic arrays, battery subsystems, charge controllers, and user requirements. This report should be of interest to designers, manufacturers, installers, and users of photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigeration systems and components.

Ventre, G.G. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Kilfoyle, D.; Marion, B. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-generated image of the Technische Universität Darmstadt 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Computer-generated image of the Technische Universität Darmstadt 2007 Solar Decathlon house. First Place: Technische Universität Darmstadt Computer-generated image of the University of Maryland 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Second Place: University of Maryland Computer-generated image of the Santa Clara University 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Third Place: Santa Clara University Solar Decathlon 2007 Final Results The Solar Decathlon challenged 20 college and university teams to compete in 10 contests and design, build, and operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered home. After two years of preparation and a week of competition, the final scores and standings are in. Overall First Place: Technische Universität Darmstadt This team from Germany came to the Solar Decathlon hoping to have an impact

19

COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

Abraham, TJ

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Turning research into results, final report  

SciTech Connect

In September 1989, the ACEC Research and Management Foundation (ACEC/RMF) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in response to the Existing Buildings Efficiency Program`s Solicitation Number DE-PS01-89CE21034. On May 15, 1990, DOE informed ACEC/RMF that it had been selected for a grant award; the final agreement was signed on July 23, 1990. The purpose of the effort was to develop an information package showing engineering firms that energy services can be sold to owners and developers successfully and profitably, that not every design that goes beyond code results in a lawsuit, that owners can be shown the value of paying for the additional design analysis that energy efficiency design requires. The package was envisioned to include examples of buildings that succeed in terms of energy, cost, and design team benefits. It was further conceptualized as both a technical and marketing resource to provide helpful facts, references to relevant documents, graphic materials to be used during client presentations, and guidance on the latest in useful research results.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Greenbuilt Retrofit Test House Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenbuilt Retrofit Test House Greenbuilt Retrofit Test House Final Report B. Sparn, K. Hudon, L. Earle, C. Booten, and P. C. Tabares-Velasco National Renewable Energy Laboratory G. Barker and C. E. Hancock Mountain Energy Partnership Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-54009 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Greenbuilt Retrofit Test House Final Report B. Sparn, K. Hudon, L. Earle, C. Booten, and P. C. Tabares-Velasco National Renewable Energy Laboratory G. Barker and C. E. Hancock

22

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield. Author(s): Glaspey, Douglas J. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/30/2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/922630 Source: View Original Report Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

23

DOE Issues Final Appliance Test Procedure Rule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance Test Procedure Rule Appliance Test Procedure Rule DOE Issues Final Appliance Test Procedure Rule December 8, 2006 - 9:46am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a final rule establishing new test procedures and related definitions to determine the energy efficiency of certain residential appliances and commercial equipment. The rulemaking clarifies and codifies the test procedures mandated by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005. "These new test procedures are the foundation for standards that will help bring more energy efficient options to the marketplace and result in energy savings for all Americans," said DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner. The final rulemaking, which appears in today's Federal Register, will

24

Experimental electrochemical capacitor test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various electrochemical capacitors (ultracapacitors) are being developed for hybrid vehicles as candidate power assist devices for the fast response engine. The primary functions of the ultracapacitor are to level the dynamic power loads on the primary propulsion device and recover available energy from regenerative breaking during off-peak power periods. Ultracapacitors show promise toward being able to accept high regenerative pulses while exhibiting very high cycle life. This paper will present test data from selected US Department of Energy (DOE) supported ultracapacitor projects designed to meet the fast response engine requirements. Devices containing carbon, conducting polymers, and metal oxide electrode materials in combination with aqueous or organic electrolytes are being supported by the DOE. This paper will present and discuss testing data obtained from recent prototype capacitors supplied by Maxwell Energy Products, Inc., SAFT America, Inc., Federal Fabrics-Fibers and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Constant-current, constant-power, leakage-current, and self-discharge testing of these various capacitors have been conducted. All devices were cycled between the rated charged voltage and zero volts for the constant-current tests and between the rated charged voltage and half that value for the constant-power tests.

Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.; Kramer, W.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Satula, R.A.; Rogers, S.A. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Microsoft PowerPoint - Energy CS Prius Accel Testing Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 and the final results can be found in the table to the right. The Energy CS Prius averaged 66.1 mpg over the 5,596 miles of testing (5,440-mile goal). Based on an...

26

Microsoft PowerPoint - Hymotion Prius Accel Testing Results Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in May 2008 and the final results can be found in the table to the right. The Hymotion Prius averaged 79.5 mpg over the 5,591 miles of testing (5,440-mile goal). Based on an...

27

Distribution Conductor Burndown Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On overhead distribution circuits, conductor burndown is a well-documented phenomenon. Two systems are especially vulnerable to burndown: covered conductors (also known as tree wires or coated conductors) and small bare wires. In a burndown scenario, a power-follow arc develops on the system, with at least one end of the arc attached to a conductor. The arc heats the conductor, which causes the strands to anneal and lose tensile strength. The burndown event results in the strands breaking and the conduct...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Barwood CNG Cab Fleet Study: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a fleet study conducted over a 12-month period to evaluate the operation of dedicated compress natural gas (CNG) Ford Crown Victoria sedans in a taxicab fleet. In the study, we assess the performance and reliability of the vehicles and the cost of operating the CNG vehicles compared to gasoline vehicles. The study results reveal that the CNG vehicles operated by this fleet offer both economic and environmental advantages. The total operating costs of the CNG vehicles were about 25% lower than those of the gasoline vehicles. The CNG vehicles performed as well as the gasoline vehicles, and were just as reliable. Barwood representatives and drivers have come to consider the CNG vehicles an asset to their business and to the air quality of the local community.

Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; John, M.

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APSâ?? customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a working, utility distribution feeder. To address the technical challenges related to the integration of distributed PV when PV penetration levels reach or exceed 30% of the total load, technologies and methods to ensure the stable and safe operation of the feeder will be evaluated. Lessons learned will enable APS to improve the framework for future PV integration on its system and may also aid other utilities across the United States energy sector in accelerating the adoption of distributed photovoltaic generation.

Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a working, utility distribution feeder. To address the technical challenges related to the integration of distributed PV when PV penetration levels reach or exceed 30% of the total load, technologies and methods to ensure the stable and safe operation of the feeder will be evaluated. Lessons learned will enable APS to improve the framework for future PV integration on its system and may also aid other utilities across the United States energy sector in accelerating the adoption of distributed photovoltaic generation.

Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen; Bebic, Jovan; Schelenz, Owen

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Solar Total Energy Project final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Test results of early photovoltaic concentrating collectors  

SciTech Connect

Several passively and actively cooled photovoltaic concentrating collectors built during the period 1976 to 1979 have been tested. The tests provide information on the performance characteristics of these collectors. The results of the tests are summarized.

Gerwin, H.J.; Pritchard, D.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Final Focus Test Facility ATF2 Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometre level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European and American scientists. In this paper, the present status and performance of the recently deployed ATF2 systems are briefly described, based on the first experience with beam measurements and tuning during winter, spring and early autumn of 2009. The near and longer term plans are outlined as well. The ATF collaboration has completed the construction of ATF2 and has started its commissioning. Important experience operating the new cavity BPM and BSM instrumentation in real conditions has been gained and first beam measurements have been performed in a magnetic configuration with reduced optical demagnification. Both horizontal and vertical emittances were successfully tuned and measured in the extraction line, with values approaching the design values of 2 nm and 12 pm, respectively. First checks of the first order optics along the beam line and at the IP were also done. Hardware developments for the second ATF2 goal are being pursued in parallel with the present commissioning work for the first goal. The collaboration is also preparing several near and long terms plans for ATF2. In the next few years, information very valuable for any future collider with local chromaticity correction and tuning of very low emittance beams can be expected. In the previous experience at the FFTB, the smallest vertical beam sizes which were achieved were about 70 nanometers. The work described here continues to address this largely unexplored regime in a systematic way.

Bambade, P.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL; Seryi, A.; /SLAC; Tauchi, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - PHEV Testing Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on cycles 7 Baseline Performance Testing Results 8 EnergyCS Prius - UDDS Fuel Use * 9 kWh Valence lithium pack - AC kWh EnergyCS PHEV Prius MPG & kWh - UDDS Testing 180 9 170...

35

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical...

36

Peach Bottom test element program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-three test elements were irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of the testing program for advanced HTGRs. Extensive postirradiation examinations and evaluations of 21 of these irradiation experiments were performed. The test element irradiations were simulated using HTGR design codes and data. Calculated fuel burnups, power profiles, fast neutron fluences, and temperatures were verified via destructive burnup measurements, gamma scanning, and in-pile thermocouple readings corrected for decalibration effects. Analytical techniques were developed to improve the quality of temperature predictions through feedback of nuclear measurements into thermal calculations. Dimensional measurements, pressure burst tests, diametral compression tests, ring-cutting tests, strip-cutting tests, and four-point bend tests were performed to measure residual stress, strain, and strength distributions in H-327 graphite structures irradiated in the test elements.

Saurwein, J.J.; Holzgraf, J.F.; MIller, C.M.; Myers, B.F.; Wallroth, C.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

FINAL REPORT UFP RESTART AND SPARGER TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a Design Basis Event (DBE), potential plugging of the PJM systems is highly probable after air compressors and/or electric power become unavailable for up to 100 hrs. Under such conditions, the rheologically bounding yield stress of the pretreated sludge simulant could reach 300-625 Pa. (Defined in WTP-RPP-100, Rev. 0, Sec. 6.1. [1] and WTP-RPP-98, Rev. 0, Secs. 5.1 and 5.2 [2].) The tests covered under this report are conservative since this range of bounding yield stress is based on the settled solids component in the tank. Also, note that CCN 065607 states that the design basis is 70 Pa for 'gelled material' over the entire tank. Three issues must be addressed by these tests: (1) Determine the required pressure and air flow to overcome the plugged sparger tube resistance following a DBE event. (2) Can the UFP PJMs be restarted with or without assistance from air spargers? (3) Show that solids can be mixed by air spargers following a DBE to allow generated hydrogen gas to rise and be vented to the vessel head space. This is to limit hydrogen concentrations below LFL level. In the first test, a full-scale sparger was simulated by a 2-inch dia. Schedule 160 pipe, installed in an 18-inch diameter plastic tank, 37-foot high (full scale height), 6-inch from the bottom. The bottom 5-ft. lower section was clear to facilitate visual observations. Two simulants were used: a 120 Pa Laponite solution and a 30 Pa/30 cP kaolin:bentonite clay mixture, which filled the tank to the 32-foot level. The first test with 120 Pa Laponite demonstrated breakthrough at an air pressure of 14.6 psig. The second test with the clay simulant resulted in breakthrough at 16.7 psig. Given the specific gravities of these simulants, the breakthrough pressures are very close to the hydrostatic pressures corresponding to the simulant elevations inside the sparger. The CRV test stand at the Engineering Development Laboratory, SRNL, was used to simulate the UFP at 1/4-scale, where the tank diameter was 40.5-inches. The simulant was a 30 Pa/30 cP kaolin:bentonite mixture loaded with 3.3 wt% dry laponite, which successfully achieved a 596 Pa yield stress (vane method) after 14 hrs. However, it apparently had a thicker consistency than the 30 Pa/30 cP rheology of real waste under flowing conditions. The vessel was filled to a H/D of 1.38 and the PJMs were initially filled to approximately full height (39-inch). During the initial drive phase, starting from the full PJM level, application of the same PJM air pressure during normal operation did push the gelled simulant the full travel distance. But on the refill or suction phase, the maximum simulant height in the PJM was only about a third (9.2-inch) of the original travel (27-inch). After 20 cycles of PJM operation only, air sparging, starting at 7 scfm, increasing to 10 scfm was introduced. This increased the PJM drive distance to a stable value of 64% of the full travel after 327 cycles. Visual observation suggests that the simulant was moving up and down as a solid plug and that the cavern may be very limited. Thus, air sparging did not reestablish full PJM operation, but this could be due to the higher consistency of the simulant as compared to the actual waste. A third test utilized 5 mm glass beads deposited at the bottom of the CRV vessel, which was filled with water. Enough glass beads were added to cover the tank bottom surface with a one-bead-thick layer. Based on empirical correlations, the glass beads simulate the behavior of solid particles in the waste. Two spargers were tested: a 2-inch dia. Sch. 160 pipe with straight end, and a 2-inch dia. Sch. 160 pipe with 4 (45 deg) notches around the perimeter, 3/4-inch deep. The objectives were to determine the required distance between the sparger end and the vessel bottom, air pressures, and air flows required to lift the glass beads off the vessel bottom. The test started with the spargers 6 inches from the bottom. For the flat faced sparger, no lifting was observed up to 50 scfm. Liftoff was observed only when the sparger end was 1-inch off

Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER APRIL 4,1995 FC9510 / 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer April 4, 1995 55103/9510:jb CONTENTS Page Introduction........................................................................................1 NPR-3 Map........................................................................................2 Benefits of D-JAX Pump-Off Controller.....................................................3 Test Results.......................................................................................3 Production Information..........................................................................4

39

y12 performance test final012604.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protective Force Performance Test Improprieties DOE/IG-0636 January 2004 PROTECTIVE FORCE PERFORMANCE TEST IMPROPRIETIES TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objectives 1 Observations and Conclusions 3 DETAILS OF FINDINGS June 26, 2003, Performance Test 4 Performance Testing 5 Performance Measurement 8 RECOMMENDATIONS 9 MANAGEMENT COMMENTS 9 INSPECTOR COMMENTS 9 APPENDICES A. Scope and Methodology 10 B. Management Comments 11 Overview Page 1 Protective Force Performance Test Improprieties INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 National Security AND OBJECTIVES Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is a component of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is an integral

40

Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pyrotechnic study and test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unidynamics/Phoenix entered into LANL contract {number_sign}9-X51-D9928-1 on March 11, 1991. The contract was to perform chemical analysis and provide analytical data, provide test data from functioning units, build and test pyrotechnic devices and fabricate and test approximately 100 pyrotechnic devices to approximate the chemical and functioning characteristics of the devices from the Army inventory. Because of government regulations, it became nearly impossible to ship the units from White Sands to Unidynamics. Consequently a series of functional tests were conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Comments on the functional tests are included herein. In addition, small scale tests were conducted at Unidynamics. These tests were to demonstrate a so called {open_quotes}line{close_quotes} charge and a {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} charge. A discussion of these two charges is presented. The program was put on hold on November 6, 1991 and subsequently reopened to prepare and submit this report.

Smith, R.D.; Fronabarger, J.W. [Unidynamics/Phoenix, AZ (US)

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 / 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager February 19, 1997 650200/551107:9532 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Model-2000 Ajust A Pump system at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) manufactures compact beam-pumping units that incorporate energy-efficient gear boxes. The equipment is designed to reduce operating costs and minimize maintenance labor. This report documents the equipment performance and the results of the Ajust A Pump test. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate claims of energy efficiency and reduced labor requirements. The test showed

43

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETRO-PLUG PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: Michael R. Tyler RMOTC Project Manager January 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/96ET4 CONTENTS Page Technical Description ...................................................................................................... 1 Problem ............................................................................................................................ 1 Solution ............................................................................................................................ 2 Operation..........................................................................................................................

44

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL NOVEMBER 28, 1996 FC9520 / 95PT8 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETROLEUM MAGNETIC INTERNATIONAL DOWNHOLE MAGNETS FOR SCALE CONTROL Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9520:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Petroleum Magnetics International (PMI) downhole magnet, at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. PMI of Odessa, Texas, states that the magnets are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing

45

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Docket No. EO-05-01: TRC Environmental Corporation (TRC) of Lowell, Massachusetts was retained by Mirant Potomac River, LLC (Mirant) to provide sampling and analytical support in completing a Particulate Emission Test of Unit 1 of the Potomac River generating facility. The Test Program at the Potomac facility involved the completion of two series of emissions tests for particulate matter (PM), the first during normal unit operation and the second with the injection of TRONA upstream of hot side ESP fields. All tests were completed while Unit 1 was operating at 90% of full load (84MW)

46

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE MARCH 15, 1998 FC9553/96PT16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sperry-Sun Permanent Downhole Pressure Gauge PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Sperry-Sun Downhole Permanent Pressure Gauge (DPPG) is a pressure gauge that is designed to remain in the well for long periods of time providing real time surface data on borehole pressures. The DPPG was field tested at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center in well 63-TPX-10. The instrument was attached to the production string directly above a submersible pump. It was expected to monitor pressure draw-down and build-ups during normal production cycles. During the first two months of the test, the tool worked fine providing a pressure up survey that

47

NREL: Wind Research - SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results The SWIFT wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing the SWIFT small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The competitive grant was awarded to Cascade Engineering. The SWIFT is a 1-kilowatt (kW), five-bladed with outer ring, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. The turbine's rotor diameter is 2 meters, and its hub height is 13.72 meters. The SWIFT uses a single-phase permanent-magnet generator rated at 1 kW grid connected through an inverter at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data provided in this table will be provided in the final reports. Data presented are preliminary and subject

48

Slant hole completion test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

Mann, R.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS APRIL 4,1995 FC9511 / 95PT5 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9511:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Mag-Well Downhole Magnetic Fluid Conditioners (MFCs), at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. Mag-Well, Inc., manufactures the MFCs, that are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing and downhole pump of producing oil wells. The Mag-Well magnetic tools failed to

50

Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT); Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT.

Ramirez, A.L. [ed.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

MGCR HEAT EXCHANGER TEST PROGRAM. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Maritime Gas-cooled Reactor (MGCR) project has conipleted the study and design of a closed-cycle gasturbine propulsion plant utilizing a helium- cooled nuclear reactor as the heat source. The cycle employs a counterflow shell- and-tube regenerator to attain a high thermodynamic cycle efficiency. A heat exchanger test program was conducted to compile and correlate sufficient experimental data for the aerodynamic and thermal design of the prototype regenerator. The model heat exchanger was similar in configaration to the prototype unit. The pressure-drop and heat-transfer performance of a compact parallel-flow tube bundle is given hoth in the unsupported configuration and with airfoil-shaped tube supports distributed along the bundle. The Fanning friction factor with the airfoil-shaped supports is approximately 70% greater than for the unsupported tube configuration. The airfoil supports effect a 40% increase in Colburn's heat transfer factor, j, over the unsupported configuration. Determinations of the unsupported-tube values of friction factor and Colburn-j agreed well with the literature. A section is devoted to the application of these data to the design of exchangers. The correlated data, representing some 1200 individual runs, cover a range of Reynolds number from 10,000 to 500,000. The moderate pressure-drop increment due to the airfoil-shaped supports, in conjunction with the favorable increase in heat-transfer rate, becomes especially important in the design of compact gas-to-gas heat exchangers with very low friction pressure losses. The concluding section of the report compares the size, weight, and cost of conventional baffled-shell units and the MGCR design for the requirements of the MGCR cycle. The MGCR design was one-fifth the volume, one-fourth the weight, and one-third the cost of comparable baffled-shell units. (auth)

Paulson, H.C. II

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Single-event upset testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental program to characterize single event upset phenomena in selected bipolar memory devices irradiated with relativistic heavy ions. The principle objective was to determine the multibit upset rate at normal and parallel beam incidence angles. The impetus for this objective is that multibit errors are not generally detectable by the simple Hamming codes currently used on spacecraft. Multibit errors significantly reduce spacecraft reliability in initiating spurious commands. It was found in this program that the multibit error cross section is equal to or greater than the projected area of the depletion regions for parallel and for normal to 60 degree incidence beams.

Criswell, T.L.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Measel, P.R.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOMETER DYNAMOMETER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9514 / 95PT6 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-

55

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOTER DYNAMOTER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9542 / 96PT11 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-off state.

56

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL PARAFFIN CONTROL PROJECT DECEMBER 17, 1997 FC9544 / 96PT12 RMOTC Test Report Paraffin Control Project BDM Oklahoma/NIPER 220 N. Virginia Bartlesville, OK 4003 918-336-2400, FAX 918-337-4365 Leo Giangiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17. 1997 Abstract This report summarizes the field performance results of a comparison of chemical and microbial paraffin control systems. The two systems were selected from laboratory screening work. Well selection was based on production rates, produced fluids, and prior paraffin treatments. The treatments were performed on similar groups of wells over the same period of time, using quantities and techniques recommended by the supplier specifically for the wells to be treated. The tests were conducted by the U. S. Department of

57

PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the range of 1 to 6 atm (15 to 90 psia). Temperatures could be controlled in the range from ambient to 80 C. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell was collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to operate, versatile, and reliable.

Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

58

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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Thermal Testing Data Summary - Summary Plots - - Comparison Plots - - Prototype Drawings - Prototype Summary prototype prototype description (test conditions: cold side -18C,...

60

Los Alamos test-room results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fourteen Los Alamos test rooms have been operated for several years; this paper covers operation during the winters of 1980-81 and 1981-82. Extensive data have been taken and computer analyzed to determine performance parameters such as efficiency, solar savings fraction, and comfort index. The rooms are directly comparable because each has the same net coefficient and solar collection area and thus the same load collector ratio. Configurations include direct gain, unvented Trombe walls, water walls, phase change walls, and two sunspace geometries. Strategies for reducing heat loss include selective surfaces, two brands of superglazing windows, a heat pipe system, and convection-suppression baffles. Significant differences in both backup heat and comfort are observed among the various rooms. The results are useful, not only for direct room-to-room comparisons, but also to provide data for validation of computer simulation programs.

McFarland, R.D.; Balcomb, J.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 (specimen 22 data from Test 19) position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC...

62

Switching surge test results ehv substation bus configurations  

SciTech Connect

The industry has been actively engaged in, and has presented many results of, ehv switching surge test programs associated with transmission line designs. It would seem equally important that similar efforts be staged relative to ehv switching surge capabilities of the terminal equipment as it would normally be found in its variety of configurations. Toward this end, a series of switching surge test programs on a number of substation bus configurations was conducted. Particular emphasis was placed on the determination of switching surge characteristics of the air gaps found in ehv substation bus designs. The test data are presented with pertinent data evaluations in an attempt to provide a more refined basis for the application of final judgments to bus designs for 345, 500, and 750 kV substations.

Hertig, G.E.; Kelly, W.B.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NREL: Wind Research - Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT10 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Ventera's VT10 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The VT10 is a horizontal-axis downwind, three-bladed turbine rated at 10 kilowatts (kW). Its diameter is 6.7 meters, and it is mounted on a lattice tower with a hub height of 21.7 meters. The VT10 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, permanent-magnet generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/22/2010: 0; 3/29/2010: 26; 3/31/2010: 74; 4/1/2010: 75; 4/2/2010: 174;

64

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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3 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

65

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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1 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

66

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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0 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

67

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

68

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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8 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

69

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROBIAL PRODUCTION STIMULATION MARCH 31, 1998 FC970010 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Microbial Production Stimulation for: D. Michael Dennis Geomicrobial Technologies,...

70

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

RePower Bainbridge "Final Boarding Call" Event Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This story is just one example of how RePower's "Final Boarding Call" helped homeowners and our partners. By the end of this one-day event, Kitsap Credit Union and Puget...

72

Microsoft Word - NTS Performance Test Rpt - Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE September 21, 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Summary ....................................................................................................................................................... 2 Results...........................................................................................................................................................

73

Microsoft Word - PR_SWG Trial Results_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT Gary Koppenjan 805-376-6546 mediaoffice@ceres.net Ceres Yield Results: Energy Crop Benefits are Greatly Underestimated THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. - May 20, 2009 - Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. announced today that switchgrass can produce substantially more biomass than previously reported and that average yields often used by academics and policymakers to forecast bioenergy economics and environmental benefits may, in fact, be far too conservative. The company reported that yield results from its nation-wide network of field trials showed that average biomass yields among switchgrass seed varieties tested last season were as much as 50% more than the government's projected yields for 2022. Proprietary varieties sold under the

74

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM JULY 25, 1996 FC9519 / 95PT7 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM DOUBLE M ELECTRIC Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer July 25, 1996 551103/9519:jb ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Tank Level Gauging System at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Double M. Electric manufactures the equipment that incorporates an optical-encoder sending unit, cellular communications, and software interface. The system effectively displayed its capabilities for remote monitoring and recording of tank levels.

75

ROC/RMOTC Hydraulic Pump Test Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXTREME EXTREME PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY, INC. Petroleum Engineers Property Evaluation and Economics Reserves Estimates and Reports Well and Completion Design Reservoir and EOR Studies Expert Witness Testimony Regulatory Permitting Wellsite Management Coalbed Methane Final Report Roc Oil/RMOTC Hydraulic Pump Test For Mr. Bob Cook Roc Oil, Inc. Level 16 100 William Street, Sydney 2011 NSW Australia Office +61 2 8356 2059 Fax +61 2 9380 2066 BCook@rocoil.com.au 29 Oct 2004 159 N. Wolcott, Suite 100 PO Box 490 Casper, WY 82601 USA Phone (307)266-4498 Fax (307)266-4495 Web ExtremePetroTech.com ROC OIL/RMOTC HYDRAULIC PUMP TEST FINAL REPORT Executive Summary Roc Oil (ROC) has a majority interest and acts as Operator in a JV project (Cliff Head) in the Offshore

76

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is also possible. Well 83A4 at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 was selected as a test well. This well is rod pumped and had a stable production history. It produced enough...

77

Uncertainty in in-place filter test results  

SciTech Connect

Some benefits of accounting for uncertainty in in-place filter test results are explored. Information the test results provide relative to system performance acceptance limits is evaluated in terms of test result uncertainty. An expression for test result uncertainty is used to estimate uncertainty in in-place filter tests on an example air cleaning system. Modifications to the system test geometry are evaluated in terms of effects on test result uncertainty.

Scripsick, R.C.; Beckman, R.J.; Mokler, B.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Limited Soil Investigation of Project Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes Cape Thompson, Alaska December 2010 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District Post Office Box 6898 Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 99506-6898 Contract W911KB-08-D-0003 Task Order 12, Mod 001 Prepared by Fairbanks Environmental Services 3538 International Street Fairbanks, Alaska 99701 (907) 452-1006 FES Project No. 5012-06 Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes, Cape Thompson, Alaska Fairbanks Environmental Services 5012-06 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 1-1

79

Test results for robotic manipulator EMMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) headquarters in Gaithersburg, Maryland, where Grey Pilgrim has experimental space available under a Cooperative R & D Agreement (CRADA) with NIST. Under the CRADA, Grey Pilgrim is tasked with developing a version of EMMA suitable for deployment of a stereo camera on a NIST RoboCrane, a mobile platform with applications to several industrial environments (including hazardous materials) based on the concept of the Steward Platform, a structure with great strength and a minimum of material.

Ramsower, D.C.

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for almost 9,150 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and coarse and fine ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and mode...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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81

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

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IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR PROGRESSIVE CAVITY PUMPS Cameron Elastomer Technology MARCH 23, 1998 FC9563/96PT17 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT17 Improved Elastomer Compound for Progressive Cavity Pumps Cameron Elastomer Technology 29501 Katy Fwy Katy, Texas 77494-7801 (281) 391-4615 (281) 391-4640 (fax) David H. Doyle, PE, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 23, 1998 Introduction The purpose of this project was to evaluate improved progressing cavity (PC) pump stator elastomer materials in NPR-3 crude under field conditions. The goal of the project was to test an elastomer material that can be used in high API-gravity (greater than 38' API) crude oils. Currently available materials used for the construction of pump stators swell and fail in contact with such crude oils. This limits the applicability of progressing cavity

82

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/11/05 11:40 18.10 17.80 18.13 17.44 17.82 right 7 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer top angled toward cold side, Kr 17.80 13.74 16.90 14.44 15.77 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

83

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/15/05 13:40 18.08 17.75 17.91 16.84 17.43 right 8 triple/quad, 2 sputtered low-e layers, 2 layer teflon center insert clinging in center, Kr 18.26 17.58 18.05 17.23 17.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

84

Property:Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Property Type Text...

85

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the performance of devices...

86

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/4/05 21:29 18.57 17.93 17.92 17.66 16.52 17.13 right 18 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated glass center layer in traditional broken spacer, Kr 18.54 18.38 17.67 17.81 16.85 17.37 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

87

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at top only, Kr 6/28/06 23:48 18.39 17.74 17.53 17.48 16.45 17.00 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.40 17.74 16.71 17.56 16.09 16.88 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

88

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/29/05 16:09 18.54 17.98 17.98 17.85 16.77 17.34 right 17 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer with 1/16" perimeter gap, Kr 18.88 16.14 16.08 17.71 14.41 16.15 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

89

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/14/05 17:22 18.51 17.42 17.76 17.67 16.61 17.18 right 15 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, dense sun screen center layer, Kr 19.33 17.07 13.77 18.00 14.20 16.26 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

90

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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9 9 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 1/31/06 16:22 17.15 15.06 16.46 15.32 13.91 14.68 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.53 17.87 16.90 17.71 16.41 17.11 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

91

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/24/05 12:40 17.51 17.52 17.63 16.30 17.03 right 9 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 72% open insect screen center layer, Kr 17.12 13.05 17.65 13.84 15.91 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 1.12 0.00 0.39 4.47 21.36 20.68 21.02 20.8

92

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

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7 7 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/25/05 16:15 18.47 17.37 17.87 17.40 16.11 16.82 right 20 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, folded Lexan center layer, Kr 18.63 17.24 16.06 17.51 15.64 16.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

93

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at bottom only, Kr 9/22/06 9:42 18.28 18.07 17.38 17.66 16.79 17.27 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.34 17.70 16.83 17.57 16.28 16.98 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

94

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/20/05 18:05 18.33 16.96 17.89 17.27 16.04 16.71 right 19 double, 1 sputtered low-e glass layer, 3/8" gap, Kr 15.73 15.53 14.97 14.51 13.65 14.13 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 2.59 2.60 1.43 2.92 21.54 20.61 21.08 20.85

95

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOW COST REFRACTURING LOW COST REFRACTURING JANUARY 23, 1998 FC9550/96PT14 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT14 Low Cost Refracturing Rock Creek Enterprises 980 Rock Creek Road Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (307) 684-5243 (307) 684-0902 (fax) David H. Doyle, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center January 23, 1998 Introduction There are relatively few stimulation options available to owners of marginal or stripper wells. These wells are commonly restricted in their production rates because of formation or wellbore damage near the wellbore. Current services available to remove this damage are compared to the small gains possible from old, marginal wells. Over time, several things can occur that cause the flow of oil into the wellbore to be restricted. First, carbonate or sulfate scale can accumulate around the well or in the perforations. The accumulated scale will block oil from

96

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06/97DT15 06/97DT15 RMOTC Test Report Rotary Steerable Stabilizer Smith Drilling and Completions 16740 Hardy Street P. 0. Box 60068 Houston, Texas, 77205-0068 281-443-3370 Leo Giangiacorno, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17, 1997 Introduction Directional drilling is more expensive than vertical drilling. This is due to the high maintenance cost of downhole motors and MWD systems required to control hole trajectory. In addition, directional holes have lower penetration rates due to the poor hole cleaning with a non-rotating string. Down time is often spent orienting tool face to obtain the desired trajectory after tile weight is placed on the bit and the reactive torque of the motor is absorbed by the drill string. Holes drilled in this manner often have a tortuous profile compared to holes drilled with a rotary system, increasing the torque

97

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR (JACGAS COMPRESSOR) MARCH 3, 1998 FC970004/97PT23 RMOTC Test Report Number 97PT23 Jacgas Compressor Morrison International Iron Horse Compression Ltd. 9852-33 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1C6 (403) 462-6847 David H. Doyle, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 3, 1998 Introduction Gas compressors that mount on the walking beam of an oil well pumping unit have been tried with mixed success for many years. Gas compression at the wellhead instead of further downstream can 'increase both oil and gas production by reducing the casinghead gas pressure. Excess pressure on the annulus of the well reduces fluid inflow and restricts production. In old, shallow wells, the small amount of pressure (50 psi) may be sufficient to prevent the well from producing economically. Other applications include the unloading of water

98

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup and, thereb...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Thermionic Fuel Element performance: TFE Verification Program. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full power life of 7 years. A TFE was designed that met the reliability and lifetime requirements for a 2 MW(e) conceptual reactor design. Analysis showed that this TFE could be used over the range of 0.5 to 5 megawatts. This was used as the basis for designing components for test and evaluation. The demonstration of a 7-year component lifetime capability was through the combined use of analytical models and accelerated, confirmatory tests in a fast test reactor. Iterative testing was performed in which the results of one test series led to evolutionary improvements in the next test specimens. The TFE components underwent screening and initial development testing in ex-reactor tests. Several design and materials options were considered for each component. As screening tests permitted, down selection occurred to very specific designs and materials. In parallel with ex-reactor testing, and fast reactor component testing, components were integrated into a TFE and tested in the TRIGA test reactor at GA. Realtime testing of partial length TFEs was used to test support, alignment and interconnective TFE components, and to verify TFE performance in-reactor with integral cesium reservoirs. Realtime testing was also used to verify the relation between TFE performance and fueled emitter swelling, to test the durability of intercell insulation, to check temperature distributions, and to verify the adequacy over time of the fission gas venting channels. Predictions of TFE lifetime rested primarily on the accelerated component testing results, as correlated and extended to realtime by the use of analytical models.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN-SITU H IN-SITU H 2 S BIOREMEDIATION JULY 11, 1994 FC9509 / 95PT3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 North Poplar, Suite 100, Casper, WY 82601 (307) 261-5000, ext. 5060; FAX (307) 261-5997 IN-SITU H2S BIOREMEDIATION NATIONAL PARAKLEEN COMPANY PREPARED BY Fred Brown Michael R. Tyler 731 W.Wadley Field Engineer Building O July 11, 1994 Suite 130 Midland, Texas 79705 Phone (915)-683-3076 Fax (915)-683-3081 TEST PURPOSE: To treat producing oil wells that contain high concentrations of H2S with a product that will lower the levels of H2S in the well. METHOD OF TREATMENT: A bio-nutrient product (55 gallons) was mixed with 120 bbls of produced tensleep water and the mixture was pumped down the annulus of selected wells. The well was then shut-in for a 24 hour period and then was returned to production.

102

PHEV and Other Electric Drive Testing Results and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity PHEV and Other Electric Drive Testing Results and Resources Jim Francfort Electric Drive Session Alternative Fuels & Vehicles Las Vegas, Nevada -...

103

Secure SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results Secure SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the cryptographic implementation and performance impact of the Secure SCADA Communication Protocol (SSCP) upon supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) communications. This report presents performance test data derived from proof of concept implementations of the SSCP. Secure SCADA Communication Protocol Performance Test Results More Documents & Publications AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan Hallmark Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device

104

First Measurements and Results With a Stretched Wire Test Setup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LINAC Coherent Light Source [LCLS] is a free electron laser, designed to produce high brilliant X-ray beams using Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission [SASE]. Due to the physics of SASE, the electron beam has to be held very precisely on the same trajectory as the X-ray light beam generated by the undulator magnets. To optimize the SASE output, trajectory deviations between both beams have to be minimized to a few micrometers along the entire undulator section and held stable over the time period between beam-based-alignment processes. Consequently, extremely high position stability of all magnets in the undulator section is required to operate the LCLS successfully. The knowledge of any magnet movement exceeding few micrometers during periods of several weeks is essential for efficient X-ray generation. A well known principle of monitoring transverse component positions along beam lines is the application of stretched wires, associated with suitable wire position sensors and electronics. The particular challenge at LCLS is the required wire system performance in conjunction with the length of the undulator section and the large number of monitors. Verification of system stability and resolution under real conditions is the primary goal of this test setup. A stretched wire test setup has been implemented to gain experience for the final design of a wire system, which will meet the position monitoring requirements in the LCLS undulator section. The report briefly introduces the system's architecture and describes first measurements and results.

Peters, Franz

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

105

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results (Brochure)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Results Results Prepared for South Coast Air Quality Management District by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory CRD-01-098 Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Fuel Demonstration in a Southern California Vehicle Fleet Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report i Alternative Fuel Trucks YOSEMITE WATERS VEHICLE EVALUATION REPORT Authors Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

106

Final Results from U.S. FCEV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the objectives of the U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Project, describes NREL's technology validation approach, and summarizes key technical results from the project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

L1B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADM-Aeolus L1B test results Jos de Kloe, L1B PM16 10-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

110

L2B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADM-Aeolus L2B test results Jos de Kloe, L2B PM15 11-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

111

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS Gregor v. BOCHMANN and Omar B. BELLAL Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada Abstract: There are two aspects to testing: (1) the selection of appropriate test inputs and (2) the analysis of the observed interactions of the implementation under test

von Bochmann, Gregor

112

Silo 3 Vacuum Wand Demonstration Test Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silo 3, a freestanding, pre-stressed concrete, domed cylindrical tank, located at the Fernald Closure Project near Cincinnati, Ohio, contains approximately 5,100 cubic yards of metal oxide waste generated from Fernald operations that extracted uranium from ore material. The baseline for the Silo 3 Project is to remove a portion of this material from the silo pneumatically by inserting vacuum retrieval wands and/or hoses in existing manways on the silo dome. After the loose material has been removed by the pneumatic system, the project intends to cut an opening in the silo wall and use a mechanical excavator to complete removal of the remaining material, including possible combination with pneumatic retrieval. Fluor Fernald previously requested that the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology provide a Technical Assistance Team to review this approach. One of the key recommendations made by this team was to assess the wand operability, effectiveness, reliability, and safety in a mock-up test. A team was convened to develop the test plan, build the demonstration test loop, and perform the tests. The tests focused primarily on the operability of the system, and to a significantly lesser extent process performance. This report documents the results for the testing completed in April 2003. Based upon the testing performed, the team identified several key issues to be incorporated into the design and operation of the retrieval system.

Steve Birrer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Final Binary Stars Results From The VLT Lunar Occultations Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on 13 sub-arcsecond binaries, detected by means of lunar occultations in the near-infrared at the ESO Very Large Telescope. They are all first-time detections, except for the visual binary HD~158122 which we resolved for the first time in the near infrared. The primaries have magnitudes in the range $K$=4.5 to 10.0, and the companions in the range $K$=6.8 to 11.1. The magnitude differences have a median value of 2.4, with the largest being 4.6. The projected separations are in the range 4 to 168 milliarcseconds with a median of 13 milliarcseconds. We discuss and compare our results with the available literature. With this paper, we conclude the mining for binary star detections in the volume of 1226 occultations recorded at the VLT with the ISAAC instrument. We expect that the majority of these binaries may be unresolvable by adaptive optics on current telescopes, and they might be challenging for long-baseline interferometry. However they constitute an interesting sample for future larger telescope...

Richichi, Andrea; Cusano, Felice; Ivanov, Valentin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

TANK 40 FINAL SB7B CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB7b. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH{sup -}/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The ratios of the major elements for the SB7b WAPS sample are different from those measured for the SB7a WAPS sample. There is less Al and Mn relative to Fe than the previous sludge batch. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. The element ratios for Al/Fe, Ca/Fe, Mn/Fe, and U/Fe agree within 10% between this work and the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt analyses. (3) Sulfur in the SB7b WAPS sample is 82% soluble, slightly less than results reported for SB3, SB4, and SB6 samples but unlike the 50% insoluble sulfur observed in the SB5 WAPS sample. In addition, 23% of the soluble sulfur is not present as sulfate in SB7b. (4) The average activities of the fissile isotopes of interest in the SB7b WAPS sample are (in {mu}Ci/g of total dried solids): 4.22E-02 U-233, 6.12E-04 U-235, 1.08E+01 Pu-239, and 5.09E+01 Pu-241. The full radionuclide composition will be reported in a future document. (5) The fission product noble metal and Ag concentrations appear to have largely peaked in previous DWPF sludge batches, with the exception of Ru, which still shows a slight increase in SB7b.

Bannochie, C.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

TANK 40 FINAL SLUDGE BATCH 8 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

Bannochie, C.

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

116

Distributed Utility Interconnection Tests -- Results and Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensive suites of tests have been planned and performed to evaluate the impacts of distributed resources in a realistic test environment. This report describes the results of unintentional islanding and voltage regulation tests conducted at the Distributed Utility Integration Test (DUIT) facility, located at the Pacific Gas and Electric (PGE) test facility in San Ramon, California. The California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ha...

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Light-Duty Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Federal Test Procedure Emissions Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development and deployment of alternative fuels for environmental and national security reasons, NREL has managed a series of light-duty vehicle emissions tests on alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). The purpose of this report is to give a detailed evaluation of the final emissions test results on vehicles tested on methanol, ethanol, and compressed natural gas.

Kelly, K.; Eudy, L.; Coburn, T.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Technical Review Meeting April 29-30, 2013 A Research Institute of the University of Central...

119

Initial Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the Initial round robin results of the IEC 62804 system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon modules.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Ambrosi, H.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Ebert, M.; Mathiak, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

Mersman, C.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Results and conclusions test capabilities task group summary report  

SciTech Connect

This annotated briefing documents an economic analysis of Sandia`s system-level test facilities maintained and operated by the Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Center 9700. The study was divided into four primary sub-tasks: (1) Estimation of the future system-level test workload, (2) Development of a consistent economic model to estimate the cost of maintaining and operating the test facilities, (3) Determination of the availability of viable alternative test sites, and (4) Assessment of the potential savings through reduction of excess capacity under various facility-closure scenarios. The analysis indicated that potential savings from closing all facilities could approach $6 million per year. However, large uncertainties in these savings remove any sound economic arguments for such closure: it is possible that testing at alternative sites could cost more than maintaining the current set of system-level test facilities. Finally, a number of programmatic risks incurred by facility closure were identified. Consideration of facility closure requires a careful weighing of any projected economic benefit against these programmatic risks. This summary report covers the briefing given to upper management. A more detailed discussion of the data and analyses is given in the full report, available for internal use from the technical library.

Bomber, T.; Pierce, K.; Easterling, R.; Rogers, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

2007 Nissan Altima-7982 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number 1N4CL21E27C177982). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Grey; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

2007 Toyota Camry-7129 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K773007129). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

2007 Nissan Altima-7982 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number 1N4CL21E27C177982). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Grey; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

2007 Toyota Camry-7129 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K773007129). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Round Robin Testing Results and Analysis by China National Institute of Standardization..................................................................................................................... 1 I.1.1 China's Energy Constraint Problem and the Need to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy

133

Development and testing of an automated wood-burning heating system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved wood continuous, automated combustion system has been developed using a tunnel burner. The tunnel burner implemented into a boiler heating system has proven to be very efficient. The prototype was tested and evaluated. A second generation tunnel system was designed and fabricated. Work performed between April 1980 and April 1981 is summarized. The most important results of the project are: the finalized tunnel burner design; high combustion efficiency; and low air pollution emissions. 3 tables. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L.L.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance & Equipment Standards » Implementation, Certification, & Appliance & Equipment Standards » Implementation, Certification, & Enforcement » Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. Standardized DOE Testing Templates Residential Product Templates Automatic Commercial Ice Makers - September 17, 2012 Battery Chargers - June 13, 2011 Beverage Vending Machines - October 25, 2012 Central Air Conditioners and Central Air Conditioning Heat Pumps -

137

Three principal results from recent Fenton Hill flow testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells -- one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region -- would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DuTeaux, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

2007 Nissan Altima-2351 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and the battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima HEV, number 2351 (VIN 1N4CL21E87C172351). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec). The Idaho National Laboratory and eTec conduct the AVTA for DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

2007 Nissan Altima-2351 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and the battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima HEV, number 2351 (VIN 1N4CL21E87C172351). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec). The Idaho National Laboratory and eTec conduct the AVTA for DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

ERCC to Begin Test Rounds for Final RNA Reference Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Richmond, Va.) to produce suites of RNA test samples that will ... The eight registered testing sites represent companies that manufacture microarrays ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microsoft Word - NTS Performance Test Rpt - Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE September 21, 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT...

146

DOE ETV-1 electric test vehicle. Phase III: performance testing and system evaluation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE ETV-1 represents the most advanced electric vehicle in operation today. Engineering tests have been conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in order to characterize its overall system performance and component efficiencies within the system environment. A dynamometer was used in order to minimize the ambient effects and large uncertainties present in track testing. Extensive test requirements have been defined and procedures were carefully controlled in order to maintain a high degree of credibility. Limited track testing was performed in order to corroborate the dynamometer results. Test results include an energy flow analysis through the major subsystems and incorporate and aerodynamic and rolling losses under cyclic and various steady speed conditions. A complete summary of the major output from all relevant dynamometer and track tests is also included as an appendix.

Kurtz, D. W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analysis of the optics of the Final Focus Test Beam using Lie algebra based techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the analysis of the beam optics of the final focus test beam at the Stanford Linear Collider using Lie algebra. (LSP).

Roy, G.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the final report for ASHRAE Research Project 1004-RP: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents the results of the development and application of the methodology to Case Study #2, the Delmar College, in Corpus Christi, Texas, and Case Study #3, the Austin Convention Center, in Austin, Texas. A previous report presented the analysis results for Case Study #1, which was a large hotel located in San Francisco, CA. This report also includes a summary and discussion of the results from all three case studies, recommendations for further research, and a step-by-step guide to applying the analysis methodology.

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Single-Unit Unintentional Islanding Test Results at the DUIT Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of single-unit unintentional islanding tests performed at the DUIT Test Facility. These tests are the first tests to be performed in a comprehensive suite of tests to evaluate the impacts of distributed resources in a realistic test environment. The work described in this report has been sponsored by the California Energy Commission (CEC), and by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the U.S. Department of Energy.

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR-ATR FINAL CONCEPTUAL DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study are presented which provided additional experimental-loop irradiation space for the AECDRD testing program. It was a premise that the experiments allocated to this reactor were those which could not be accommodated in the MTR, ETR, or in existing commercial test reactors. To accomplish the design objectives called for a reactor producing perturbed neutron fluxes exceeding 1O/sup 15/ thermal n/cm/sup 2/-sec and 1.5 x 1O/sup 15/ epithermal n/cm/sup 2/-sec. To accommodate the experimental samples, the reactor fuel core is four feet long in the direction of experimental loops. This is twice the length of the MTR core and a third longer than the ETR core. The vertical arrangement of reactor and experiments permits the use of loops penetrating the top cap of the reactor vessel running straight and vertically through the reactor core. The design offers a high degree of accessibility of the exterior portions of the experiments and offers very convenient handling and discharge of experiments. Since the loops are to be integrated into the reactor design and the in-pile portions installed before reactor start-up, it is felt that many of the problems encountered in MTR and ETR experience will cease to exist. Installation of the loops prior to startup will have an added advantage in that the flux variations experienced in experiments in ETR every time a new loop is installed will be absent. The Advanced Test Reactor has a core configuration that provides essentially nine flux-trap regions in a geometry that is almost optimum for cylindrical experiments. The geometry is similar to that of a fourleaf clover with one flux trap in each leaf, one at the intersection of the leaves, and one between each pair of leaves. The nominal power level is 250 Mw. The study was carried out in enough detail to permit the establishment of the design parameters and to develop the power requirement which, conservatively rated, will definitely reach the flux specifications. A critical mockup of an arrangement similar to ATR was loaded into the Engineering Test Reactor Critical Facility. (auth)

deBoisblanc, D.R. et al

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project Jump to: navigation, search Name New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project Agency/Company /Organization Department of Energy Partner National Renewable Energy Laboratory Batelle"National Renewable Energy Laboratory Batelle" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Focus Area Transportation Phase Bring the Right People Together, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Guide/manual Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 7/1/2002 Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy02o Locality New York City References New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project[1]

153

RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab.

Harms, E; Chase, B; Cullerton, E; Hocker, A; Jensen, C; Joireman, P; Klebaner, A; Kubicki, T; Kucera, M; Legan, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; McGee, M; Nagaitsev, S; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pfeffer, H; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Tupikov, V; Varghese, P; Branlard, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

COMPARISON OF RESPONSE OF 9977 TEST PACKAGES TO ANALYTICAL RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the hypothetical accident test cases for the 9977 prototypes was included in the battery of finite element structural analyses performed for the package. Comparison of the experimental and analytical results provides a means of confirming that the analytical model correctly represents the physical behavior of the package. The ability of the analytical model to correctly predict the performance of the foam overpack material for the crush test is of particular interest. The dissipation of energy in the crushing process determines the deceleration of the package upon impact and the duration of the impact. In addition, if the analytical model correctly models the foam behavior, the predicted deformation of the package will match that measured on the test articles. This study compares the deformations of the test packages with the analytical predictions. In addition, the impact acceleration and impact duration for the test articles are compared with those predicted by the analyses.

Smith, A; Tsu-Te Wu, T

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Results of the PBF/LOFT Lead Rod Test Series  

SciTech Connect

The PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (PBF/LLR) Test Series consisted of four sequential, nuclear blowdown experiments (Test LLR-3, LLR-5, LLR-4, and LLR-4A). The primary objective of the test series was to evaluate the extent of mechanical deformation that would be expected to occur to low pressure (0.1 MPa) light water reactor design fuel rods subjected to a series of nuclear blowdown tests, and to determine if subjecting deformed fuel rods to subsequent testing would result in rod failure. The extent of mechanical deformation (buckling, collapse, or waisting of the cladding) was evaluated by comparison of cladding temperatue versus system pressure response with out-of-pile experimental data and by posttest visual examinations and cladding diametral measurements.

Varacalle, Jr, D J; Garner, R W; Hobbins, R R

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

Wardlaw, R. Jr.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Geothermal pump test facility. Final report, July 1977--July 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design configuration and fabrication description of a transportable geothermal pump test facility are discussed. The test facility, consisting of a test rig and data acquisition system trailer, provides the user with the unique opportunity to develop and calibrate geothermal pumps with less liability and risk, and at lower cost than would be incurred by actually installing the pump in a geothermal well. Pump tests may be performed using either domestic water, heated by pumping energy, or by using actual geothermal brines supplied directly to the test rig which would be located adjacent to the well. The geothermal pump test facility is completely self supporting and requires only an electrical supply source to become fully operational. Information and discussion presented provide substantive background, design and operational capabilities, and pertinent fabrication details.

Blakemore, R.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cross-cooled dehumidifier model test results and computer simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the development of a solar operated cross-cooled desiccant cooling system is described. A 15 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm (6'' x 6'' x 6'') cross-cooled silica gel desiccant dehumidifier model was designed, built and tested. The process of producing the silica gel sheets, the design and construction of the unit, the test setup and the test procedures are described in detail. A total of twenty tests were performed to determine the effect of inlet process stream dew point, process stream and cooling stream flowrates and regeneration stream temperature and dew point, on the performance of the unit. The test results show that the unit performance improves with increasing regeneration temperature, process stream flowrate and process air inlet dew point. The unit performance decreases with increase of the regeneration stream dew point. The results clearly show that the process stream inlet dew point is the dominating factor and that the concept of cross-cooling works very well. With moderate cross-cooling, the unit performance can increase over 50%. All tests were simulated by a computer program. The experimental and theoretical results are in very good agreement.

Mei, V.; Lavan, Z.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Utility Connected .. 92 CONCLUSION.. 99 II ListUtility Connected mode for Test 10.4.17 .. 215 XV Listutility grid. .. 25 II List

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Microsoft Word - GHStratTestFINAL-formatedFIX-1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data and include production testing. Index Terms- Alaska, gas hydrate, resources, production. I. INTRODUCTION HIS cooperative research between BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc....

163

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Test Bed. California Energy Commission, PublicCERTS Microgrid, California Energy Commission R&D Forum, 4CERTS Microgrid, California Energy Commission R&D Forum, 4

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Final safeguards analysis, High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Information on the HTLTR Reactor is presented concerning: reactor site; reactor buildings; reactor kinetics and design characteristics; experimental and test facilitles; instrumentation and control; maintenance and modification; initial tests and operations; administration and procedural safeguards; accident analysis; seifterminated excursions; main heat exchanger leak; training program outline; and reliability analysis of safety systems. (7 references) (DCC)

Hanthorn, H.E.; Brown, W.W.; Clark, R.G.; Heineman, R.E.; Humes, R.M.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

HOWSE (HOt Water SAver) test program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of recovering heat from a domestic dishwasher was demonstrated in a working, full scale model. That project showed it could be done. This test program showed the HOWSE to be effective and safe over a period of eighteen months. The data from the test program is essential to show safety for requesting approval for use of this appliance by building code authorities.

Olson, W.R.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

SAE J2579 Validation Testing Program: Powertech Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Safety Working Group at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has developed a new 'systems-level' document for hydrogen vehicles. This document, SAE TIR J2579, is a new approach to certification standards for components. The document eliminates the need for dozens of test samples, tested in isolation from each other. SAE TIR J2579 describes the components which create the 'high-pressure envelope', the components whose primary function is the containment of the high-pressure hydrogen on-board the vehicle, and has created a sequential test based on those specific components.

McDougall, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project. Final report. Volume 1. Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS Project Summary - Final Report contains a synopsis of each completed project based on contractors final report. Additionally, a brief description of the limited testing completed by the SOLERAS staff on the collectors is included. SOLERAS comments or opinions expressed in the report are solely based on experiences with the SOLERAS Installations. It must be recognized that many product improvements and design modifications have been made since installation completion, many of which are the result of SOLERAS experience. The last chapter of this report is a synopsis of suggested new research areas for the solar cooling program. These suggestions were made by the participants of the cooling workshop held in Phoenix, Arizona in August 1984.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width length) 0.3 5 to 2.74 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Final Report_Production Hydrualic Packer Test.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CENTER CENTER Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test i DOE/RMOTC/020120 PRODUCTION HYDRAULIC PACKER FIELD TEST Field Report for the period of October 21, 1999 - November 01, 1999 Date Published: June 30, 2000 Tricia Schneller, Halliburton Energy Services Jose Salas, RMOTC (PDVSA, Venezuela) PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Work Performed Under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA No. 2000-001 PROTECTED CRADA INFORMATION This product contains Protected CRADA Information which was produced on June 30, 2000 under CRADA No. 2000-001 and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. Distribution E. Further dissemination authorized to the Department of Energy

172

Microsoft Word - FCL Testing Report Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at transmission-level voltages. While there is a need to conduct high voltage-current tests, there are a number of experts that believe it may be possible to substitute modeling...

173

Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(PM), the first during normal unit operation and the second with the injection of TRONA upstream of hot side ESP fields. All tests were completed while Unit 1 was operating...

175

Prototypical Rod Construction Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 3 discusses the following topics: Downender Test Results and Analysis Report; NFBC Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report; Fuel Assembly Handling Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; and Fuel Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NREL: Wind Research - Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results Viryd Technologies CS8 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Viryd Technologies' CS8 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The CS8 is an upwind, horizontal-axis, three-bladed, stall controlled turbine rated at 8 kilowatts (kW). It has an 8.5-meter rotor diameter and is mounted on a guyed tilt-up lattice tower with a hub height of 24.9 meters. The CS8 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, induction generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data included in this table are provided in the final reports.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development, testing, and certification of the Northrup, Inc. , ML Series concentrating solar collector model NSC-01-0732. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the final results of Northrup, Inc., of Hutchins, Texas, for the additional development work on their existing ML Series concentrating solar collector Model NSC-01-0732 for use with solar heating and cooling systems. The intended use of the final report, the development hardware, deliverable end items, problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and certification statements of performance are included. It is shown that the products developed are marketable and suitable for public use.

Parker, J.C.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

First Test Results of the New LANSCE Wire Scanner  

SciTech Connect

The Beam Diagnostics and Instrumentation Team (BDIT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE facility is presently developing a new and improved wire scanner diagnostics system controlled by National Instrument's cRIO platform. This paper describes the current state of development of the control system along with the results gathered from the latest actuator motion performance and accelerator-beam data acquisition tests.

Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

SIMS prototype System 3 test results: engineering analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results obtained during testing of a closed hydronic drain down solar system designed for space and hot water heating are presented. Data analysis is included which documents the system performance and verifies the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 3 for field installation.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Results of Sandia National Laboratories grid-tied inverter testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a definition for a Non-Islanding Inverter. This paper also presents methods that can be used to implement such an inverter, along with references to prior work on the subject. Justification for the definition is provided on both a theoretical basis and results from tests conducted at Sandia National Laboratories and Ascension Technology, Inc.

Kern, G.A. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Bonn, R.H.; Ginn, J.; Gonzalez, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Commercial Nonintrusive Load Monitoring System Beta Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring many different individual loads on customer premises is a costly, complex, and trouble-prone operation. The availability of a single instrument that could plug into the meter socket and measure individual premise loads would greatly simplify and reduce the cost of customer load monitoring. This report provides the test results of such a prototype instrument.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width length) 0.3 5 to 2.74 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Insulator seal final test report, TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective was to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and with a full-power life of 7 years. This report documents one portion of the testing program, that of the Insulator seals. The insulator seal isolates the space filled with gaseous fission products from the cesium filled interelectrode gap. It also assures that electrons flow from the collector of one cell to the emitter of an axially adjacent cell. Fabrication, materials and testing information are presented.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Low-cost solar collector test and evaluation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project was to test and evaluate a highly efficient low cost solar collector and to make this technology available to the average homeowner. The basic collector design was for use in mass production, so approximately forty collector panels were made for testing and to make it simple to be hand built. The collectors performed better than expected and written and visual material was prepared to make construction easier for a first time builder. Publicity was generated to make public aware of benefits with stories by Associated Press and in publications like Popular Science.

Benjamin, C.M.

193

Biomass Cofiring: Field Test Results: Summary of Results at the Bailly and Seward Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cofiring, the simultaneous combustion of two dissimilar fuels in a given boiler, is a technology being considered for low-cost, low-risk use of biomass by electricity generating companies. The process of commercializing cofiring has proceeded from engineering studies through parametric tests to longer-term demonstrations. This report summarizes the results of those demonstrations to date, placing them in the context of the previous test programs.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Methanol fuel vehicle demonstration: Exhaust emission testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company converted four stock 1986 Ford Crown Victoria sedans to methanol flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). During 143,108 operational miles from 1987 to 1990, the FFVs underwent more than 300 dynamometer driving tests to measure exhaust emissions, catalytic activity, fuel economy, acceleration, and driveability with gasoline and methanol blend fuels. Dynamometer driving tests included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. Exhaust emission measurements included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non- oxygenated hydrocarbons, organic material hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE), formaldehyde, and methanol. Catalytic activity was based on exhaust emissions data from active and inactive catalysts. OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} were usually lower with M85 (85% methanol, 15% gasoline) than with gasoline for both active and inactive catalysts when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near normal operating temperatures. CO was higher with M85 than with gasoline when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near ambient temperature. Formaldehyde and methanol were higher with M85. Active catalyst FTP OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} increased as vehicle mileage increased, but increased less with M85 than with gasoline. Energy based fuel economy remained almost constant with changes in fuel composition and vehicle mileage.

Hyde, J.D. [New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY (US). Automotive Emissions Lab.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Solair heater program: solair applications study test program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three prototypes of low cost solar forced air heating using evacuated tube collectors for application to hot water and space heating were tested in various climates in the US during the period winter/spring 1976/1977. The data acquisition and data analysis are reported. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Wireless Roadside Inspection Proof of Concept Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) FMCSA commissioned the Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program to validate technologies and methodologies that can improve safety through inspections using wireless technologies that convey real-time identification of commercial vehicles, drivers, and carriers, as well as information about the condition of the vehicles and their drivers. It is hypothesized that these inspections will: -- Increase safety -- Decrease the number of unsafe commercial vehicles on the road; -- Increase efficiency -- Speed up the inspection process, enabling more inspections to occur, at least on par with the number of weight inspections; -- Improve effectiveness -- Reduce the probability of drivers bypassing CMV inspection stations and increase the likelihood that fleets will attempt to meet the safety regulations; and -- Benefit industry -- Reduce fleet costs, provide good return-on-investment, minimize wait times, and level the playing field. The WRI Program is defined in three phases which are: Phase 1: Proof of Concept Test (POC) Testing of commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) or near-COTS technology to validate the wireless inspection concept. Phase 2: Pilot Test Safety technology maturation and back office system integration Phase 3: Field Operational Test Multi-vehicle testing over a multi-state instrumented corridor This report focuses on Phase 1 efforts that were initiated in March, 2006. Technical efforts dealt with the ability of a Universal Wireless Inspection System (UWIS) to collect driver, vehicle, and carrier information; format a Safety Data Message Set from this information; and wirelessly transmit a Safety Data Message Set to a roadside receiver unit or mobile enforcement vehicle.

Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL; Plate, Randall S [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

D-0 South End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The South endcap calorimeter vessel was moved into Lab A on Sept. 18, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on Sept. 26 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. The test of the ECS was performed in the same manner using the same equipment as the ECN cold test. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN-I07, and 3740.210-EN-II0 for information about the CC cold test. Reference EN-260 for the results of the ECN cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 40 microns. The pumping continued overnight (another 16 hours). In the morning the pressure was 11.5 microns. A rate of rise test was performed. With the pump valved off, the pressure rose to 14 microns within 5 minutes and then rose to 16 microns in 6 hours (0.33 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. After 18 hours, the pressure vessel was down to 270 microns. An additional day of pumping took the pressure down to only 250 microns. A leak was then found and fixed around the seal of the rupture disc. The pump was put on line again. The pressure vessel with pump on line was 27 microns after 16.5 hours. A rate of rise was then conducted. The pressure was 90 microns after valving out the pump. After 30 minutes the pressure increased to 107 microns. (34 microns/hr).

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1990-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermally Induced Groundwater Flow Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the transient residual thermal signal resulting from an underground nuclear test (buried below the water table) and its potential to affect local groundwater flow and radionuclide migration in a saturated, fractured, volcanic aquifer system. Thermal profiles measured in a drillback hole between 154 days and 6.5 years after the test have been used to calibrate a non-isothermal model of fluid flow. In this process, they have estimated the magnitude and relative changes in permeability, porosity and fracture density between different portions of the disturbed and undisturbed geologic medium surrounding the test location. The relative impacts of buoyancy forces (arising from the thermal residual of the test and the background geothermal gradient) and horizontal pressure gradients on the post-test flow system are better understood. A transient particle/streamline model of contaminant transport is used to visualize streamlines and streaklines of the flow field and to examine the migration of non-reactive radionuclides. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand the effects of local and sub-regional geologic features, and the effects of fractured zones on the movement of groundwater and thermal energy. Conclusions regarding the overall effect of the thermal regime on the residence times and fluxes of radionuclides out of the system are drawn, and implications for more complicated, reactive contaminant transport are discussed.

Maxwell, R.M.; Tompson, A.F.B.; Rambo, J.T.; Carle, S.F.; Pawloski, G.A.

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNLs test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

UHM/HNEI EV test and evaluation program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The electric vehicle (EV) program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) focuses primarily on the field testing of promising EV/traction batteries. The intent is to utilize typical driving cycles to develop information that verifies or refutes what is obtained in the laboratory. Three different types of battery were assigned by the US DOE for testing in this program: Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160, Exide GC-5, Trojan T-145. We added the following battery to the test program: ALCO2200. HNEI`s existing EVs were utilized as test beds. The following EVs were chosen in our program: Converted Ford Escort station wagon, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Dodge van (typically daily driving distances, 10--30 miles). Capacity testing is a very effective way of monitoring the status of battery modules. Based on capacity tests, corrective action such as battery replacement, additional charging, adjusting terminal connections, etc., may be taken to maintain good performance. About 15,500 miles and 600 cycles have been accumulated on the Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160 battery pack. Five of its 18 modules have been changed. Based on DOE`s standard, the battery has reached the end of its useful life. Nevertheless, the battery pack is still operational and its operating range is still greater than 40 miles per charge. It is too early to evaluate the life expectancy of the other three batteries, the Trojan T-145, Exide GC-5, and Alco 2200. No module has been replaced in these three packs. The Trojan T-145 battery is a very promising EV traction battery in terms of quality and reliability versus price. HNEI will keep the Trojan and Exide battery packs in operation. The Alco 2200 batteries will be transferred to another vehicle. The Additional Charging Method seems to be an effective way of restoring weak modules. The ``Smart Voltmeter`` developed by HNEI is a promising way of monitoring the remaining range for an EV.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Final Test Report for BioCOPE.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

33 33 An Evaluation of BioCOPE to Reduce Hydrogen Sulfide in Sediments, and Accelerate the Breakdown of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil June 28, 2000 - October 16, 2000 Date Published: June 12, 2001 L.M. Jackson PREPARED FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Work Performed Under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA No. 2000-006 PROTECTED CRADA INFORMATION This product contains Protected CRADA Information which was produced on June 12, 2001 under CRADA No. 2000-006 and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 1 year(s) from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. Distribution E. Further dissemination authorized to the Department of Energy only; other requests shall be

206

Microsoft Word - FCL Testing Report Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Prepared by Brian Marchionini and Ndeye K. Fall, Energetics Incorporated Michael "Mischa" Steurer, Florida State University February 2009 Energetics Incorporated i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on next-generation electricity delivery equipment including fault current limiters (FCLs). Prototype FCL devices are undergoing testing with the aim of market-ready devices making their debut in the transmission and distribution (T&D) system in the next five years. As these

207

Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNLs test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Package  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) contracted with the Packaging Review Group (PRG) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a single, 30-ft shallow-angle drop test on the Combustion Engineering ABB-2901 drum-type shipping package. The purpose of the test was to determine if bolted-ring drum closures could fail during shallow-angle drops. The PRG at LLNL planned the test, and Defense Technologies Engineering Division (DTED) personnel from LLNL's Site-300 Test Group executed the plan. The test was conducted in November 2001 using the drop-tower facility at LLNL's Site 300. Two representatives from Westinghouse Electric Company in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-SC); two USNRC staff members; and three PRG members from LLNL witnessed the preliminary test runs and the final test. The single test clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of the bolted-ring drum closure to shallow-angle drops-the test package's drum closure was easily and totally separated from the drum package. The results of the preliminary test runs and the 30-ft shallow-angle drop test offer valuable qualitative understandings of the shallow-angle impact.

Hafner, R S; Mok, G C; Hagler, L G

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electric vehicle/photovoltaic test and evaluation program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of South Florida (USF) in collaboration with Florida utilities and other organizations have executed a research and development program for the test and evaluation of Electric Vehicles. Its activity as one of 13 US Department of Energy (DOE) Electric Vehicle Test Site Operators was funded by DOE and the Florida Energy Office (FEO). The purpose of this program was to determine the efficiency of electric vehicles under commuter and fleet conditions in Florida. An additional feature of this program was the development of a utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) system for charging electric vehicles with solar energy. USF developed an effective and economical automated on board Mobile Data Acquisition System (MDAS) that records vehicle operating data with minimum operator interface. Computer programs were written by the USF team to achieve processing and analysis of the vehicles` MDAS data, again minimizing human involvement, human effort and human error. A large number of passenger cars, vans and pickup trucks were studied. Procedures for monitoring them were developed to a point where the equipment is commercially available and its operation has become routine. The nations first PV solar powered electric vehicle charging station and test facility was designed, developed and put into operation under this program. The charging station is capable of direct DC-DC (PV to battery) or AC-DC (power grid to battery) charging and it routes unused PV power to the University`s power grid for other use. The DC-DC charging system is more efficient, more dependable and safer than DC-AC-DC and traditional methods of DC-DC charging. A fortuitous correlation was observed between battery charging demand and solar power availability in commuter application of electric vehicles.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Aluminized film, seam sealing tests and observations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to investigate various seam sealing techniques, reinforcing methods, fitting installations, seam tolerances and geometric configurations pertinent to an aluminized plastic laminate. The program seeks a successful fabricating method for producing low-diffusion, cylindrical, spar liners to contain pressurized GH{sub 2} and GO{sub 2}. The test plan included: (1) seaming techniques on metallized Mylar film; (2) ``double patches`` for end fittings; (3) stainless steel bulkhead fitting assembly with seals; (4) minimum run tolerance on linear shear seam; (5) peel seam vs. inverted seal seam fabrication.

Not Available

1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Exhaust emission testing of two ethanol variable fueled 1992 Chevrolet Luminas. Test results - 1993. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the exhaust emission testing results for two 1992 low-mileage Chevrolet Lumina ethanol variable fuel vehicles. The vehicles were tested on both Indolene and E85 fuel using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) for exhaust emissions. In the future, the EPA will retest the Luminas at future mileage accumulations of 20,000, 50,000 and possibly 100,000. At these future mileage accumulations, the vehicles will also be tested using intermediate fuel blends for both exhaust and evaporative emissions.

Samulski, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results  

SciTech Connect

The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Nie, J.; Morante, R.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Test results of the AGS Booster low frequency RF system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Band II RF system was originally built to support the Booster operations during the acceleration of heavy ions. Designed to sweep from 0.6 to 2.5 MHz, it was build and successfully tested over a much broader range reaching 4 MHz. Voltages up to more than 20 kV were reached over the design frequency range. The system consists of two stations, each of which is made of one single gap cavity directly driven by a grounded cathode push pull power amplifier. The low Q high permeability ferrites needed in the coaxial cavity in order to reach the lower end of the band make tuning extremely easy. Both systems were thoroughly tested both at single frequencies and on a sweep and are now installed in the ring, ready for operations. Static measurements showed no high-loss effects. The Band 11 system has been fully described in a previous paper; presented here are the results of the ``bench`` tests that lead to important performance improvements.

Sanders, R.T.; Cameron, P.; Damm, R.; Dunbar, A.; Goldman, M.; Kasha, D.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Ratti, A.; Spitz, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. (Telephone: 412.776.4970; E-mail: publications@sae.org)

222

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 g/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 C, 27 C, and 32 C there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-2  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on specimens of nuclear graphites irradiated in capsule OG-2. About half the irradiation space was allocated to H-451 near-isotropic petroleum-coke-based graphite or its subsized prototype grade H-429. Most of these specimens had been previously irradiated. Virgin specimens of another near-isotropic graphite, grade TS-1240, were irradiated. Some previously irradiated specimens of needle-coke-based H-327 graphite and pitch-coke-based P$sub 3$JHAN were also included.

Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

1975-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

TMED-4 INTERIM REPORT PURE ZR EQUILIBRIUM TEST RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to higher than expected permeation rates in the production of tritium in the TVA, a development and testing program was implemented to develop the understanding of why the higher rates were occurring. In addition, improved data are needed for both the design as well as the predictive models. One part of the program was to determine the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen and tritium over NPZ (1). During the course of this testing, some curious results were discovered (2) compared to the published literature data (3). Due to these apparently results, a follow-on task was undertaken to determine the equilibrium pressure of protium and deuterium over pure zirconium. A series of experiments were conducted to determine equilibrium pressures and isotherm data for the zirconium - protium and zirconium - deuterium systems. The data match the published literature data reasonably well with the plateau extending to loadings of about 1.4. There is a significant pressure rise for loadings greater than 1.7.

Korinko, P.; Morgan, G.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout this report as the ProTec{trademark} tear-off system) can be directly applied to the shielded cell, glovebox, or hood sash window to serve as a secondary (or primary) barrier. Upon degradation of visual clarity due to accidental scratching, spills/splatters, and/or radiation damage, the outer layer (or sheet) of Mylar could be removed refreshing or restoring the view. Due to the multilayer aspect, the remaining Mylar layers would provide continued protection for the window from potential reoccurrences. Although the concept of using a tear-off system as a protective barrier is conceptually enticing, potential technical issues were identified and addressed as part of this phased study to support implementation of this type of system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specific test conditions of interest to the DWPF included the performance of the tear-off system exposed to or under the following conditions: (1) acid(s) (concentrated (28.9 M) HF, concentrated (15.9M) HNO{sub 3}, 6M HCl, and 0.6M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); (2) base (based on handling of radioactive sludges with pH of {approx}12-13); (3) gamma radiation (due to radioactive sources or materials being used in the analytical cells); (4) scratch resistance (simulating accidental scratching with the manipulators); and (5) in-situ testing (sample coupons exposed to actual field conditions in DWPF). The results of the Phase 1 study indicated that the ProTec tear-off concept (as a primary or secondary protective barrier) is a potential technical solution to prevent or retard excessive damage that would result from acid etching, base damage (as a result of a sludge spill or splatter), gamma radiation damage, and/or accidental scratching (due to manipulator/tool contact). Although identified as a potential solution, the Phase 1 testing was relatively short-term with exposure times up to 1-2 months for the acid and gamma radiation tests. Phase 2 testing included longer exposure times for the acid resistance (up to 456 days) and gamma radiation exposure (700 days with a cumulative gamma dose of {approx}3.1 x 10{sup 5} rad) assessments. The tear-off system continued to perform well in these longer-term acid resistance testing and gamma exposure conditions. Complete removal of the tear-offs after these long-term exposure times indicate that not only could visual clarity be restored but the mechanical integrity could be retained. The results also provided insight into the ability of the ProTec tear-off system to withstand the chemical and physical abuses expected in off-normal shielded cells operations. The conceptual erasing of scratches or marks by excessive manipulator abuse was demonstrated in the SRNL Shielded Cells mock-up facility through the removal of the outer layer tear-off with manipulators. In addition, the Phase 2 testing included an in-situ assessment of a prototype tear-off system in the DWPF Sampling Cells where the system was exposed to actual field conditions including radioactive sources, acidic and basic environments, dusting, and chemical cleaning solutions over a 5-6 month period. DWPF personnel were extremely satisfied with the performance (including the successful removal of 3 layers with manipulators) of the ProTec tear-off system under actual field conditions. The successful removal of the outer layer tear-offs with the manipulator, using tabs not specifically designed for remote operations, demonstrates that the system is 'manipulator-friendly' and could be implemented in a remote environment. The ability to remove the outer layer tear-off not only regains visual clarity but also reduces waste disposal volumes (i.e., dispo

Peeler, D

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Enhancing Building Operations Through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) is a modular diagnostic software system that provides detection and diagnosis of problems with the operation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems and major energy end-uses. It has been extensively field tested and demonstrated in buildings over the past several years. WBD found problems with many air-handling units at all sites. The problems ranged from a simple set point deviation to improper implementation of controls. The results from these demonstrations, along with the feedback from building operators and managers on the use of diagnostic tools, are presented in the paper. Experience from field tests indicates that providing diagnostic tools to building operators can increase their awareness of equipment faults, but it will not by itself solve the problems of inefficient operations. Changes in operation and maintenance practices and behavior are needed. We discuss how these new technologies might be delivered and used more effectively to better manage facilities, improving their condition and increasing their energy efficiency.

Katipamula, S.; Brambley, M. R.; Bauman, N.; Pratt, R. G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Results of the 1000 Hour Rotary Microfilter Endurance Test  

Stellite on Nitronic 60. 8 SRNL-L3100-2010-00229 Rotary Microfilter 1000 Hour Test Flux Data for 1000 Hour Test 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 100 200 300 400 500 ...

232

Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste ...  

PEP Testing Objectives Qualitatively demonstrate leaching and ultrafiltration processes, equipment design and process control strategies Obtain data to ...

233

Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three crystalline silicon module designs were distributed in five replicas each to five laboratories for testing according to the IEC 62804 (Committee Draft) system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules. The stress tests were performed in environmental chambers at 60 degrees C, 85% relative humidity, 96 h, and with module nameplate system voltage applied.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Mathiak, G.; Ebert, M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Preliminary design for hot dirty-gas control-valve test facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a preliminary design and cost estimating effort for a facility for the testing of control valves in Hot Dirty Gas (HDGCV) service. This design was performed by Mittelhauser Corporation for the United States Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The objective of this effort was to provide METC with a feasible preliminary design for a test facility which could be used to evaluate valve designs under simulated service conditions and provide a technology data base for DOE and industry. In addition to the actual preliminary design of the test facility, final design/construction/operating schedules and a facility cost estimate were prepared to provide METC sufficient information with which to evaluate this design. The bases, assumptions, and limitations of this study effort are given. The tasks carried out were as follows: METC Facility Review, Environmental Control Study, Gas Generation Study, Metallurgy Review, Safety Review, Facility Process Design, Facility Conceptual Layout, Instrumentation Design, Cost Estimates, and Schedules. The report provides information regarding the methods of approach used in the various tasks involved in the completion of this study. Section 5.0 of this report presents the results of the study effort. The results obtained from the above-defined tasks are described briefly. The turnkey cost of the test facility is estimated to be $9,774,700 in fourth quarter 1979 dollars, and the annual operating cost is estimated to be $960,000 plus utilities costs which are not included because unit costs per utility were not available from METC.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

237

2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Selected test results from the neosonic polymer Li-ion battery.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery was measured using a number of tests including capacity, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, hybrid pulsed power test, utility partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycle test, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the polymer Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery technology can provide power levels up to the 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h (1C) discharge rate. Two of the three cells used in the utility PSOC pulsed cycle test completed about 12,000 cycles with only a gradual loss in capacity of 10 and 13%. The third cell experienced a 40% loss in capacity at about 11,000 cycles. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were increases in impedance after cycling, especially for the third cell. Cell No.3 impedance Rs increased significantly along with extensive ballooning of the foil pouch. Finally, at a 1C (10 A) charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test with cell confinement similar to a multi cell string resulted in the cell venting hot gases at about 45 C 45 minutes into the test. At 104 minutes into the test the cell voltage spiked to the 12 volt limit and continued out to the end of the test at 151 minutes. In summary, the Neosonic cells performed as expected with good cycle-life and safety.

Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Final Report - Assessment of Testing Options for the NTR at the INL  

SciTech Connect

One of the main technologies that can be developed to dramatically enhance the human exploration of space is the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Several studies over the past thirty years have shown that the NTR can reduce the cost of a lunar outpost, reduce the risk of a human mission to Mars, enable fast transits for most missions throughout the solar system, and reduce the cost and time for robotic probes to deep space. Three separate committees of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences have recommended that NASA develop the NTR. One of the primary issues in development of the NTR is the ability to verify a flight ready unit. Three main methods can be used to validate safe operation of a NTR: 1) Full power, full duration test in an above ground facility that scrubs the rocket exhaust clean of any fission products; 2) Full power , full duration test using the Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) technique to capture the exhaust in subsurface strata; 3) Test of the reactor fuel at temperature and power density in a driver reactor with subsequent first test of the fully integrated NTR in space. The first method, the above ground facility, has been studied in the past. The second method, SAFE, has been examined for application at the Nevada Test Site. The third method relies on the fact that the Nuclear Furnace series of tests in 1971 showed that the radioactive exhaust coming from graphite based fuel for the NTR could be completely scrubbed of fission products and the clean hydrogen flared into the atmosphere. Under funding from the MSFC, the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) at the Idaho National laboratory (INL) has completed a reexamination of Methods 2 and 3 for implementation at the INL site. In short, the effort performed the following: 1) Assess the geology of the INL site and determine a location suitable SAFE testing; 2) Perform calculations of gas transport throughout the geology; 3) Produce a cost estimate of a non-nuclear , sub-scale test using gas injection to validate the computational models; 4) Produce a preliminary cost estimate to build a nuclear furnace equivalent facility to test NTR fuel on a green field location on the INL site. The results show that the INL geology is substantially better suited to the SAFE testing method than the NTS site. The existence of impermeable interbeds just above the sub-surface aquifer ensure that no material from the test, radioactive or not, can enter the water table. Similar beds located just below the surface will prevent any gaseous products from reaching the surface for dispersion. The extremely high permeability of the strata between the interbeds allows rapid dispersion of the rocket exhaust. In addition, the high permeability suggests that a lower back-pressure may develop in the hole against the rocket thrust, which increases safety of operations. Finally, the cost of performing a sub-scale, non-nuclear verification experiment was determined to be $3M. The third method was assessed through discussions with INL staff resident at the site. In essence, any new Category I facility on any DOE site will cost in excess of $250M. Based on the results of this study, a cost estimate for testing a nuclear rocket at the INL site appears to be warranted. Given the fact that a new nuclear fuel may be possible that does not release any fission products, the SAFE testing option appears to be the most affordable.

Howe, Steven D; McLing, Travis L; McCurry, Michael; Plummer, Mitchell A

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

244

Results of Repeat Tracer Tests at Ohaaki, NZ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 20 years of tracer testing at Ohaaki a number of wells have been used more than once as tracer injection sites. In studying the various responses obtained it has been necessary to consider variations in the experimental test conditions before making comparisons which relate to field conditions. Some very significant changes have occurred in the field hydrology in recent years and water flow speeds as high as those encountered at Wairakei have been demonstrated.

McCabe, W.J.; Clotworthy, A.W.; Morris, C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE/EA-1652: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Technology Testing Center (August 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Technology Testing Center Boston, Massachusetts August 2009 DOE/EA-1652 Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401-3393 NREL - ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE WIND TECHNOLOGY TESTING CENTER, BOSTON, M.A. FINAL EA, AUGUST 2009 i Table of Contents SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES ................................ 1 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ....................................................................................................................... 2

247

Microsoft Word - DTRS56-05-T-0003-Benchmark Results Report- Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Inspection Technologies Demonstration Report Pipeline Safety Research & Development Program Final 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

248

Test Procedure for 170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Procedure for §170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (h) Incorporate Laboratory Test Results This document describes the test procedure for evaluating conformance of complete EHRs or EHR modules1

249

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1--3 test results report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--3 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1--3 was the third test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel rod behavior, hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (38,000 MWd/tU) pressurized water reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 empty zircaloy guide tubes, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1-h transient at a nominal coolant pressure of 6.85 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 1340-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of online instrumentation, analysis of fission product data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 34 refs., 241 figs., 51 tabs.

Martinson, Z.R.; Gasparini, M.; Hobbins, R.R.; Petti, D.A.; Allison, C.M.; Hohorst, J.K.; Hagrman, D.L.; Vinjamuri, K. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of laboratory and pilot plant tests, detailed process and project engineering work, and process engineering and economic evaluation studies has been carried out in support of the design of a test facility for demonstration of the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions. A demonstration plant has been designed which is capable of removing 99% of the H/sub 2/S, 90% of the NH/sub 3/, and significant amounts of H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and particulates from 100,000 lb/hr of geothermal steam of The Geysers composition. Criteria for the mechanical and process design of the scrubber have been confirmed in field tests of fifty hours duration on an eight-inch diameter scrubber at PG and E's Unit No. 7, The Geysers. The background of the problem and the technical approach to its solution, the scope and results of the first-phase laboratory testing, the scope and results of the experimental and analytical studies carried out in the second phase, and a description of the configuration of the demonstration plant and the test plan for its operation are summarized. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Recent results from the Spacecraft Fabrication and Test MODIL  

SciTech Connect

The Spacecraft Fabrication and Test Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory (SF&T MODIL) is working with SDIO program offices and contractors to reduce schedule and budget risks for SDIO systems as they go into production. The concurrent engineering thrust has identified potential high payoff areas. A materials and structures demonstration project has been successfully completed in partial automated closing of matched metal molds for a continuous fiber composite. In addition to excellent accuracy, the parts demonstrated excellent predictability and repeatability of physical properties. The cryocooler thrust successfully demonstrated and inserted precision technologies into a generic cryocooler part. The precision technologies thrust outlined two potentially high payoff areas in precision alignment and miniature rocket thrust measurement. The Producible Technology Working Group (PTWG) efforts identified the need for a test and assembly thrust. Due to funding limitations, continuing efforts are limited to the cryocooler thrust.

Saito, T.T.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for over 7,750 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and modeling software, the...

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development and testing of the Solar Control Corporation modular Controller and Solarstat Subsystem. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the final results of contract NAS8-32258 Solar Control Corporation, for the additional development work on their existing Controller and Solarstat Subsystem for use with solar heating and cooling systems. It discusses the intended use of the final report, describes the deliverable end items, lists program objectives, and relates how they were accomplished. The report shows that the products developed are marketable and suitable for public use.

Hankins, J.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Vehicle Technologies Heavy Vehicle Program: FY 2007 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Benefits Analysis, 7 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report ANL-08/06 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

257

Vehicle Technologies Heavy Vehicle Program: FY 2008 Benefit Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Benefits Analysis, 8 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results- Final Report ANL-08/07 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

258

Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

260

Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

Jeppson, D.W.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

Lyons, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Results from the NREL Variable-Speed Test bed  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Variable-Speed Test bed turbine has been used to examine the performance and controllability of a variable-speed, variable-pitch turbine. Control strategies that eliminate drive-train torque fluctuations in high winds have been published before and example data are given here. The energy capture of a variable-speed wind turbine depends in part on its ability to successfully operate at the peak of the C{sub p}-{lambda} curve. The losses associated with the inability of the rotor to stay exactly on top of the curve at all have been found and quantified. New control strategies for improving energy capture in moderate winds are also proposed. The potential exists to improve overall energy capture by 5% or more.

Fingersh, L.J.; Carlin, P.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Plug-in 2011: Initial PEV and Charging Infrastructure Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug in 2011: Initial PEV and Charging in 2011: Initial PEV and Charging Infrastructure Test Results Infrastructure Test Results Jim Francfort Jim Francfort Jim Francfort Jim...

266

Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. III: Observations and Results for a Final Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the fourth in a series whose purpose is to study the interstellar abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and argon in the Galaxy using a sample of 86 planetary nebulae. Here we present new high-quality spectrophotometric observations of 20 Galactic planetary nebulae with spectral coverage from 3700-9600 Angstroms. A major feature of our observations throughout the entire study has been the inclusion of the near-infrared lines of [S III] 9069,9532, which allows us to calculate accurate S+2 abundances and to either improve upon or convincingly confirm results of earlier sulfur abundance studies. For each of the 20 objects here we calculate ratios of S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O and find average values of S/O=1.1E-2+/-1.1E-2, Cl/O=4.2E-4+/-5.3E-4, and Ar/O=5.7E-3+/-4.3E-3. For six objects we are able to compare abundances of S+3 calculated directly from available [S IV] 10.5 micron measurements with those inferred indirectly from the values of the ionization correction factors for sulfur. In the final paper of the series, we will compile results from all 86 objects, search for and evaluate trends, and use chemical evolution models to interpret our results.

K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry; J. B. Milingo

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2008 benefits analysis, methodology and results --- final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Vehicle Technologies (VT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, and (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 08 the Heavy Vehicles program continued its involvement with various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. These changes are the result of a planning effort that first occurred during FY 04 and was updated in the past year. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY08 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the VT program for internal project management purposes.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

Glaspey, Douglas J.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Selected test results from the LiFeBatt iron phosphate Li-ion battery.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the performance of the LiFeBatt Li-ion cell was measured using a number of tests including capacity measurements, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, high power partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycling, pulse power measurements, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the iron phosphate Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, and wind farm energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the LiFeBatt battery technology can function up to a 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h discharge rate (1C). The utility PSOC cycle test at up to the 4C{sub 1} pulse rate completed 8,394 PSOC pulsed cycles with a gradual loss in capacity of 10 to 15% depending on how the capacity loss is calculated. The majority of the capacity loss occurred during the initial 2,000 cycles, so it is projected that the LiFeBatt should PSOC cycle well beyond 8,394 cycles with less than 20% capacity loss. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were only very small changes after cycling. Finally, at a 1C charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test resulted in the cell venting electrolyte at 110 C after 30 minutes and then open-circuiting at 120 C with no sparks, fire, or voltage across the cell.

Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

MICRO PIN ARRAY DETECTOR (MIPA): FIRST TEST RESULTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel gas proportional detector, consisting of an array of pins immersed into a cathode made out of closely packed hexagonals has been developed. The resulting geometry of the detector is 3 dimensional. Electron multiplication is limited to a region in close proximity to the tip of each pin, where the electric field decreases with distance from the pin at a rate faster than l/r, the rate that exists in a traditional wire chamber. The multiplication region is limited to a small part of the detector volume leading to stability of operation up to high charge gas gains. The amplification region is located far enough from any dielectric surface that the gas gain is insensitive to the charge state of the surface, a significant benefit compared with many other micro-pattern detectors. The microscopic dimensions of the individual pins of the array result in signals whose total duration is about a microsecond. Two identical, but opposite polarity signals are detected, one on the pin and one on the cathode. Both signals can be used by two independent, charge division, read-out systems to obtain unambiguous x-y position information of the primary ionization.

REHAK,P.; SMITH,G.C.; WARREN,J.B.; YU,B.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

MICRO PIN ARRAY DETECTOR (MIPA): FIRST TEST RESULTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel gas proportional detector, consisting of an array of pins immersed into a cathode made out of closely packed hexagonals has been developed. The resulting geometry of the detector is 3 dimensional. Electron multiplication is limited to a region in close proximity to the tip of each pin, where the electric field decreases with distance from the pin at a rate faster than 1/r, the rate that exists in a traditional wire chamber. The multiplication region is limited to a small part of the detector volume leading to stability of operation up to high charge gas gains. The amplification region is located far enough from any dielectric surface that the gas gain is insensitive to the charge state of the surface, a significant benefit compared with many other micro-pattern detectors. The microscopic dimensions of the individual pins of the array result in signals whose total duration is about a microsecond. Two identical, but opposite polarity signals are detected, one on the pin and one on the cathode. Both signals can be used by two independent, charge division, read-out systems to obtain unambiguous x-y position information of the primary ionization.

REHAK,P.; SMITH,G.C.; WARREN,J.B.; YU,B.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

DOE/EA-1499; Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

499 499 Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site Final Environmental Assessment August 2004 U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Las Vegas, Nevada Available for sale to the Public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis..gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from-- U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

276

Pressurization test results: Bonneville Power Administration Energy Conservation Study  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of air leakage measurements in 18 single-family detached houses at the Midway substation, Hanford, Washington, performed as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's Energy Conservation Study. The change in energy consumption following various retrofit strategies is compared. Air leakage was measured in each house with the fan pressurization technique, before and after the retrofits were installed. No significant change was found in infiltration rates in those houses receiving either no retrofits or insulation only; and average reduction of 17% in leakage area was found in the houses retrofitted with storm doors and windows. There appears to be great potential for further savings in energy use from reduced infiltration, and the study is being extended to investigate this.

Krinkel, D.L.; Dickeroff, D.J.; Casey, J.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance--Observations and Results: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presented observations and results from round robin testing of commercial hydrogen sensor performance.

Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Post, M.; Boon-Bret, L.; Black, G.; Harskamp, F.; Moretto, P.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Project Rio Blanco reentry drilling and testing of RB-E-01 well. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reentry by the RB-E-01 hole was made through the 7-in. emplacement casing. Details of the drilling operations and test results are presented. (TFD)

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energyâ??s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Programâ??s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

Test result analysis and validation of test verdicts G. v. Bochmann, D. Desbiens, M. Dubuc, D. Ouimet and F. Saba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test result analysis and validation of test verdicts G. v. Bochmann, D. Desbiens, M. Dubuc, D's) are useful in the protocol development cycle, particulary in the conformance testing area. In this paper, we present TETRA, a test and trace analysis tool based on the LOTOS FDT which can be used to automatically

von Bochmann, Gregor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report. Advanced Technology Vehicle Evaluation: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Report Data Report Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report By Kevin Chandler, Battelle Ken Proc, National Renewable Energy Laboratory February 2005 This report provides detailed data and analyses from the U.S. Department of Energy's evaluation of prototype liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks operated by Norcal Waste Systems, Inc. The final report for this evaluation, published in July 2004, is available from the Alternative Fuels Data Center at www.eere.energy.gov/afdc or by calling the National Alternative Fuels Hotline at 1-800-423-1363. Request Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results, document number DOE/GO-102004-1920. i NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

282

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF HEAT EXCHANGER TEST STAND WITH INITIAL TEST RESULTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Continual development of internal combustion engines requires greater performance from liquid coolants and heat exchangers to maintain optimal temperature. For the purpose of experimental testing (more)

Albrecht, Daniel David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Results of OpenDSS CIM Interoperability Testing: Paris Interoperability Test, March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) participated in the 2011 interoperability testing of the Common Information Model (CIM) for distribution, which was conducted at the Electricit de France facilities in Clamard, France, from March 28 through April 1, 2011. The testing covered the following parts of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard 61970, Energy Management System Application Program Interface (EMS-API), and standard 61968, Application Integration at Electric Utilities, Sy...

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Final Report for Organic Partitioning Resulting from Operation of an INTEC Double-needle Sampler  

SciTech Connect

The double needle sampler testing is a continuation of previous test series that investigated the fate of organic species in the Process Equipment Waste Evaporator (PEWE) system at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This test series was designed to investigate the effects of operation of the double needle sampling systems on volatile organic constituents in an acidic feed matrix.

Michael B. Heiser

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Qualification test procedures and results for Honeywell solar collector subsystem, single-family residence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedures and results are described in qualifying the Honeywell solar collector subsystem. Testing began in mid-August 1976, and was concluded in late February 1977. Testing was done in the following areas: pressure, service loads, hail, solar degradation, pollutants, thermal degradation, and outgassing. Results from these tests are summarized.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Final Environmental Assessment for the Test Capabilities Revitalization at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Final Environmental Assessment for the Test Capabilities Revitalization at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A January 2003 Department of Energy, Office of Kirtland Site Operations Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque New Mexico Test Capabilities Revitalization Environmental Assessment January 2003 Department of Energy Office of Kirtland Site Operations i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION ........................................................... 1 2.0 NO ACTION AND PROPOSED ACTION ALTERNATIVES........................................ 2 2.1 EXISTING FACILITIES ...........................................................................................................

288

50 kW PEM Fuel Cell System Design, Fabrication, and Test: System Design -- Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a development program funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Arthur D. Little, and EPRIsolutions. The effort was aimed at the conceptual design and optimization of a 50 kW commercial power system, using advanced proton exchange (or polymer electrolyte) membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology and the verification of key design parameters. (Note: This design effort addresses some of the key technical issues faced by the developers of commercial-scale PEMFC...

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

McEntire, B.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E. [TRW, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

GOVERNOR PERFORMANCE TESTS. CORE I, SEED 2. Test Results. Section 4  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was conducted to determine the load at which each of the governor valves open when the primary average temperature is at 500 deg F. Data compilations for the test are presented along with comparisons with past performances. (J.R.D.)

1961-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Information Resources: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues This April 9, 2009 webcast provided an overview of CALiPER's Round 7 testing results, and an update on the emerging understanding of...

294

Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Facebook Tweet about...

295

Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant applied to the connection by applying it to the box or pin only and reducing the amount applied. Samples 3 and 4 received one makeup only. Sample 5 initially received two make/breaks to test for galling resistance before final makeup, No galling was observed. Later, three additional make/breaks were performed with no pin end collapse and galling over 1/2 a thread occurring on one of the breakouts. During the make/break tests, the stabbing and hand tight makeup of the WW connection was found to be very easy and trouble free. There was no tendency to crossthread, even when stabbed at an angle, and it screwed together very smoothly up to hand tight. During power tight makeup, there was no heat generated in the box (as checked by hand contact) and no jerkiness associated with any of the makeups or breakouts. Sample 2 was tested in pure compression. The maximum load obtained was 1,051 kips and the connection was beginning to significantly deform as the sample buckled. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 3 was capped-end pressure tested to failure. The capped-end yield pressure of the pipe was 16,572 psi and the sample began to leak at 12,000 psi. Sample 4 was tested in pure tension. The maximum load obtained was 978 kips and the connection failed by fracture at the pin critical section. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 5 was tested in combined tension/compression and internal gas pressure. The sample was assembled, setup and tested four times. The first time was with a torque of 7,298 ft-lbs and the connection leaked halfway to ISO Load Point 2 with loads of 693 kips and 4,312 psi. The second time the torque was increased to 14,488 ft-lbs and a leak occurred at 849 kips and 9,400 psi, which was ISO Load Point 2. The third time the makeup torque was again increased, to 20,456 ft-lbs, and a leak occurred at 716 kips and 11,342 psi, ISO Load Point 4. The fourth test was with the same torque as before, 20,617 ft-lbs, and the connection successfully tested up to load step 56, ISO Load Point 6 (second round) before leaking at 354 kips and 11,876 psi. At this point,

John D. Watts

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

BP-5 Remedial Investigation Slug-Test Characterization Results for Well 699-52-55A  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted slug-test characterization at the final, completed BP-5 Remedial Investigation well 699-52-55A near the 200-East Area at the Hanford Site on April 22, 2008. The slug-test characterization was in support of the BP-5 Remedial Investigation. The portion of the unconfined aquifer tested is composed of sediments of the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flowtop. The basalt flowtop unit was included as part of the effective test-interval length for the slug-test analysis because the flowtop unit is hydraulically communicative with the unconfined aquifer. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity for the effective test-interval length represent composite values for the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flow top.

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ``like-new`` condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ``like-new`` condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report.

Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

City of North Bonneville, Washington: Geothermal Exploration Project, production test well, Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed in order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

I Atlas Relocation and Operation At the Nevada Test Site Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlas Relocation and Operation Atlas Relocation and Operation At the Nevada Test Site Final Environmental Assessment May 2001 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Available for sale to the Public, in paper, from U.S. Department of Commerce National Teclmical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22 161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@,ntis.fed~vorId.gov Online Ordering: http:llwww.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at: http:ilwww.doe.govibridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from-- U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1-0062 Phone: 865.576.8401

305

First Beam Waist Measurements in the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ATF2 project is the final focus system prototype for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects, with a purpose to reach a 37 nm vertical beam size at the interaction point using compact optics based on a novel scheme of local chromaticity correction. Construction of all components and installation were completed at the end of 2008. An initial commissioning phase followed in 2009, using larger than nominal {beta} functions at the interaction point, corresponding to reduced demagnification factors in comparison to the design, to limit effects from higher-order optical aberrations and hence simplify beam tuning procedures while key instrumentation was being tested and calibrated. In this paper, first measurements of dispersion and Twiss parameters are presented based on scanning the beam during this period with a set of tungsten wires located just behind the interaction point, using two complementary analysis methods.

Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Aryshev, Alexander; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bambade, Philip; /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, IPN; McCormick, Doug; /SLAC; Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Gao, Jie; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhou, Feng; /SLAC

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Double-contained receiver tank 244-TX, grab samples, 244TX-97-3 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the double-contained receiver tank (DCRT) 244-TX grab samples. Three grabs samples were collected from riser 8 on May 29, 1997. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in a table.

Esch, R.A.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Test results for the 201.25 MHZ tetrode power amplifier at LANSCE  

SciTech Connect

A new RF amplifier has been constructed for use as the intermediate power amplifier stage for the 201.25 MHz Alvarez DTL at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). It is part of a larger upgrade to replace the entire RF plant with a new generation of components. The new RF power system under development will enable increased peak power with higher duty factor. The first tank requires over 400 kW of RF power. This can be satisfied using the TH781 tetrode in a THALES cavity amplifier. The same stage will be also used to drive a TH628 Diacrode(reg. sign) final power amplifier for each of the three remaining DTL tanks. In this application, it will only be required to deliver approximately 150 kW of peak power. Details of the system design, layout for DTL 1, and test results will be presented. The Thales cavity amplifier and TH78I tetrode have been tested for two upcoming requirements at LANSCE. As an IPA to drive a future TH628 Diacrode(reg. sign) FPA with 120-150 kW, the amplifier provided over 16 dB power gain with 50% efficiency or better. As a stand-alone FPA to drive a 5 MeV Alvarez DTI, tank, the amplifier provided 13.5 dB power gain with 50% efficiency or better. It can also be used to drive a 200 MHz RFQ in the future. Power supplies, driver amplifier and coaxial circulators are being specified for the complete installation.

Lyles, J. T. (John T.); Archuletta, S. (Steven); Davis, J. L. (Jerry L.); Lopez, L. J. (Luis J.); Roybal, G. (Gabriel)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Field test of ultra-low head hydropower package based on marine thrusters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project includes the design, fabrication, assembly, installation, and field test of the first full-scale operating hydropower package (turbine, transmission, and generator) based on a design which incorporates a marine-thruster as the hydraulic prime mover. Included here are: the project overview; engineering design; ultra-low head hydropower package fabrication; component procurement, cost control, and scheduling; thruster hydraulic section installation; site modeling and resulting recommended modifications; testing; and baseline environmental conditions at Stone Drop. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Initial results of the California Testing and Inspection Program for solar equipment (TIPSE)  

SciTech Connect

The California Energy Commission has accredited seven independent test laboratories to test solar collectors. Data for 65 collector models are tabulated. Terms used in the table are defined and ways to interpret the results are discussed. (MHR)

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Test Results for HD1, a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and Fabrication ofa 16 Tesla Nb 3 Sn Dipole Magnet",Test Results for HD 1, a 16 Tesla Nb 3 Sn Dipole Magnet A.F.and bore fields above 16 Tesla. II. MAGNET FEATURES AND TEST

Lietzke, A.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mode-Stirred Method Implementation for HIRF Susceptibility Testing and Results Comparison with Anechoic Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the implementation of mode-stirred method for susceptibility testing according to the current DO-160D standard. Test results on an Engine Data Processor using the implemented procedure and the comparisons with the standard anechoic ...

Nguyen Truong X.; Ely Jay J.; Koppen Sandra V.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Lab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The independent testing project was established at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion. Among these barriers is a lack of independent testing results for small turbines.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation modular industrial solar retrofit qualification test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations test to demonstrate automatic operation, performance tests to provide a database for predicting system performance, and life cycle tests to evaluate component and maintenance requirements. Component-level modifications to improve system performance and reliability were also evaluated.

Cameron, C.P.; Dudley, V.E.; Lewandoski, A.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulations Some results for probabilistic CSP 3/29 Background Testing theory pCSP Simulations Some results Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goal: Specification and proof methodologies for probabilistic concurrent systems Nondeterminism + Probability why necessary? ? Nondeterminism intrinsic to specification development la CSP ? underspecified components expressed using nondeterminism COMP ? OPTION ? underspecified COMP more specified ? Analysis of concurrent systems requires nondeterminism ?- internal choice of CSP 4/29 Background Testing theory pCSP Simulations Some results Background

Matthew Hennessy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Final Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation results for new Orion VII buses at NYCT with CNG propulsion and new hybrid propulsion.

Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final test report: demonsration testing in support of the Track 3system waste dislodging, retrieval and conveyance concepts  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the quantitative and qualitative data and information collected during performance of the Track 3 System testing protocol. Information contained herein focuses on the data collected during performance ofthe following Tests Procedures. *Test Procedure-1, Position Management Test Procedure-2, Waste Dislodging, Retrieval, and Conveyance and Decontamination *Test Procedure-3, Dynamic Response Test procedures, Safety Demonstration

Berglin, E.J.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Central receiver solar thermal power system: collector subsystem extended life test. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate long term durability and stability of heliostat reflector and enclosure materials an extended life test program was performed on Research Experiment Heliostats by Boeing Engineering and Construction. The reflectors and enclosures were periodically evaluated and analyzed for the effects of dirt, sunlight, wind and thermal cycling on the mechanical and optical properties of Tedlar and changes in the Mylar reflector tension and reflectivity. During testing the heliostats were maintained and semi-annualy evaluated for optical and mechanical stability. The heliostats tested were located at the Boeing Boardman, Oregon test facility. The purpose of the program was to obtain data through measurements and observation to aid in heliostat design improvement. Certain weather and time related information, most reliably acquired by real time exposure testing, was sought through performance of mechanical and optical testing of the Boardman heliostats. The key areas of technical concern were: (1) enclosure and reflector optical property retention; (2) enclosure and reflector mechanical property retention; and (3) reflector creep (or loss in membrane tension) using bonded joints. In-place optical measurements as well as laboratory optical measurements on coupons cut from a heliostat, mechanical measurements from heliostat coupons, reflector sag measurements, and observations of the air supply system pressure stability and filter condition were made during the initial and two semi-annual test samplings. Results are summarized and discussed. (WHK)

1979-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

323

Final Report - LAW Envelope A and B Glass Formulations Testing in Increase Waste Loading. VSL-06R6900-1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of testing specified by the Test Plan VSL-06R6900-1 Rev 0. The work was performed in compliance with quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The test results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

Kruger, Albert A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final Report - LAW Envelope C Glass Formulation Testing to Increase Waste Loading, VSL-05R5900-1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of testing specified by Test Plan VSL-05R5900-1 Rev.0. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The test results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

326

New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of facilities, a description of the project start-up process, evaluation results of hybrid buses studied, lessons learned, and recommendations for future alternative fuel...

327

INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC POWER GENERATION. VOLUME I. SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A system analysis was performed to establish the design and performance characteristics of 250- and 1000-Mev MHD generators. The results are presented, and the necessary equations are derived. The results of environmental tests that investigated boundary and bulk conductivity, structural concepts, and combustion phenomena are included. The other five volumes of the report are summarized, together with the principal conclusions. (D.C.W.)

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun  

SciTech Connect

The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Synthetic crude oils carcinogenicity screening tests. Final report, October 16, 1978-August 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight crude oils (Southern Louisiana Petroleum, H Coal Syncrude, H Coal Fuel Oil, SRC II, Exxon Donor Solvent Liquid, Occidental in situ Shale Oil, Paraho Shale Oil and Geokinetics in situ Shale Oil) were distilled into, or have been received, as four fractions for analysis and screening for biological (mutagenicity and tumor initiating) activity. Results of selected analytical tests have been obtained on the undistilled crude oils and the fractions. Salmonella typhimurium mutation assay and an accelerated tumor initiation-promotion test have been run on the undistilled crude oils and the fractions. Low boiling (naphtha) fractions of all eight materials showed little or no mutagenicity or skin tumor initiating activity by the two tests used. The higher boiling fractions (gas oils and residues) and the crude oils themselves were mutagenic and exhibited tumor initiation activity. The coal derived fractions were more active by both tests than the shale oil samples, the latter were similar to the petroleum controls. Few differences were apparent in biological activity between coal derived samples of equivalent boiling range among the various coal liquefaction processes, except that the SRC II naphtha sample showed a degree of acute toxicity through skin absorption not exhibited by the other samples. Generally the results agreed closely for the various samples between the salmonella mutation assay with activation and the skin tumor initiation test.

Calkins, W.H.; Deye, J.F.; Hartgrove, R.W.; King, C.F.; Krahn, D.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

2006 Lexus RX400h-4807 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660004807). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

2006 Lexus RX400h-2575 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660002575). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

2006 Lexus RX400h-2575 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660002575). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

2006 Lexus RX400h-4807 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660004807). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Final Report - Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Hematite Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensees procedures and survey results.

E.N. Bailey

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

Gary Blythe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Abstract N/A Authors James Kauahikaua and Douglas Klein Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Citation James Kauahikaua,Douglas Klein. 1978. Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A. Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS. 2:363-366. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Results_of_Electric_Survey_in_the_Area_of_Hawaii_Geothermal_Test_Well_HGP-A&oldid=682499

337

Microsoft Word - RFLMA CR 2010-06 Monitoring Results at SW027 Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Report of Steps Taken Regarding Monitoring Results at Surface Water Report of Steps Taken Regarding Monitoring Results at Surface Water Point of Evaluation (POE) SW027 and Contact Record 2010-06 This page intentionally left blank 1 of 16 Report of Steps Taken Regarding Monitoring Results at Surface Water Point of Evaluation (POE) SW027 August 31, 2010 Introduction Surface water location SW027 is the Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) POE at the eastern (downstream) end of the South Interceptor Ditch (SID), upstream of Pond C-2. The plutonium-239/240 (Pu) concentration measured at SW027 in samples collected through April 27, 2010, indicated that the 12-month rolling average of data from this monitoring point for the full month of April 2010 would likely exceed the RFLMA surface water standard when the

338

Monitoring to detect groundwater problems resulting from enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a four-stage monitoring program to detect groundwater contamination events that may potentially result from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. The monitoring system design is based on a statistical analysis evolving from a series of equations that model subsurface transport of EOR spills. Results of the design include both spatial and frequency monitoring intervals that depend on properties of the local geology and dispersion characteristics of the potential contaminants. Sample results are provided for typical reservoir characteristics. The number of independent variables in the analysis dictate that EOR monitoring systems be designed on a site-specific basis. Sampling designs can be easily formulated to conform to the peculiarities of chosen EOR sites based on data already available from federal and state geological surveys and from oil company statistics.

Beck, R.; Aboba, B.; Miller, D.; Kaklins, I.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Results from baseline tests of the SPRE I and comparison with code model predictions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. This paper presents results of base-line engine tests at design and off-design operating conditions. The test results are compared with code model predictions.

Cairelli, J.E.; Geng, S.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Skupinski, R.C. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States). NASA Lewis Research Center Group

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

EPRI/C-E PWR Safety Valve Test Report Volume 3: Test Results for Dresser Safety Valve Model 31739A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI at the request of the PWR utilities developed an overall program for the testing of PWR primary system safety and relief valves. This program was in response to NUREG 0578 Item 2.1.2 and NUREG 0737 Item II.D.1.A requirements. This report documents the results of safety valve testing performed as part of the overall program at the EPRI/C-E Valve Test Facility located at Combustion Engineering's Kreisinger Development Laboratory, Windsor, Connecticut. Seven safety valves representative of those utiliz...

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing: Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. This testing was conducted on a five-axle combination vehicle with tractor brakes meeting the Reduced Stopping Distance requirement rulemaking. This report provides a summary of the testing activities, the results of various analyses of the data, and recommendations for future research. Following a complete brake rebuild, instrumentation, and brake burnish, stopping tests were performed from 20 and 40 mph with various brake application pressures (15 psi, 25 psi, 35 psi, 45 psi, 55 psi, and full system pressure). These tests were conducted for various brake conditions at the following GVWs: 60,000, 80,000, 91,000, 97,000, 106,000, and 116,000 lb. The 80,000-lb GVWs included both balanced and unbalanced loads. The condition of the braking system was also varied. To introduce these defects, brakes (none, forward drive axle, or rear trailer axle) were made inoperative. In addition to the stopping tests, performance-based brake tests were conducted for the various loading and brake conditions. Analysis of the stopping test data showed the stopping distance to increase with load (as expected) and also showed that more braking force was generated by the drive axle brakes than the trailer axle brakes. The constant-pressure stopping test data revealed a linear relationship between brake application pressure and was used to develop an algorithm to normalize stopping data for weight and initial speed.

Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL] ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL] ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL] ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

Kirpich, A.

1977-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Final results of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 ultrasonic inspection  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AY-102. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found some indication of insignificant general and local wall thinning with no cracks detected.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Final results of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 ultrasonic inspection  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AZ-101. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found one reportable indication of thinning and no reportable pitting, corrosion, or cracking.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

346

Final results of double-shell tank 241-AN-106 ultrasonic inspection  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AN-106. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AN-106 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found no reportable indications of thinning, pitting, corrosion, or cracking.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Procedures for evaluating health impacts resulting from development of energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a compilation of formats, protocols, and procedures that may be used by communities and state agencies to evaluate health impacts resulting from the development of energy resources. The manual also considers ways of using these evaluations to develop plans for coping with health impacts. It is an outgrowth of a study of health problems experienced by impacted communities in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

High Power Testing Results of the X-band Mixed-mode RF Windows for Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we summarize the high power testing results of the X-band mixed-mode RF windows at KEK and SLAC for linear colliders. The main feature of these windows is that the combination of modes on the surface of the ceramic significantly decreases the electric and magnetic fields in the junction between the ceramic and the metal. So far two types of high power windows (with the diameter of 53 mm and 64 mm) have been fabricated. A high power model of the smaller type window was fabricated and tested in a resonant ring at KEK. A maximum circulating power of 81 MW with 300 ns duration or 66 MW with 700 ns duration was achieved. Light emission was observed for a power level of over 10 MW. Later, both windows were shipped to SLAC for even higher power testing using combined power from two klystrons. The first window (53 mm diameter) achieved a transmitted power of 80 MW with 1.5 microsec duration at 30 Hz repetition. It was not destroyed during the testing. The testing of the second window was carried out next to the small type and achieved 62 MW with 1.5 microsec duration with 10 Hz repetition. The final results of both windows are presented in this report.

Loewen, Roderick J

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

FINAL REPORT FOR INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE HEMATITE DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT, FESTUS, MISSOURI  

SciTech Connect

ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the Hematite site during the period of June 12 through June 13, 2012. The survey activities included in-process inspections, document review, walkover surveys, sampling activities, and laboratory analysis of split samples. WEC was forthcoming with information relating to practices, procedures, and surface scan results. Scans performed by the WEC technician were extremely thorough and methodical. The WEC and ORAU technicians identified the same areas of elevated activity with comparable detector responses. WEC sampling of re-use soils, waste soils, sediments, and groundwater were conducted under ORAU observation. The sampling efforts observed by ORAU were performed in accordance with site-specific procedures and in a manner sufficient to provide quality supporting data. Three observations were made during groundwater sampling activities. First, the water level indicator was re-used without submitting rinse blank. Second, bubbles created during tubing extraction could indicate the presence of volatilized organic compounds. Third, samplers did not use a photo ionization detector prior to sample collection to indicate the presence of volatile organic vapors. Results of split samples indicated a high level of comparability between the WEC and ORAU/ORISE radiological laboratories. Analytical practices and procedures appear to be sufficient in providing quality radiochemical data. All concentrations from the Soil Re-Use Area and sediment samples are below Uniform radionuclide-specific derived concentration guideline level (DCGL{sub W}) limits; thus, comparisons to the less conservative stratified geometry were not required. Results were compared to individual DCGLs and using the sum of fractions approach. Both composite soil samples collected from the Waste Handling Area (Bins 1 and 4) were well below the prescribed USEI waste acceptance criteria.

Bailey, Erika N.; Lee, Jason D.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Tank 241-S-102, Core 232 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-S-102 push mode core segments collected between March 5, 1998 and April 2, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-S-102 Retained Gas Sampler System Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1998), Letter of Instruction for Compatibility Analysis of Samples from Tank 241-S-102 (LOI) (Thompson, 1998) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1998). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

STEEN, F.H.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

B Plant canyon sample TK-21-1 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for the TK-21-1 sample collected from the B Plant Canyon on February 18, 1998. The sample was analyzed in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for B Plant Solutions (SAP) (Simmons, 1997) in support of the B Plant decommissioning project. Samples were analyzed to provide data both to describe the material which would remain in the tanks after the B Plant transition is complete and to determine Tank Farm compatibility. The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

Steen, F.H.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Panel results of the solar thermal program research requirement assessment review. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the assessment were to identify: research needs by topic and activity, relative priority of research needs, options for performing needed research, potential performers, costs and duration of R and D activities, gaps and duplications within the R and D program, and activities underway that appear to be of low priority. To achieve these objectives, research programs of the Division of Solar Thermal Technologies within the Office of Renewable Energy and Conservation and the Materials and Advanced Energy Programs of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences were reviewed. Several recent assessments of solar thermal research needs made within the past two years by various groups were also reviewed, and the key research issues and needs were extracted. The primary results from the assessment are a set of prioritized activities to meet the most important research needs for solar thermal technologies. These activities belong to four disciplines: materials science, thermal science, thermochemistry, and engineering. Further, priorities associated with the needs for research result from the various activities allow the recommended activities to be grouped into two categories; a core group which should be at the heart of any future program developed by the department, and a set of important needs that should, at least, find their way into a program at some time during its existence. The recommended research program is outlined, and the complete set of ranked research needs is listed.

None

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

ESCH, R.A.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report.

Steen, F.H.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Correlating Dynamometer Testing to In-Use Fleet Results of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Standard dynamometer test procedures are currently being developed to determine fuel and electrical energy consumption of plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV). To define a repeatable test procedure, assumptions were made about how PHEVs will be driven and charged. This study evaluates these assumptions by comparing results of PHEV dynamometer testing following proposed procedures to actual performance of PHEVs operating in the US Department of Energys (DOE) North American PHEV Demonstration fleet. Results show PHEVs in the fleet exhibit a wide range of energy consumption, which is not demonstrated in dynamometer testing. Sources of variation in performance are identified and examined.

John G. Smart; Sera White; Michael Duoba

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Treaty verification sample analysis program analytical results: UNSCOM 65 samples. Final report, December 1993-January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen samples from the United Nations Special Commission 65 on Iraq (UNSCOM 65) were analyzed for chemical warfare (CW) related compounds using a variety of highly sophisticated spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. The samples consisted of six water, six soil, two vegetation, one cloth, one wood, and two mortar shell crosscut sections. No sulfur or nitrogen mustards, Lewsite, or any of their degradation products were detected. No nerve agents were observed, and no tin was detected precluding the presence of stannic chloride, a component of NC, a World War I choking agent. Diethyl phosphoric acid was unambiguously identified in three water samples, and ethyl phosphoric acid was tentatively identified, at very low levels, in one water sample. These phosphoric acids are degradation products of Amiton, many commercially available pesticides, as well as Tabun, and impurities in munitions-grade Tabun. No definitive conclusions concerning the source of these two chemicals could be drawn from the analytical results.

Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Bossle, P.C.; Durst, H.D.; Ellzy, M.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Devon Station repowering study: Volume 1, Summary and results: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents the results of a site specific conceptual design and economic evaluation of a combined cycle repowering scheme for four nonreheat steam turbines. The first and major objective of the study from EPRI's perspective was to document the methodology of the study so that other utilities that may be planning similar studies in the future may benefit from knowledge developed in this study. The second objective was to select a repowering scheme and develop a site specific conceptual engineering design and associated budget capital and operating estimates. The third objective was to evaluate the feasibility of repowering the plant in stages. The fourth objective was to evaluate the economics of the repowering scheme as an alternative to other generating options. To meet the first objective, the study's team set up a screening approach to identify and evaluate all possible alternatives for repowering the four steam turbines and select the scheme for detailed engineering. To meet the second and third objectives, the project team prepared conceptual level capital cost estimates for both a complete dismantlement and reconstruction project. To meet the fourth objective, NUSCO evaluated the repowered plant against other generating options using a levelized bus bar analysis. In addition, NUSCO compared the repowered plant with a pulverized coal steam plant on a year-by-year basis over the forty year life of the plant. 24 tabs.

Rorstrom, E.G.; Pishko, D.A.; Athas, J.G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results. Final report, July 1991  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

Yeoh, Eric E., E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Holloway, Richard H. [Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Fowler, Jack [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Final results of Borexino Phase-I on low energy solar neutrino spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borexino has been running since May 2007 at the LNGS with the primary goal of detecting solar neutrinos. The detector, a large, unsegmented liquid scintillator calorimeter characterized by unprecedented low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, is optimized for the study of the lower energy part of the spectrum. During the Phase-I (2007-2010) Borexino first detected and then precisely measured the flux of the 7Be solar neutrinos, ruled out any significant day-night asymmetry of their interaction rate, made the first direct observation of the pep neutrinos, and set the tightest upper limit on the flux of CNO neutrinos. In this paper we discuss the signal signature and provide a comprehensive description of the backgrounds, quantify their event rates, describe the methods for their identification, selection or subtraction, and describe data analysis. Key features are an extensive in situ calibration program using radioactive sources, the detailed modeling of the detector response, the ability to define an innermost fiducial volume with extremely low background via software cuts, and the excellent pulse-shape discrimination capability of the scintillator that allows particle identification. We report a measurement of the annual modulation of the 7 Be neutrino interaction rate. The period, the amplitude, and the phase of the observed modulation are consistent with the solar origin of these events, and the absence of their annual modulation is rejected with higher than 99% C.L. The physics implications of phase-I results in the context of the neutrino oscillation physics and solar models are presented.

Borexino Collaboration; G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; M. B. Avanzini; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Empl; A. Etenko; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; C. Hagner; E. Hungerford; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; V. Kobychev; D. Korablev; G. Korga; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; B. Loer; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; G. Lukyanchenko; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; G. Manuzio; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; C. Pena-Garay; L. Perasso; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; N. Rossi; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schoenert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; J. Xu; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; G. Zuzel

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Giromill wind tunnel test and analysis. Volume II. Technical discussion. Final report, June 1976--October 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind tunnel test of a Giromill rotor was conducted. The objective of this test was to substantiate the performance computed by the Larsen cyclogiro vortex theory. Additional objectives were to obtain performance comparison data between the Giromill, a sinusoidal blade modulation Giromill, a Darrieus rotor, and a modified Darrieus rotor that flips the blades a few degrees. A three bladed Giromill rotor having a diameter of 2.13 m (7 ft) and a span of 1.52 m (5 ft) was tested in the McDonnell Aircraft Company 15 x 20 ft Mini Speed Wind Tunnel. The blade modulations were accomplished through use of a cam and push rod arrangement. Replaceable cams provided the desired blade modulation at the various operating points. Various operating conditions were achieved by adjusting the rotor RPM and tunnel speed. The results show that the Giromill has good performance, equal to or much better than that predicted by theory, and outperforms the other types of vertical axis wind turbines tested.

Moran, W.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fabrication and testing of TAA bonded carbon electrodes. Final report, March 1978 - May 1979  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to evaluate metallated dihydrodibenzo tetraazannulene (TAA) as a primary fuel-cell cathode catalyst where the TAA is covalently bonded to the conductive cathode matrix. Under the program, cobalt TAA was demonstrated to be an active oxygen dissolution reaction catalyst; bonded cobalt TAA was also demonstrated to be stable in a primary fuel cell with performance data obtained for a one month full cell test. Details of some of the key results and achievements are presented. Cobalt TAA bonded to Vulcan XC-72 was shown to be stable in 150/sup 0/C concentrated phosphoric acid for periods of over one month. Cathodes fabricated from cobalt TAA bonded to Vulcan XC-72 were tested in primary fuel cells: preliminary tests showed that bonded-CoTAA has activity similar to platinum on a per weight metal basis; performance of 100 mA/cm/sup 2/ at 650 to 700 mV vs hydrogen was obtained at 110/sup 0/C with oxygen. Bonded-CoTAA catalyzed cathodes were tested in primary fuel cells for periods of up to one month and shown to provide stable performance at 110 to 130/sup 0/C. Bonding of TAA was shown to improve its catalytic performance.

Walsh, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in groundwater only at well GW01. No evidence of contamination was found in other monitoring wells and piezometers. This pattern is consistent with findings of previous investigations. The findings of the 2007 targeted investigation clearly demonstrate that the former CCC/USDA facility at Hilton was not the source of the carbon tetrachloride contamination persistently detected in well GW01. Well GW01 is approximately 300 ft upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. This well is the only sampling location at Hilton where carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater has ever been identified. The CCC/USDA never operated grain storage facilities on the property on which well GW01 is located.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

365

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 2: Results from the Controlled Cooking Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five charcoal cookstoves were tested using a Controlled Cooking Test (CCT) developed from cooking practices in Haiti. Cookstoves were tested for total burn time, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and the ratio of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO{sub 2}). These results are presented in this report along with LBNL testers observations regarding the usability of the stoves.

Lask, Kathleen; Jones, Jennifer; Booker, Kayje; Ceballos, Cristina; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect

During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensees final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

S.J. Roberts

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

OECD/NEA Agesta Decontamination Project. Phase 1, final report. Volume 1. Project description and overview of results  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Agesta Decontamination Project, which has been organized by the Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris, is to utilize the four primary loops of the Agesta reactor to demonstrate decontamination methods for PWR primary systems. The first phase of the project consisted of laboratory scale tests. The test programme consisted of decontamination tests on steam generator tubing and other active material from Agesta and number of operating reactors as well as material compatibility tests on standardized samples of a representative selection of modern PWR primary system materials. The results show that all six processes in general met the acceptance criteria both regarding decontamination and corrosion. The decontamination results with the hard chemistries were rather uneven. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Inlet Air Spray Cooler for Gas Turbine Power Augmentation: Plans, Specifications and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field tests on a commercial combustion turbine generator show that novel cooling technology economically augments power output. This report details the results and presents key spray cooler design parameters.

1997-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to raw plug-in hybrid vehicle dynamometer test results to better estimate PHEVs' in-use fuel and electricity consumption.

Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Carlson, R.; Smart, J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A...

373

On the System Dependency of Satellite Sounding Impact-Comments on Recent Impact Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As shown by the Data Systems Test results, the impact of satellite temperature soundings on numerical weather prediction is highly dependent on the particular analysis and forecast system used to incorporate the data. The more amenable a system ...

M. S. Tracton; A. J. Desmaris; R. J. van Haaren; R. D. McPherson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Feasibility test on compounding the internal combustion engine for automotive vehicles, Task II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The organic Rankine bottoming cycle can be considered for various automobile and truck applications. The most attractive use, however, is in large, heavy-duty diesel trucks for long distance hauling. Here, the engine load and speed requirements are nearly constant over a large portion of the operating hours, and high mileages are accumulated. Thus, the potential fuel savings are sufficient to justify the added cost of a bottoming cycle system. A conceptual design study of compounding the diesel truck engine with an ORCS was made and the results of the study are presented. Based on the results of the conceptual design study which showed a 15 percent fuel economy improvement potential over the duty cycle, an early feasibility demonstration test of the system was initiated. The demonstration system uses a Mack ENDT 676 diesel engine with existing but nonoptimum ORCS hardware made available from an earlier automotive Rankine-cycle program. The results of these feasibility demonstration tests, both steady-state and transient, over the operating range of the diesel engine, are presented.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Variability in energy factor test results for residential electric water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Recent modifications to the minimum energy efficiency requirements for residential water heaters have spurred an investigation into the variability in testing high-efficiency electric water heaters. While initial inter-laboratory comparisons showed excellent agreement between test results from different labs, subsequent inter-laboratory comparisons show differences between measured energy factors of up to 0.040. To determine the source of these differences, analyses of various parts of the test procedure are performed. For one case studied, the uncertainty in test results can be as high as +-0.028 if instrument accuracies reach the minimum level allowed in the test procedure. Other areas of the test procedure where variability is introduced are the optional use of pre-draws, the location of the lower tank temperature-measuring device, the use of insulation on tank fittings, and the use of a warm-up period before the simulated-use test commences. The implications of these issues on test results are provided.

Healy, William; Lutz, James D.; Lekov, Alex

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Detailed design, fabrication and testing of an engineering prototype compensated pulsed alternator. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, fabrication, and test results of a prototype compensated pulsed alternator are discussed. The prototype compulsator is a vertical shaft single phase alternator with a rotating armature and salient pole stator. The machine is designed for low rep rate pulsed duty and is sized to drive a modified 10 cm Beta amplifier. The load consists of sixteen 15 mm x 20 mm x 112 cm long xenon flashlamps connected in parallel. The prototype compulsator generates an open circuit voltage of 6 kV, 180 Hz, at a maximum design speed of 5400 rpm. At maximum speed, the inertial energy stored in the compulsator rotor is 3.4 megajoules.

Bird, W.L. Jr.; Woodson, H.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Preliminary results of the US pool-boiling coils from the IFSMTF full-array tests  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Task to develop superconducting magnets for fusion reactors, is now in the midst of full-array tests in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Included in the test array are two pool-boiling coils designed and fabricated by US manufacturers, General Dynamics/Convair Division and General Electric/Union Carbide Corporation. So far, both coils have been energized to full design currents in the single-coil tests, and the General Dynamics coil has reached the design point in the first Standard-I full-array test. Both coils performed well in the charging experiments. Extensive heating tests and the heavy instrumentation of these coils have, however, revealed some generic limitations of large pool-boiling superconducting coils. Details of these results and their analyses are reported.

Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Subject: Results of Test 5 on Bonded Jacket Electric Cables Dear Satish:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As you know, we have recently completed the fifth test in our research program on low-voltage electric cables (JCN W-6465). The objective of this test was to determine if bonded jacket cables have any unique failure mechanisms that are not present in unbondedjacket cables. To achieve this objective, EPR insulated cables with both a bonded and unbonded CSPE jacket were preaged and accident tested. The cables were manufactured by Okonite, Samuel Moore, and Anaconda. As a result of this test, one of the two Okonite cables preaged to simulate 20 years of qualified life, and three of the three Okonite cables preaged to simulate 40 years of qualified life failed catastrophically by splitting open. These results call into question the qualification basis for these cables. The Samuel Moore and Anaconda cables performed acceptably. The enclosed letter report documents the findings of this test. If you have any questions on this, please contact me. Sincerely,

Mr. Satish; K. Aggarwal; Robert J. Lofaro; S. Carfagno; E. Grove

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) began testing small wind turbines (SWTs) through the Independent Testing project. Using competitive solicitation, five SWTs were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's NWTC is accredited by the American Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) to conduct duration, power performance, safety and function, power quality, and noise tests to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. Results of the tests conducted on each of the SWTs are or will be available to the public on the NREL website. The results could be used by their manufacturers in the certification of the turbines or state agencies to decide which turbines are eligible for state incentives.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development and testing of a wastewater recycler and heater. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of this program have demonstrated the feasibility of an automatic and self-contained appliance that can recover and store usable hot water from waste laundry water, using essentially the same amount of energy as an equivalent-capacity water heater. It has been shown by extended evaluation tests with a waste stream of real laundry water that this unit is capable of recovering sterile hot water at a steady state rate of 22.7 liters/hour (6 gph) with a specific energy draw of 79 watt-hours/liter (299 watt-hours/gal), without the use of any expendable chemicals. It has also been shown by extended evaluation tests with a feed that simulates hospital wastewater preconcentrated by ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis that this unit can increase the solids concentration of a waste water from less than 2% to at least 29.3%. The results of a manufacturing cost analysis have shown that a conservative annual cost (that is, a maximum annual cost) of this appliance is $717 per year. Economic feasibility therefore is not demonstrable at present on a large scale. However, should water cost increase or the cost of the appliance decrease, a viable demand for household water recovery with the appliance would be possible.

Guarino, V.J.; Bambenek, R.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Forecast of thermal-hydrological conditions and air injection test results of the single heater test at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESF Single Heater Test, Sandia National Laboratories Letterthe Single Heater Test by Sandia (Sobolik et al. , 1996).the Single Heater Test by Sandia (Sobolik etal. , 1996). cap

Birkholzer, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed that the HGS fluids act similarly to conventional fluids and that they have potential application in many areas, including underbalanced drilling, completions, and riserless drilling. Early field tests under this project are encouraging. These led to limited tests by industry (which are also described). Further field tests and cost analyses are needed to demonstrate the viability of HGS fluids in different applications. Once their effectiveness is demonstrated, they should find widespread application and should significantly reduce drilling costs and increase oil and gas production rates. A number of important oilfield applications for HGS outside of Underbalanced Drilling were identified. One of these--Dual Gradient Drilling (DGD) for deepwater exploration and development--is very promising. Investigative work on DGD under the project is reported, along with definition of a large joint-industry project resulting from the work. Other innovative products/applications are highlighted in the report including the use of HGS as a cement additive.

William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Studies of participants in nuclear tests. Final report, 1 September 1978-31 October 1984  

SciTech Connect

A study of mortality, by cause of death, was done on a cohort of 46,186 participants in one or more of five test series. The series studied were UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE (1953) and PLUMBBOB (1957) at the Nevada Test Site, and GREENHOUSE (1951), CASTLE (1954), and REDWING (1956) which were conducted at the Pacific Proving Ground at Enewetak and Bikini. The participants were traced individually by the use of Veterans Administration records. For the participants in each series, the number of deaths attributed to particular causes was compared with the number expected to occur at US cause- and age-specific mortality rates. A total of 5113 deaths from all causes was ascertained; this was 11.1% of the number of participants. The number was, however, only 83.5% of the number expected at US mortality rates. Mortality from leukemia among the 3554 participants at SMOKY - 10 deaths below age 85 - were 2.5 times the expected number. When the leukemia deaths are compared to other deaths in all six data sets, the differences among the series are not significant. No cancer other than leukemia was ascertained to have occurred in significant excess among SMOKY participants and the number of deaths from other cancers (67) was less than the number expected at population rates (83.8). The total body of evidence cannot convincingly either affirm or deny that the higher than statistically expected incidence of leukemia among SMOKY participants (or of prostate cancer among REDWING participants) is the result of radiation exposure incident to the tests. 19 refs., 27 tabs.

Robinette, C.D.; Jablon, S.; Preston, T.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Godchaux Well No. 1, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Godchaux Well No. 1 was originally drilled too a total depth of 16,000 feet in January, 1981 by C and K Petroleum, Inc. and was temporarily abandoned. The well was re-entered by Eaton on 6 August 1981 in an effort to clean out the original open hole below the 7-5/8 inch liner and test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure was estimated to be 14,480 psi, and the temperature of the formation water was expected to be 298/sup 0/F. The water salinity was predicted to be 70,000 ppM. The well was expected to produce up to 20,000 BWPD, was a gas content of 44 SCF per barrel. An optional test of a zone from 14,905 to 15,006 feet was also proposed in the detailed completion prognosis, which preceded the attempted test. In the process of drilling the cement plug set by the original operators, the drill string became side-tracked from the original hole. While drilling at 14,510 feet a severe loss of circulation of drilling fluid occurred through a hole in the intermediate casing. The reduction in hydrostatic head resulting from lost circulation caused the open hole to close around and stick the drill string. Efforts to repair the intermediate casing and return to normal operations were estimated to be prohibitively expensive in view of the expected poor probability of success; accordingly, the decision to plug and abandon was carried out on September 12, 1981.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Test Project: Honeywell Technology Strategy Center. Final report, Volume 2. Engineering field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS solar cooling system at Arizona Public Service Company in Phoenix, Arizona, was subjected to engineering field testing for a period of 18 months. Although some problems arose, which is typical with a new engineering model, the system generally ran well. This document describes the work completed in all three phases of this program, which included the preliminary analysis and detailed design of the solar cooling system, installation, testing, and data analysis.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid for Energy Recovery Linac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID FOR ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC* R. Gupta # , M. Anerella, I. Ben-Zvi, G. Ganetis, D. Kayran, G. McIntyre, J. Muratore, S. Plate and W. Sampson, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 USA and M. Cole and D. Holmes, Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medord, NY, 11763 USA Abstract An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at ~77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the

391

Structure test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at gradients well below expectations from single cavity tests. The papers and presentations listed here illustrate some recent work on the topic. SLAC meeting notes are found here. Overview - Basic understanding of the role of particulate contaminants (Hasan Padamsee, PAC97) Literature study - Field emission and high voltage breakdown - (presentation by D. Burke 1996) References listed in D. Burke summary: SLAC Breakdown in S-band structures (Loew and Wang 1988) High Gradient studies in structures (Loew and Wang 1990) High Gradient tests (Wang et.al. 1994) Properties of Periodic Accelerating Structures for Linear Colliders (Wang 1989) Field emission in high gradient structures - (Loew and Wang -School 1997)

392

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

396

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Simulation Test for Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Mike Kennedy Mike D. Kennedy, Inc. Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (3.9 MB) This document is intended for use with the following documents: Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), NREL/TP-550-47427 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX, NREL/TP-550-47502 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52414 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy

397

FINAL PERFORMANCE TESTS OF TWO-COOLANT-REGION SODIUM PUMP SHAFT FREEZE- SELAS  

SciTech Connect

A prototype of the two-coolant-region pump shaft freezeseals intended for application to the Hallam Power Reactor sodium pumps was fabricated. Tests under simulated reactor service conditions revealed satisfactory operation only when the lower of the two regions received heat from the circulating fluid (tetralin in the tests). With the inlet temperature of tetralin to the upper region of the seal maintained at 95 deg F and that to the lower region held in the range 240 to 285 deg F the sealfunctioned satisfactorily for 1100 hr. When 95 deg F coolant was circulated through both sections of the seal excessive cooling occurred, resulting in either improper formation of the seal or in seizure of the shaft when rotative speed was low. In this case, the cooling load on the seal varied directly with both shaft speed and bulk sodium temperature. A maximum cooling load of 2.56 kw occurred at a shaft speed of 840 rpm and with a bulk sodium temperature of 1000 deg F. (C.J.G.)

Streck, F.O.

1960-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Dynamic performance of packed-bed dehumidifiers: experimental results from the SERI desiccant test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussed are the design and construction of a desiccant test loop and results of tests with a silica-gel-packed bed. The test loop consists of two centrifugal fans, two duct heaters, a steam humidifier, 24.4m (80 ft) of 30-cm (12-in.) circular duct, instrumentation, and a test section. The loop is capable of testing adsorption and desorption modes at flow rates up to 0.340 kg/s (600 scfm) and at regeneration temperatures up to 120/sup 0/C (248/sup 0/F). Tests of a 74-cm(29-in.)-diameter, 3.2-cm(1.25-in.)-thick silica gel bed indicated that mass transfer occurs more readily in the adsorption direction than in the desorption direction. Pressure drop data indicated that the resistance of each of the two screens that hold the silica gel in place was equivalent to 2.5-cm(1-in.) of silica gel due to plugging. Results of the tests were also used to validate a SERI desiccant computer model, DESSIM.

Kutscher, C F; Barlow, R S

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Beam test results of the irradiated Silicon Drift Detector for ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Silicon Drift Detectors will equip two of the six cylindrical layers of high precision position sensitive detectors in the ITS of the ALICE experiment at LHC. In this paper we report the beam test results of a SDD irradiated with 1 GeV electrons. The aim of this test was to verify the radiation tolerance of the device under an electron fluence equivalent to twice particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation.

Kushpil, S; Giubellino, P; Idzik, M; Kolozhvari, A; Kushpil, V; Martnez, M I; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, A; Meddi, F; Nouais, D; Petracek, V; Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Wheadon, R; PH-TH

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Test results of heat-exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These tests evaluated flow-driven brushes, recirculating sponge rubber balls, chlorination, and mechanical system/chlorination combinations for in-situ cleaning of two potential heat exchanger materials: titanium and aluminum alloy 5052. Tests were successful when fouling resistance was <3.0 x 10/sup -4/ ft/sup 2/ hr-/sup 0/F/Btu. Results indicated systems and cleaning techniques using brushes, soft sponge balls, and various concentrations of chlorine had some potential for maintaining heat transfer efficiency.

Lott, D F

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing results final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EPRI/C-E PWR Safety Valve Test Report, Volume 10: Piping Structural Response Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI at the request of the PWR Utilities developed an overall program for the testing of PWR primary system safety and relief valves. This program was in response to NUREG 0578 Item 2.1.2 and NUREG 0737 Item II.D.l.A requirements.This report documents the results of safety valve testing performed as part of the overall program at the EPRI/C-E Valve Test Facility located at Combustion Engineering's Kreisinger Development Laboratory, Windsor, Connecticut. Seven safety valves ...

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

High-g shock test results of Tadiran TLM-1530MP cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April of 2009, testing was done of a high-g instrumentation device that utilized Tadiran TLM-1530MP cells as a power source. As a result of that testing, it was determined that those cells exhibit failure more often when shocked in the axial direction. No failures over many tests where found when the cells were shocked laterally. Moreover, when shocked laterally, the cells exhibited no observable degradation in performance. We looked at the failed cells via non-destructive x-ray analysis to determine what internal structures failed.

O'Malley, Patrick D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

Results of recent reactor-material tests on dispersal of oxide fuel from a disrupted core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations and related analyses are reported addressing the dispersal of molten oxide fuel from a disrupted core via various available pathways for the CRBR system. These investigations included the GAPFLOW tests in which pressure-driven and gravity drainage tests were performed using dispersal pathways mocking up the intersubassembly gaps, the CAMEL C6 and C7 tests in which molten fuel entered sodium-filled control assembly ducts under prototypic thermal-hydraulic conditions, and the Lower Internals Drainage (LID) tests in which molten fuel drained downward through simulated below-core structure (orifice plate stacks) as the bottom of control assembly ducts. The results of SHOTGUN tests addressing basic freezing of molten UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2//metal mixtures flowing through circular tubes are also reported. Test results have invariably shown the existance of stable UO/sub 2/ crusts on the inside surfaces of the flow paths. Appreciable removal of fuel was indicated prior to freezing-induced immobilization. Application of heat transfer models based upon the presence of stable, insulating fuel crusts tends to overpredict the removal process.

Spencer, B.W.; Wilson, R.J.; Vetter, D.L.; Erickson, E.G.; Dewey, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Short and long-term tests of elastomers with hot hostile fluids. Environmental Compatibility Test Program final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Equipment manufacturers and elastomer houses were called to find the best currently available high-temperature elastomers. Tensile specimens of 46 such compounds were immersion tested for five days in six 190C fluids of interest: isobutane, brine, ASTM No. 1 oil, ASTM No. 3 oil, Pacer DHT-185M synthetic oil, and Chevron Cylinder Grade 460X oil. The best eight were selected based upon the least change in mechanical properties. These eight were then simultaneously tested (a) by immersion in five 190C fluids for six months and (b) as 0-rings for 46 hours at 190C, 230C, and 265C (accelerated ageing) in three fluids and at a differential pressure of 21 MPa. Based upon these 0-ring tests, four compounds were selected for testing as 0-rings in three 204C fluids at 21 MPa differential pressure. The data were evaluated and conclusions were drawn. Conclusions and recommendations are provided. There was immersion testing of primarily L'Garde compounds in brine and CL3 mineral oil for 6 months at 190C. L'Garde had formulated several compounds specifically for 260C brine, and their applicability to a specific problem was assessed early in the program.

Friese, G.J.

1982-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O' Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology  

SciTech Connect

Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power's DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.

Provol, S.J.; Dryden, R.J. (Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power`s DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.

Provol, S.J.; Dryden, R.J. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O'Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) Test Case Implementation Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final report for the project. This project was designed to demonstrate the use of the Radiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) radiation detection transport modeling package (developed in a previous NA-22 project) for specific radiation detection scenarios important to proliferation detection.

Shaver, Mark W.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z