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1

PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

Burnett, David

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options Format Test Information 1. Enter a Name for the Test. 2. Choose a color for the title text of the Test. (Optional) 3. Enter a Description in the Text Box. The description is visible to Students before they click on the link to take the Test. (Optional) 4. If you want

Xu, Shouhuai

3

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

Stowell, Michael

5

Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40%) with coal.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Navigating Career Options PRE-TEST AND POST-TEST ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Navigating Career Options PRE-TEST AND POST-TEST ANALYSIS Winter 2014 SUBJECTS: Undergraduate students enrolled in GENSTD 350-D "Navigating Career Options" course QUARTER: Winter 2014, pre-test given in week 1, post-test given during finals week SAMPLE SIZE: Fifty-eight students who took both the pre-test

Manchak, John

8

Navigating Career Options PRE-TEST AND POST-TEST ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Navigating Career Options PRE-TEST AND POST-TEST ANALYSIS Spring 2013 SUBJECTS: Undergraduate students enrolled in GENSTD 350-D "Navigating Career Options" course QUARTER: Spring 2013, pre-test given in week 1, post-test given during finals week SAMPLE SIZE: Sixty-nine students who took both the pre-test

Manchak, John

9

Navigating Career Options PRE-TEST AND POST-TEST ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Navigating Career Options PRE-TEST AND POST-TEST ANALYSIS Spring 2014 SUBJECTS: Undergraduate students enrolled in GENSTD 350-D "Navigating Career Options" course QUARTER: Spring 2014, pre-test given in week 1, post-test given during finals week SAMPLE SIZE: Sixty-four students who took both the pre-test

Manchak, John

10

Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

Howden, G.F.

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Technology Options for a Fast Spectrum Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory has evaluated technology options for a new fast spectrum reactor to meet the fast-spectrum irradiation requirements for the USDOE Generation IV (Gen IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. The US currently has no capability for irradiation testing of large volumes of fuels or materials in a fast-spectrum reactor required to support the development of Gen IV fast reactor systems or to demonstrate actinide burning, a key element of the AFCI program. The technologies evaluated and the process used to select options for a fast irradiation test reactor (FITR) for further evaluation to support these programmatic objectives are outlined in this paper.

D. M. Wachs; R. W. King; I. Y. Glagolenko; Y. Shatilla

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a cask’s internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Report Title: PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051SoilWindFraud to theReport Title:

15

Bearing options, including design and testing, for direct drive linear generators in wave energy converters   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The key focus of this research was to investigate the bearing options most suited to operation in a novel direct drive linear generator. This was done through bearing comparisons, modelling and testing. It is fundamental ...

Caraher, Sarah

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biomass pretreatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reaching corporate sustainability goals requires new thinking, testing options, and a diverse skill set.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reaching corporate sustainability goals requires new thinking, testing options, and a diverse Students from multiple disciplines design an innovative approach to solving a sustainability problem from a triple bottom line perspective. Technical skills are combined with a more comprehensive sustainability

Stuart, Josh

18

Moving Granular-Bed Filter Development Program, Option 1 - Component Test Facilities - Test Plan; topical report, September 8, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test plan has been devised for Option 1 Contract period that focuses on the remaining SMGBF technical issues for the purpose of optimizing the SMGBF performance and generating key process performance data needed to promote the continued development of the technology. These technical issues have been identified and ranked in the Task 8, Technical Tradeoffs and Issues Report, submitted to DOE in May, 1994. Three activities are defined in this test plan to address the key issues identified: the first activity performs engineering modeling and design evaluation to Support the test activities; the second activity is directed toward SMGBF cold flow model testing; and the third activity is directed toward high- temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) SMGBF testing. All of the activities are directed toward Recycle SMGBF, although much of it also applies to Once-Through SMGBF.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten-rhenium and platinum rhodium thermocouples can be avoided. INL is also developing an Ultrasonic Thermometry (UT) capability. In addition to small size, UT’s offer several potential advantages over other temperature sensors. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, potentially allowing monitoring of temperatures up to 3000 C. In addition, because no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length. As discussed in this paper, the suite of temperature monitors offered by INL is not only available to ATR users, but also to users at other MTRs.

J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Disposal configuration options for future uses of greater confinement disposal at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of a variety of radioactive and mixed wastes, some of which are considered special-case waste because they do not currently have a clear disposal option. The DOE`s Nevada Field Office contracted with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of disposing of some of this special-case waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). As part of this investigation, a review of a near-surface and subsurface disposal options that was performed to develop alternative disposal configurations for special-case waste disposal at the NTS. The criteria for the review included (1) configurations appropriate for disposal at the NTS; (2) configurations for disposal of waste at least 100 ft below the ground surface; (3) configurations for which equipment and technology currently exist; and (4) configurations that meet the special requirements imposed by the nature of special-case waste. Four options for subsurface disposal of special-case waste are proposed: mined consolidated rock, mined alluvium, deep pits or trenches, and deep boreholes. Six different methods for near-surface disposal are also presented: earth-covered tumuli, above-grade concrete structures, trenches, below-grade concrete structures, shallow boreholes, and hydrofracture. Greater confinement disposal (GCD) in boreholes at least 100 ft deep, similar to that currently practiced at the GCD facility at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the NTS, was retained as the option that met the criteria for the review. Four borehole disposal configurations are proposed with engineered barriers that range from the native alluvium to a combination of gravel and concrete. The configurations identified will be used for system analysis that will be performed to determine the disposal configurations and wastes that may be suitable candidates for disposal of special-case wastes at the NTS.

Price, L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 3, Test plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the base contract, Combustion Power Co. developed commercial designs for a moving granular-bed filter (GBF). The proposed filter is similar to previous designs in terms of its shape and method of filtration. The commercial designs have scaled the filter from a 5 ft diameter to as large as a 20 ft diameter filter. In Task 2 of the Moving Bed-Granular Filter Development Program, all technical concerns related to the further development of the filter are identified. These issues are discussed in a Topical Report which has been issued as part of Task 2. Nineteen issues are identified in this report. Along with a discussion of these issues are the planned approaches for resolving each of these issues. These issues will be resolved in either a cold flow component test facility or in pilot scale testing at DOE`s Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located at Southem Company Services` Wilsonville facility. Task 3 presents a test plan for resolving those issues which can be addressed in component test facilities. The issues identified in Task 2 which will be addressed in the component test facilities are: GBF scale-up; effect of filter cone angle and sidewall materials on medium flow and ash segregation; maximum gas filtration rate; lift pipe wear; GBF media issues; mechanical design of the gas inlet duct; and filter pressure drop. This document describes a test program to address these issues, with testing to be performed at Combustion Power Company`s facility in Belmont, California.

Haas, J.C.; Purdhomme, J.W.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An updated dose assesment for resettlement options at Bikini atoll - A US nuclear test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radio nuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1978. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, {sup 137}Cs produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 91 mSv, 130 mSv, and 150 mSv, respectively. A detailed uncertainty analysis for these dose estimates is presented in a companion paper in this issue. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5 % of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences. We have calculated the dose for the rehabilitation scenario where the top 40 cm of soil is removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island is treated with potassium fertilizer; the maximum annual effective dose is 0.41 mSv and the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.8 mSv, 14 mSv, and 16 mSv, respectively. 44 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Bearing options, including design and testing, for direct drive linear generators in wave energy converters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The key focus of this research was to investigate the bearing options most suited to operation in a novel direct drive linear generator. This was… (more)

Caraher, Sarah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Final Report - Assessment of Testing Options for the NTR at the INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main technologies that can be developed to dramatically enhance the human exploration of space is the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Several studies over the past thirty years have shown that the NTR can reduce the cost of a lunar outpost, reduce the risk of a human mission to Mars, enable fast transits for most missions throughout the solar system, and reduce the cost and time for robotic probes to deep space. Three separate committees of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences have recommended that NASA develop the NTR. One of the primary issues in development of the NTR is the ability to verify a flight ready unit. Three main methods can be used to validate safe operation of a NTR: 1) Full power, full duration test in an above ground facility that scrubs the rocket exhaust clean of any fission products; 2) Full power , full duration test using the Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) technique to capture the exhaust in subsurface strata; 3) Test of the reactor fuel at temperature and power density in a driver reactor with subsequent first test of the fully integrated NTR in space. The first method, the above ground facility, has been studied in the past. The second method, SAFE, has been examined for application at the Nevada Test Site. The third method relies on the fact that the Nuclear Furnace series of tests in 1971 showed that the radioactive exhaust coming from graphite based fuel for the NTR could be completely scrubbed of fission products and the clean hydrogen flared into the atmosphere. Under funding from the MSFC, the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) at the Idaho National laboratory (INL) has completed a reexamination of Methods 2 and 3 for implementation at the INL site. In short, the effort performed the following: 1) Assess the geology of the INL site and determine a location suitable SAFE testing; 2) Perform calculations of gas transport throughout the geology; 3) Produce a cost estimate of a non-nuclear , sub-scale test using gas injection to validate the computational models; 4) Produce a preliminary cost estimate to build a nuclear furnace equivalent facility to test NTR fuel on a green field location on the INL site. The results show that the INL geology is substantially better suited to the SAFE testing method than the NTS site. The existence of impermeable interbeds just above the sub-surface aquifer ensure that no material from the test, radioactive or not, can enter the water table. Similar beds located just below the surface will prevent any gaseous products from reaching the surface for dispersion. The extremely high permeability of the strata between the interbeds allows rapid dispersion of the rocket exhaust. In addition, the high permeability suggests that a lower back-pressure may develop in the hole against the rocket thrust, which increases safety of operations. Finally, the cost of performing a sub-scale, non-nuclear verification experiment was determined to be $3M. The third method was assessed through discussions with INL staff resident at the site. In essence, any new Category I facility on any DOE site will cost in excess of $250M. Based on the results of this study, a cost estimate for testing a nuclear rocket at the INL site appears to be warranted. Given the fact that a new nuclear fuel may be possible that does not release any fission products, the SAFE testing option appears to be the most affordable.

Howe, Steven D; McLing, Travis L; McCurry, Michael; Plummer, Mitchell A

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modeling and Experimental Tests on the Hydraulically Driven Control Rod option for IRIS Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adoption of Internal Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (ICRDMs) represents a valuable alternative to classical, external CRDMs based on electro-magnetic devices, as adopted in current PWRs. The advantages on the safety features of the reactor are apparent: inherent elimination of the Rod Ejection accidents and of possible concerns about the vessel head penetrations. A further positive feedback on the design is the reduction of the primary system overall dimensions. Within the frame of the ICRDM concepts, the Hydraulically Driven Control Rod solution is investigated as a possible option for the IRIS integral reactor. After a brief comparison of the solutions currently proposed for integral reactors, the configuration of the Hydraulic Control Rod device for IRIS, made up by an external movable piston and an internal fixed cylinder, is described. A description of the whole control system is reported as well. Particular attention is devoted to the Control Rod profile characterization, performed by means of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The investigation of the system behavior has been carried out, including the dynamic equilibrium and its stability properties, the withdrawal and insertion step movement and the sensitivity study on command time periods. A suitable dynamic model has been set up for the mentioned purposes: the models corresponding to the various Control Rod system devices have been written in an Object-Oriented language (Modelica), thus allowing an easy implementation of such a system into the simulator for the whole reactor. Finally, a preliminary low pressure, low temperature, reduced length experimental facility has been built. Tests on HDCR stability and operational transients have been performed. The results are compared with the dynamic system model and CFD simulation model, showing good agreement between simulations and experimental data. During these preliminary tests, the control system performed correctly, allowing stable dynamic equilibrium positions for the Control Rod and stable behavior during withdrawal and insertion steps. (authors)

Cammi, Antonio; Ricotti, Marco E.; Vitulo, Alessia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio, 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Pretreatment Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology plan presents a strategy for the identification, evaluation, and development of technologies for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This strategy includes deployment of facilities and process development schedules to support the other program elements. This document also presents schedule information for alternative pretreatment systems: (1) the reference pretreatment technology development system, (2) an enhanced pretreatment technology development system, and (3) alternative pretreatment technology development systems.

Barker, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US); Thornhill, C.K.; Holton, L.K. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

For assistance, contact the Instructional Resource Center, irchelp@uconn.edu; (860)486-5052 Summary of Recommended Settings for Test Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Recommended Settings for Test Options Enter a "Display After" date for the start of the availability period Do for "Do not allow students to start Test if due date passed" Display Dates and Due Date: Rationale: This combination of settings will determine a start date for the test and enforce an end date. In addition

Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

31

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

GREET Pretreatment Module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. This report documents the material and energy flows that occur when fermentable sugars from four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar) are produced via dilute acid pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion. These flows are documented for inclusion in the pretreatment module of the Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. Process simulations of each pretreatment technology were developed in Aspen Plus. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in the GREET pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

Adom, Felix K.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

MAY TH

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

SU-E-J-97: Pretreatment Test and Post-Treatment Evaluation for Iso-NTCP Dose Guided Adapive Radiotherapy (DGART), Experience with Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Rectal Balloons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To explore the feasibility of pretreatment test for iso-NTCP DGART and to compare the pretreatment test results with post-treatment evaluations. Methods: NTCP here refers to late rectal wall toxicity only and is calculated with the ring rectal wall DVH. Simulation for one time iso- NTCP DGART starts after half of the total dose was done for 10 patients to investigate if TCP gains could be achieved. Six patients were treated using a 12-fraction 4.3Gy technique and four using 16-fraction 3.63Gy technique. For each of the 12-fraction cases a VMAT plan was generated in Pinnacle3™ using the daily CT obtained prior to the 6th fraction. A pretreatment simulation was performed using only the first 6 daily CTs. The idea is to add the 6 original plan delivered doses with 6 DGART plan delivered doses by deformable dose accumulation (DDA) on each of the first 6 CTs, resulting in 6 rectal wall doses (RWDs) and NTCPs. The 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for the 6 NTCPs were computed.The posttreatment evaluation was done by: a) copy the DGART plan to 6 CTs for fraction 7–12 and calculate the 6 actual DGART delivered fractional doses; b) sum the 6 actual DGART doses with the 6 original plan delivered doses by DDA on each of the 12 CTs resulting in 12 post-treatment RWDs and NTCPs; c) boxplot the 12 post-treatment NTCPs. Results: Target dose gain is 0.76–1.93 Gy. The 95%CI widths of the pretreatment tests NTCPs were 1.1–2.7%. For 5 patients, the planned NTCP fell within the 95%CI. For 4 patients, the planned NTCP was lower than the 95%CI lines. Post-treatment results show that for 7 patients, the upper quartile was within the 95%CI; for 2 patients, the upper quartile were higher than the 95%CI. Conclusion: The pretreatment test yields conservative prediction of the actual delivered NTCP.

Yu, J [The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Thomas Jefferson UniversityHospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hardcastle, N [The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Bender, E [The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Jeong, K [The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Xiao, Y; Ritter, M [Thomas Jefferson UniversityHospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tome', M [The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

Huber, Heinz J.

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

Financing Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A growing variety of options are available for financing an LED street lighting replacement program. One or another approach may be preferable based on the system ownership and maintenance model in...

40

REFEREED PAPER PRE-TREATMENT OF REFINERY FINAL RUN-OFF FOR CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the case of a back-end refinery, the final run-off or return syrup of 92-95 % purity and 75 ° brix is generally returned to the raw mill to be combined with raw syrup and boiled in the A-pans. Approximately 8 % of the input raw sugar brix into a refinery is returned, consequently locking up A-pan capacity and, in the case of a factory with marginal pan capacity, cane throughput is restricted. In addition, energy consumption is increased and sugar losses in final molasses are elevated. A number of processes have been considered to eliminate recycling refinery run-off, most of which require pre-treatment and/or high capital investment with a high degree of commercial risk. Test work was undertaken at the Tsb Malalane cane sugar refinery to determine the optimal pre-treatment option for decolorising and softening refinery return syrup. The pre-treatment results indicate that chemical softening, followed by the addition of a cationic colour precipitant and pH adjustment with sulphur dioxide, yields appreciable calcium reduction and modest decolourisation. The overall benefit indicates that the treated final run-off is of suitable quality to apply another crystallisation step and/or alternatively consider for further purification by chromatographic separation and/or resin decolourisation.

Singh I; Stolz Hnp; Ndhlala T

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

What's the Option?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option value. Second, the real options literature developed1994) spread the work on real options analysis to a broadis known as the real options approach. Translated into our

Traeger, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biomass shock pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIan KalinResearch,IntroducingIonic Liquid Pretreatment EERE

44

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment of biomass solids at different temperatures.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline peroxide pretreated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grant Western Regional Center Summary: performed tests on Douglas fir and hybrid poplar biomass to identify the effect of pretreatment conditions... of alkaline elements and a...

47

Introduction to Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Options give the agricultural industry a flexible pricing tool to assist in price risk managment. This publication defines an option and gives a brief introduction to this tool....

Mintert, James R.; Welch, Mark

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Calcium hydroxide pretreatment of biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROXIDE RECOVERY DATA. . . . . . 135 138 142 . . . . . 148 . . . . . 150 . . . . . 153 156 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Methods used for pretreatment of lignocellulosics. . . . . . . . 15 2. Ammoniation conditions used by previous workers...C-pH diagram for a carbonate solution. 32 12. Flow diagram for continuous calcium hydroxide recovery. . . 13. A tree of possible experimental conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. Sugar yields obtained from ammoniated bagasse...

Nagwani, Murlidhar

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effect of Acid, Alkali, and Steam Explosion Pretreatments on Characteristics of Bio-Oil Produced from Pinewood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bio-oil produced from pinewood by fast pyrolysis has the potential to be a valuable substitute for fossil fuels. Pretreatment prior to the fast pyrolysis process has been shown to alter the structure and chemical composition of biomass. To determine the influence of biomass pretreatments on bio-oil produced during fast pyrolysis, we tested three pretreatment methods: dilute acid, dilute alkali, and steam explosion. Bio-oils were produced from untreated and pretreated pinewood feedstocks in an auger reactor at 450 C. The bio-oils�¢���� physical properties including pH, water content, acid value, density, viscosity, and heating value were measured. Chemical characteristics of the bio-oils were determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Results showed that bio-oil yield and composition were influenced by biomass pretreatment. Of the three pretreatment methods, 1%H2SO4 pretreatment resulted in the highest bio-oil yield and best bio-oil quality.

Wang, Hui; Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Yu, Fei; Steele, Philip; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Impacts of project management on real option values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduces the value of real options. The example of resource allocation is used to test this hypothesis. Based on the results, it is concluded that project management reduces the value of real options by reducing variance of the exercise signal...

Bhargav, Shilpa Anandrao

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

OPTIONS for ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIONS for ENERGY EFFICIENCY in EXISTING BUILDINGS December 2005 CEC-400-2005-039-CMF;OPTIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY in EXISTING BUILDINGS COMMISSION REPORT TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................iii California's Successful Energy Efficiency Programs

53

Natural Gas Purchasing Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

Watkins, G.

54

TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

7-DESIGN-047 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007...

56

Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

57

Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale...

58

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Broszkiewicz-Suwaj, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high was provided to low temperature pretreatment. In contrast, lignin removal for pretreatment with hot water

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Physics & Astronomy Degree options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

148 Physics & Astronomy Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics MPhys (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics Theoretical Physics BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Physics) Theoretical Physics and Mathematics MSci (Joint Honours Degree) Physics and Chemistry Entrance Requirements

Brierley, Andrew

64

Mathematics & Degree options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

132 Mathematics & Statistics Degree options MMath (Single Honours Degrees) Mathematics Applied Mathematics Pure Mathematics Statistics BSc or MA (Single Honours Degrees) Mathematics Statistics [If you wish (Joint Honours Degrees) Mathematics and one of: Biology Chemistry Computer Science Economics Geography

Brierley, Andrew

65

Cogeneration System Design Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, engine, turbine, generator, switchgear, and balance of plant can be bewildering. This paper presents an overview and a systematic approach to the basic system alternatives and attributes. The presentation illustrates how these options match the electrical...

Gilbert, J. S.

66

Assessing Renewable Energy Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies should assess renewable energy options for each specific project when integrating renewable energy in new building construction or major renovations. This section covers the preliminary screening, screening, feasibility study, and sizing and designing systems phases.

67

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nevada Transportatoion Options Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence of rail is restricted to approximately twelve, without upgrading public highways. There is high uncertainty as to what road upgrades and security/escorts the Nevada Department of Transportation would require to obtain an overweight/overdimensional permit. In addition, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has indicated that a larger cask weight than that analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement may be required for naval shipments, resulting in additional costs for heavy-haul transport. These uncertainties result in a high cost and schedule risk. Option 3 assumes that the start of rail construction will be delayed until after construction authorization is received from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Similar to Option 2, Option 3 uses legal-weight truck shipments and limited heavy haul truck shipments to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as Option 1, until rail becomes available. By using heavy-haul truck for two years, Option 3 contains the same uncertainties and resultant high cost and schedule risk as Option 2. The cost and schedule of legal-weight truck transport are not included in this report as that will be evaluated in the report on national transportation.

P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Economics & Finance Degree options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

98 Economics & Finance Degree options MA or BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Applied Economics Economics Financial Economics BA (International Honours Degree) Economics (See page 51) MA or BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Economics and one of: Geography Management Mathematics MA (Joint Honours Degrees

Brierley, Andrew

73

Sustainable Office Lighting Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

74

Computer Science Degree options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

82 Computer Science Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degree) Computer Science BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Computer Science and one of: Economics Logic and Philosophy of Science Management Management Science MSci (Single Honours Degree) Computer Science Entrance Requirements (see also pages 164 - 205

Brierley, Andrew

75

Fuels options conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the Fuels Options Conference held May 9-10, 1995 in Atlanta, Georgia are presented. Twenty-three papers were presented at the conference that dealt with fuels outlook; unconventional fuels; fuel specification, purchasing, and contracting; and waste fuels applications. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Idaho's Energy Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is provided as an introduction to and an update of the status of technologies for the generation and use of energy. Its purpose is to provide information useful for identifying and evaluating Idaho’s energy options, and for developing and implementing Idaho’s energy direction and policies.

Robert M. Neilson

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

OVERVIEW OF CONTRACTING OPTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW OF CONTRACTING OPTIONS Presented by Bill McNally July 24, 2012 #12;National Aeronautics and Space Administration Selecting the Right Contract Type · Objective ­ Negotiate a contract type and price a Contract Type · What are your acquisition's objectives? ­ New program? ­ Existing program? (Historical

Waliser, Duane E.

78

Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate the laboratory procedure is a valid indica-Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be incorporated into the conventional RF design (a Option 8 High-efficiency fan motor single fan-forced evaporator heat load. Adaptive condensate at the door gaskets were estimated by ..zeroing defrost, efficient fan the laboratory procedure is a valid indica- Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a tion of energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

79

Factors Affecting Option Premium Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices or buyers against ris- ing prices. A put option allows producers to establish a price floor or minimum selling price. With a put the producer can benefit from a price rally. The buyer of a put option pays an option premium but does not have... to establish a margin account. For this premium, the put option buyer has the right, but not the obliga- tion, to sell a futures contract at a predetermined price known as the ?strike? price. Call Options Call options protect buyers from rising prices...

Johnson, Jason; Smith, Jackie; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Waller, Mark L.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime...

Meysing, Daniel

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price Jin-Chuan Duan, Yazhen Wang that as the time interval between two consecutive observations shrinks to zero, a properly constructed GARCH model will weakly converge to a bivariate diffusion. Naturally the European option price under the GARCH model

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

83

Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price Jin-Chuan Duan National constructed GARCH model will weakly converge to a bi- variate diffusion. Naturally the European option price under the GARCH model will also converge to its bivariate diffusion counterpart. This paper investigates

Wang, Yazhen

84

Hedging With a Put Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, corn options delivery months are December, March, May, July and September. Cotton delivery months are December, March, May, July, and October. Strike Price A put option is tied to a predetermined price level, in the underlying delivery month, at which...

Anderson, Carl; Smith, Jackie; McCorkle, Dean; O'Brien, Daniel

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Milk Futures, Options and Basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The milk futures and options market enables producers and processors to manage price risk. This publication explains hedging, margin accounts, basis and how to track it, and other fundamentals of the futures and options market....

Haigh, Michael; Stockton, Matthew; Anderson, David P.; Schwart Jr., Robert B.

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Window Strategy with Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The window strategy is one of several marketing strategies using futures and options to establish a floor price and allow for upside price potential. It also reduces option premium costs. This publication discusses how the window strategy works...

McCorkle, Dean; Amosson, Stephen H.; Fausett, Marvin

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

The safeguards options study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards Options Study was initiated to aid the International Safeguards Division (ISD) of the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in developing its programs in enhanced international safeguards. The goal was to provide a technical basis for the ISD program in this area. The Safeguards Options Study has been a cooperative effort among ten organizations. These are Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and Special Technologies Laboratory. Much of the Motivation for the Safeguards Options Study is the recognition after the Iraq experience that there are deficiencies in the present approach to international safeguards. While under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at their declared facilities, Iraq was able to develop a significant weapons program without being noticed. This is because negotiated safeguards only applied at declared sites. Even so, their nuclear weapons program clearly conflicted with Iraq`s obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) as a nonnuclear weapon state.

Hakkila, E.A.; Mullen, M.F.; Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Olsen, A.P.; Roche, C.T.; Rudolph, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bieber, A.M.; Lemley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Filby, E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Design options for clothes washers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses possible design options for improving the energy efficiency of standard capacity, residential clothes washers.

Biermayer, Peter J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Laboratory Investigation of Deferral Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. and Antikarov, V. , 2003, “Real Options: A Practitioner’ssteady state. Keywords: Real options, optimal stopping,email Introduction Real options theory came of age in the

Oprea, Ryan; Friedman, Daniel; Anderson, Steven T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Resources, real options, and corporate strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

211–234 Resources, real options, and corporate strategy $D83; G30; G31 Keywords: Real options; Valuation; Corporateparticipants at the Real Options Conference at Northwestern

Bernardo, Antonio; Chowdhry, Bhagwan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Retrieval options study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Transition Strategies: Government Options and Market Penetration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Strategies: Government Options and Market Penetration Scenarios Transition Strategies: Government Options and Market Penetration Scenarios Presentation on Transition Strategies:...

93

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Local Option- Property Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vermont allows municipalities the option of offering an exemption from the municipal real and personal property taxes for certain renewable energy systems (Note: state property taxes would still...

96

Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options Byand William A. Peters. Sustainable Energy: Choosing AmongAll the authors of Sustainable Energy are associated with

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

98

Rural Health Option The Rural Health Option requires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rural Health Option The Rural Health Option requires: Membership in StORM Club, the Students include up to 3 sites/3physician-mentors Enrollment into BOTH rural health electives for a total of 2.sumner@okstate.edu) o Spring: Perspectives in Rural Health for OMSI or OMSII (or OMSIII with special permission) CLME

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

99

Determination of Insoluble Solids in Pretreated Biomass Material...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of Insoluble NRELTP-510-42627 Solids in Pretreated Biomass March 2008 Material Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 03212008 A. Sluiter, D. Hyman, C....

100

Pretreated Slurries; Issue Date: August 2010; Revision Date:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Material." This LAP is used to determine the fraction of insoluble solids (FIS) that is present in the pretreated slurry. It describes the detailed measurement of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Communication Needs and Integration Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" links that carry data from smart meters to the control center. The consensus on HAN technologiesCommunication Needs and Integration Options for AMI in the Smart Grid Future Grid Initiative White System #12;Communication Needs and Integration Options for AMI in the Smart Grid Prepared for the Project

102

Communication Needs and Integration Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

home area networks (HANs) than "backhaul" links that carry data from smart meters to the control centerCommunication Needs and Integration Options for AMI in the Smart Grid Future Grid Initiative White System #12;Communication Needs and Integration Options for AMI in the Smart Grid Prepared for the Project

103

Solid Target Options S. Childress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power is higher than for existing solid target designs - but not by a large factor. · NuMI graphite beam power) · High beam power solid targets frequently use higher z materials for increased yield plusSolid Target Options NuFACT'00 S. Childress Solid Target Options · The choice of a primary beam

McDonald, Kirk

104

AFCI Options Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the background and framework for both organizing the discussion and providing information on the potential for nuclear energy R&D to develop alternative nuclear fuel cycles that would address the issues with the current implementations of nuclear power, including nuclear waste disposal, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics, and sustainability. The disposition of used fuel is the cause of many of the concerns, and the possible approaches to used fuel management identify a number of basic technology areas that need to be considered. The basic science in each of the technology areas is discussed, emphasizing what science is currently available, where scientific knowledge may be insufficient, and especially to identify specific areas where transformational discoveries may allow achievement of performance goals not currently attainable. These discussions lead to the wide range of technical options that have been the basis for past and current research and development on advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the United States. The results of this work are then briefly reviewed to show the extent to which such approaches are capable of addressing the issues with nuclear power, the potential for moving further, and the inherent limitations.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic evaluation has been conducted of the potential for advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategies and options to address the issues ascribed to the use of nuclear power. Issues included nuclear waste management, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics and affordability, and sustainability. The two basic strategies, once-through and recycle, and the range of possibilities within each strategy, are considered for all aspects of the fuel cycle including options for nuclear material irradiation, separations if needed, and disposal. Options range from incremental changes to today’s implementation to revolutionary concepts that would require the development of advanced nuclear technologies.

Roald Wigeland; Temitope Taiwo; Michael Todosow; William Halsey; Jess Gehin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A real options approach to criminal careers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. (2004) Criminal behavior: A real option approach with anTrigeorgis, L. (1996) Real Options. Cambridge: MIT Press.A real options approach to criminal careers Cristiano Aguiar

Aguiar de Oliveira, Cristiano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Patents and R& D as Real Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Technology as Real Options, UCLA Working Paper.Patents and R&D as Real Options* September 2001 RevisedPatents and R&D as Real Options Abstract This article

Schwartz, Eduardo S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow...

109

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state....

110

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible...

111

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

112

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS) GRADUATE PROGRAM OPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS) GRADUATE PROGRAM OPTION IN Bioinformatics and Genomics (BG) Degree-Faculty Relation----------------------------------------------------------------- 8 Bioinformatics and Genomics--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------17 #12;- -3 Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

dePamphilis, Claude

113

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Presentation on Hydrogen...

114

Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis...

115

Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

pipelines for gaseous hydrogen delivery Option 2: Use of existing natural gas or oil pipelines for gaseous hydrogen delivery Option 3: Use of existing natural gas pipelines...

116

A review on biomass classification and composition, cofiring issues and pretreatment methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presently around the globe there is a significant interest in using biomass for power generation as power generation from coal continues to raise environmental concerns. Biomass alone can be used for generation of power which can bring lot of environmental benefits. However the constraints of using biomass alone can include high investments costs for biomass feed systems and also uncertainty in the security of the feedstock supply due to seasonal variations and in most of the countries biomass is dispersed and the infrastructure for biomass supply is not well established. Alternatively cofiring biomass along with coal offer advantages like (a) reducing the issues related to biomass quality and buffers the system when there is insufficient feedstock quantity and (b) costs of adapting the existing coal power plants will be lower than building new systems dedicated only to biomass. However with the above said advantages there exists some technical constrains including low heating and energy density values, low bulk density, lower grindability index, higher moisture and ash content to successfully cofire biomass with coal. In order to successfully cofire biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications need to be established to direct pretreatment options that may include increasing the energy density, bulk density, stability during storage and grindability. Impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation and boiler tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications including composition and blend ratios if necessary. Some of these limitations can be overcome by using pretreatment methods. This paper discusses the impact of feedstock pretreatment methods like sizing, baling, pelletizing, briquetting, washing/leaching, torrefaction, torrefaction and pelletization and steam explosion in attainment of optimum feedstock characteristics to successfully cofire biomass with coal.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Richard D. Boardman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment of municipal solid waste components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enzymatic reactivity. Concluding the project will be a study designed to separate the effect of the physical disruption and ammoniation caused by the ~ pretreatment. 1. 2 LIGNOCELLULOSE STRUCTURE The enzymatic conversion of lignocellulose to soluble...

Lundeen, Joseph Eric

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19 2.3.3. Lignin………………………………………………………. ……………..22 2.3.4.S, Ragauskas A. Pseudo-lignin and pretreatment chemistry.ME, Vinzant TB. Visualizing lignin coalescence and migration

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Design Evolution Study - Aging Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new subsurface area (high cost); surface aging in the complete waste package (risk to the waste package and impact on the Waste Handling Facility); and aging in the stainless steel liner (impact on the waste package design and new high risk operations added to the waste packaging process). The selection of a design basis for aging will be made in conjunction with the other design re-evaluation studies.

P. McDaniel

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

Method and apparatus for gasifying with a fluidized bed gasifier having integrated pretreating facilities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integral gasifier including a pretreater section and a gasifier section separated by a distribution grid is defined by a single vessel. The pretreater section pretreats coal or other carbon-containing material to be gasified to prevent caking and agglomeration of the coal in the gasifier. The level of the coal bed of the pretreater section and thus the holding or residence time in said bed is selectively regulated by the amount of pretreated coal which is lifted up a lift pipe into the gasifier section. Thus, the holding time in the pretreater section can be varied according to the amount of pretreat necessary for the particular coal to be gasified.

Rice, Louis F. (Arcadia, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Forecourt Storage and Compression Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capital costs and maximize utilization NATURAL GAS & HYDROGEN FUELING STATION SIZING SOFTWARE Developed 510 520 530 540 Minutes Bank1 Bank2 Bank3 Cascade Banks Pressure Vs.Time (Hydrogen) #12;16 Compressor> Forecourt Storage and Compression Options DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery

122

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Based on the request of Pawnee Nation’s Energy Task Force the research team, consisting Tribal personnel and Summit Blue Consulting, focused on a review of renewable energy resource development potential, funding sources and utility organizational along with energy savings options. Elements of the energy demand forecasting and characterization and demand side options review remained in the scope of work, but were only addressed at a high level. Description of Activities Performed Renewable Energy Resource Development Potential The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Energy Efficiency Options While this was not a major focus of the project, the research team highlighted common strategies for reducing energy use in buildings. The team also discussed the benefits of adopting a building energy code and introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cementitious waste option scoping study report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

EVALUATION OF TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR INTERMEDIATE NON DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.”

Case, Susan; Hoggard, Gary

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fuel option for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth in electricity demand is an average of 10% per year. Energy, emission, and economy are importance of critical concerns for generating systems. Therefore, combined cycle power plant is preferred to Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) new power generating capacity. The various option of available fuel for gas turbine are natural gas, liquid fuel and coal fuel. Particularly with the tremendous price increases in imported and domestic fuel supplies, natural gas is an attractive low cost alternative for power generation. EGAT has researched using heavy fuel instead of natural gas since the year 1991. The problems of various corrosion characteristics have been found. In addition, fuel treatment for gas turbine are needed, and along with it, the environmental consideration are options that provide the limitation of environmental regulation.

Tantayakom, S. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand). Chemical and Analysis Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Early Exercise Option Valuation 00000001111111  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early Exercise Option Valuation 0 0 1 1 00000001111111 s T 0 0s K Mm+1m t 0 With V (tM , S(tM)) = E. Computational Finance (Summerschool) Hitotsubashi University August 2009 2 / 51 #12;The CONV method (Carr-Madan extended) The main premise of the CONV method is that f (y|x) depends on x and y via f (y|x) = f (y - x

Oosterlee, Cornelis W. "Kees"

128

The new option view of investment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides a simple introduction to the new option view of investment. We explain the shortcomings of the orthodox theory, and then outline the basic ideas behind the option framework. Several industry examples ...

Dixit, Avinash K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Numerical Valuation of Discrete Barrier Options with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Valuation of Discrete Barrier Options with the Adaptive Mesh Model and Other Competing for discrete barrier options such that many methods have been suggested and declared to price discrete barrier options fast and accurately but no one can tell exactly that what method is the best. We also make

Chu, Hao-hua

130

Moving-bed, granular-bed filter development program option III: Development of moving-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control task 14: Test plan. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot gas cleanup of fuel gas resulting from coal gasification and combustion streams is described. Testing of various clay and sodium compound sorbents was performed and reviewed. Efforts are described for the control of halogens, sodium, cesium, lead, ammonia, potassium, and chlorine.

Haas, J.C.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Valuation of Information Technology Investments as Real Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999) A Case for Using Real Options Pricing Analysis toExpansion Using Real Options Analysis. MIS Quarterly. Vol.Investment Opportunities as Real Options: Getting Started on

Schwartz, Eduardo S.; Zozaya-Gorostiza, Carlos

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Statement of Work - Optional Service Offerings for Contractor...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Work - Optional Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project Statement of Work - Optional Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project Spreadsheet features optional...

133

GARCH Option Pricinga Options can be priced when the underlying asset's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GARCH Option Pricinga · Options can be priced when the underlying asset's return follows a GARCH for any elapsed time t. aA Bloomberg quant said, on Feb 29, 2008, that GARCH option pricing is seldom used in trading. c 2008 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 686 #12;GARCH Option Pricing

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

134

Hydrogen Delivery InfrastructureHydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option AnalysisOption Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Converting NG/oil pipelines for GH delivery Option 3 Blending GH into NG pipelines Option 4* GH tube trailers Option 5* LH tank trucks Option 6 Use of novel H2 carriers (alanate; chemical hydride; liquid hydrocarbon as CA) -- NG distribution lines: gas companies usually use for Class 3 & 4 No odorants used in current H

135

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

136

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahoma’s new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nation’s current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Team’s broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee Nation’s Energy Team.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

137

Combined filtered cathodic arc etching pretreatment-magnetron sputter deposition of highly adherent CrN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrN films were prepared on steel substrates by a hybrid method utilizing filtered cathodic arc for Cr ion pretreatment and magnetron sputtering for coating deposition. During pretreatment the substrates were biased to -1200 V and exposed to filtered chromium plasma. The substrate-coating interface formed during the pretreatment contained a Cr-enriched modified layer with composition that was strongly influenced by the temperature of the substrate as observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy--energy dispersive spectroscopy. The modified layer had a nanocrystalline morphology and thickness of 15 nm. The path of formation of the layer is linked to the combined action of implantation, diffusion, and resputtering. The resulting adhesion of 3 {mu}m thick CrN films was very high with scratch test critical load values of 83 N. The morphology of the films was smooth without large scale defects and the microstructure was columnar. The coatings behaved well in dry sliding tests with very low wear coefficients of 2.3x10{sup -16} m{sup 3} N{sup -1} m{sup -1}, which can be linked to the high adhesion and defect-free microstructure. The smooth coatings also had a high resistance to corrosion as demonstrated by potentiodynamic tests with particularly high pitting potentials of +800 mV.

Ehiasarian, A. P.; Anders, A.; Petrov, I. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Review of Alternative Technologies for Pretreatment of Accumulated HLW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accumulated liquid high-level wastes (HLW) from nuclear centers in Russia and the United States (U. S.) contain great amounts of nonradioactive salts; it is prudent to vitrify not the entire volume of these wastes, but only the concentrates of radionuclides recovered from them. For this purpose, different pretreatment technologies based on liquid-liquid extraction are under development.

Romanovsky, V.; Rimski-Korsakov, A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effects of catalyst pretreatment for carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of pretreatment of iron catalyst for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) thin-film catalyst deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C2H4 in a thermal chemical ...

Morgan, Caitlin D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Separations/pretreatment considerations for Hanford privatization phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Focus Area is funded to develop, demonstrate, and deploy technologies that will assist in the treatment and closure of its nuclear waste tanks. Pretreatment technologies developed to support the privatization effort by the Department of Energy are reviewed. Advancements in evaporation, solid-liquid separation, sludge treatment, solids controls, sodium management, and radionuclide removal are considered.

Hunt, R.D.; McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300.degree. C. before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil.

Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Application of High Throughput Pretreatment and Co-Hydrolysis System to Thermochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. Although hydrothermal pretreatment is currently being employed in most high were compared to results from hydrothermal pretreatments, providing new insights in understanding their recalcitrance and consolidating processing of enzymes and microorganisms to overcome biomass recalci- trance

California at Riverside, University of

143

Exit Options and Dividend Policy under Liquidity Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal exercise of real options. Boyle and Guthrie (2003)described by the standard real option model of optimal exit.

Murto, Pauli; Terviö, Marko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

NREL Breaks New Ground in Plant Pretreatment for Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden knowledge of plant cell wall structures and identify ideal pretreatment of plant material.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although a Supplemental LAW feed simulant has previously been prepared, this feed composition differs from that simulant because those tests examined only the fully soluble aqueous solution at room temperature, not the composition formed after evaporation, including the insoluble solids that precipitate after it cools. The conceptual flow sheet for Supplemental LAW immobilization has an option for removal of {sup 99}Tc from the feed stream, if needed. Elutable ion exchange has been selected for that process. If implemented, the stream would need filtration to remove the insoluble solids prior to processing in an ion exchange column. The characteristics, chemical speciation, physical properties, and filterability of the solids are important to judge the feasibility of the concept, and to estimate the size and cost of a facility. The insoluble solids formed during these tests were primarily natrophosphate, natroxalate, and a sodium aluminosilicate compound. At the elevated temperature and 8 M [Na+], appreciable insoluble solids (1.39 wt%) were present. Cooling to room temperature and dilution of the slurry from 8 M to 5 M [Na+] resulted in a slurry containing 0.8 wt% insoluble solids. The solids (natrophosphate, natroxalate, sodium aluminum silicate, and a hydrated sodium phosphate) were relatively stable and settled quickly. Filtration rates were in the range of those observed with iron-based simulated Hanford tank sludge simulants, e.g., 6 M [Na+] Hanford tank 241-AN-102, even though their chemical speciation is considerably different. Chemical cleaning of the crossflow filter was readily accomplished with acid. As this simulant formulation was based on an average composition of a wide range of feeds using an integrated computer model, this exact composition may never be observed. But the test conditions were selected to enable comparison to the model to enable improving its chemical prediction capability.

McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT: In dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin has been shown formed by hydrothermal pretreatment of a mixture of Avicel cellulose and poplar wood showed that lignin

California at Riverside, University of

147

DOE outlines complex cleanup options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Department said last week it will consider four different strategies for cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex in a draft programmatic environmental impact statement due for release this summer. In an implementation plan released for public comment February 17, DOE also said the EIS would look at centralized, decentralized and regional approaches to management of six types of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Other issues to be addressed in the EIS are development of innovative cleanup technology, budgeting and prioritization, job cutbacks and worker retraining, waste minimization and community involvement in cleanup decisions. However, DOE said it had decided not to address spent nuclear fuel storage in the EIS, as had been previously planned. Instead, spent fuel storage options will be reviewed in another environmental study being done under court order for DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Findings from the INEL study will be incorporated in the department-wide EIS for environmental restoration and waste management.

Lobsenz, G.

1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Optional Residential Program Benchmarking | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Optional Residential Program Benchmarking, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 23, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary...

149

Biochemistry, Research Option BS Degree Completion Checklist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

____ CHEM 4601 ____ Biology Electives: 9 hours 4701 _____ LCC 4702 _____ Free Electives: ____ hours petition. Note on CHEM 4698 vs. 4699 CHEM 4698 does count toward the Research Option designation

Sherrill, David

150

Model-based Estimation of Flexibility and Optionability in an Integrated Real Options Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainties can be managed through real options that provide a decision maker the right, but not the obligation, to exercise actions at a later time. In previous work we introduced an integrated real options framework ...

Mikaelian, Tsoline

151

Real options "in" projects and systems design : identification of options and solutions for path dependency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research develops a comprehensive approach to identify and deal with real options in" projects, that is, those real options (flexibility) that are integral parts of the technical design. It represents a first attempt ...

Wang, Tao, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

A new option in ECE @ UBC The Biomedical Engineering (BE) option offers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new option in ECE @ UBC The Biomedical Engineering (BE) option offers the opportunity to gain core competency in fundamental electrical engineering topics, key topics in biomedical engineering on the Biomedical Engineering option: Student Services Electrical & Computer Engineering The University of British

Pulfrey, David L.

155

Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity@IEOR.Berkeley.edu Abstract In a competitive electricity market traditional demand side management options offering customers curtailable service at reduced rates are replaced by voluntary customer responses to electricity spot prices

156

architecture 2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

credits) 1 environmental technology course (3 credits) 2 architectural history courses (6 credits) 3master of architecture (M.Arch.) #12;2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option Taubman College's 2-year master of architecture option

Papalambros, Panos

157

Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

On Accurate Trinomial GARCH Option Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Accurate Trinomial GARCH Option Pricing Algorithms Advisor: Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu Chun-Yang Liu Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering National Taiwan University #12;Abstract The GARCH-based GARCH option pricing algorithms suffer from exponential running time, inaccuracy, or other problems

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

159

Montana State University 1 Geology Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Geology Option The Geology Option is a degree program designed and private sectors in fields such as petroleum geology, mining geology, seismology (including earthquake and volcanic risk assessment), hydrology (surface and ground water) natural-hazard geology, environmental clean

Maxwell, Bruce D.

160

Electric retail market options: The customer perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec ay of plutonium-241) in the dissolved precipitate, a value consistent with the recovery of europium, the americium surrogate.In a subsequent experiment, the plutonium solubility following an oxalate precipitation to simulate the preparation of a slurry feed for a batch melter was 21 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. The increase in solubility compared to the value measured during the pretreatment experiment was attributed to the increased nitrate concentration and ensuing increase in plutonium complexation. The solubility of the plutonium following a precipitant wash with 0.1M oxalic acid was unchanged. The recovery of plutonium from the precipitate slurry was greater than 97 percent allowing an estimation that approximately 92 percent of the plutonium in Tank 17.1 will report to the glass. The behavior of the lanthanides and soluble metal impurities was consistent with the behavior seen during the pretreatment experiment. A trace level material balance showed that 99.9 percent of the americium w as recovered from the precipitate slurry. The overall recovery of americium from the pretreatment and feed preparation processes was greater than 97 percent, which was consistent with the measured recovery of the europium surrogate.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Rolling Up a Put Option as Prices Increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural producers use put options to protect themselves against declining prices. The technique of "rolling up a put option, explained in this publication, allows the producer to raise the minimum expected selling price of a put option...

Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act gives local governments the option to provide direct and indirect assistance to business enterprises in their communities, whether for expansion of existing operations, the creation of new...

165

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options Bruce Schumm Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics for new S design (pattern recognition, resolution) S detector in real trouble at low angle w/out beam

California at Santa Cruz, University of

166

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options Bruce Schumm Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics tracking somewhat more pressed for new S design (pattern recognition, ` resolution) S detector in real

California at Santa Cruz, University of

167

Hedging Milk with BFP Futures and Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic Formula Price (BFP) milk futures and options can be used to hedge, or lock in, milk prices in order to manage milk price fluctuations. This publication offers information on futures contracts, basis, cash settlement and margin call. There also...

Anderson, David P.; McCorkle, Dean; Schwart Jr., Robert B.; Jones, Rodney

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

Real Options for Project Schedules (ROPS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real Options for Project Schedules (ROPS) has three recursive sampling/optimization shells. An outer Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) optimization shell optimizes parameters of strategic Plans containing multiple Projects containing ordered Tasks. A middle shell samples probability distributions of durations of Tasks. An inner shell samples probability distributions of costs of Tasks. PATHTREE is used to develop options on schedules.. Algorithms used for Trading in Risk Dimensions (TRD) are applied to develop a relative risk analysis among projects.

Ingber, Lester

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion adsorption chemicals, solid-liquid separation methods, and achievable decontamination factors. Results of the radionuclide removal testing indicate that the radionuclides, including Tc-99, can be removed with inorganic sorbents and precipitating agents. Evaporation test results indicate that the simulant can be evaporated to fairly high concentration prior to formation of appreciable solids, but corrosion has not yet been examined.

McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Tool to Compare Solar Energy Program Financing Options | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Information Resources Tool to Compare Solar Energy Program Financing Options Tool to Compare Solar Energy Program Financing Options This model is intended to be used for...

171

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems...

172

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid pretreated corn Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vision Summary: then be fermented. 2. Pretreatment Steam and acid separate the shredded biomass into three components: cellulose... Platforms Thermochemical (pyrolysis;...

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative truex-based pretreatment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

converts raw biomass to ethanol in high yields. The process was developed... biomass feedstocks such as corn stover, agricultural waste, and energy crops. The pretreatment...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative pretreatment modalities Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

converts raw biomass to ethanol in high yields. The process was developed... biomass feedstocks such as corn stover, agricultural waste, and energy crops. The pretreatment...

176

EVALUATION OF SUPPLEMENTAL PRE-TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS TO MEET TRL 6 ROTARY MICROFILTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spring 2011, the Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) for the Supplemental Treatment Project (RPP-PLAN-49827, Rev. 0), Technology Maturation Plan for the Treatment Project (T4S01) was developed. This plan contains all identified actions required to reach technical maturity for a field-deployable waste feed pretreatment system. The supplemental pretreatment system has a filtration and a Cs-removal component. Subsequent to issuance of the TMP, rotary microfiltration (RMF) has been identified as the prime filtration technology for this application. The prime Cs-removal technology is small column ion exchange (ScIX) using spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) as the exchange resin. During fiscal year 2011 (FY2011) some of the tasks identified in the TMP have been completed. As of September 2011, the conceptual design package has been submitted to DOE as part of the critical decision (CD-1) process. This document describes the remaining tasks identified in the TMP to reach technical maturity and evaluates the validity of the proposed tests to fill the gaps as previously identified in the TMP. The potential vulnerabilities are presented and the completed list of criteria for the DOE guide DOE G 413.3-4 different technology readiness levels are added in an attachment. This evaluation has been conducted from a technology development perspective - all programmatic and manufacturing aspects were excluded from this exercise. Compliance with the DOE G 413.3-4 programmatic and manufacturing requirements will be addressed directly by the Treatment Project during the course of engineering design. The results of this evaluation show that completion of the proposed development tasks in the TMP are sufficient to reach TRL 6 from a technological point of view. The tasks involve actual waste tests using the current baseline configuration (2nd generation disks, 40 psi differential pressure, 30 C feed temperature) and three different simulants - the PEP, an AP-Farm and an S-saltcake. Based on FY2011 dollars used in the TMP, these tests will have ROM costs of $950K and require up to 10 months to complete. Completion of the simulant testing will satisfy the TRL 5 and TRL 6 criteria that are related to system testing with materials that represent the full range of properties in a relevant environment.

HUBER HJ

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

Direct dose to water dosimetry for pretreatment IMRT verification using a modified EPID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are high resolution systems that produce electronic dose maps with minimal time required for equipment setup, and therefore potentially present a time-saving alternative for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) pretreatment verification. A modified commercial EPID was investigated operated with an opaque sheet blocking the optical signal produced in the phosphor layer as a precursor to a switched mode dual dosimetry-imaging EPID system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using this system for direct dose to water dosimetry for pretreatment IMRT verification. Methods: A Varian amorphous silicon EPID was modified by placing an opaque sheet between the Gd{sub 2}S{sub 2}O:Tb phosphor layer and the photodiode array to block the optical photons. The EPID was thus converted to a direct-detecting system (dEPID), in which the high energy radiation deposits energy directly in the photodiode array. The copper build-up was replaced with d{sub max} solid water. Sixty-one IMRT beams of varying complexity were delivered to the EPID, to EDR2 dosimetric film and to a 2D ion chamber array (MapCheck). EPID data was compared to film and MapCheck data using gamma analysis with 3%, 3mm pass criteria. Results: The fraction of points that passed the gamma test was on average 98.1% and 98.6%, for the EPID versus film and EPID versus MapCheck comparisons, respectively. In the case of comparison with film, the majority of observed discrepancies were associated with problems related to film sensitivity or processing. Conclusions: The very close agreement between EPID and both film and MapCheck data demonstrates that the modified EPID is suitable for direct dose to water measurement for pretreatment IMRT verification. These results suggest a reconfigured EPID could be an efficient and accurate dosimeter. Alternatively, optical switching methods could be developed to produce a dual-mode EPID with both dosimetry and imaging capabilities.

Gustafsson, Helen; Vial, Philip; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia) and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney 2065 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia) and Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney 2170 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia); School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308 (Australia) and Radiation Oncology Department, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle 2310 (Australia); School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308 (Australia) and Radiation Oncology Department, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle 2310 (Australia)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Gnie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering, CVG4130 or CVG4148. Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais

Petriu, Emil M.

179

Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11 Option B: The program is organized by t Spanish Institute and the Asso program on renewable energy will provide students with advanced knowledge. opportunities: option A- two renewable energies; option B include on-site visits to renewable energy generation

Simaan, Nabil

180

Wireless Network Capacity Management: A Real Options Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity, market price of risk, investment timing option 1 Introduction Wireless networks are now regarded

Forsyth, Peter A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and research needs and next steps

182

Inhibition of aortic wall calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves by ethanol pretreatment: Biochemical and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhibition of aortic wall calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves by ethanol pretreatment 16 September 1997; 20 February 1998 Abstract: The effectiveness of ethanol pretreatment on pre was previously demonstrated, and the mechanism of action of ethanol was attributed in part to both lipid removal

Zand, Robert

183

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

CONRAD EA

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Sai Venkatesh Pingali,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for renewable and clean energy production. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of lignocellulose, production of seeds, and adapt- ability to poor soils.3,4 All lignocellulosic biomass is largely composed deconstruction of the plant cell walls by mechanical and chemical pretreatment. Typically, biomass pretreatment

185

Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic Dilute sulfuric acid Sulfur dioxide Biofuels Switchgrass a b s t r a c t Dacotah switchgrass was pretreated with sulfuric acid concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt.% at 140, 160, and 180 °C and with 1

California at Riverside, University of

186

Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment and adsorption of b-glucosidase for lignin left after enzymatic digestion of the solids from these pretreatments effectiveness was determined. Furthermore, Avicel hydrolysis inhibition by enzymatic and acid lignin of poplar

California at Riverside, University of

187

Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment.

Rudisill, T.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy Conservation Options in Distillation Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~itroo.? ':!OD.e~tell.,..ot!.k1 .'k..,.-.ottNltlu'..,. II ""'I'JI ..... ~I_ """-.4008l1"OO I ~.z.,. 1 ,1'1 (-frl-.'....u_~ R.da at AC~Ofllftl\\,J'ftlit...." ? I 5 "'-tlnc&! Tt.,.. ? 21.' \\lip Gilil.In31 j TnyE.'tIc>Mcy .11.1'llo I ~~TI""'.'2.at... I There are many options available to the engi*eer seeking to reduce the energy requirements of a distil lation process. The technology for most of these I, options has been available for many years, but it has only recently become economically...

Harris, G. E.; Hearn, W. R.; Blythe, G. M.; Stuart, J. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIS-0123: Direct Service Industry Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

BPA proposes to implement one or more options to reduce load fluctuations and revenue uncertainty resulting from its electrical service to 10 aluminum smelters and its other direct service industrial customers. BPA believes these options will give BPA greater ability to plan for power needs and help to maintain its relatively strong financial position during the current period of power surplus. They also are expected to enhance BPA's ability to repay the U.S. Treasury. In turn, BPA rates to other customers would stabilize.

190

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

EXOTIC OPTIONS FOR INTERRUPTIBLE ELECTRICITY SUPPLY CONTRACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the last decade have been directed at increasing competition in the generation of electricity. This hasEXOTIC OPTIONS FOR INTERRUPTIBLE ELECTRICITY SUPPLY CONTRACTS RAJNISH KAMAT and SHMUEL S. OREN of financial contracts for the supply and procurement of interruptible electricity service. While the contract

192

Waste disposal options report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the potential options for the processing and disposal of mixed waste generated by reprocessing spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. It compares the proposed waste-immobilization processes, quantifies and characterizes the resulting waste forms, identifies potential disposal sites and their primary acceptance criteria, and addresses disposal issues for hazardous waste.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory International Workshop MFE Roadmapping for the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 10 September 2011 #12;Outline 2 · Pilot plant ­ mission, motivation, and description. · Role of pilot plants on the Roadmap to Demo. Pilot Plant

194

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

195

RTGs Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small spacecraft design for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) Mission is under study by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for a possible launch as early as 1998. JPL's 1992 baseline design calls for a power source able to furnish an energy output of 3963 kWh and a power output of 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. Satisfying those demands is made difficult because NASA management has set a goal of reducing the spacecraft mass from a baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for the power source. To support the ongoing NASA/JPL studies, the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA) commissioned Fairchild Space to prepare and analyze conceptual designs of radioisotope power systems for the PFF mission. Thus far, a total of eight options employing essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules were designed and subjected to thermal, electrical, structural, and mass analyses by Fairchild. Five of these - employing thermoelectric converters - are described in the present paper, and three - employing free-piston Stirling converters - are described in the companion paper presented next. The system masses of the thermoelectric options ranged from 19.3 kg to 10.2 kg. In general, the options requiring least development are the heaviest, and the lighter options require more development with greater programmatic risk. There are four duplicate copies

Schock, Alfred

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Parking Options 2011/12 Reserved Permits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parking Options 2011/12 Reserved Permits A Reserved permit is $275 this fiscal year and is only available to faculty and staff through payroll deduction. Individuals issued a Reserved permit may park is completely full someone is parked illegally and Parking Services should be notified. Reserved permit holders

197

Options for Affordable Fission Surface Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission surface power systems could provide abundant power anywhere on the surface of the moon or Mars. Locations could include permanently shaded regions on the moon and high latitudes on Mars. To be fully utilized, however, fission surface power systems must be safe, have adequate performance, and be affordable. This paper discusses options for the design and development of such systems. (authors)

Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; Van Dyke, Melissa; Martin, Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP31, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Interdisciplinary Option Computer Science Graduation Worksheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering 3 CSCI 338 Computer Science Theory 3 CSCI 361 Computer Architecture 3 CSCI 481 Program Assessment. · The Statistics Elective can be satisfied by any probability or statistics course, such as EIND 354Interdisciplinary Option Computer Science Graduation Worksheet 2010-2012 Semester Catalog Revised

Dyer, Bill

199

Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar yields from different switchgrass sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and lime pretreatments eased comparisons. All pretreatments enhanced sugar recovery from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic production. The high world con- sumption of fossil energy also drives up accumulation of carbon dioxide

California at Riverside, University of

200

EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. Synergistic control of these parameters offers the potential for further improvements in carbonation reactivity. A new sonication exfoliation system incorporating a novel sealing system was developed to carry out the sonication studies. Our initial studies that incorporate controlled sonication have not yet lead to a significant improvement in the extent of carbonation observed. Year 2 studies will emphasize those approaches that offer the greatest potential to cost effectively enhance carbonation, as well as combined approaches that may further enhance carbonation. Mechanistic investigations indicate incongruent dissolution results in the observed silica-rich passivating layer formation. Observations of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating layers that form indicate the layers can exhibit significant permeability to the key reactants present (e.g., Mg{sup 2+}, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and HCO{sub 3} -). Atomistic modeling supports the observation of robust passivating layers that retain significant permeability to the key reaction species involved. Studies in Year 2 will emphasize the impact that controlled aqueous speciation and activity and slurry-flow dynamics have on the mechanisms that control carbonation reactivity and the potential they offer to substantially reduce olivine mineral sequestration process cost.

Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (i) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (ii) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (iii) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. We have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. Synergistic control of the slurry-flow and aqueous chemistry parameters offers further potential to improve carbonation reactivity, which is being investigated during the no-cost extension period. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation system with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated(Abstract truncated).

Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Tank-Mix Options for Control of Tropical Soda Apple and Dogfennel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SS-AGR-300 Tank-Mix Options for Control of Tropical Soda Apple and Dogfennel1 B. A. Sellers and J throughout Florida, GrazonNext HL tank-mixed with another herbicide will be required to effectively control both species. Many combinations were tested to determine what herbi- cides could be tank

Watson, Craig A.

204

Gnie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering or CVG4148. Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais/français), les cours

Petriu, Emil M.

205

Gnie chimique / Chemical Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie chimique / Chemical Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Engineering GNG4170/4570 2010.12.02 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais

Petriu, Emil M.

206

Gnie chimique / Chemical Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie chimique / Chemical Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Engineering GNG4170/4570 2011.11.07 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais

Petriu, Emil M.

207

Gnie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais/français), les cours en français ne sont pas

Petriu, Emil M.

208

Gnie chimique / Chemical Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie chimique / Chemical Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Engineering GNG4170/4570 2010.03.21 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais

Petriu, Emil M.

209

Gnie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie civil, option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Civil Engineering, Engineering, CVG4113, CVG4130 or CVG4148. Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais

Petriu, Emil M.

210

Influence of mechanical-biological waste pre-treatment methods on the gas formation in landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to minimise emissions and environmental impacts, only pre-treated waste should be disposed of. For the last six years, a series of continuous experiments has been conducted at the Institute WAR, TU Darmstadt, in order to determine the emissions from pre-treated waste. Different kinds of pre-treated waste were incubated in several reactors and various data, including production and composition of the gas and the leachate, were collected. In this paper, the interim results of gas production and the gas composition from different types of waste after a running time of six years are presented and discussed.

Bockreis, A. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute for Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Flows and Environmental Planning (Institute WAR), Chair of Waste Management and Waste Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.bockreis@iwar.tu-darmstadt.de; Steinberg, I. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute for Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Flows and Environmental Planning (Institute WAR), Chair of Waste Management and Waste Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Experiment Station FE Exco Resources SCNGO 2012 1012009 - 10312012 John Terneus Armstrong County, PA Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Frac Flowback...

212

MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

McKinney, Gregg W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armstrong, Hirotatsu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clem, John [University of Delaware, BRI; Goldhagen, Paul [DHS, National Urban Security Technology Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Understanding Leasing Options for Energy Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNDERSTANDING LEASING OPTIONS FOR ENERGY PROJECTS Baker Davenport Davenport Finance Company Richmond, Virginia Industrials often find it difficult to fund energy projects with internal monies. Energy projects must compete with the company...?s ?core? assets for capital dollars. Leasing can be used to overcome some of these hurdles. Topics of discussion will include several key leasing structures, with benefits and disadvantages noted. Project financing is also discussed as a way...

Davenport, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Cyanide treatment options in coke plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

216

Seattle's system for evaluating energy options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1975, the City Council developed a blueprint called Energy 1990 for meeting Seattle's future electric energy needs. Priorities for addressing or offsetting expected growth in demand are in order: (1) conservation (2) hydroelectricity (3) other renewable sources such as wind, biomass, solar, and geothermal energy (4) abundant nonrenewable resources such as coal, and (5) other renewables. An energy resources planning group was formed and a data base was established. Resource options were investigated and the recommendations were published.

Logie, P.; Macdonald, M.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modeling Dependence in Data: Options Pricing and Random Walks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option pricing under GARCH by a Markov chain approximation.S. (2000). A closed-form GARCH option valuation model. Theof stochastic and/or GARCH volatility (Heston, 1993; Heston

Kumar, Nitesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A streamlined real options model for Real Estate Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis introduces a streamlined model that incorporates the value of the real options that exist in real estate development projects. Real options add value to a project by providing developers with flexibility to ...

Barman, Baabak

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Using Options to Hedge Farm and Ranch Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A call option is a pricing tool that helps producers manage the price risks associated with farm and ranch inputs. This publication offers a thorough explanation of the way call options work. It includes various strategies producers might use...

Anderson, David P.; McCorkle, Dean; Schwart Jr., Robert B.; O'Brien, Daniel

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

The British Asian Option K. Glover, G. Peskir & F. Samee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The British Asian Option K. Glover, G. Peskir & F. Samee Sequential Anal. Vol. 29, No. 3, 2010 Option K. Glover, G. Peskir & F. Samee Sequential Anal. Vol. 29, No. 3, 2010, (311­327) Research Report

Sidorov, Nikita

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The British Russian Option K. Glover, G. Peskir & F. Samee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The British Russian Option K. Glover, G. Peskir & F. Samee Stochastics Vol. 83, No. 4-6, 2011, (315 and Statistics Group School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester #12;The British Russian Option K. Glover

Sidorov, Nikita

222

Options for Burning LWR SNF in LIFE Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have pursued two processes in parallel for the burning of LWR SNF in the LIFE engine: (1) solid fuel option and (2) liquid fuel option. Approaches with both are discussed. The assigned Topical Report on liquid fuels is attached.

Farmer, J

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Analysis of sustainable water supply options for Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis considers several options for improving the sustainability of Kuwait's water supply system. The country currently relies heavily on desalination and brackish groundwater extraction. The options considered for ...

Murtaugh, Katharine A. (Katharine Ann)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

PRETREATMENT OF TC CONTAINING WASTE AND ITS EFFECT ON 99 TC LEACHING FROM GROUTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A salt solution (doped with Tc-99), that simulates the salt waste stream to be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, was immobilized in grout waste forms with and without (1) ground granulated blast furnace slag and (2) pretreatment with iron salts. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. Although Fe (+2) was shown to be effective in reducing Tc-99 to the +4 state, the strong reducing nature of the blast furnace slag present in the grout formulation dominated the reduction of Tc-99 in the cured grouts. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.75 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol. The leaching results show that, even in the presence of a concentrated salt solution, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. The measured diffusivity was introduced into a flow and transport model (PORFLOW) to calculate the release of Tc-99 from a Saltstone Vault as a function of hydraulic conductivity of the matrix.

Harbour, J

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pretreatment of Tc-Containing Waste and Its Effect on Tc-99 Leaching From Grouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A salt solution (doped with Tc-99), that simulates the salt waste stream to be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, was immobilized in grout waste forms with and without (1) ground granulated blast furnace slag and (2) pretreatment with iron salts. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. Although Fe (+2) was shown to be effective in reducing Tc-99 to the +4 state, the strong reducing nature of the blast furnace slag present in the grout formulation dominated the reduction of Tc-99 in the cured grouts. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.75 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol. The leaching results show that, even in the presence of a concentrated salt solution, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. The measured diffusivity was introduced into a flow and transport model (PORFLOW) to calculate the release of Tc-99 from a Saltstone Vault as a function of hydraulic conductivity of the matrix. (authors)

Aloy, Albert; Kovarskaya, Elena N. [RosAtom, 'V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute' (KRI), 2-nd Murinsky str., 28, Saint Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Harbour, John R.; Langton, Christine A.; Holtzscheiter, E. William [Savannah River National Laboratory, Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Computer simulation and economic analysis for ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ammonia fiber explosion (AFFECT) process is a promising new pretreatment for enhancing the reactivity of lignocerulose materials with many advantages over existing processes. The material is soaked in high-pressure liquid ammonia for a few...

Wang, Lin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pricing A Class of Multiasset Options using Information on Smaller ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 19, 2007 ... Extensions to markets where only a finite set of options are traded on ...... On non-

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

230

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

231

An Accurate and Provably Efficient GARCH Option Pricing Tree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Accurate and Provably Efficient GARCH Option Pricing Tree Advisor: Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu Chi-Ning Wu Department of Finance National Taiwan University #12;Abstract The trinomial-tree GARCH option not prevent explosion. This thesis then presents a trinomial-tree GARCH option pricing algorithm that solves

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

232

Cache-Optimal Algorithms for Option Pricing John E. Savage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the leaves are at expiration times. We use G (n) biop to determine the price of an option at the root node a discrete time model [Kwok 1998; Cox et al. 1979]. The binomial option pricing computation is modeledCache-Optimal Algorithms for Option Pricing John E. Savage Brown University, Providence, Rhode

Savage, John

233

PRICING AND HEDGING SPREAD OPTIONS RENE CARMONA AND VALDO DURRLEMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy prices dynamics, and we explain how the pricing and hedging algorithms can be implemented bothPRICING AND HEDGING SPREAD OPTIONS REN´E CARMONA AND VALDO DURRLEMAN ABSTRACT. We survey the theoretical and the computational problems associated with the pricing of spread options. These options

Carmona, Rene

234

Architecture independent parallel binomial tree option price valuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architecture independent parallel binomial tree option price valuations Alexandros V. Gerbessiotis­02 #12; Architecture independent parallel binomial tree option price valuations Alexandros V in American or European­style option valuations can be performed in parallel in the binomial­tree model

Gerbessiotis, Alexandros V.

235

Industrial Engineering-BS ,PhD option in Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I Industrial Engineering- BS ,PhD option in Engineering Industrial & Management Engineering - BS MS Applied Mathematics - BS optionin Mathematics Applied Mechanics PhD option in Engineering Applied; teaching "minor, Art History minor Art.History - BA option in Art; minor B Bio-resources`Engineering - BS

Dyer, Bill

236

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A PUBLIC OPTION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A PUBLIC OPTION IN HEALTH CARE REFORM: An Economic Analysis Ethan Kaplan and Benefits of a Public Option in Health Care Reform: An Economic Analysis ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We would like Security|The Costs and Benefits of a Public Option in Health Care Reform: An Economic Analysis EXECUTIVE

Kammen, Daniel M.

237

The Information in Option Volume for Future Stock Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that option trading volume contains information about future stock prices. Taking advantage of a unique dataThe Information in Option Volume for Future Stock Prices Jun Pan MIT Sloan School of Management set, we construct put-call ratios from option volume initiated by buyers to open new positions. Stocks

Gabrieli, John

238

THE ECONOMIC THRESHOLD WITH A STOCHASTIC PEST POPULATION: A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

101. Trigeorgis, L. , Real Options: Managerial FlexibilityPEST POPULATION: A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH ? Jean-Daniel M.Keywords: Uncertainty; Real Options; Pest Control; Reentry

Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

Robison, W. L., LLNL

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

Swanson, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Distillation: Still towering over other options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distillation dominates separations in the chemical process industries (CPI), at least for mixtures that normally are processed as liquids. The authors fully expect that distillation will continue to be the method of choice for many separations, and the method against which other options must be compared. So, in this article, they will put into some perspective just why distillation continues to reign as the king of separations, and what steps are being taken to improve its applicability and performance, as well as basic understanding of the technique.

Kunesh, J.G. [Fractionation Research, Inc., Stillwater, OK (United States); Kister, H.Z. [Brown and Root, Inc., Alhambra (Canada); Lockett, M.J. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Fair, J.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Food Options | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: Since the FlickrFluorimeterFood Options

243

Math 373 Fall 2012 Test 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copyright Jeffrey A Beckley. Math 373. Fall 2012. Test 2. October 18, 2012. 1. Jordan has the option to purchase either of the two bonds below. Both bonds will

Owner

2014-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of stripper options for FRIB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University includes a heavy ion superconducting linac capable of accelerating all ions up to uranium with energies higher than 200 MeV/u and beam power up to 400 kW. To achieve these goals with present ion source performance it is necessary to accelerate simultaneously two charge states of uranium from the ion source in the first section of the linac. At an energy of approximately 16.5 MeV/u it is planned to strip the uranium beam to reduce the voltage needed in the rest of the linac to achieve the final energy. Up to five different charge states are planned to be accelerated simultaneously after the stripper. The design of the stripper is a challenging problem due to the high power deposited (approximately 0.7 kW) in the stripper media by the beam in a small spot. To assure success of the project we have established a research and development program that includes several options: carbon or diamond foils, liquid lithium films, gas strippers and plasma strippers. We present in this paper the status of the different options.

Marti, F.; Hershcovitch, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Thieberger, P.

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Real options : a way to deal with market uncertainty in real estate development projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The practice of applying options theory to real estate investments has only recently begun. In particular, options in real estate are called "real options." Real options add value to real estate development projects by ...

Kim, Kyungwon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gnie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Course selection grid 2010-03-16 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais GNG4170/4570 Cours de gestion au choix/ Management Elective Cours technique au choix/ Technical

Petriu, Emil M.

247

Gnie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Course selection grid 2013-03-22 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais GNG4170/4570 Cours de gestion au choix/ Management Elective Cours technique au choix/ Technical

Petriu, Emil M.

248

Gnie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Course selection grid 2011-11-03 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais GNG4170/4570 Cours de gestion au choix/ Management Elective Cours technique au choix/ Technical

Petriu, Emil M.

249

Gnie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie / Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie informatique / Computer Engineering Option gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie / Course selection grid 2010-12-01 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais GNG4170/4570 Cours de gestion au choix/ Management Elective Cours technique au choix/ Technical

Petriu, Emil M.

250

DEGREES, MAJORS, AND OPTIONS This is a list of the degrees, majors, and options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&S) Asian Studies* (L&S) Astronomy - Physics* (L&S) Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences* (L&S) Biochemistry* (L to the degree are shown. These degree titles appear on the student's transcript and on the diploma. The major titles and any applicable options appear only on the student's transcript. The school

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

251

Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Maintenance of Parent Strategies is Associated with Pre-Treatment Parent Fidelity, Treatment Assignment, and Post Treatment Community Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuller, A. (2011). JASPER: Interventionist workshops atjoint attention intervention (JASPER) in which the specificlevel of naturally occurring JASPER fidelity pre-treatment.

Fuller, Amy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modification of alkaline pulping to facilitate the isolation of aliphatic acids. Part 1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of pine wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pretreating pine chips (Pinus sylvestris) with sodium hydroxide prior to the alkaline delignification kraft, kraft-anthraquinone, and soda-anthraquinone) can facilitate the recovery of the carbohydrate degradation products from alkaline pulping liquors. Under suitable pretreatment conditions large amounts of carbohydrate degradation products (alipahtic acids) were formed relative to lignin. The lignin fraction was composed of comparatively low-molecular-weight fragments. Although the delignification was considerably retarded and the yield (based on wood) was decreased by 1-3%, the properties of the resulting pulp were essentially maintained despite pretreatment. Finally, data are given for the composition of aliphatic acids in liquors resulting from pretreatments.

Alen, R.; Niemelae, K.; Sjoestroem, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble {sup 137}Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in {sup 137}Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005.

HAMILTON, D.W.

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and load-serving entities (LSEs) to procure renewable energy generation. Utility procurement options may be a function of state policy and regulatory preferences, and in some cases, may be dictated by legislative authority. Utilities and LSEs commonly use competitive solicitations or bilateral contracting to procure renewable energy supply to meet RPS mandates. However, policymakers and regulators in several states are beginning to explore the use of alternatives, namely feed-in tariffs (FITs) and auctions to procure renewable energy supply. This report evaluates four procurement strategies (competitive solicitations, bilateral contracting, FITs, and auctions) against four main criteria: (1) pricing; (2) complexity and efficiency of the procurement process; (3) impacts on developers access to markets; and (4) ability to complement utility decision-making processes. These criteria were chosen because they take into account the perspective of each group of stakeholders: ratepayers, regulators, utilities, investors, and developers.

Kreycik, C. E.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000{degrees} F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effect of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to that obtained using catalytically modified host oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coggeshall. 2008. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: DeploymentEconomics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California.Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact of improved hydrogen storage may be through makingand M. Gardiner, Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies andscience related to hydrogen storage could change how a

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to Their Adoption: A Scoping Study Jump to: navigation, search Name Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their Adoption: A Scoping Study AgencyCompany...

263

How to implement renewable energy and energy efficiency options...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

implement renewable energy and energy efficiency options Support for South African local government Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to implement...

264

Investigation of energy storage options for sustainable energy systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Determination of the possible energy storage options for a specific source of energy requires a thorough analysis from the points of energy, exergy, and exergoeconomics.… (more)

Hosseini, Mehdi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Automobile Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Feebates: A Legislative...

266

Directory of Standard, Optional and Other Agency Forms  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive lists the Directory of Standard, Optional and Other Agency Forms and includes a list of Departmental reports and forms managers. Cancels DOE 1322.4A.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)...

268

Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional...

269

NCSL - State Policy Options: A Report of the National Conference...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NCSL - State Policy Options: A Report of the National Conference of State Legislatures Task Force on military and Veterans Affairs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

270

Announcement Notice Options By STI Type | Scientific and Technical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transmission Option BooksMonographs (non-copyrighted) BooksMonographs (copyrighted) Conference PapersPresentationsProceedings (non-copyrighted Conference Papers...

271

Clean Energy Options for Sabah: An Analysis of Resource Availability...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Analysis of Resource Availability and Cost Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Energy Options for Sabah: An Analysis of Resource Availability and Cost AgencyCompany...

272

DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and operating the Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in New Mexico. The option DOE exercised is a part of the WIPP contract that was competitively...

273

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation apparatus with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated investigations to explore the potential that sonication may offer to enhance carbonation reactivity. During the second project year, we extended our investigations of the effects of sonication on the extent of carbonation as a function of the following parameters: particle size distribution, the mass of solid reactant, volume fraction of aqueous solution present, sonication power, time, temperature, and CO{sub 2} pressure. To date, none of the conditions investigated have significantly enhanced carbonation. Mechanistic investigations of the stirred ({approx}1,500 rpm) aqueous olivine carbonation process indicate the carbonation process involves both incongruent magnesium dissolution and silica precipitation, which results in robust silica-rich passivating layer formation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry observation of H within the passivating layer that forms during static carbonation suggests 2H{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ion exchange is associated with incongruent dissolution. Apparently, H{sub 2}O forms at or near the olivine/passivating-layer interface during the process and diffuses out through the passivating layers during the carbonation reaction. This is

Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment. 6 figures.

Feng, Z.; Brewer, M.; Brown, I.; Komvopoulos, K.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Final Report - "Foaming and Antifoaming and Gas Entrainment in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass, while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule-heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The DWPF has experienced difficulty during operations. The cause of the operational problems has been attributed to foaming, gas entrainment and the rheological properties of the process slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and meter feed processes. Highly viscous material can lead to air entrainment during agitation and difficulties with pump operations. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the surface phenomena, suspension rheology and bubble generation of interactions that lead to foaming and air entrainment problems in the DOE High Level and Low Activity Radioactive Waste separation and immobilization processes were pursued under this project. The first major task accomplished in the grant proposal involved development of a theoretical model of the phenomenon of foaming in a three-phase gas-liquid-solid slurry system. This work was presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis (9). The second major task involved the investigation of the inter-particle interaction and microstructure formation in a model slurry by the batch sedimentation method. Both experiments and modeling studies were carried out. The results were presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis. The third task involved the use of laser confocal microscopy to study the effectiveness of three slurry rheology modifiers. An effective modifier was identified which resulted in lowering the yield stress of the waste simulant. Therefore, the results of this research have led to the basic understanding of the foaming/antifoaming mechanism in waste slurries as well as identification of a rheology modifier, which enhances the processing throughput, and accelerates the DOE mission. The objectives of this research effort were to develop a fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical mechanisms that produced foaming and air entrainment in the DOE High Level (HLW) and Low Activity (LAW) radioactive waste separation and immobilization processes, and to develop and test advanced antifoam/defoaming/rheology modifier agents. Antifoams/rheology modifiers developed from this research ere tested using non-radioactive simulants of the radioactive wastes obtained from Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Wasan, Darsh T.

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of Catalyst Pre-Treatment on Chirality-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that catalyst pre-treatment conditions can have a profound effect on the chiral distribution in single-walled carbon nanotubes chemical vapor deposition. Using a SiO2-supported Cobalt model catalyst and pre-treatment in NH3, we obtain a...

Fouquet, Martin; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Thomsen, Christian; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Jump Starting GARCH: Pricing Options with Jumps in Returns and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jump Starting GARCH: Pricing Options with Jumps in Returns and Volatilities J. Duan, P. Ritchken and volatilities. Our model nests Duan's GARCH option models where conditional returns are constrained to being normal, as well as extends Merton's jump-diffusion model by allowing return volatility to exhibit GARCH

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

280

Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-lived radioactive components. · Safe: no catastrophic accidents; Low-risk for nuclear materials proliferation WhyMike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization Aspen, 9 July 2003 Fusion Energy: "Pipe Dream or Panacea" #12;Mike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths

Mauel, Michael E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Trinomialtree based parallel option price Alexandros V. Gerbessiotis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be performed in parallel. We introduce a method in performing these valuations in parallelTrinomial­tree based parallel option price valuations Alexandros V. Gerbessiotis Department; Trinomial­tree based parallel option price valuations Alexandros V. Gerbessiotis CS Department New Jersey

Gerbessiotis, Alexandros V.

282

QUADRATIC CONVERGENCE FOR VALUING AMERICAN OPTIONS USING A PENALTY METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUADRATIC CONVERGENCE FOR VALUING AMERICAN OPTIONS USING A PENALTY METHOD P.A. FORSYTH AND K.R. VETZAL Abstract. The convergence of a penalty method for solving the discrete regularized American option valuation problem is studied. Sufficient conditions are derived which both guarantee conver- gence

Forsyth, Peter A.

283

Swing Options Valuation: a BSDE with Constrained Jumps Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swing Options Valuation: a BSDE with Constrained Jumps Approach Marie Bernhart Huy^en Pham Peter Tankov Xavier Warin§ January 7, 2011 Abstract We introduce a new probabilistic method for solving a class (BSDEs for short) with constrained jumps. As an example, our method is used for pricing Swing options. We

284

Finance 2nd Option Worksheet 2010 -2012 Name: Date: UNOFFICIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finance 2nd Option Worksheet 2010 - 2012 Name: Date: UNOFFICIAL Fall Credits Spring Credits ECNS 3 Spring only BFIN 456 Entrp Finance 3 Fall/Spring BFIN 452 Int'l Finance 3 Spring only BFIN 466/2012 Senior-Level Option Courses Finance Restricted Electives (9 crds required) Form can be found online

Maxwell, Bruce D.

285

Finance 2nd Option Worksheet 2012 -2014 Name: Date: UNOFFICIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finance 2nd Option Worksheet 2012 - 2014 Name: Date: UNOFFICIAL Fall Credits Spring Credits ECNS 3 Spring only BFIN 456 Entrp Finance 3 Fall/Spring BFIN 452 Int'l Finance 3 Spring only BFIN 466/2012 Senior-Level Option Courses Finance Restricted Electives (9 crds required) Form can be found online

Maxwell, Bruce D.

286

Equilibrium pricing bounds on option prices Marie Chazala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

probability measure that is equivalent to the historical one, and under which the discounted price processesEquilibrium pricing bounds on option prices Marie Chazala and Ely`es Jouinib a CREST, France price at maturity, we derive an upper bound on the call option price by putting two kind of restrictions

Boyer, Edmond

287

Valuation and Optimal Exercise Strategy of Electricity Swing Options.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Valuation and Optimal Exercise Strategy of Electricity Swing Options. Gido Haarbrücker, Daniel Kuhn plateforme de recherche Alexandria https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch | 04.02.2014 Electricity swing options https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch | 04.02.2014 mot-clé energy, derivative pricing, electricity swing

Dalang, Robert C.

288

ICORE: Image Co-addition with Optional Resolution Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masci * Implemented QA plot files. * Included ­wf option to control inverse variance weighting. When on. There is no warranty that the software described herein is free of bugs. This includes proper graceful program WCS and distortion keys). * Implemented auto-tiling option to support memory management for outlier

Masci, Frank

289

An option of "UCN pump" for ESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this short note is to present an option for a source of ultracold neutrons (UCNs), which could profit from the pulse time-structure of the future ESS spallation neutron source in Lund, and thus which could produce a very high UCN density and a rather high UCN flux simultaneously. In order to realize this idea one has to install a relatively thin solid-deuterium UCN source in a close vicinity to the spallation target and to couple it with an extraction UCN guide with an entrance membrane window, which is moving periodically and synchronously with the operation cycle of the spallation source, as explained in the text below. This proposal profits from the fact that all characteristic parameters of the problem, such as the pulse duration of the ESS spallation source, the typical thickness of solid deuterium source that could be easily realized, the typical time of generation of UCNs in solid deuterium, the length and diameter of the extraction neutron guide and the time diagram of the membrane motion t...

Nesvizhevsky, Valery V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of passive solar retrofit options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation framework has been developed which allows for the assessment of the role of passive solar retrofit in the nationwide reduction of conventional fuel use. Three types of analysis are proposed within this framework: the physical/technical capability of the present housing stock to incorporate passive solar retrofit; the economic feasibility of the application of retrofit designs; and the actual market potential or acceptance of these alternative retrofit options. Each type of analysis has specific data requirements and a series of evaluation procedures to help establish estimates of the potential for passive solar retrofit in the present housing stock. The data requirements with their respective sources and evaluation procedures for the first two types of analysis-physical/technical setting and economic feasibility, are examined. A distinction is drawn between community specific case studies and more generalized national assessments. Information derived from these three types of analysis, whether case specific or national in scope, can then be used in an evaluation of potential economic impacts. The establishment of regional economic benefits and costs werve as a measure of the merit or attractiveness of the implementation of a passive solar retrofit program.

Ben-David, S.; Kirchemen, C.; Martin, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Comparing different pre-treatment methods for strongly compacted organic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sieving: a case study on Roman waterlogged deposits Patricia Vandorpe and Stefanie Jacomet Four preComparing different pre-treatment methods for strongly compacted organic sediments prior to wet of the experiment was to find out which pre- treatment method facilitates the sieving process without destroying

Jacomet, Stefanie

292

Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glycol 4000 during water-only or dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover at 140­220 °C were evaluated energy security, trade deficit, environmental, and economic issues that are becoming more urgent in light of declining petroleum reserves and increasing international demand for transportation fuels. However

California at Riverside, University of

293

De-oiling and Pre-treatments for High-Quality Potato Chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A de-oiling step using a centrifuge ensures oil content reduction and improves the quality of fried snacks. A commercial deep-fat fryer with the basket loaded with potatoes and a sample holder was used to fry potato slices, non-pretreated, blanched...

Kim, Tae Hoon

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Functions and requirements for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Site tank waste supernatants will be pretreated to separate the low-level and high-level fractions. The low-level waste fraction, containing the bulk of the chemical constituents, must be processed into a vitrified waste product which will be disposed of onsite, in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner. The high-level waste fraction separated during supernatant pretreatment (primarily cesium) will be recombined with an additional high-level waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-level waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository. The purpose of this document is to establish the functional requirements baseline for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module, by defining the level 5 and 6 functions and requirements for the project. A functional analysis approach has been used to break down the program functions and associated physical requirements that each function must meet. As the systems engineering process evolves, the design requirements document will replace this preliminary functions and requirements document. The design requirements document (DRD) will identify key decisions and associated uncertainties that impact the project. A revision of this document to a DRD is not expected to change the performance requirements or open issues. However, additional requirements and issues may be identified.

Swanson, L.M.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

2007 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Pretreatment: the key to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presents important opportunities to achieve very low costs, pretreatment of naturally resistant cellulosic materials is essential if we are to achieve high yields from biological operations; this operation biological, chemical, physical, and thermal approaches have been investigated over the years, but only those

California at Riverside, University of

296

Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment on the Enzymatic understand these trade-offs, comparative data are reported on xylan and lignin removal and enzymatic with just water enhanced the xylan dissolution rate, more than doubled total lignin removal, and increased

California at Riverside, University of

297

Chemical cleaning of coal by molten caustic leaching after pretreatment by low-temperature devolatilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Pretreatment of coal by devolatization at temperatures ranging from about 420.degree. C. to about 450.degree. C. for from about 10 minutes to about 30 minutes before leaching with molten caustic leads to a significant reduction in carbonate formation, greatly reducing the cost of cleaning coal on a per ton basis.

Chriswell, Colin D. (Slater, IA); Kaushik, Surender M. (Socorro, NM); Shah, Navin D. (Houston, TX); Markuszewski, Richard (Ames, IA)

1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hypersonic flight testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the design process for a hypersonic vehicle, it is necessary to predict the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment for flight conditions. This involves combining results obtained from ground testing with analytical modeling to predict the aerodynamics and heating for all conditions of interest. The question which always arises is, how well will these models predict what is actually seen in a flight environment This paper will briefly address ground-testing and analytical modeling and discuss where each is appropriate, and the associated problems with each area. It will then describe flight test options as well as instrumentation currently available and show how flight tests can be used to validate or improve models. Finally, several results will be shown to indicate areas where ground testing and modeling alone are inadequate to accurately predict hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics.

Williamson, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gnie mcanique avec option Gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie/ Mechanical Engineering with Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie mécanique avec option Gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie/ Mechanical Engineering / Course selection grid 06/05/2013 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais/4722 (6 cr) MCG4328/4728 Cours au choix de l'option gestion et entrepreneuriat/ Management

Petriu, Emil M.

300

Gnie mcanique avec option Gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingnierie/ Mechanical Engineering with Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Génie mécanique avec option Gestion et entrepreneuriat en ingénierie/ Mechanical Engineering / Course selection grid 29/02/2012 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux langues (anglais/4722 (6 cr) MCG4328/4728 Cours au choix de l'option gestion et entrepreneuriat/ Management

Petriu, Emil M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS

Collins, Gary S.

302

Nanoporous Membranes for Pretreatment of Lignocellulose and Other  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplications - Energy

303

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Proceeding of the Hawaii International System Science Conference, January 1999 Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity Service Shmuel S. Oren that provides a hedge against price risk and reflects the "real options" available to the customer. This paper flexibility by responding to the price signal and exercise its "real option" to reduce consumption when

Oren, Shmuel S.

305

Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater adaptability of the process to DOE alkaline salt wastes, and greater readiness for implementation. Such benefits accrue from optimal sizing of centrifugal contactors for application of the CSSX process for the IPS; more accurate modeling of cesium extraction with greater flexibility and applicability to a variety of feeds and flowsheet conditions; and further improving and optimizing the alternative CSSX solvent and scrub/strip system.

Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

Dowe, N.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Scarcity of Ideas and R&D Options: Use it, Lose it, or Bank it  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Delay in a Real Options Model of R&D Competition,"ideas; imagination; innovation; real options; search models;low cost. Our model is a real options model in the spirit of

Erkal, Nisvan; Scotchmer, Suzanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Real Options Valuation of U.S. Federal Renewable Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Real Options Valuation of US FederalBerkeley, 18 March 2005 Real Options Valuation of US Federalabove by developing a real options model of RE RD 3 that

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Wiser, Ryan H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Scarcity of Ideas and R&D Options: Use it, Lose it or Bank it.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Delay in a Real Options Model of R&D Competition,"low cost. Our model is a real options model in the spirit ofa value to delay. In many real options models, the value of

Scotchmer, Suzanne; Erkal, Nisvan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Valuing innovative technology R&D as a real option : application to fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to elucidate real option thinking and real option valuation techniques for innovative technology investment. Treating the fuel cell R&D investment as a real option for General Motor's light passenger vehicle ...

Tsui, Maggie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

For Immediate Release --Wednesday, September 24, 2014 University of Lethbridge unveils three options for new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the design process. In developing the three options, an Integrated Design Planning of Lethbridge unveils three options for new Science and Academic Building, as three building massing options for the new Science and Academic Building were

Hossain, Shahadat

312

Phase 1: A Compilation of Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every week, news headlines report on toxic substances discovered in consumer products. The public assumes that the government tests products for chemical safety, but that is not true for most items. We know little about how the thousands of industrial chemicals in use today affect people and the

California Green

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

DESIGN OPTIONS FOR SMALL SCALE SHARED MEMORY MULTIPROCESSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i DESIGN OPTIONS FOR SMALL SCALE SHARED MEMORY MULTIPROCESSORS by Luiz André Barroso Copyright 1996 Luiz André Barroso #12;ii to Jacqueline Chame #12;iii Acknowledgments During my stay at USC I

Barroso, Luiz André

315

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable...

316

A two-method solution to the investment timing option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the realm of derivative asset valuation, two types of methods are available for solving the investment timing option, each with a serious limitation for practical projects. Methods that use Monte Carlo simulation ...

Laughton, David G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Application of real options to reverse logistics process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, real options are used to identify the optimal model for the reverse logistics process of a technology company in the circuit board business. Currently, customers return defective boards and the company ...

Kaga, Akihiro, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Extensions of Lo's semiparametric bound for European call options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 19, 2006 ... call option, given up to third-order moment information on the underly- ing asset ...... Assume p(s) has real roots r1 ? r2 ? r3. If a3 > 0 then p(s) ...

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

An Analysis of Steam Process Heater Condensate Drainage Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production and reliability performance of Steam Process Heaters can be significantly affected by the condensate drainage design that is employed. There are currently a variety of drainage options which can be confusing to a system designer who...

Risko, J. R.

320

Early Draft Energy Policy and Financing Options to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................................................. 6 3. HIDDEN BENEFITS OF SOLAR ENERGYEarly Draft Energy Policy and Financing Options to Achieve Solar Penetration Targets: Accounting the costs both of solar technology and of grid integration, so enabling solar deployment nationwide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microsoft Word - Draft Option Mod Oct - Dec 2011 rev 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2006 to December 31, 2011, may be for period(s) from three months to five years. The Contracting Officer will determine the duration of these option period(s) at the time of...

322

Local Option- Property Tax Credit for High Performance Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Similar to Maryland's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=M... Local Option Property Tax Credit for Renewable Energy], Title 9 of Maryland's property tax code...

323

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option embedded in a solar PPA or lease be priced no lowerit harder to sell solar PPAs or leases. 2) Credit Quality:post-flip). A lease enables the solar PPA provider to, in

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Real options approach to capacity planning under uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis highlights the effectiveness of Real Options Analysis (ROA) in capacity planning decisions for engineering projects subject to uncertainty. This is in contrast to the irreversible decision-making proposed by ...

Mittal, Geetanjali, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Robust option pricing : An [epsilon]-arbitrage approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research aims to provide tractable approaches to price options using robust optimization. The pricing problem is reduced to a problem of identifying the replicating portfolio which minimizes the worst case arbitrage ...

Chen, Si, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

More than six dozen middle school girls visited INL to learn about career options in science and engineering at the annual My Amazing Future event organized by Idaho Women in Nuclear.

327

The Minimum Assumed Incentive Effect of Executive Share Options   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In granting executive share options (ESOs), companies hand over financial assets to the executive at an opportunity cost that generally outweighs the value placed on those assets by the executive on the receiving end. This ...

Main, Brian G M; Skovoroda, Rodion; Buck, Trevor; Bruce, Alistair

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Platforms and real options in large-scale engineering systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis introduces a framework and two methodologies that enable engineering management teams to assess the value of real options in programs of large-scale, partially standardized systems implemented a few times over ...

Kalligeros, Konstantinos C., 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

> Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project Review Meeting 6 January 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN Mark E....

330

A New Spectral Element Method for Pricing European Options ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 11, 2011 ... Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA) 2011 ...... Carr, P., Madan, D.B., Smith, R.H.: Option valuation using the fast Fourier ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

Building America Expert Meeting: Windows Options for New and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the...

332

Required and Optional Metadata | Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and Optional Metadata Print page Print page Metadata Provided to OSTI via AN 241.1 Web Metadata Provided to OSTI via Harvesting Metadata Provided to OSTI via Batch Upload...

333

China-Assessing Policy Options for Increasing the Use of Renewable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Options for Increasing the Use of Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Assessing Policy Options for Increasing the Use of...

334

Structural carbohydrate availability with electrochemical ozonation and ammonia pressurization / depressurization pre-treatment technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass into available and /or soluble sugars and organic acids (i. e. uronic acid esters etc. ). The chemical linkages between hemicellulose and lignin may be affected by ammoniation pre-treatment. The significance of this fact is that heavily cross... by Turner et al (1995) demonstrated a significant increase in the available energy and crude protein of NH3 treated maize. Ammoniation of rice straw (Pradhan et al, 1997) bound residual ammonia to fiber and yielded an increase in the level of crude...

Williams, James Jason

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermal Pretreatment of Wood for Cogasification/cofiring of Biomass and Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of biomass as a co-feed in coal and biomass co-firing and co-gasification requires size reduction of the biomass. Reducing biomass to below 0.2 mm without pretreatment is difficult and costly because biomass is fibrous and compressible. Torrefaction is a promising thermal pretreatment process and has the advantages of increasing energy density, improving grindability, producing fuels with more homogenous compositions and hydrophobic behavior. Temperature is the most important factor for the torrefaction process. Biomass grindability is related to cell wall structure, thickness and composition. Thermal treatment such as torrefaction can cause chemical changes that significantly affect the strength of biomass. The objectives of this study are to understand the mechanism by which torrefaction improves the grindability of biomass and discuss suitable temperatures for thermal pretreatment for co-gasification/cofiring of biomass and coal. Wild cherry wood was selected as the model for this study. Samples were prepared by sawing a single tangential section from the heartwood and cutting it into eleven pieces. The samples were consecutively heated at 220, 260, 300, 350, 450 and 550oC for 0.5 hr under flowing nitrogen in a tube furnace. Untreated and treated samples were characterized for physical properties (color, dimensions and weight), microstructural changes by SEM, and cell wall composition changes and thermal behaviors by TGA and DSC. The morphology of the wood remained intact through the treatment range but the cell walls were thinner. Thermal treatments were observed to decompose the cell wall components. Hemicellulose decomposed over the range of ~200 to 300oC and resulted in weakening of the cell walls and subsequently improved grindability. Furthermore, wood samples treated above 300oC lost more than 39% in mass. Therefore, thermal pretreatment above the hemicelluloses decomposition temperature but below 300oC is probably sufficient to improve grindability and retain energy value.

Wang, Ping; Howard, Bret; Hedges, Sheila; Morreale, Bryan; Van Essendelft, Dirk; Berry, David

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

HAMILTON, D.W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant places first complex piping module in Pretreatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crews at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant, also known as the "Vit Plant," placed a 19-ton piping module inside the Pretreatment Facility. The module was lifted over 98-foot-tall walls and lowered into a space that provided less than two inches of clearance on each side and just a few feet on each end. It was set 56 feet above the ground.

339

Sequestration Options for the West Coast States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source-sink matching was implemented and preliminary marginal cost curves developed, which showed that 20, 40, or 80 Mega tonnes (Mt) of CO{sub 2} per year could be sequestered in California at a cost of $31/tonne (t), $35/t, or $50/t, respectively. Phase I also addressed key issues affecting deployment of CCS technologies, including storage-site monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks. A framework for screening and ranking candidate sites for geologic CO{sub 2} storage on the basis of HSE risk was developed. A webbased, state-by-state compilation of current regulations for injection wells, and permits/contracts for land use changes, was developed, and modeling studies were carried out to assess the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration. Public outreach activities resulted in heightened awareness of sequestration among state, community and industry leaders in the Region. Assessment of the changes in carbon stocks in agricultural lands showed that Washington, Oregon and Arizona were CO{sub 2} sources for the period from 1987 to 1997. Over the same period, forest carbon stocks decreased in Washington, but increased in Oregon and Arizona. Results of the terrestrial supply curve analyses showed that afforestation of rangelands and crop lands offer major sequestration opportunities; at a price of $20 per t CO{sub 2}, more than 1,233 MMT could be sequestered over 40-years in Washington and more than 1,813 MMT could be sequestered in Oregon.

Larry Myer

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Spcialis approfondi en informatique, option gestion et entrepreneuriat / Honours with Specialization in Computer Science, Management and Entrepreneurship Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spécialisé approfondi en informatique, option gestion et entrepreneuriat / Honours/3719, ADM3326/3726, GNG4170/4570 et PHI2397/2797 Bien que les cotes de cours apparaissent dans les deux

Petriu, Emil M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Sedov Test Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sedov test is classically defined as a point blast problem. The Sedov problem has led us to advances in algorithms and in their understanding. Vorticity generation can be physical or numerical. Both play a role in Sedov calculations. The RAGE code (Eulerian) resolves the shock well, but produces vorticity. The source definition matters. For the FLAG code (Lagrange), CCH is superior to SGH by avoiding spurious vorticity generation. FLAG SGH currently has a number of options that improve results over traditional settings. Vorticity production, not shock capture, has driven the Sedov work. We are pursuing treatments with respect to the hydro discretization as well as to artificial viscosity.

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Masser, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

High SO2 Removal Efficiency Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, "High Efficiency SO2 Removal Testing", for the time period 1 January through 31 March 1997. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO2 removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The "base" project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company?s Big Bend Station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy?s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company?s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy?s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light?s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation?s (NYSEG) Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. However, additional testing is planned at the Big Bend Station. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the second quarter of calendar year 1997. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

Gary Blythe

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Statement of Work- Optional Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Spreadsheet features optional Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) services for energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

346

Perturbation Expansion for Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We fit the volatility fluctuations of the S&P 500 index well by a Chi distribution, and the distribution of log-returns by a corresponding superposition of Gaussian distributions. The Fourier transform of this is, remarkably, of the Tsallis type. An option pricing formula is derived from the same superposition of Black-Scholes expressions. An explicit analytic formula is deduced from a perturbation expansion around a Black-Scholes formula with the mean volatility. The expansion has two parts. The first takes into account the non-Gaussian character of the stock-fluctuations and is organized by powers of the excess kurtosis, the second is contract based, and is organized by the moments of moneyness of the option. With this expansion we show that for the Dow Jones Euro Stoxx 50 option data, a Delta-hedging strategy is close to being optimal.

Petr Jizba; Hagen Kleinert; Patrick Haener

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nuclear Power Options Viability Study. Volume 4. Bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Documents in the Nuclear Power Options Viability Study (NPOVS) bibliography are classified under one of four headings or categories as follows: nuclear options; light water reactors; liquid metal reactors; and high temperature reactors. The collection and selection of these documents, beginning early in 1984 and continuing through March of 1986, was carried out in support of the study's objective: to explore the viabilities of several nuclear electric power generation options for commercial deployment in the United States between 2000 and 2010. There are approximately 550 articles, papers, reports, and books in the bibliography that have been selected from some 2000 surveyed. The citations have been made computer accessible to facilitate rapid on-line retrieval by keyword, author, corporate author, title, journal name, or document number.

Trauger, D.B.; White, J.D.; Sims, J.W. (eds.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preceding paper described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 watts(e) if desired by the mission planners. There are 5 copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository. There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected.

Dixon, B.W.; Piet, S.J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Farm Credit Crisis: Policy Options and Consequences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IUU\\,., Z TA245.7 8873 NO.1532 8-1532 ~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service -P~fJ& 1I~tA!/ P~fJ& --------=-. ------- Ifhe Farm Credit Crisis: Policy Opt~ons and ,Consequences LI3RAnv APR 181986 -l~ ? '. University Texas Agricultural... to the need for a comprehensive documentation of the broad spectrum of policy options available to deal with the farm credit crisis. Emphasis is placed upon a description of options and their consequences. The topics covered in the articles were...

Duncan, Marvin; Harrington, David H.; Brake, John; Boehlje, Michael; Lee, Warren; Barry, Peter J.; Penson, John B.; Hughes, Dean W.; Knutson, Ronald D.: Richardson, James W.; Jolly, Robert W.; Lins, David A.; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Guither, Harold D.; Marshall, J. Paxton; Barkley, Paul W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hybrid options for light-duty vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer great promise in improving fuel economy. In this paper, we analyze why, how, and by how much vehicle hybridization can reduce energy consumption and improve fuel economy. Our analysis focuses on efficiency gains associated solely with vehicle hybridization. We do not consider such other measures as vehicle weight reduction or air- and tire-resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. The analysis starts with understanding the energy inefficiencies of light-duty vehicles associated with different operation modes in US and Japanese urban and highway driving cycles, with the corresponding energy-saving potentials. The potential for fuel economy gains due to vehicle hybridization can be estimated almost exclusively on the basis of three elements: the reducibility of engine idling operation, the recoverability of braking energy losses, and the capability of improving engine load profiles to gain efficiency associated with specific HEV configurations and control strategies. Specifically, we evaluate the energy efficiencies and fuel economies of a baseline MY97 Corolla-like conventional vehicle (CV), a hypothetical Corolla-based minimal hybrid vehicle (MHV), and a MY98 Prius-like full hybrid vehicle (FHV). We then estimate energy benefits of both MHVs and FHVs over CVs on a performance-equivalent basis. We conclude that the energy benefits of hybridization vary not only with test cycles, but also with performance requirements. The hybrid benefits are greater for ''Corolla (high) performance-equivalent'' vehicles than for ''Prius (low) performance-equivalent'' vehicles. An increasing acceleration requirement would result in larger fuel economy benefits from vehicle hybridization.

An, F., Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

Lumetta, G.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assessment of First Wall and Blanket Options with the Use of Liquid Breeder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As candidate blanket concepts for a U.S. advanced reactor power plant design, with consideration of the time frame for ITER development, we assessed first wall and blanket design concepts based on the use of reduced activation ferritic steel as structural material and liquid breeder as the coolant and tritium breeder. The liquid breeder choice includes the conventional molten salt Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} and the low melting point molten salts such as LiBeF{sub 3} and LiNaBeF{sub 4} (FLiNaBe). Both self-cooled and dual coolant molten salt options were evaluated. We have also included the dual coolant leadeutectic Pb-17Li design in our assessment. We take advantage of the molten salt low electrical and thermal conductivity to minimize impacts from the MHD effect and the heat losses from the breeder to the actively cooled steel structure. For the Pb-17Li breeder we employ flow channel inserts of SiC{sub f}/SiC composite with low electrical and thermal conductivity to perform respective insulation functions. We performed preliminary assessments of these design options in the areas of neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, safety, and power conversion system. Status of the R and D items of selected high performance blanket concepts is reported. Results from this study will form the technical basis for the formulation of the U.S. ITER test module program and corresponding test plan.

Wong, C.P.C.; Malang, S.; Sawan, M. (and others)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

On Accurate and Provably Efficient GARCH Option Pricing Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Accurate and Provably Efficient GARCH Option Pricing Algorithms Yuh-Dauh Lyuu Chi-Ning Wu Abstract The GARCH model has been very successful in capturing the serial corre- lation of asset return tree-based GARCH op- tion pricing algorithms suffer from exponential running time, a cut-off maturity

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

355

SHORT-TERM GENERATION ASSET VALUATION: A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using real options to value power plants with unit commitment constraints over a short-term period. We forward-moving Monte Carlo simulation with backward-moving dynamic programming. We assume that the power significantly overvalue a power plant. With deregulation of the electricity industry a global trend, utilities

Tseng, Chung-Li

356

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Composting is an effective treatment option for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Composting is an effective treatment option for sanitization of Phytophthora of California, Berkeley, CA, USA 2 Sonoma Compost, Sonoma, CA, USA 3 McEvoy Ranch, Marin, CA, USA Introduction.1111/j.1365-2672.2006.03008.x Abstract Aims: To determine the effects of heat and composting treatments

California at Berkeley, University of

357

National Transportation Policy Options: A Time for Choice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Transportation Policy Options: A Time for Choice A white paper for participants of the 2008 James L. Oberstar Forum The Next Authorization: Transforming Transportation Policy? April 6­7, 2008 Minneapolis, Minnesota Sponsored by Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota

Minnesota, University of

358

Assessing Novel Foundation Options for Offshore Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing Novel Foundation Options for Offshore Wind Turbines B.W. Byrne, BE(Hons), BCom, MA, DPhil G.T. Houlsby, MA, DSc, FREng, FICE Oxford University, UK SYNOPSIS Offshore wind farms of these being the foundations for the offshore turbines. We review here the results of a recent research

Byrne, Byron

359

Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options Belal E. Baaquie RMI are financial derivatives that can be analyzed in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum finance. Forward-2963 Fax: (65) 6777-6126 Email: phybeb@nus.edu.sg #12;Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

360

Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

Cipparone, L.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

YEAR PALAEOMAGNETISM OPTION 5TH WEEK ENVIRONMENTAL MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4TH YEAR ­ PALAEOMAGNETISM OPTION ­ 5TH WEEK ­ ENVIRONMENTAL MAGNETISM Questions to be investigated: 1. What is environmental magnetism? 2. What rock magnetic parameters are used in environmental magnetism? 3. What geologic parameters are contributing to the environmental magnetic signals? 4. How can we

Niocaill, Conall Mac

362

DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION CENTERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, VMT fee, data processing, fuel tax alternatives, fee collection center, customer service center 18DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION CENTERS by Robert L. Bertini Kerri-based fee collection centers, including the identification of issues related to data transmission, data

Bertini, Robert L.

363

RISK MANAGEMENT IN REAL OPTIONS BASED PHARMACEUTICAL PORTFOLIO PLANNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 814-863-9958. Fax: 814-865-7846. In the pharmaceutical industry, the optimal management of the newRISK MANAGEMENT IN REAL OPTIONS BASED PHARMACEUTICAL PORTFOLIO PLANNING Michael J. Rogers, Anshuman incorporate a Monte Carlo simulation procedure to a stochastic optimization model (OptFolio) of pharmaceutical

Maranas, Costas

364

Department of Philosophy -Philosophy Option Checklist 2010 -2012 Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Philosophy - Philosophy Option Checklist 2010 -2012 Catalog Student: GID #: Students may declare a philosophy major at any time. Please go to the Department Office in 2-155 Wilson Hall Upper-division courses: Required History of Philosophy Courses Semester Grade 1. PHL 361RH History

Maxwell, Bruce D.

365

Department of History and Philosophy Philosophy -Philosophy Option Checklist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of History and Philosophy Philosophy - Philosophy Option Checklist 2012 -2014 Catalog Student: GID #: Students may declare a philosophy major at any time. Please go to the Department Office Grade 1. PHL 236Q, Logic Upper-division courses: Required History of Philosophy Courses Semester Grade 1

Lawrence, Rick L.

366

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND OPTIONS FOR FINAL FOCUSING SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND OPTIONS FOR FINAL FOCUSING SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS OF HEAVY-ION DRIVERS L of using both high-temperature superconductors and con- ventional low-temperature superconductors are investi- gated. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials may offer an attractive, although

California at San Diego, University of

367

General Electric Company Evaluation of Sustainable Energy Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Electric Company Evaluation of Sustainable Energy Options for the Big Island of Hawaii-West Rd, Post 109 Honolulu, HI 96822 Phone: 808-956-8346 e-mail: rochelea@hawaii.edu General Electric by General Electric Company (GE) as an account of work sponsored by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI

368

Database Managament IS&M Option Mark Levene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Database Managament IS&M Option Mark Levene Email: m.levene@dcs.bbk.ac.uk Web: http://www.dcs.bbk.ac.uk/~mark/ Lecture Plan 1. Introduction to Databases 2. Data Modelling with the Entity-Relationship Model 3 and Referential Integrity 4. Querying a Relational Database (a) Querying a Single Table (b) Aggregating

Levene, Mark

369

SURVEY OF EARNED DOCTORATES (SED) WEB REGISTRATION OPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEY OF EARNED DOCTORATES (SED) WEB REGISTRATION OPTION Congratulations on completing your recipients will now be able to register directly via the web and instantaneously receive a PIN and password about the web survey, please do not hesitate to contact us: 4800-sed@norc.uchicago.edu or 1

Omiecinski, Curtis

370

Assessment for advanced fuel cycle options in CANDU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possible options for advanced fuel cycles in CANDU reactors including actinide burning options and thorium cycles were explored and are feasible options to increase the efficiency of uranium utilization and help close the fuel cycle. The actinide burning TRUMOX approach uses a mixed oxide fuel of reprocessed transuranic actinides from PWR spent fuel blended with natural uranium in the CANDU-900 reactor. This system reduced actinide content by 35% and decreased natural uranium consumption by 24% over a PWR once through cycle. The thorium cycles evaluated used two CANDU-900 units, a generator and a burner unit along with a driver fuel feedstock. The driver fuels included plutonium reprocessed from PWR, from CANDU and low enriched uranium (LEU). All three cycles were effective options and reduced natural uranium consumption over a PWR once through cycle. The LEU driven system saw the largest reduction with a 94% savings while the plutonium driven cycles achieved 75% savings for PWR and 87% for CANDU. The high neutron economy, online fuelling and flexible compact fuel make the CANDU system an ideal reactor platform for many advanced fuel cycles.

Morreale, A.C.; Luxat, J.C. [McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W. Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Friedlander, Y. [AMEC-NSS Ltd., 700 University Ave. 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X6 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

6 options spring '00 understanding adaptation in natural systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Fisheries scientists and mana- gers have increasingly6 options spring '00 understanding adaptation in natural systems Shrinking Cod: Fishery-Induced Change in an Oceanic Stock Fishing is a major source of food and other resources for humankind. Today

Dieckmann, Ulf

372

Evaluation of Optional Cancellation Contracts using Quantitative Finance Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market. There are two ways of transporting natural gas: pipelines and liquefied natural gas (LNG). If there is a pipeline available, then it is the cheapest transportation option. LNG is the choice when no pipeline is available. LNG takes up to 1/600th the volume of natural gas. It requires special ships, known as LNG

Zubelli, Jorge Passamani

373

DISPOSITION PATHS FOR ROCKY FLATS GLOVEBOXES: EVALUATING OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC has the responsibility for closure activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). One of the challenges faced for closure is the disposition of radiologically contaminated gloveboxes. Evaluation of the disposition options for gloveboxes included a detailed analysis of available treatment capabilities, disposal facilities, and lifecycle costs. The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC followed several processes in determining how the gloveboxes would be managed for disposition. Currently, multiple disposition paths have been chosen to accommodate the needs of the varying styles and conditions of the gloveboxes, meet the needs of the decommissioning team, and to best manage lifecycle costs. Several challenges associated with developing a disposition path that addresses both the radiological and RCRA concerns as well as offering the most cost-effective solution were encountered. These challenges included meeting the radiological waste acceptance criteria of available disposal facilities, making a RCRA determination, evaluating treatment options and costs, addressing void requirements associated with disposal, and identifying packaging and transportation options. The varying disposal facility requirements affected disposition choices. Facility conditions that impacted decisions included radiological and chemical waste acceptance criteria, physical requirements, and measurement for payment options. The facility requirements also impacted onsite activities including management strategies, decontamination activities, and life-cycle cost.

Lobdell, D.; Geimer, R.; Larsen, P.; Loveland, K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Analysis of Green Energy Options for The Phipps Conservatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power and thermal energy via on-site generation or purchases of renewable energy credits: 1) A 5kW solid1 Analysis of Green Energy Options for The Phipps Conservatory Shahzeen Attari Elisabeth Gilmore or educational projects may make them worth the additional expense. Qualitative relative rankings of the project

Attari, Shahzeen Z.

375

"THE NUCLEAR OPTION IN GREEK NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"THE NUCLEAR OPTION IN GREEK NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY: A RENAISSANCE OR A DJA VUE" by RAPHAEL MOISSIS? · the Commission: · Recognizes the contribution of nuclear energy in CO2 emission reduction. · Underlines of nuclear energy generation is reduced, it is essential that this reduction be phased

376

On-Going Comparison of Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current comprehensive comparison of four major fuel cycle strategies: once-through, thermal recycle, thermal+fast recycle, fast recycle. It then proceeds to summarize comparison of the major technology options for the key elements of the fuel cycle that can implement each of the four strategies - separation processing, transmutation reactors, and fuels.

Piet, S.J.; Bennett, R.G.; Dixon, B.W.; Herring, J.S.; Shropshire, D.E.; Roth, M.; Smith, J.D.; Finck, P.; Hill, R.; Laidler, J.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Initial studies of pretreatment methods for neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing conceptual and experimental studies for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) aimed at determining the effectiveness of various pretreatment methods for the neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge currently being stored at the Hanford Site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of such pretreatment methods is to separate the transuranic (TRU) elements and the bulk components of the waste (primarily zirconium, sodium, fluoride, and hydroxide) to a level low enough that the bulk components can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW), with only a small volume, TRU-containing fraction requiring geologic disposal. This objective is driven primarily by the large cost differential projected between LLW and geologic disposal procedures. This report contains the results of the first three years (1987, 1988, and 1989) of the program. These results were earlier reported informally in letter reports; they are here compiled in appendix form in this formal report to be more readily available to other workers and the public. The results of work done in 1990 and in following years will be reported in separate formal reports.

Swanson, J L

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Application of cellulase and hemicellulase to pure xylan, pure cellulose, and switchgrass solids from leading pretreatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-glucosidase, Multifect xylanase, and beta-xylosidase were evaluated for hydrolysis of pure cellulose, pure xylan for transportation fuels are needed to replace depleting petroleum-based options and address global cli- mate change of technical and economical feasibilities (Wyman, 1994). A wide range of lignocellulosic biomass materials have

California at Riverside, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SRNL Review And Assessment Of WTP UFP-02 Sparger Design And Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During aerosol testing conducted by Parsons Constructors and Fabricators, Inc. (PCFI), air sparger plugging was observed in small-scale and medium-scale testing. Because of this observation, personnel identified a concern that the steam spargers in Pretreatment Facility vessel UFP-02 could plug during Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) operation. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide consultation on the evaluation of known WTP bubbler, and air and steam sparger issues. The authors used the following approach for this task: reviewed previous test reports (including smallscale testing, medium-scale testing, and Pretreatment Engineering Platform [PEP] testing), met with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) personnel to discuss sparger design, reviewed BNI documents supporting the sparger design, discussed sparger experience with Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Sellafield personnel, talked to sparger manufacturers about relevant operating experience and design issues, and reviewed UFP-02 vessel and sparger drawings.

Poirier, M. R.; Duignan, M. R.; Fink, S. D.; Steimke, J. L.

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effects of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to those obtained using catalytically modified heavy oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1993-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proposed Fidelity Option Line-Up Tier Fund Type Fund Category/Asset Class Proposed Investment Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Fidelity Option Line-Up Tier Fund Type Fund Category/Asset Class Proposed Investment Vanguard Inflation Protected Securities U.S. Large Cap Stock Index Fund Vanguard S&P 500 Index Fund U.S. Small/Mid Cap Stock Index Fund Vanguard Extended Market Index Fund International Stock Index Fund

384

On-Going Comparison of Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program is addressing key issues associated with critical national needs. This paper compares the major options with these major “outcome” objectives - waste geological repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety as well as “process” objectives associated with readiness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties. Working together, separation, transmutation, and fuel technologies provide complete energy systems that can improve waste management compared to the current “once-through/no separation” approach. Future work will further increase confidence in potential solutions, optimize solutions for the mixtures of objectives, and develop attractive development and deployment paths for selected options. This will allow the nation to address nearer-term issues such as avoiding the need for additional geological repositories while making nuclear energy a more sustainable energy option for the long-term. While the Generation IV Initiative is exploring multiple reactor options for future nuclear energy for both electricity generation and additional applications, the AFCI is assessing fuel cycles options for either a continuation or expansion of nuclear energy in the United States. This report compares strategies and technology options for managing the associated spent fuel. There are four major potential strategies, as follows: · The current U.S. strategy is once through: standard nuclear power plants, standard fuel burnup, direct geological disposal of spent fuel. Variants include higher burnup fuels in water-cooled power plants, once-through gas-cooled power plants, and separation (without recycling) of spent fuel to reduce the number and cost of geological waste packages. · The second strategy is thermal recycle, recycling some fuel components in thermal reactors. This strategy extends the useful life of the geologic repository, producing energy from the fissile transuranics in spent fuel while reducing plutonium. · The third strategy is thermal+fast recycle. The difference from the second strategy is that more components of spent fuel can be recycled to reduce both fissile and non-fissile transuranics, but at the cost of developing and deploying at least one fast reactor or accelerator driven system. A mix of thermal and fast reactors would implement this strategy. · The fourth strategy is pure fast recycle; fuel would not be recycled in thermal reactors, which would be phased out in favor of deploying fast spectrum power reactors.

Steven J. Piet; Ralph G. Bennett; Brent W. Dixon; J. Stephen Herring; David E. Shropshire; Mark Roth; J. D. Smith; Robert Hill; James Laidler; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Close in Place Option for Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF8/%2AAdministration

386

^O l ll ORNL/CON-125 Design Options to Test the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Utility Conservation Program: TVA'S Heat Pump Water Heater Program Linda Berry How Tsao Eric Hirst #12;r THE EFFECTS OF FINANCIAL INCENTIVES IN A UTILITY CONSERVATION PROGRAM: TVA'S HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER PROGRAM.2 REASONS FOR CHOOSING THE HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER PROGRAM .. . .. .. . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. 2 1

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

387

Options for converting excess plutonium to feed for the MOX fuel fabrication facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storage and safekeeping of excess plutonium in the United States represents a multibillion-dollar lifecycle cost to the taxpayers and poses challenges to National Security and Nuclear Non-Proliferation. Los Alamos National Laboratory is considering options for converting some portion of the 13 metric tons of excess plutonium that was previously destined for long-term waste disposition into feed for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). This approach could reduce storage costs and security ri sks, and produce fuel for nuclear energy at the same time. Over the course of 30 years of weapons related plutonium production, Los Alamos has developed a number of flow sheets aimed at separation and purification of plutonium. Flow sheets for converting metal to oxide and for removing chloride and fluoride from plutonium residues have been developed and withstood the test oftime. This presentation will address some potential options for utilizing processes and infrastructure developed by Defense Programs to transform a large variety of highly impure plutonium into feedstock for the MFFF.

Watts, Joe A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Psaras, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Jr., Edward L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A review of nuclear fuel cycle options for developing nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of several nuclear reactor and fuel cycle options for developing nations was performed. All reactor choices were considered under a GNEP framework. Two advanced alternative reactor types, a nuclear battery-type reactor and a fuel reprocessing fast reactor were examined and compared with a conventional Generation III+ LWR reactor. The burn of nuclear fuel was simulated using ORIGEN 2.2 for each reactor type and the resulting information was used to compare the options in terms of waste produced, waste quality and repository impact. The ORIGEN data was also used to evaluate the economics of the fuel cycles using unit costs, discount rates and present value functions with the material balances. The comparison of the fuel cycles and reactors developed in this work provides a basis for the evaluation of subsidy programs and cost-benefit comparisons for various reactor parameters such as repository impact and proliferation risk versus economic considerations. (authors)

Harrison, R.K.; Scopatz, A.M.; Ernesti, M. [The University of Texas at Austin, Pickle Research Campus, Building 159, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nonlethal weapons as force options for the Army  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper suggests that future challenges to US national security will be very different from those previously experienced. In a number of foreseeable circumstances, conventional military force will be inappropriate. The National Command Authority, and other appropriate levels of command, need expanded options available to meet threats for which the application of massive lethal force is counterproductive or inadvisable. It is proposed that nonlethal concepts be developed that provide additional options for military leaders and politicians. Included in this initiative should be exploration of policy, strategy, doctrine, and training issues as well as the development of selected technologies and weapons. In addition, civilian law enforcement agencies have similar requirements for less-than-lethal systems. This may be an excellent example for a joint technology development venture.

Alexander, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Bridge Health Insurance Options ief gap in health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limitations to bear in mind: n denied health care coverage, you almost certainly won't qualify y at the end-800-304-0372 www.anthem.com and click on visitor and click on state. United Health Care at 1-888-545-5205 or visitBridge Health Insurance Options ief gap in health of coverage became seriously hurt or ill. That

392

A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid stover Dilute sulfuric acid Hydrothermal pretreatment Kinetic model Xylose a b s t r a c t Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric

California at Riverside, University of

393

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power Denver Post Staff Writer Colorado wind power Page 1 of 3http://eeredev.nrel.gov/greenpower/option.html #12;In a related announcement

394

Options introduction and volatility in the EU ETS1 Julien Chevallier 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), the European Climate Exchange (ECX) has introduced option the introduction of options has increased or decreased volatility in the European Union Emissions Trading Sc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

395

Managing a portfolio of real options : sequential exploration of dependent prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the impact of sequential investment and active management on the value of a portfolio of real options. The options are assumed to be interdependent, in that exercise of any one is assumed to produce, in addition ...

Smith, James L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

OPTIMAL EXERCISE POLICIES AND SIMULATION-BASED VALUATION FOR AMERICAN-ASIAN OPTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMAL EXERCISE POLICIES AND SIMULATION-BASED VALUATION FOR AMERICAN-ASIAN OPTIONS RONGWEN WU-based method that exploits the established structural properties to efficiently price such options. Sections 2

Fu, Michael

397

Apply option-thinking in long term infrastructure investment : the case of commercial real estate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last two decades the application of real options theory has dramatically altered the way researches model infrastructure investment decisions. Real options are the right, but not obligation to do something for a ...

Zhang, Na, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A generalized real options methodology for evaluating investments under uncertainty with application to air transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real options analysis is being increasingly used as a tool to evaluate investments under uncertainty; however, traditional real options methodologies have some shortcomings that limit their utility, such as the use of the ...

Miller, Bruno, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and...

400

Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for Spent Nuclear Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study on Alternative Cargo Launch Options from the Lunar Surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the future, there will be a need for constant cargo launches from Earth to Mars in order to build, and then sustain, a Martian base. Currently, chemical rockets are used for space launches. These are expensive and heavy due to the amount of necessary propellant. Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) are the next step in rocket design. Another alternative is to create a launcher on the lunar surface that uses magnetic levitation to launch cargo to Mars in order to minimize the amount of necessary propellant per mission. This paper investigates using nuclear power for six different cargo launching alternatives, as well as the orbital mechanics involved in launching cargo to a Martian base from the moon. Each alternative is compared to the other alternative launchers, as well as compared to using an NTR instead. This comparison is done on the basis of mass that must be shipped from Earth, the amount of necessary propellant, and the number of equivalent NTR launches. Of the options, a lunar coil launcher had a ship mass that is 12.7% less than the next best option and 17 NTR equivalent launches, making it the best of the presented six options.

Cheryl A. Blomberg; Zamir A. Zulkefli; Spencer W. Rich; Steven D. Howe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Phase I high-level waste pretreatment and feed staging plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the preliminary planning basis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a sufficient quantity of high-level waste feed to the privatization contractor during Phase I. By this analysis of candidate high-level waste feed sources, the initial quantity of high-level waste feed totals more than twice the minimum feed requirements. The flexibility of the current infrastructure within tank farms provides a variety of methods to transfer the feed to the privatization contractor`s site location. The amount and type of pretreatment (sludge washing) necessary for the Phase I processing can be tailored to support the demonstration goals without having a significant impact on glass volume (i.e., either inhibited water or caustic leaching can be used).

Manuel, A.F.

1996-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of Mixed Feedstocks and Feedstock Densification on Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Lignocellulosic biorefineries must be able to efficiently process the regional feedstocks that are available at cost-competitive prices year round. These feedstocks typically have low energy densities and vary significantly in composition. One potential solution to these issues is blending and/or densifying the feedstocks in order to create a uniform feedstock. Results/discussion: We have mixed four feedstocks - switchgrass, lodgepole pine, corn stover, and eucalyptus - in flour and pellet form and processed them using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Sugar yields from both the mixed flour and pelletized feedstocks reach 90% within 24 hours of saccharification. Conclusions: Mixed feedstocks, in either flour or pellet form, are efficiently processed using this pretreatment process, and demonstrate that this approach has significant potential.

Jian Shi; Vicki S. Thompson; Neal A. Yancey; Vitalie Stavila; Blake A. Simmons; Seema Singh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Screening for Real Options “In” an Engineering System: A Step Towards Flexible System Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research is to develop an analytical framework for screening for real options “in” an

Bartolomei, Jason E.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

American and Bermudan options in currency markets under proportional transaction costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pricing and hedging of a general class of options (including American, Bermudan and European options) on multiple assets are studied in the context of currency markets where trading in all assets is subject to proportional transaction costs, and where the existence of a riskfree numeraire is not assumed. Probabilistic dual representations are obtained for the bid and ask prices of such options, together with constructions of hedging strategies, optimal stopping times and approximate martingale representations for both long and short option positions.

Roux, Alet

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions.

Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Efficient pricing of swing options in Levy-driven models Oleg Kudryavtsev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Amer- ican options; energy derivatives; Numerical methods for option pricing. 1 Introduction for risk management. In a deregulated market, energy contracts will need to be priced accordingEfficient pricing of swing options in L´evy-driven models Oleg Kudryavtsev Department

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

A NEWTON METHOD FOR AMERICAN OPTION PRICING THOMAS F. COLEMAN, YUYING LI, AND ARUN VERMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the American option valuation. We illustrate that the proposed method on aver- age solves a discretized problem curve. American option valuation has been an active research area; many methods have been proposedA NEWTON METHOD FOR AMERICAN OPTION PRICING THOMAS F. COLEMAN, YUYING LI, AND ARUN VERMA December

Li, Yuying

410

Beta Smile and Coskewness: Theoretical and Empirical Results in Options Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta Smile and Coskewness: Theoretical and Empirical Results in Options Markets Masahiko Egami of the higher moment risks of option returns, namely beta and coskewness. Under mild assumptions, the investors' decreasing absolute risk aversion can result in a U-shaped pattern (a beta smile) for put option betas

Egami, Masahiko

411

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis Ram Chandra Sekar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture in Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar technologies are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2

412

Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1 2/ Brian A and economic options for the analysis of nuclear plant siting possibilities (Burnham 1974; Jones, April 1975 of nuclear plant siting options for the AEC. BNWL's multi-disciplinary impact evaluation pro- cedure required

Standiford, Richard B.

413

Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Quarterly status report, July--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on the project ``High Efficiency SO{sub 2} Removal Testing``, for the time period 1 July through 30 September 1994. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades evaluated mostly involve using additives in the FGD systems. The ``base`` project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. AR five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station (Option I), the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station (Option II), the PSI Energy Gibson Station (Option III), the Duquesne Light Elrama Station (Option IV), and the New York State Electric and Gas Company Kintigh Station (Option V). By the end of September 1994, testing was completed for the base project and for all options. The document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from these technical efforts during the quarter. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the fourth quarter of calendar year 1994. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

Blythe, G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals.

Ojczyk, C.; Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed.

Mitchell, D.E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey:form View source HistoryBarriers and Policy Options Jump

420

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Groundto Apply forInstituteCompatibleTransition andOption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Philosophy UJCC Alternative Guide to FHS Options This guide is aimed at helping philosophy students decide on which philosophy options they  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Philosophy UJCC Alternative Guide to FHS Options This guide is aimed at helping philosophy students decide on which philosophy options they would like to take for their finals. There is an often and Reality, so the Philosophy UJCC (Undergraduate Joint Consultative Committee) has prepared this guide

Oxford, University of

422

SOLID EARTH OPTION FOR EARTH SCIENCE (GYA/GYS) MAJORS The main goals of the Solid Earth option are to give you an understanding of how our lively  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLID EARTH OPTION FOR EARTH SCIENCE (GYA/GYS) MAJORS The main goals of the Solid Earth option are to give you an understanding of how our lively planet works beneath its surface and of the scientific tools we use to unravel its complex history. Solid Earth science is the study of the materials

Liu, Paul

423

Option study of an orthogonal X-ray radiography axis for pRad at LANSCE area C, Los Alamos.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on an option study of two potential x-ray systems for orthogonal radiography at Area C in the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The systems assessed are expected to be near equivalent systems to the presently existing Cygnus capability at the Nevada Test Site. Nominal dose and radiographic resolution of 4 rad (measured at one meter) and 1 mm spot are desired. Both a system study and qualitative design are presented as well as estimated cost and schedule. Each x-ray system analyzed is designed to drive a rod-pinch electron beam diode capable of producing the nominal dose and spot.

Oliver, Bryan Velten; Johnson, David L.; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Jones, Peter (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Advanced radioisotope power source options for Pluto Express  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the drive to reduce mass and cost, Pluto Express is investigating using an advanced power conversion technology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RPS) to deliver the required mission power of 74 W(electric) at end of mission. Until this year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). This RTG would be a scaled down GPHS RTG with an inventory of 6 General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) and a mass of 17.8 kg. High efficiency, advanced technology conversion options are being examined to lower the power source mass and to reduce the amount of radioisotope needed. Three technologies are being considered as the advanced converter technology: the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters, and Stirling Engines. Conceptual designs for each of these options have been prepared. Each converter would require only 2 GPHSs to provide the mission power and would have a mass of 6.1, 7.2, and 12.4 kg for AMTEC, TPV, and Stirling Engines respectively. This paper reviews the status of each technology and the projected performance of an advanced RPS based on each technology. Based on the projected performance and spacecraft integration issues, Pluto Express would prefer to use the AMTEC based RPS. However, in addition to technical performance, selection of a power technology will be based on many other factors.

Underwood, M.L. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongsuchoto, Porntip [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: prasert.p@chula.ac.th

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

The National Energy Policy Act and lamp replacement options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Policy Act of 1992 involves the creation of energy efficiency standards for a wide range of products including fluorescent and incandescent lamps. Minimum efficacy (lumens per watt) and color rendering index (CRI) standards are mandated for the popular fluorescent lamps: four-foot medium bi-pin, two-foot U-bent, eight-foot slimline and eight-foot high output. Minimum efficacies are mandated for specific incandescent R and PAR reflector lamps. These standards will affect selected colors and designs of fluorescent lamps, the most significant being the standard lamps in the cool white and warm white colors. The incandescent reflector lamps will include the R-30, R-40, PAR-38 lamps above 40 watts, excluding the halogen types. These efficiency and color rendering standards will require end-users and specifiers to select replacement fluorescent lamps from a range of performance characteristics (lumen output, efficacy, CRI and price). The choice of replacement for the R and PAR incandescent lamps will include the halogen designs and compact fluorescent designs. In this paper, replacement options will be analyzed and discussed and the effect of these options on the performance of the lighting system will be explored in detail.

Ryerson, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Real Time Pricing as a Default or Optional Service for C&I Customers: A Comparative Analysis of Eight Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Load Response Program – Real Time Option is a unique examplePJM Economic LRP – Real Time Option, PJM Emergency LRPPJM Economic LRP – Real Time Option PowerShare – QuoteOption

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Hopper, Nicole; Ting, Michael; Neenan, Bernie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000 F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effects of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to those obtained using catalytically modified heavy oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments. In the progress report for January, 1993--March, 1993, we concluded that the dispersed iron based catalysts were not effective in hydrotreating the AMOCO VTR at 400{degree}C. During the second quarter of this year, several pretreatment runs were conducted at 440{degree}C using molybdenum naphthenate, a known active hydrotreatment catalyst. The reaction time was increased from one hour to two hours, during which time the reaction pressure leveled off. hen Mo naphthenate was added at a concentration of 500 ppM of Mo, coke production was drastically reduced, to less than 3%. Gas production was also reduced which resulted in higher oil (pentane soluble) yields. At a higher catalyst loading of 2,000 ppM of Mo there was little change to the products, the asphaltene content decreasing slightly. This indicates that a catalyst loading of 500 ppM of Mo is probably sufficient for hydrotreating the AMOCO VTR, and there is little benefit in increasing the loading to 2000 ppM.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, [1 July--30 September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, {open_quotes}High Efficiency SO{sub 2} Removal Testing{close_quotes}, for the time period 1 July through 30 September, 1993. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated primarily involve the addition of organic acid buffers to the FGD systems. The {open_quotes}base{close_quotes} project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. As of September 1993, all five potential options to the base program had been exercised by DOE, involving testing at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station (Option I), the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station (Option II), the PSI Energy Gibson Station (Option III), the Duquesne Light Elrama Station (Option IV), and the New York State Electric and Gas Company Kintigh Station (Option V). As of September 1993, testing has been completed for the base project and for Options 1 and 2, has begun but not been completed for Options III and IV, and has not yet begun for Option V. This document is divided into five sections. After a brief introduction (Section 1), Section 2 (Project Summary) provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3 (Results) summarizes the outcome from these technical efforts during the quarter. Results for each site for which there were significant technical efforts or for which there are updated technical results are discussed in separate subsections. In Section 4 (Plans for the Next Reporting Period) an overview is provided of the technical progress that is anticipated for the fourth quarter of calendar year 1993. Section 5 includes a brief acknowledgement.

Blythe, G.

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

Effects of temperature and acidic pre-treatment on Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of temperature and acidic pretreatment on Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC, derived from bituminous coal) were investigated. Limiting factors in MTBE removal in GAC include the heterogeneous distribution of amended Fe, and slow intraparticle diffusive transport of MTBE and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) into the 'reactive zone'. Acid pretreatment of GAC before Fe amendment altered the surface chemistry of the GAC, lowered the pH point of zero charge, and resulted in greater penetration and more uniform distribution of Fe in GAC. This led to a condition where Fe, MTBE, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} coexisted over a larger volume of the GAC contributing to greater MTBE oxidation and removal. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction and MTBE removal in GAC increased with temperature. Modeling H{sub 2}O{sub 2} transport and reaction in GAC indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} penetration was inversely proportional with temperature and tortuosity, and occurred over a larger fraction of the total volume of small GAC particles (0.3 mm diameter) relative to large particles (1.2 mm diameter). Acidic pretreatment of GAC, Fe-amendment, elevated reaction temperature, and use of small GAC particles are operational parameters that improve Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE in GAC. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Kan, E.; Huling, S.G. [Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, OK (United States)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Test Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

432

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.

Robert Finley

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Market-Based Indian Grid Integration Study Options: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indian state of Gujarat is forecasting solar and wind generation expansion from 16% to 32% of installed generation capacity by 2015. Some states in India are already experiencing heavy wind power curtailment. Understanding how to integrate variable generation (VG) into the grid is of great interest to local transmission companies and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. This paper describes the nature of a market-based integration study and how this approach, while new to Indian grid operation and planning, is necessary to understand how to operate and expand the grid to best accommodate the expansion of VG. Second, it discusses options in defining a study's scope, such as data granularity, generation modeling, and geographic scope. The paper also explores how Gujarat's method of grid operation and current system reliability will affect how an integration study can be performed.

Stoltenberg, B.; Clark, K.; Negi, S. K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Valuation of exotic options in the framework of Levy processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we explore a straightforward procedure to price derivatives by using the Monte Carlo approach when the underlying process is a jump-diffusion. We have compared the Black-Scholes model with one of its extensions that is the Merton model. The latter model is better in capturing the market’s phenomena and is comparative to stochastic volatility models in terms of pricing accuracy. We have presented simulations of asset paths and pricing of barrier options for both Geometric Brownian motion and exponential Levy processes as it is the concrete case of the Merton model. A desired level of accuracy is obtained with simple computer operations in MATLAB for efficient computational time.

Milev, Mariyan, E-mail: marianmilev2002@gmail.com; Georgieva, Svetla, E-mail: marianmilev2002@gmail.com; Markovska, Veneta, E-mail: marianmilev2002@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Physics, UFT-Plovdiv, bul. Maritza 26, 4002 Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Systems analysis of decontamination options for civilian vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project, which was supported by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Chemical and Biological Division (CBD), was to investigate options for the decontamination of the exteriors and interiors of vehicles in the civilian setting in order to restore those vehicles to normal use following the release of a highly toxic chemical. The decontamination of vehicles is especially challenging because they often contain sensitive electronic equipment, multiple materials some of which strongly adsorb chemical agents, and in the case of aircraft, have very rigid material compatibility requirements (i.e., they cannot be exposed to reagents that may cause even minor corrosion). A systems analysis approach was taken examine existing and future civilian vehicle decontamination capabilities.

Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing sensors for the pulp and paper industry that uses a magnetic field. The applications for magnetic sensors that have studied include (1) sensors for the measurement of the water and ice content of wood chips entering the pulping mill, (2) sensors for measuring the water content and other constituents of the black liquor leaving the paper digester, and (3) sensors for measuring paper thickness and water content as the paper is being processed. These tasks can be done using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The magnetic field used for doing the NMR can come from either permanent magnets or superconducting magnets. The choice of the magnet is dependent on a number of factors, which include the size of the sample and field strength needed to do the sensing task at hand. This paper describes some superconducting magnet options that can be used in the pulp and paper industry.

Green, M.A.; Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Luft, P.A.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.S.

2001-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The availability of healthy food options in fast food outlets in six rural counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods for healthy options. 76, 78, 79 A menu audit was conducted in one investigation to assess opportunities to select healthy options in restaurants in Los Angeles. The audit included observational information on the restaurant as well... of the menu items. Healthier options were based on the recommendations from the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans 13 and included fruits, vegetables, low-fat milk, low- fat items, 100% whole wheat items, items without added sugar, and foods that have...

Creel, Jennifer Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASA’s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564 fuel elements within 1% of the average element power. Results for this and alternate enrichment zoning options for the SNRE are compared.

Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition: Opportunities, Options, and Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has created a legacy of surplus fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium) in the United States (U.S.) and the former Soviet Union. These materials pose a danger to national and international security. During the past few years, the U.S. and Russia have engaged in an ongoing dialog concerning the safe storage and disposition of surplus fissile material stockpiles. In January 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced the U. S. would pursue a dual track approach to rendering approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons. One track involves immobilizing the plutonium by combining it with high-level radioactive waste in glass or ceramic ''logs''. The other method, referred to as reactor-based disposition, converts plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors. The U.S. and Russia are moving ahead rapidly to develop and demonstrate the technology required to implement the MOX option in their respective countries. U.S. MOX fuel research and development activities were started in the 1950s, with irradiation of MOX fuel rods in commercial light water reactors (LWR) from the 1960s--1980s. In all, a few thousand MOX fuel rods were successfully irradiated. Though much of this work was performed with weapons-grade or ''near'' weapons-grade plutonium--and favorable fuel performance was observed--the applicability of this data for licensing and use of weapons-grade MOX fuel manufactured with modern fuel fabrication processes is somewhat limited. The U.S. and Russia are currently engaged in an intensive research, development, and demonstration program to support implementation of the MOX option in our two countries. This paper focuses on work performed in the U.S. and provides a brief summary of joint U.S./Russian work currently underway.

Greene, S.R.

1999-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - american put options Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

using binomial lattice model with generic... input parameter values. 2. Develop a MATLAB code to price European and American call optionsput options... . Develop a MATLAB...

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment mitigation options Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

accounting as far as possible for their environmental, biodiversity... scenarios to offset carbon; A comparative assessment of the above options with each other in...

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment options issues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opportunity Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System (QUEST) Summary: scenarios to offset carbon; A comparative assessment of the above options with each other in...

444

Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems Program-Sustainable Crop Production Option 2014-2015 Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems Program- Sustainable Crop Production Option 2014-2015 Catalog SFBS 146 Intro to Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems ................................ S

Dyer, Bill

445

Systems engineering study: tank 241-C-103 organic skimming,storage, treatment and disposal options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates alternatives for pumping, storing, treating and disposing of the separable phase organic layer in Hanford Site Tank 241-C-103. The report provides safety and technology based preferences and recommendations. Two major options and several varations of these options were identified. The major options were: 1) transfer both the organic and pumpable aqueous layers to a double-shell tank as part of interim stabilization using existing salt well pumping equipment or 2) skim the organic to an above ground before interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103. Other options to remove the organic were considered but rejected following preliminary evaluation.

Klem, M.J.

1996-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

446

Pretreatment Nomogram to Predict the Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 (I-125) prostate brachytherapy negatively influences long-term quality of life and therefore should be prevented. We aimed to develop a nomogram to preoperatively predict the risk of AUR. Methods: Using the preoperative data of 714 consecutive patients who underwent I-125 prostate brachytherapy between 2005 and 2008 at our department, we modeled the probability of AUR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of a set of pretreatment predictors and the additional value of a new risk factor (the extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder). The performance of the final model was assessed with calibration and discrimination measures. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 patients (8.0%) developed AUR after implantation. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of prostate volume, IPSS score, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment and the extent of prostate protrusion contribute to the prediction of AUR. The discriminative value (receiver operator characteristic area, ROC) of the basic model (including prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment) to predict the development of AUR was 0.70. The addition of prostate protrusion significantly increased the discriminative power of the model (ROC 0.82). Calibration of this final model was good. The nomogram showed that among patients with a low sum score (<18 points), the risk of AUR was only 0%-5%. However, in patients with a high sum score (>35 points), the risk of AUR was more than 20%. Conclusion: This nomogram is a useful tool for physicians to predict the risk of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. The nomogram can aid in individualized treatment decision-making and patient counseling.

Roeloffzen, Ellen M., E-mail: e.m.a.roeloffzen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van; Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Saibishkumar, Elantholi P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

VAMOS: The verification and monitoring options study: Current research options for in-situ monitoring and verification of contaminant remediation and containment within the vadose zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Verification and Monitoring Options Study Project (VAMOS) was established to identify high-priority options for future vadose-zone environmental research in the areas of in-situ remediation monitoring, post-closure monitoring, and containment emplacement and verification monitoring. VAMOS examined projected needs not currently being met with applied technology in order to develop viable monitoring and verification research options. The study emphasized a compatible systems approach to reinforce the need for utilizing compatible components to provide user friendly site monitoring systems. To identify the needs and research options related to vadose-zone environmental monitoring and verification, a literature search and expert panel forums were conducted. The search included present drivers for environmental monitoring technology, technology applications, and research efforts. The forums included scientific, academic, industry, and regulatory environmental professionals as well as end users of environmental technology. The experts evaluated current and future monitoring and verification needs, methods for meeting these needs, and viable research options and directions. A variety of high-priority technology development, user facility, and technology guidance research options were developed and presented as an outcome of the literature search and expert panel forums.

Betsill, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R.D. [Tech Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Romanian experience on packaging testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

Vieru, G. [IAEA Technical Expert, Head, Reliability and Testing Lab., Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Pricing bivariate option under GARCH processes with time-varying copula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pricing bivariate option under GARCH processes with time-varying copula J. Zhang a,b,c,, D. Gu Autoregressive Conditionally Heteroskedastic (GARCH) process. As the associa- tion between the underlying assets, the empirical work displays the advantages of the suggested method. Key words: call-on-max option, GARCH process

Boyer, Edmond

450

Option Pricing for GARCH-type Models with Generalized Hyperbolic Innovations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Option Pricing for GARCH-type Models with Generalized Hyperbolic Innovations Christophe Chorro on equity option books. Given the historical measure, the dynamics of assets are modeled by Garch, Incomplete markets, CAC 40, SP 500, GARCH-type models. JEL classification: G13, C22. The authors

Boyer, Edmond

451

Complexity of the Ritchken-Trevor-Cakici-Topyan GARCH Option Pricing Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity of the Ritchken-Trevor-Cakici-Topyan GARCH Option Pricing Algorithm Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, Taiwan Abstract The trinomial-tree GARCH option pricing algo- rithm of Ritchken and Trevor (1999, exceeds a typically small number determined by the GARCH parameters. Worse, when explo- sion happens

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

452

Energy Spot Price Models and Spread Options Pricing Samuel Hikspoors and Sebastian Jaimungal a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Spot Price Models and Spread Options Pricing Samuel Hikspoors and Sebastian Jaimungal In this article, we construct forward price curves and value a class of two asset exchange options for energy the implied market prices of risk for this commodity. 1. Introduction The energy commodity markets

Jaimungal, Sebastian

453

A REAL OPTIONS OPTIMIZATION MODEL TO MEET AVAILABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A REAL OPTIONS OPTIMIZATION MODEL TO MEET AVAILABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES on Real Options (RO) and stochastic dynamic programming for the availability maximization of an offshore wind farm with prognostic capabilities. Alternative energy sources such as offshore wind turbines

Sandborn, Peter

454

Pricing Parisian-Type Options A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate Institute of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1.1 The Process for Stock Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.1.2 Risk-Neutral Valuation to problems in valuation. A path-dependent option is among all the most complicated derivative in its valuation. The terminal payoff for an option of such type depends critically on the price path of its

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

455

Combining Monte Carlo Simulations and Options to Manage the Risk of Real  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate portfolio valuations can be improved through the simultaneous use of Monte Carlo simulations and options theory. Our method considers the options embedded in Continental European lease are more reliable that those usually computed by the traditional method of discounted cash flow. Moreover

Boyer, Edmond

456

Using System Dynamics to Extend Real Options Use: Insights from the Oil & Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to real options through work with a major energy firm to apply real options. Five key challenges facing & Production Technology Group, BP. 3111 Winding Shore Lane, Katy TX 77450. E-mail address: JohnsoST@bp.com 2, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136. E-mail address: xftu@tamu.edu 3 Assistant

Ford, David N.

457

Committee Role Required/ Optional CSM faculty status Department Advisor Required Full time Home Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee Role Required/ Optional CSM faculty status Department Advisor Required Full time Home faculty status Department Advisor Required Full time Home Dept* or familiar with area of study Co-Advisor to specify on form Full time-cannot be advisor or co-advisor Committee Role Required/ Optional CSM faculty

458

Value Creation with Dye's Disclosure Option: Optimal Risk-Shielding with an Upper Tailed Disclosure Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Value Creation with Dye's Disclosure Option: Optimal Risk-Shielding with an Upper Tailed DisclosureRiskShielding-CDAM.tex CDAM Research Report LSE-CDAM-2007-30 Abstract Dye (1985) showed that the optimal disclosure policy¤ level, we value the corresponding option using contingent claims analysis. It is shown that the Dye

Haase, Markus

459

Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas Industry Mulan Xiaofeng Wang Submitted to the Tepper School of Business in Partial Fulfillment options in the natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry, including gas pipeline transportation

Sadeh, Norman M.

460

VoIP at CSU -Frequently asked questions and options Instructions for your individual phone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" options 2. Forward your phone to a personal cell phone and use the voicemail that comes with your cell phone package. Enter your cell phone number with 8 + area code (e.g. 8-970-123-4567) at httpVoIP at CSU - Frequently asked questions and options Instructions for your individual phone: 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Dynamic Programming Procedure for Pricing American-Style Asian Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Dynamic Programming Procedure for Pricing American-Style Asian Options Hatem Ben-Ameur · Michèle@iro.umontreal.ca http://www.iro.umontreal.ca/~lecuyer Pricing European-style Asian options based on the arithmetic) for which no easily computable analytical solution is available. Pricing their American-style counter- parts

L'Ecuyer, Pierre

462

SEA LEVEL RISE, COASTAL RISK, ADAPTATION OPTIONS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEA LEVEL RISE, COASTAL RISK, ADAPTATION OPTIONS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014 For More Information@odu.edu "Sea Level Rise, Coastal Risk, and Adaptation Options" "Looking at what we know about sea level rise will be explored. A special look will be taken at the Philippines and its situation with sea level rise." Skip

463

A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model with correlation Vicky Henderson Princeton University David Hobson § University of Bath Sam Howison ¶ University option prices in an incomplete stochastic volatility model with correlation. In a general setting, we

Howison, Sam

464

Europe, Cutting Biofuel Subsidies, Redirects Aid to Stress Greenest Options -New York Times January 22, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Europe, Cutting Biofuel Subsidies, Redirects Aid to Stress Greenest Options - New York Times January 22, 2008 Europe, Cutting Biofuel Subsidies, Redirects Aid to Stress Greenest Options By ELISABETH for biofuels, acknowledging that the environmental benefits of these fuels have often been overstated

465

Capture-Ready Power Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Capture-Ready Power Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics by Mark C. Bohm Bachelor and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Capture-ready Power Plants ­ Options, Technologies and Costs by Mark C. Bohm of a plant. Power plant owners and policymakers are interested in capture-ready plants because they may offer

466

Real Option Pricing with Mean-Reverting Investment and Project Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the valuation of the option to the invest in an oil field. Like most commodities, oil prices tend to mean-revert, and as a direct result the value of investment in an oil field is also mean-reverting. Consequently, it wouldReal Option Pricing with Mean-Reverting Investment and Project Value Sebastian Jaimungal , Max

Zubelli, Jorge Passamani

467

Flexible Facility Interior Layout: A Real Options and Chung-Li Tseng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Delta Consulting Group, Inc., 310 Commerce Street, Occoquan, VA 22125, USA. Tel: (703) 497-7735, fax, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409, USA. Tel: (573) 341-7621, fax: (573) 341-6567, email: chungli will be evaluated. The concept of real options, stemming from financial options, refers to flexibility em- bedded

Tseng, Chung-Li

468

Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education University of New Hampshire below), or candidate can obtain MS at UNH on the way to the PhD with Option in Chemistry Education Cumulative exams are split between education and chemistry cores Professional presentation allowed in place

New Hampshire, University of

469

Updated: 10/03/08! Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated: 10/03/08! ! ! ! TLL Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED) The Occupational Education Studies (OCED) option in the TLL is intended for professionals in the general field of workforce education and development. Teachers and administrators in career and technical education; personnel

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

470

Research Report Recycling gone bad: When the option to recycle increases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Report Recycling gone bad: When the option to recycle increases resource consumption Jesse Abstract In this study, we propose that the ability to recycle may lead to increased resource usage compared to when a recycling option is not available. Supporting this hypothesis, our first experiment

Loudon, Catherine

471

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: how much does this uncertain option affect near-term policy choices?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: how much does this uncertain option affect near-term policy Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) as a key option to avoid costly emission reduction. While Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) technologies are receiving increasing atten- tion, mainly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

472

Analysis on the KOSPI200 option from the time-series and cross- sectional perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Korean derivatives market is one of the most active markets in the world. The KOSPI200 options accounted for 43.4% of the global trading volume in equity index futures and options in 2011. It also accounted for 93.5% ...

Jung, Jaewook

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, and an immiscible CO{sub 2} flood pilot was conducted in the Jackson sandstone (Mississippian System Big Clifty Sandstone Member) at the Sugar Creek Field in Hopkins County, western Kentucky. Up to 12% incremental oil recovery was estimated based on these pilots. A CO{sub 2} huff â??nâ?? puff (HNP) pilot project was conducted in the Cypress Sandstone in the Loudon Field. This pilot was designed to measure and record data that could be used to calibrate a reservoir simulation model. A pilot project at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois, tested the potential storage of CO{sub 2} in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} storage and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot results from all four sites showed that CO{sub 2} could be injected into the subsurface without adversely affecting groundwater. Additionally, hydrocarbon production was enhanced, giving further evidence that CO{sub 2} storage in oil reservoirs and coal beds offers an economic advantage. Results from the MVA program at each site indicated that injected CO{sub 2} did not leave the injection zone. Topical reports were completed on the Middle and Late Devonian New Albany Shale and Basin CO{sub 2} emissions. The efficacy of the New Albany Shale as a storage sink could be substantial if low injectivity concerns can be alleviated. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Illinois Basin were projected to be dominated by coal-fired power plants.

Robert Finley

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

THE ROLE OF LIQUID WASTE PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLVING THE DOE CLEAN-UP MISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the pretreatment solutions that allow treatment to be tailored to specific wastes, processing ahead of the completion schedules for the main treatment facilities, and reduction of technical risks associated with future processing schedules. Wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River offer challenging scientific and engineering tasks. At both sites, space limitations confound the ability to effectively retrieve and treat the wastes. Additionally, the radiation dose to the worker operating and maintaining the radiochemical plants has a large role in establishing the desired radioactivity removal. However, the regulatory requirements to treat supernatant and saltcake tank wastes differ at the two sites. Hanford must treat and remove radioactivity from the tanks based on the TriParty Agreement and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing (WIR) documentation. These authorizing documents do not specify treatment technologies; rather, they specify endstate conditions. Dissimilarly, Waste Determinations prepared at SRS in accordance with Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act along with state operating permits establish the methodology and amounts of radioactivity that must be removed and may be disposed of in South Carolina. After removal of entrained solids and site-specific radionuclides, supernatant and saltcake wastes are considered to be low activity waste (LAW) and are immobilized in glass and disposed of at the Hanford Site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) or formulated into a grout for disposal at the Savannah River Site Saltstone Disposal Facility. Wastes stored at the Hanford Site or SRS comprise saltcake, supernate, and sludges. The supernatant and saltcake waste fractions contain primarily sodium salts, metals (e.g., Al, Cr), cesium-137 (Cs-137), technetium-99 (Tc-99) and entrained solids containing radionuclides such as strontium-90 (Sr-90) and transuranic elements. The sludges contain many of the transition metal hydroxides that precipitate when the spent acidic process solutions are rendered alkaline with sodium hydroxide. The sludges contain Sr-90 and transuranic elements. The wastes stored at each site have been generated and stored for over fifty years. Although the majority of the wastes were generated to support nuclear weapons production and reprocessing, the wastes differ substantially between the sites. Table 5 shows the volumes and total radioactivity (including decay daughters) of the waste phases stored in tanks at each site. At Hanford, there are 177 tanks that contain 56.5 Mgal of waste. SRS has 51 larger tanks, of which 2 are closed, that contain 36.5 Mgal. Mainly due to recovery operations, the waste stored at Hanford has less total curies than that stored at Savannah River. The total radioactivity of the Hanford wastes contains approximately 190 MCi, and the total radioactivity of the Savannah River wastes contains 400 MCi.

Wilmarth, B; Sheryl Bush, S

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

High-order accurate implicit methods for the pricing of barrier options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with a high-order accurate implicit finite-difference approach to the pricing of barrier options. In this way various types of barrier options are priced, including barrier options paying rebates, and options on dividend-paying-stocks. Moreover, the barriers may be monitored either continuously or discretely. In addition to the high-order accuracy of the scheme, and the stretching effect of the coordinate transformation, the main feature of this approach lies on a probability-based optimal determination of boundary conditions. This leads to much faster and accurate results when compared with similar pricing approaches. The strength of the present scheme is particularly demonstrated in the valuation of discretely monitored barrier options where it yields values closest to those obtained from the only semi-analytical valuation method available.

Ndogmo, J C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solid breeder blanket option for the ITER conceptual design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solid-breeder water-cooled blanket option was developed for ITER based on a multilayer configuration. The blanket uses beryllium for neutron multiplication and lithium oxide for tritium breeding. The material forms are sintered products for both material with 0.8 density factor. The lithium-6 enrichment is 90%. This blanket has the capability to accommodate a factor of two change in the neutron wall loading without violating the different design guidelines. The design philosophy adopted for the blanket is to produce the necessary tritium required for the ITER operation and to operate at power reactor conditions as much as possible. At the same time, the reliability and the safety aspects of the blanket are enhanced by the use of a low-pressure coolant and the separation of the tritium purge lines from the coolant system. The blanket modules are made by hot vacuum forming and diffusion bonding a double wall structure with integral cooling channels. The different aspects of the blanket design including tritium breeding, nuclear heat deposition, activation analyses, thermal-hydraulics, tritium inventory, structural analyses, and water coolant conditions are summarized in this paper. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Gohar, Y.; Attaya, H.; Billone, M.C.; Finn, P.; Majumdar, S.; Turner, L.R.; Baker, C.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Raffray, R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Fuel cell systems for first lunar outpost -- Reactant storage options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Lunar Surface Power Working Group was formed to review candidate systems for providing power to the First Lunar Outpost habitat. The working group met for five days in the fall of 1992 and concluded that the most attractive candidate included a photovoltaic unit, a fuel cell, a regenerator to recycle the reactants, and storage of oxygen and hydrogen gases. Most of the volume (97%) and weight (64%) are taken up by the reactants and their storage tanks. The large volume is difficult to accommodate, and therefore, the working group explored ways of reducing the volume. An alternative approach to providing separate high pressure storage tanks is to use two of the descent stage propellant storage tanks, which would have to be wrapped with graphite fibers to increase their pressure capability. This saves 90% of the volume required for storage of fuel cell reactants. Another approach is to use the descent storage propellant tanks for storage of the fuel cell reactants as cryogenic liquids, but this requires a gas liquefaction system, increases the solar array by 40%, and increases the heat rejection rate by 170% compared with storage of reactants as high pressure gases. For a high power system (>20 kW) the larger energy storage requirement would probably favor the cryogenic storage option.

Nelson, P.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that would help design a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. Existing surveys present comprehensive information about regional manufactured home occupants and their homes that are relevant to a potential conservation marketing plan. An independent analysis of the cost-effectiveness of various efficiency improvements provides background information for designing a marketing plan. This analysis focuses on the economic impacts of alternative energy conservation options as perceived by the home owner. Identifying impediments to conservation investments is also very important in designing a marketing plan. A recent report suggests that financial constraints and the need for better information and knowledge about conservation pose the major conservation investment barriers. Since loan interest rates for new manufactured homes typically exceed site-built rates by a considerable amount and the buyers tend to have lower incomes, the economics of manufactured home conservation investments are likely to significantly influence their viability. Conservation information and its presentation directly influences the manufactured home buyer's decision. A marketing plan should address these impediments and their implications very clearly. Dealers express a belief that consumer satisfaction is the major advantage to selling energy efficient manufactured homes. This suggests that targeting dealers in a marketing plan and providing them direct information on consumers' indicated attitudes may be important. 74 refs.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Natural Gas as a Fuel Option for Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) is promoting the use of natural gas as a fuel option in the transportation energy sector through its natural gas vehicle program [1]. The goal of this program is to eliminate the technical and cost barriers associated with displacing imported petroleum. This is achieved by supporting research and development in technologies that reduce manufacturing costs, reduce emissions, and improve vehicle performance and consumer acceptance for natural gas fueled vehicles. In collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory, projects are currently being pursued in (1) liquefied natural gas production from unconventional sources, (2) onboard natural gas storage (adsorbent, compressed, and liquefied), (3) natural gas delivery systems for both onboard the vehicle and the refueling station, and (4) regional and enduse strategies. This paper will provide an overview of these projects highlighting their achievements and current status. In addition, it will discuss how the individual technologies developed are being integrated into an overall program strategic plan.

James E. Wegrzyn; Wai Lin Litzke; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

480

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Options for Gas-to-Liquids Technology in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10 percent. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinquish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, Eric Partridge

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Options for gas-to-liquids technology in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10%. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinguish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, E.P.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

High efficiency SO{sub 2} removal testing. Quarterly report, 1 January--31 March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using additives in the FGD systems. The ``base`` project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station (Option 1), the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station (Option 11), the PSI Energy Gibson Station (Option III), the Duquesne Light Elrama Station (Option IV), and the New York State Electric and Gas Corporation`s (NYSEG) Kintigh Station (Option V). Testing has been completed for all six sites. Following the introduction, this document divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from these technical efforts during the quarter. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the second quarter of calendar year 1995. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

NONE

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

484

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Training and Certification OptionsTraining and Certification Options ocal, small-scale farmers are proud of the fruits and vegetables they produce and strive to offer products that are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Certification OptionsTraining and Certification Options L ocal, small-scale farmers by small-scale producers because, depending on the situation, GAPs may be one of the least expensive and sanitize the sink and

Liskiewicz, Maciej

486

Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository (63,000 MTiHM commercial, 7,000 MT non-commercial). There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected. The first step in understanding the need for different spent fuel management approaches is to understand the size of potential spent fuel inventories. A full range of potential futures for domestic commercial nuclear energy is considered. These energy futures are as follows: 1. Existing License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus extrapolation of future plant-by-plant discharges until the end of each operating license, including known license extensions. 2. Extended License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus a plant-by-plant extrapolation of future discharges assuming on all operating plants having one 20-year extension. 3. Continuing Level Energy Generation - Based on extension of the current ~100 GWe installed commercial base and average spent fuel discharge of 2100 MT/yr through the year 2100. 4. Continuing Market Share Generation – Based on a 1.8% compounded growth of the electricity market through the year 2100, matched by growing nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge. 5. Growing Market Share Generation - Extension of current nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge through 2100 with 3.2% growth representing 1.5% market growth (all energy, not just electricity) and 1.7% share growth. Share growth results in tripling market share by 2100 from the current 8.4% to 25%, equivalent to continuing the average market growth of last 50 years for an additional 100 years. Five primary spent fuel management strategies are assessed against each of the energy futures to determine the number of geological repositories needed and how the first repository would be used. The geological repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has the physical potential to accommodate all the spent fuel that will be generated by the current fleet of domestic commercial nuclear reactors, even with license extensions. If new nuclear plants are built in the future as replacements or additions, the United States will need to adopt spent fuel treatment to extend the life of the repository. Should a significant number of new nuclear plants be built, advanced fuel recycling will be needed to fully manage the spent fuel within a single repository. The analysis also considers the timeframe for most efficient implementation of new spent fuel management strategies. The mix of unprocessed spent fuel and processed high level waste in Yucca Mountain varies with each future and strategy. Either recycling must start before there is too much unprocessed waste emplaced or unprocessed waste will have to be retrieved later with corresponding costs. For each case, the latest date to implement reprocessing without subsequent retrieval is determined.

Brent W. Dixon; Steven J. Piet

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ? Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ? Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ? Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ? Mathematical models can be used to help us understand the chemistry and processes.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Costs of mixed low-level waste stabilization options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selection of final waste forms to be used for disposal of DOE`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) depends on the waste form characteristics and total life cycle cost. In this paper the various cost factors associated with production and disposal of the final waste form are discussed and combined to develop life-cycle costs associated with several waste stabilization options. Cost factors used in this paper are based on a series of treatment system studies in which cost and mass balance analyses were performed for several mixed low-level waste treatment systems and various waste stabilization methods including vitrification, grout, phosphate bonded ceramic and polymer. Major cost elements include waste form production, final waste form volume, unit disposal cost, and system availability. Production of grout costs less than the production of a vitrified waste form if each treatment process has equal operating time (availability) each year; however, because of the lower volume of a high temperature slag, certification and handling costs and disposal costs of the final waste form are less. Both the total treatment cost and life cycle costs are higher for a system producing grout than for a system producing high temperature slag, assuming equal system availability. The treatment costs decrease with increasing availability regardless of the waste form produced. If the availability of a system producing grout is sufficiently greater than a system producing slag, then the cost of treatment for the grout system will be less than the cost for the slag system, and the life cycle cost (including disposal) may be less depending on the unit disposal cost. Treatment and disposal costs will determine the return on investment in improved system availability.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Cooley, C.R.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Using Dynamic DCF and Real Option Methods for Economic Analysis in NI43-101 Technical Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Dynamic DCF and Real Option Methods for Economic Analysis in NI43-101 Technical Reports or staff. #12;Abstract The introduction of Dynamic Discounted Cash Flow ("Dynamic DCF") and Real Options

491

Energy, Product, and Ecomonic Implications of Environmental Compliance Options- Lessons Learned from a Southern California Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial plants that are faced with regulated emissions constraints may be able to choose from a complex array of compliance options. Technology options may include a number of pollution control alternatives-retrofits with more efficient equipment...

Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Faruqui, A.; Chisti, I.

492

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

493

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

494

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

496

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OPTIONS FOR SRS WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to support the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (AECC) for sludge heel removal funded as part of the EM-21 Engineering and Technology program. The goal was to identify potential technologies or enhancements to the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process for chemically dissolving or mobilizing Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge heels. The issues with the potentially large volume of oxalate solids generated from the baseline process have driven an effort to find an improved or enhanced chemical cleaning technology for the tank heels. This literature review builds on a previous review conducted in 2003. A team was charged with evaluating the information in these reviews and developing recommendations of alternative technologies to pursue. The new information in this report supports the conclusion of the previous review that oxalic acid remains the chemical cleaning agent of choice for dissolving the metal oxides and hydroxides found in sludge heels in carbon steel tanks. The potential negative impact of large volumes of sodium oxalate on downstream processes indicates that the amount of oxalic acid used for chemical cleaning needs to be minimized as much as possible or the oxalic acid must be destroyed prior to pH adjustment in the receipt tank. The most straightforward way of minimizing the volume of oxalic acid needed for chemical cleaning is through more effective mechanical cleaning. Using a mineral acid to adjust the pH of the sludge prior to adding oxalic acid may also help to minimize the volume of oxalic acid used in chemical cleaning. If minimization of oxalic acid proves insufficient in reducing the volume of oxalate salts, several methods were found that could be used for oxalic acid destruction. For some waste tank heels, another acid or even caustic treatment (or pretreatment) might be more appropriate than the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process. Caustic treatment of high aluminum sludge heels may be appropriate as a means of reducing oxalic acid usage. Reagents other than oxalic acid may also be needed for removing actinide elements from the tank heels. A systems engineering evaluation (SEE) was performed on the various alternative chemical cleaning reagents and organic oxidation technologies discussed in the literature review. The objective of the evaluation was to develop a short list of chemical cleaning reagents and oxalic acid destruction methods that should be the focus of further research and development. The results of the SEE found that eight of the thirteen organic oxidation technologies scored relatively close together. Six of the chemical cleaning reagents were also recommended for further investigation. Based on the results of the SEE and plan set out in the TTQAP the following broad areas are recommended for future study as part of the AECC task: (1) Basic Chemistry of Sludge Dissolution in Oxalic Acid: A better understanding of the variables effecting dissolution of sludge species is needed to efficiently remove sludge heels while minimizing the use of oxalic acid or other chemical reagents. Tests should investigate the effects of pH, acid concentration, phase ratios, temperature, and kinetics of the dissolution reactions of sludge components with oxalic acid, mineral acids, and combinations of oxalic/mineral acids. Real waste sludge samples should be characterized to obtain additional data on the mineral phases present in sludge heels. (2) Simulant Development Program: Current sludge simulants developed by other programs for use in waste processing tests, while compositionally similar to real sludge waste, generally have more hydrated forms of the major metal phases and dissolve more easily in acids. Better simulants containing the mineral phases identified by real waste characterization should be developed to test chemical cleaning methods. (3) Oxalic Acid Oxidation Technologies: The two Mn based oxidation methods that scored highly in the SEE should be studied to evaluate long term potential. One of the AOP's

Hay, M.; Koopman, D.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Energy Storage Options For the New SUB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Into Energy Storage Options For the New SUB Ryan Kingston, Andrew Porritt University of British Columbia APSC; An Investigation into Energy Storage Options for the New SUB Ryan Kingston, Andrew be written to investigate possible energy storage options. This report outlines

499

EMPLOYEE STOCK OPTIONS INCENTIVE EFFECTS: A CPT-BASED MODEL Hamza BAHAJI, DRM Finance,Universit de Paris Dauphine, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

employee behaviour in terms of risk taking. Most of the theoretical literature on stock options relies to predict stock options as part of the compensation contract. Several quantitative studies taking placeEMPLOYEE STOCK OPTIONS INCENTIVE EFFECTS: A CPT-BASED MODEL Hamza BAHAJI, DRM Finance,Université de

Boyer, Edmond

500

Doctoral Defense "Biogeochemical evaluation of disposal options for arsenic-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of arsenic. Arsenic contamination is particularly severe in Bangladesh and India, where access to landfills from groundwater in West Bengal, India. Under a range of leaching tests, determinants of arsenic fate in non-landfill disposal conditions and provide additional insight on arsenic

Kamat, Vineet R.