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1

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options Format Test Information 1. Enter a Name for the Test. 2. Choose a color for the title text of the Test. (Optional) 3. Enter a Description in the Text Box. The description is visible to Students before they click on the link to take the Test. (Optional) 4. If you want

Xu, Shouhuai

2

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

Stowell, Michael

4

Underground storage tank integrated demonstration: Evaluation of pretreatment options for Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

Separation science plays a central role inn the pretreatment and disposal of nuclear wastes. The potential benefits of applying chemical separations in the pretreatment of the radioactive wastes stored at the various US Department of Energy sites cover both economic and environmental incentives. This is especially true at the Hanford Site, where the huge volume (>60 Mgal) of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks could be partitioned into a very small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW). The cost associated with vitrifying and disposing of just the HLW fraction in a geologic repository would be much less than those associated with vitrifying and disposing of all the wastes directly. Futhermore, the quality of the LLW form (e.g., grout) would be improved due to the lower inventory of radionuclides present in the LLW stream. In this report, we present the results of an evaluation of the pretreatment options for sludge taken from two different single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site-Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-U-110 (referred to as B-110 and U-110, respectively). The pretreatment options examined for these wastes included (1) leaching of transuranic (TRU) elements from the sludge, and (2) dissolution of the sludge followed by extraction of TRUs and {sup 90}Sr. In addition, the TRU leaching approach was examined for a third tank waste type, neutralized cladding removal waste.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40%) with coal.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

Howden, G.F.

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

Program on Technology Innovation: Gasification Testing of Various Biomasses in Untreated and Pretreated (Leached) Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove/eliminate troublesome constituents, such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus, presents the opportunity to solve many of the problems found when firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomasses, grasses, and waste materials for energy or production of biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has fostered projects for the development and testing of this potential game-changing biomass pretreatment technology since 2010. As part ...

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

On testing the Tradeoff Theory of capital structure with real options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explain often anomalous results of capital structure tests by infusing tradeoff theory with real options. Of course one can explain almost everything using a soft qualitative theory. This paper's addition is to use a ...

Shore, William T., S.M. (William Thomas). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten-rhenium and platinum rhodium thermocouples can be avoided. INL is also developing an Ultrasonic Thermometry (UT) capability. In addition to small size, UT’s offer several potential advantages over other temperature sensors. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, potentially allowing monitoring of temperatures up to 3000 C. In addition, because no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length. As discussed in this paper, the suite of temperature monitors offered by INL is not only available to ATR users, but also to users at other MTRs.

J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Disposal configuration options for future uses of greater confinement disposal at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of a variety of radioactive and mixed wastes, some of which are considered special-case waste because they do not currently have a clear disposal option. The DOE`s Nevada Field Office contracted with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of disposing of some of this special-case waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). As part of this investigation, a review of a near-surface and subsurface disposal options that was performed to develop alternative disposal configurations for special-case waste disposal at the NTS. The criteria for the review included (1) configurations appropriate for disposal at the NTS; (2) configurations for disposal of waste at least 100 ft below the ground surface; (3) configurations for which equipment and technology currently exist; and (4) configurations that meet the special requirements imposed by the nature of special-case waste. Four options for subsurface disposal of special-case waste are proposed: mined consolidated rock, mined alluvium, deep pits or trenches, and deep boreholes. Six different methods for near-surface disposal are also presented: earth-covered tumuli, above-grade concrete structures, trenches, below-grade concrete structures, shallow boreholes, and hydrofracture. Greater confinement disposal (GCD) in boreholes at least 100 ft deep, similar to that currently practiced at the GCD facility at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the NTS, was retained as the option that met the criteria for the review. Four borehole disposal configurations are proposed with engineered barriers that range from the native alluvium to a combination of gravel and concrete. The configurations identified will be used for system analysis that will be performed to determine the disposal configurations and wastes that may be suitable candidates for disposal of special-case wastes at the NTS.

Price, L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon injecTion opTions For Mercury conTrol AT TXu's big brown sTATion Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Lignite coal is unique because of its highly variable ash content (rich in alkali and alkaline-earth elements), high moisture levels, low chlorine content, and high calcium content. Unique to Texas lignite coals are relatively high iron and selenium concentrations. When combusting Texas lignite coals, up to 80 percent of the mercury in the flue gas is present as elemental mercury, which is not readily captured by downstream pollution control devices. To better understand the factors that influence mercury control at units firing

16

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

17

Vitrification and Product Testing of AW-101 and AN-107 Pretreated Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective for vitrifying the LAW samples is to generate glass products for subsequent product testing. The work presented in this report is divided into 6 work elements: 1) Glass Fabrication, 2) Chemical Composition, 3) Radiochemical Composition, 4) Crystalline and Non-crystalline Phase Determination, and 5) Release Rate (Modified PCT). These work elements will help demonstrate the RPP-WTP projects ability to satisfy the product requirements concerning, chemical and radionuclide reporting, waste loading, identification and quantification of crystalline and non-crystalline phases, and waste form leachability. VOA, SVOA, dioxins, furans, PCBs, and total cyanide analyses will be reported in as separate document (WTP-RPT-005).

Smith, Gary L.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Final Report - Assessment of Testing Options for the NTR at the INL  

SciTech Connect

One of the main technologies that can be developed to dramatically enhance the human exploration of space is the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Several studies over the past thirty years have shown that the NTR can reduce the cost of a lunar outpost, reduce the risk of a human mission to Mars, enable fast transits for most missions throughout the solar system, and reduce the cost and time for robotic probes to deep space. Three separate committees of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences have recommended that NASA develop the NTR. One of the primary issues in development of the NTR is the ability to verify a flight ready unit. Three main methods can be used to validate safe operation of a NTR: 1) Full power, full duration test in an above ground facility that scrubs the rocket exhaust clean of any fission products; 2) Full power , full duration test using the Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) technique to capture the exhaust in subsurface strata; 3) Test of the reactor fuel at temperature and power density in a driver reactor with subsequent first test of the fully integrated NTR in space. The first method, the above ground facility, has been studied in the past. The second method, SAFE, has been examined for application at the Nevada Test Site. The third method relies on the fact that the Nuclear Furnace series of tests in 1971 showed that the radioactive exhaust coming from graphite based fuel for the NTR could be completely scrubbed of fission products and the clean hydrogen flared into the atmosphere. Under funding from the MSFC, the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) at the Idaho National laboratory (INL) has completed a reexamination of Methods 2 and 3 for implementation at the INL site. In short, the effort performed the following: 1) Assess the geology of the INL site and determine a location suitable SAFE testing; 2) Perform calculations of gas transport throughout the geology; 3) Produce a cost estimate of a non-nuclear , sub-scale test using gas injection to validate the computational models; 4) Produce a preliminary cost estimate to build a nuclear furnace equivalent facility to test NTR fuel on a green field location on the INL site. The results show that the INL geology is substantially better suited to the SAFE testing method than the NTS site. The existence of impermeable interbeds just above the sub-surface aquifer ensure that no material from the test, radioactive or not, can enter the water table. Similar beds located just below the surface will prevent any gaseous products from reaching the surface for dispersion. The extremely high permeability of the strata between the interbeds allows rapid dispersion of the rocket exhaust. In addition, the high permeability suggests that a lower back-pressure may develop in the hole against the rocket thrust, which increases safety of operations. Finally, the cost of performing a sub-scale, non-nuclear verification experiment was determined to be $3M. The third method was assessed through discussions with INL staff resident at the site. In essence, any new Category I facility on any DOE site will cost in excess of $250M. Based on the results of this study, a cost estimate for testing a nuclear rocket at the INL site appears to be warranted. Given the fact that a new nuclear fuel may be possible that does not release any fission products, the SAFE testing option appears to be the most affordable.

Howe, Steven D; McLing, Travis L; McCurry, Michael; Plummer, Mitchell A

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Steam pretreatment is the reaction of coal with steam at temperatures well below those usually used for solubilization. The objective of the proposed work is to test the application of steam pretreatment to coal liquefaction. This quarter, a 300 ml stirred autoclave for liquefaction tests were specified and ordered, procedures for extraction tests were reestablished, and the synthesis of four model compounds was completed. Two of these compounds remain to be purified.

Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pretreatment Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

This technology plan presents a strategy for the identification, evaluation, and development of technologies for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This strategy includes deployment of facilities and process development schedules to support the other program elements. This document also presents schedule information for alternative pretreatment systems: (1) the reference pretreatment technology development system, (2) an enhanced pretreatment technology development system, and (3) alternative pretreatment technology development systems.

Barker, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US); Thornhill, C.K.; Holton, L.K. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vitrification and Product Testing of C-104 and AZ-102 Pretreated Sludge Mixed with Flowsheet Quantities of Secondary Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has acquired Hanford tank waste treatment services at a demonstration scale. The River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) team is responsible for producing an immobilized (vitrified) high-level waste (IHLW) waste form. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, hereafter referred to as PNNL, has been contracted to produce and test a vitrified IHLW waste form from two Envelope D high-level waste (HLW) samples previously supplied to the RPP-WTP project by DOE.

Smith, Gary L.; Bates, Derrick J.; Goles, Ronald W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Lettau, Ralph C.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

MAY TH

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

PRETREATING THORIUM FOR ELECTROPLATING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for pretreating a thorium surface prior to electroplating the surface. The pretreatment steps of the invention comprise cleaning by vapor blasting the surface, anodically pickling in a 5 to 15% by volume aqueous hydrochloric acid bath with a current of 125 to 250 amp/sq ft for 3 to 5 min at room temperature, chemically pickling the surface in a 5 to 15% by volume of aqueous sulfuric acid for 3 to 5 min at room temperature, and rinsing the surface with water.

Beach, J.G.; Schaer, G.R.

1959-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate the laboratory procedure is a valid indica-Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate commercially manufactured refrigerators were u~ as laboratory test beds, a testing sequence of ..as PHASE I cabinets with an optimized Option 2 Evaporator/condenser size, surface r~frige~tion circuit or cvcle were

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

29

PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC-61 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.10093 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.hydrolytic pretreatment to biomass feedstocks, higher acid

Schaleger, Larry L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment at diff erent temperatures * Biomass is heated by steam injection to temperatures of 120°C to 210°C in the pressurized mixing tube * Preheated, premixed biomass is retained for specified residence time in vertical holding vessel; material continuously moves by gravity from top to bottom of reactor in plug-fl ow fashion * Residence time is adjusted by changing amount of material held in vertical vessel relative to continuous fl ow of material entering and exiting vessel * Optional additional reactor vessel allows for secondary pretreatment at lower temperatures-120°C to 180°C-with potential to add other chemical catalysts * First vessel can operate at residence

31

Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Option 2 Program: Development and testing of zinc titanate sorbents  

SciTech Connect

One of the most advantageous configurations of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system is coupling it with a hot gas cleanup for the more efficient production of electric power in an environmentally acceptable manner. In conventional gasification cleanup systems, closely heat exchangers are necessary to cool down the fuel gases for cleaning, sometimes as low as 200--300{degree}F, and to reheat the gases prior to injection into the turbine. The result is significant losses in efficiency for the overall power cycle. High-temperature coal gas cleanup in the IGCC system can be operated near 1000{degree}F or higher, i.e., at conditions compatible with the gasifier and turbine components, resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for IGCC power systems in which mixed-metal oxides are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this contract is to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Zinc ferrite was studied under the base program of this contract. In the next phase of this program novel sorbents, particularly zinc titanate-based sorbents, are being studied under the remaining optional programs. This topical report summarizes only the work performed under the Option 2 program. In the course of carrying out the program, more than 25 zinc titanate formulations have been prepared and characterized to identify formulations exhibiting enhanced properties over the baseline zinc titanate formulation selected by the US Department of Energy.

Ayala, R.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed  

SciTech Connect

The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

Huber, Heinz J.

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Option contracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many languages support behavioral software contracts so that programmers can describe a component's obligations and promises via logical assertions in its interface. The contract system monitors program execution, checks whether the assertions hold, ... Keywords: behavioral software contracts, programming language design, propabilistic spot checking, random testing

Christos Dimoulas, Robert Bruce Findler, Matthias Felleisen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking. Author(s), Shiju Thomas, Paul Cha, Steven J McKnight, Vincent A Bouma, Andrew L Petrik,

36

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment of biomass solids at different temperatures.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Summary - WTP Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Block Block D DOE is Immob site's t facilitie purpos techno Facility to be i The as CTEs, Readin * C * C * W * Tr * U * Pu * W * H * Pl The as require The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Wast Why DOE Diagram of Cesiu s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a P se of this asses ology elements y and determin ncorporated in What th ssessment team along with eac ness Level (TR s Nitric Acid Re s Ion Exchang Waste Feed Eva reated LAW Ev ltrafiltration Pro ulse Jet Mixer Waste Feed Rec LW Lag Storag lant Wash and ssessment team ed maturity prio To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen te Treatm E-EM Did This um Nitric Acid R a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com Pretreatment F ssment was to s (CTEs) in the

38

OPTIONS for ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIONS for ENERGY EFFICIENCY in EXISTING BUILDINGS December 2005 CEC-400-2005-039-CMF;OPTIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY in EXISTING BUILDINGS COMMISSION REPORT TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................iii California's Successful Energy Efficiency Programs

39

The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

straw pretreated for bioethanol production. Biotechnologyof woody biomass for bioethanol production. Bioresources

Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

McMillan, J.D.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Natural Gas Purchasing Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower energy costs and to secure supply.

Watkins, G.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Impact of thermal pretreatment on the fast pyrolysis conversion of Southern Pine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Thermal pretreatment of biomass ranges from simple (nondestructive) drying to more severe treatments that cause devolatization, depolymerization and carbonization. These pretreatments have demonstrated promise for transforming raw biomass into feedstock material that has improved milling, handling, storage and conversion properties. In this work, southern pine material was pretreated at 120, 180, 230 and 270 degrees C, and then subjected to pyrolysis tests in a continuous-feed bubbling-fluid bed pyrolysis system. Results: High pretreatment temperatures were associated with lower specific grinding energies, higher grinding rates and lower hydrogen and oxygen contents. Higher pretreatment temperatures were also correlated with increased char production, decreased total acid number and slight decrease in the oxygen content of the pyrolysis liquid fraction. Conclusion: Thermal pretreatment has both beneficial and detrimental impacts on fast pyrolysis conversion of pine material to bio-oil, and the effect of thermal pretreatment on upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oil requires further attention.

Tyler L. Westover; Manunya Phanphanich; Micael L. Clark; Sharna R. Rowe; Steven E. Egan; Christopher T Wright; Richard D. Boardman; Alan H. Zacher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Prepayment Funding Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepayment Funding Option December 5, 2012 Prepayment Funding Meeting Prepayment Funding Presentation December 7, 2011 Prepayment Funding Meeting Prepayment Funding Process...

44

Optional Tour Program - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Optional Tour Program  ...

45

Optimization Online - Option - Alloction funds- Transaction costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 18, 2009 ... Tests on portfolio efficiency concern, at first time, a long-term investor with Out- The-Country options and strike prices are approximate by a ...

46

Caloramator sp. Tolerance of Pretreatment Inhibitors from ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Caloramator sp. Tolerance of Pretreatment Inhibitors from Lignocellulosics Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ORNL About This ...

47

Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated ...  

Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Anhydrous Liquid Ammonia Inventors: Shishir Chundawat, Leonardo Sousa, ...

48

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Broszkiewicz-Suwaj, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Modeling and optimization of operating parameters for a test-cell option of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II tandem mirror design  

SciTech Connect

Models of tandem mirror devices operated with a test-cell insert have been used to calculate operating parameters for FPD-II+T, an upgrade of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II device. Two test-cell configurations were considered, one accommodating two 1.5 m blanket test modules and the other having four. To minimize the cost of the upgrade, FPD-II+T utilizes the same coil arrangement and machine dimensions outside of the test cell as FPD-II, and the requirements on the end cell systems have been held near or below those for FPD-II. The maximum achievable test cell wall loading found for the short test-cell was 3.5 MW/m/sup 2/ while 6.0 MW/m/sup 2/ was obtainable in the long test-cell configuration. The most severe limitation on the achievable wall loading is the upper limit on test-cell beta set by MHD stability calculations. Modification of the shape of the magnetic field in the test-cell by improving the magnet design could raise this beta limit and lead to improved test-cell performance.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

Comminution employing liquid nitrogen pretreatments  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a methodology that will lead to the establishment of an effective, efficient technique for ultrafine grinding of coal. We believe that the key to successful coal grinding is strongly dependent upon the change of the brittleness of coal under a freezing temperature pretreatment. Furthermore, a cryogenic grinding process may provide the basis for the development of advanced technologies involving the separation of the pyritic minerals from coal. Specific objectives of the program are to: determine the effect of low temperature pretreatments on the microfracture development along the coal/pyrite interface and on the fracture resistance (brittleness) of coal. Specifically, we intend to examine the effect of direct contact of coal with liquid nitrogen, dry ice, and dry-iced acetone. Also, we intend to study pyrite liberation as a result of these treatments; determine the fracture resistance of coal under different low temperature pretreatments; determine the relationships between the fracture resistance of coal and the effectiveness of a grinding process; determine the effect of the frozen coal grinding on the pyrite liberation; evaluate factors which might effect process design, scale-up, and economics; and make a first pass economic assessment of the process. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Yen, S.C. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Mechanics); Hippo, E.J. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NREL: More Search Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More Search Options More Search Options Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version The following options help you find information on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory site, locate NREL staff, browse publication and photograph collections, and see what hot topics other site visitors are looking for. Search the NREL Web Site Search Tip: use quotes to find exact phrases Example: "renewable energy" Tip: use plus signs to find results that contain all your search terms Example: +biodiesel +buses Search Help Find NREL Staff in the Employee Locator Search by first or last name: Search Select a search type Select your criteria Enter your search term Look at Recent Hot Topics Biomass HOMER (computer model) Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Jobs PVWATTS (software)

57

Nevada Transportatoion Options Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence of rail is restricted to approximately twelve, without upgrading public highways. There is high uncertainty as to what road upgrades and security/escorts the Nevada Department of Transportation would require to obtain an overweight/overdimensional permit. In addition, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has indicated that a larger cask weight than that analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement may be required for naval shipments, resulting in additional costs for heavy-haul transport. These uncertainties result in a high cost and schedule risk. Option 3 assumes that the start of rail construction will be delayed until after construction authorization is received from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Similar to Option 2, Option 3 uses legal-weight truck shipments and limited heavy haul truck shipments to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as Option 1, until rail becomes available. By using heavy-haul truck for two years, Option 3 contains the same uncertainties and resultant high cost and schedule risk as Option 2. The cost and schedule of legal-weight truck transport are not included in this report as that will be evaluated in the report on national transportation.

P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Optimization of steam explosion pretreatment. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different operating conditions are required to optimize the yield from each of the various fractions in the substrate. Xylose recovery is maximized at short cooking times whereas maximum lignin recovery requires much longer cooking times. Peak glucose yield and rumen digestibility occur at intermediate times. If process conditions are set for maximum glucose yield we have achieved a yield of 68% of the theoretical, based on an average of a dozen substrates tested. Individual results ranged from 46 to 87%. If the process is optimized for maximum total sugars (i.e. glucose plus xylose) we have obtained an average yield of 60%, with a range of 31 to 75%. With rumen microflora, the average value of the in-vitro cellulose digestibility was 82%, with a range of 41 to 90%. The optimum operating conditions for total sugars are a pressure of 500 to 550 psig with a cooking time of 40 to 50 seconds and 35% starting moisture content. Particle size is not a significant factor, nor is pre-steaming or use of a constricting die in the gun nozzle. High quality lignin can be extracted with 80% yield. The Iotech lignin is very soluble, has a low molecular weight and is reactive. The unique properties of the lignin derive from the explosion at the end of the pretreatment. A lignin formaldehyde resin has been successfully formulated and tested. It represents a high value utilization of the lignin byproduct with immediate market potential. A detailed engineering design of the process gives an estimated operating cost of $7.50/OD ton of biomass. At this low cost, the Iotech process achieves many important pretreatment goals in a single step. The substrate has been sterilized; it has been pulverized into a powder; the cellulose has been accessible; and a highly reactive lignin fraction can be recovered and utilized.

Foody, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

television sets. ” Austrian Energy Agency, June. Chen, H.F.of Options for Improving Energy Efficiency Test Proceduresfor Displays”, March. Energy Conservation Center, Japan (

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

rifsimp_options.html - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are three options for specification of pivot cleaning: nopiv perform ... fullclean. This is a shortcut specification for the clean options for rifsimp (see above).

62

Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs  

SciTech Connect

Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Application of high throughput pretreatment and cohydrolysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Biofuels and Environmental Biotechnology Biotechnology and Bioengineering DOI 10.1002bit.24951 Application of High Throughput Pretreatment and Co-Hydrolysis System to...

64

Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

65

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rich solution was produced by water-only pretreatment ofDP of xylooligomers produced by water-only pretreatment ofXylooligomer mixtures were produced by water-only hydrolysis

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The hydrogen hybrid option  

SciTech Connect

The energy efficiency of various piston engine options for series hybrid automobiles are compared with conventional, battery powered electric, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell hybrid automobiles. Gasoline, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen are considered for these hybrids. The engine and fuel comparisons are done on a basis of equal vehicle weight, drag, and rolling resistance. The relative emissions of these various fueled vehicle options are also presented. It is concluded that a highly optimized, hydrogen fueled, piston engine, series electric hybrid automobile will have efficiency comparable to a similar fuel cell hybrid automobile and will have fewer total emissions than the battery powered vehicle, even without a catalyst.

Smith, J.R.

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pemex: Problems and Policy Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Studies University of California, Berkeley Pemex: Problems and Policy Options David Shields Independent Energy

Shields, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fleet servicing facilities for servicing, maintaining, and testing rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems: functional requirements, technical design concepts and options cost estimates and comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a resource document which examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of a Fleet Servicing Facility (FSF). Such a facility is intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the United States' waste handling plants presently receiving radioactive wastes have an on-site FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the system is placed into service. Thus, a need is indicated for FSF's, or their equivalent, at various radioactive materials receiving sites. In this report, three forms of FSF's solely for spent fuel transport systems were examined: independent, integrated, and colocated. The independent concept was already the subject of a detailed report and is extensively referenced in this document so that capital cost comparisons of the three concepts could be made. These facilities probably could service high-level, intermediate-level, low-level, or other waste transportation systems with minor modification, but this study did not include any system other than spent fuel. Both the Integrated and Colocated concepts were assumed to be associated with some radioactive materials handling facility such as an AFR repository.

Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Keith, D.A.; Preston, M.K. Jr.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Idaho's Energy Options  

SciTech Connect

This report, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is provided as an introduction to and an update of the status of technologies for the generation and use of energy. Its purpose is to provide information useful for identifying and evaluating Idaho’s energy options, and for developing and implementing Idaho’s energy direction and policies.

Robert M. Neilson

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cogeneration System Design Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The commercial or industrial firm contemplating cogeneration at its facilities faces numerous basic design choices. The possibilities exist for fueling the system with waste materials, gas, oil, coal, or other combustibles. The choice of boiler, engine, turbine, generator, switchgear, and balance of plant can be bewildering. This paper presents an overview and a systematic approach to the basic system alternatives and attributes. The presentation illustrates how these options match the electrical and thermal needs of a firm, and what kind of operating economics and system paybacks have been achieved. Several cogeneration options are also illustrated to eliminate the problems and uncertainties of dealing with uninterested or non-cooperative utilities, as well as to minimize system costs.

Gilbert, J. S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The safeguards options study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safeguards Options Study was initiated to aid the International Safeguards Division (ISD) of the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in developing its programs in enhanced international safeguards. The goal was to provide a technical basis for the ISD program in this area. The Safeguards Options Study has been a cooperative effort among ten organizations. These are Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and Special Technologies Laboratory. Much of the Motivation for the Safeguards Options Study is the recognition after the Iraq experience that there are deficiencies in the present approach to international safeguards. While under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at their declared facilities, Iraq was able to develop a significant weapons program without being noticed. This is because negotiated safeguards only applied at declared sites. Even so, their nuclear weapons program clearly conflicted with Iraq`s obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) as a nonnuclear weapon state.

Hakkila, E.A.; Mullen, M.F.; Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Olsen, A.P.; Roche, C.T.; Rudolph, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bieber, A.M.; Lemley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Filby, E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluating and selecting options for oil refit programs  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Oil Refit Program provides technical support for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Oil Conservation Marketing Demonstration Program implemented in several states (designed to accelerate the use of fuel saving devices and systems by homeowners). BNL assisted with the planning and implementation of the marketing and grants option phases for the New York State Pilot Marketing Demonstration Program and is monitoring the results. Additionally BNL planned, and is implementing, the Oil Refit Option Qualification Program involving procedures for evaluating refit options for selection, field testing, and quantifying fuel savings for the purpose of qualifying additional options for use in the DOE state and other marketing programs. The BNL approach for the evaluation of options on a comparative basis is shown and the potential for optimizing fuel savings by combining available single-choice refit options is examined. Also shown are the estimated fuel savings for each option installed.

Hoppe, R.; Graves, W.; Salzano, F.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Impacts of Deacetylation Prior to Dilute Acid Pretreatment on the Bioethanol Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for the biochemical production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. During dilute acid pretreatment, xylan depolymerizes to form soluble xylose monomers and oligomers. Because the xylan found in nature is highly acetylated, the formation of xylose monomers requires two steps: (1) cleavage of the xylosidic bonds, and (2) cleavage of covalently bonded acetyl ester groups. Results: In this study, we show that the latter may be the rate limiting step for xylose monomer formation. Furthermore, acetyl groups are also found to be a cause of biomass recalcitrance and hydrolyzate toxicity. While the removal of acetyl groups from native corn stover by alkaline de-esterification prior to pretreatment improves overall process yields, the exact impact is highly dependent on the corn stover variety in use. Xylose monomer yields in pretreatment generally increases by greater than 10%. Compared to pretreated corn stover controls, the deacetylated corn stover feedstock is approximately 20% more digestible after pretreatment. Finally, by lowering hydrolyzate toxicity, xylose utilization and ethanol yields are further improved during fermentation by roughly 10% and 7%, respectively. In this study, several varieties of corn stover lots were investigated to test the robustness of the deacetylation-pretreatment-saccharification-fermentation process. Conclusions: Deacetylation shows significant improvement on glucose and xylose yields during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, but it also reduces hydrolyzate toxicity during fermentation, thereby improving ethanol yields and titer. The magnitude of effect is dependent on the selected corn stover variety, with several varieties achieving improvements of greater than 10% xylose yield in pretreatment, 20% glucose yield in low solids enzymatic hydrolysis and 7% overall ethanol yield.

Chen, X.; Shekiro, J.; Franden, M. A.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D. K.; Zhang, M.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M. P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis Option Analysis DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop January 25, 2005 Washington DC This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Tan-Ping Chen Nexant Jim Campbell Bhadra Grover Air Liquide Stefan Unnasch TIAX Glyn Hazelden GTI Graham Moore Chevron Matt Ringer NREL Ray Hobbs Pinnacle West 2 Presentation Outline Project Background Knowledge Collected and Preliminary Results for Each Delivery Option Summary of Observations Next Step Project Background Project Background 4 Delivery Options Option 1* GH delivery by new pipelines Option 2 Converting NG/oil pipelines for GH delivery Option 3 Blending GH into NG pipelines Option 4* GH tube trailers

76

Bounds for Asian basket options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper ... Keywords: 60E15, 60J65, 91B28, Asian basket option, Non-comonotonic sum, Sum of non-independent random variables

Griselda Deelstra; Ibrahima Diallo; Michèle Vanmaele

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Retrieval options study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Peak load management: Potential options  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This law lists state requirements and standards regulating the introduction of pollutants into Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) by industrial users. The following substances shall not be introduced into a POTW: (1) Pollutants that create a fire or explosion hazard in the POTW including, but not limited to, wastestreams with a closed cup flashpoint of less than 140 degrees Fahrenheit or 60 degrees; (2) Pollutants that will cause corrosive structural damage to the POTW, but in no case discharges with pH lower than 5.0, unless the POTW is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options Byand William A. Peters. Sustainable Energy: Choosing AmongAll the authors of Sustainable Energy are associated with

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

85

AFCI Options Study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the background and framework for both organizing the discussion and providing information on the potential for nuclear energy R&D to develop alternative nuclear fuel cycles that would address the issues with the current implementations of nuclear power, including nuclear waste disposal, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics, and sustainability. The disposition of used fuel is the cause of many of the concerns, and the possible approaches to used fuel management identify a number of basic technology areas that need to be considered. The basic science in each of the technology areas is discussed, emphasizing what science is currently available, where scientific knowledge may be insufficient, and especially to identify specific areas where transformational discoveries may allow achievement of performance goals not currently attainable. These discussions lead to the wide range of technical options that have been the basis for past and current research and development on advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the United States. The results of this work are then briefly reviewed to show the extent to which such approaches are capable of addressing the issues with nuclear power, the potential for moving further, and the inherent limitations.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Window Strategy with Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The window strategy is one of several marketing strategies using futures and options to establish a floor price and allow for upside price potential. It also reduces option premium costs. This publication discusses how the window strategy works and when to use it.

McCorkle, Dean; Amosson, Stephen H.; Fausett, Marvin

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fifth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. Work this quarter focused on analytical characterization of untreated and treated Wyodak subbituminous coal and Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of methanol/HCl pretreatment on the composition of each coal's inorganic phase. Results from these studies indicated that calcite is largely removed during pretreatment, but that other mineral species such as pyrite are unaffected. This finding is significant, since calcite removal appears to directly correlate with low severity liquefaction enhancement. Further work will be performed to study this phenomenon in more detail.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Pricing and hedging Asian basket spread options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asian options, basket options and spread options have been extensively studied in the literature. However, few papers deal with the problem of pricing general Asian basket spread options. This paper aims to fill this gap. In order to obtain prices and ... Keywords: 91G20, Asian basket spread option, Moment matching, Non-comonotonic sum, Shifted log-extended skew normal law

Griselda Deelstra; Alexandre Petkovic; Michèle Vanmaele

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Pre-treatment of Dye Wastewater by Electrolysis Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pre-treatment of Dye Wastewater by Electrolysis Technology .... Application in High Temperature Thermochemical Hydrogen Production.

90

Nanoporous Membranes for Pretreatment of Lignocellulose and Other Applications  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an inorganic membrane element and a flowthrough recycle (FTR) process for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass to ...

91

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

92

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-047 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facilities L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-047 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery has completed a Technology Readiness

93

Double-shell tank waste pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

Double-shell tanks contain most of the transuranic/high-level chemical processing waste generated at the Hanford Site in recent years. A small mass fraction of this waste is responsible for its characterization as transuranic/high-level waste. Pretreatment will partition the waste into a small fraction containing most of the transuranic/high-level components and a large fraction that is a low-level waste. The operations for achieving this objective include dissolution of water-soluble salts, dissolution of precipitated metal oxides in acid, clarification of the resulting dissolver liquors, transuranium element removal by solvent extraction and cesium removal by ion exchange. The primary benefit of pretreatment is a reduction in the overall cost of waste disposal.

Orme, R.M.; Appel, J.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability and Other Issues with ZigBee SEP Title Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability and Other Issues...

95

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 3.3.1 Distributed Generation Options17 3.3.2 Distributed Generation Modeling18 3.3.3 Distributed Generation Option Results and

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Options Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Options & Solutions Place Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip 48103 Product Michigan-based alternative energy consultant. References Energy Options & Solutions1 LinkedIn...

97

The effect of pretreatments on surfactin production from potato process effluent by Bacillus subtilis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pretreatment of low-solids (LS) potato process effluent was tested for potential to increase surfactin yield. Pretreatments included heat, removal of starch particulates, and acid hydrolysis. Elimination of contaminating vegetative cells was necessary for surfactin production. After autoclaving, 0.40 g/L of surfactin was produced from the effluent in 72 h, versus 0.24 g/L in the purified potato starch control. However, surfactin yields per carbon consumed were 76% lower from process effluent. Removal of starch particulates had little effect on the culture. Acid hydrolysis decreased growth and surfactant production, except 0.5 wt% acid, which increased the yield by 25% over untreated effluent.

D. N. Thompson; S. L. Fox; G. A. Bala

2000-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Selection of Pretreatment Processes for Removal of Radionuclides from Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Office of River Protection (ORP) located at Hanford Washington has established a contract (1) to design, construct, and commission a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that will treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes for ultimate disposal. The WTP is comprised of four major elements, pretreatment, LAW immobilization, HLW immobilization, and balance of plant facilities. This paper describes the technologies selected for pretreatment of the LAW and HLW tank wastes, how these technologies were selected, and identifies the major technology testing activities being conducted to finalize the design of the WTP.

Carreon, R.; Mauss, B. M.; Johnson, M. E.; Holton, L. K.; Wright, G. T.; Peterson, R. A.; Rueter, K. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Options for the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options Options for the Future * John Sheffield, 1 Stephen Obenschain, 2,12 David Conover, 3 Rita Bajura, 4 David Greene, 5 Marilyn Brown, 6 Eldon Boes, 7 Kathyrn McCarthy, 8 David Christian, 9 Stephen Dean, 10 Gerald Kulcinski, 11 and P.L. Denholm 11 This paper summarizes the presentations and discussion at the Energy Options for the Future meeting held at the Naval Research Laboratory in March of 2004. The presentations covered the present status and future potential for coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar, geo- thermal, and biomass energy sources and the effect of measures for energy conservation. The longevity of current major energy sources, means for resolving or mitigating environmental issues, and the role to be played by yet to be deployed sources, like fusion, were major topics of presentation and discussion. KEY WORDS: Energy; fuels; nuclear; fusion; efficiency; renewables.

100

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Option pricing, maturity randomization and distributed computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We price discretely monitored options when the underlying evolves according to different exponential Levy processes. By geometric randomization of the option maturity, we transform the n-steps backward recursion that arises in option pricing into an ... Keywords: Discrete monitoring, Grid computing, Integral equations, Lévy processes, Option pricing

Gianluca Fusai; Daniele Marazzina; Marina Marena

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Generating Profit Using Option Selling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, option selling strategy is discussed which is different from traditional equity and commodity trading strategies. Option selling strategies can achieve various non-linear Profit & Loss (P&L) graphs instead of traditional linear P&L graph. ... Keywords: Option, trading strategy, option selling, straddle

Stanley Choi; Dong Gang; Kin Keung Lai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of widespread availability, low cost, sustainability, and potential supply far greater than that of food crops, lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among lignocellulose choices, poplar wood is appealing because of high energy potential, above-average carbon mitigation potential, fast growth, and high yields. Lignocellulose structural features limit accessibility of enzymes or microorganisms. To overcome these limitations, pretreatment is required. Among several choices of pretreatment, lime pretreatment is preferred because lime is the cheapest alkali, safest to handle, easy to recover, and compatible with oxidants. The main effect of lime pretreatment is to degrade lignin, which occurs with good carbohydrate preservation and is enhanced with oxidants. Among several choices of oxidant, oxygen and air are preferred because of low cost and widespread availability. This study systematically assesses the effects of lime pretreatment on poplar wood using four different modes: long-term oxidative, long-term non-oxidative, short-term constant pressure, and short-term varying pressure. Long-term pretreatments use temperatures between 25 and 65° C, air if oxidant is used, and last several weeks. Short-term pretreatments use temperatures between 110 and 180° C, pressurized oxygen, and last several minutes to hours. Pretreatment was assessed on the basis of 3-day enzymatic digestibility using enzyme loadings of 15 FPU/g glucan in raw biomass. The results were used to recommend pretreatment conditions based on highest overall yield of glucan (after combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis) for each pretreatment mode. For each pretreatment mode, kinetic models for delignification and carbohydrates degradation were obtained and used to determine the conditions (temperature, pressure, and time) that maximize glucan preservation subjected to a target lignin yield. This study led to conclude that the most robust, and selective mode of lime pretreatment is varying pressure.

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Based on the request of Pawnee Nation’s Energy Task Force the research team, consisting Tribal personnel and Summit Blue Consulting, focused on a review of renewable energy resource development potential, funding sources and utility organizational along with energy savings options. Elements of the energy demand forecasting and characterization and demand side options review remained in the scope of work, but were only addressed at a high level. Description of Activities Performed Renewable Energy Resource Development Potential The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Energy Efficiency Options While this was not a major focus of the project, the research team highlighted common strategies for reducing energy use in buildings. The team also discussed the benefits of adopting a building energy code and introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

CO.sub.2 Pretreatment prevents calcium carbonate formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 14 to about 68 atmospheres and a carbon dioxide partial pressure within the range from about 14 to about 34 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 100.degree. to about 200.degree. C.

Neavel, Richard C. (Baytown, TX); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL); Chaback, Joseph J. (Worthington, OH)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation Poulomi Sannigrahi 1,2 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 10.1 Introduction With the rise in global energy demand and environmental concerns about the use of fossil fuels, the need for rapid development of alternative fuels from sustainable, non-food sources is now well acknowledged. The effective utilization of low-cost high-volume agricultural and forest biomass for the production of transporta- tion fuels and bio-based materials will play a vital role in addressing this concern [1]. The processing of lignocellulosic biomass, especially from mixed agricultural and forest sources with varying composition,

109

Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulosic Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment Lee Lynd 1,2 and Mark Laser 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2.1 Our Place in History The two most profound societal transformations in history have been spawned by radical shifts in human- kind's use of natural resources. The agricultural revolution, which spanned about two millennia beginning around 4000 BC, saw hunter-gatherer societies subsisting on wild plants and animals being largely dis- placed by those cultivating the land to produce crops and domesticated livestock. The industrial revolution followed, beginning around 1700 and lasting roughly two hundred years, during which time preindustrial agricultural societies gave way to those harnessing precious metals and fossil energy to develop sophisti- cated economies centered

110

Hydrogen Delivery Options and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options and Issues Options and Issues Mark Paster DOE August, 2006 Scope * From the end point of central or distributed production (300 psi H2) to and including the dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site - GH2 Pipelines and Trucks, LH2 Trucks, Carriers <$1.00/kg of Hydrogen by 2017 Hydrogen Delivery H2 Delivery Current Status * Technology - GH2 Tube Trailers: ~340 kg, ~2600 psi - LH2 Trucks: ~3900 kg - Pipelines: up to 1500 psi (~630 miles in the U.S.) - Refueling Site Operations (compression, storage dispensing): Demonstration projects * Cost (Does NOT include refueling Site Operations) - Trucks: $4-$12/kg - Pipeline: <$2/kg H2A Analysis * Consistent, comparable, transparent approach to hydrogen production and delivery cost analysis * Excel spreadsheet tools with common economic

111

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Exotic options under Lévy models: An overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we overview the pricing of several so-called exotic options in the nowadays quite popular exponential Levy models. Keywords: Exotic options, Financial derivatives, Lèvy processes

Wim Schoutens

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The new option view of investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides a simple introduction to the new option view of investment. We explain the shortcomings of the orthodox theory, and then outline the basic ideas behind the option framework. Several industry examples ...

Dixit, Avinash K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cementitious waste option scoping study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment is required to realize high yields vital to commercial success. The focus of the pretreatment step is to methodically change key features of the biomass to favor enzymatic hydrolysis. This work assesses the compositional changes due to oxidative and non-oxidative longterm lime pretreatment of poplar wood (up to 4 weeks of pretreatment) at mild temperatures (25ºC to 65ºC), and their effect on the enzymatic yield of glucan and xylan. The most important pretreatment yield of lignin was 54 g lignin remaining/100 g lignin in raw biomass, and was accomplished for 4-week lime pretreatment at 65ºC in oxidative conditions. The corresponding pretreatment yields of glucan and xylan were 85.9 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass and 80.2 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass respectively. For poplar wood oxidatively pretreated with lime for 4 weeks at 65ºC and enzymatically hydrolyzed with an enzyme loading of 15 FPU/g glucan in raw biomass during a 3-day period, the best overall yields of glucan and xylan, were 80.7 g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in raw biomass and 66.9 g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g xylan in raw biomass respectively. The corresponding hydrolysis yields were 94.0 g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in treated biomass and 83.5 g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g xylan in treated biomass respectively. Because there is a previous study of long-term lime pretreatment of corn stover (Kim, 2004), the data obtained in this work show the effect of using woody lignocellulose as substrate. From the comparison, resulted that in the case of poplar wood oxidatively pretreated at 65ºC for 4 weeks, less lignin was removed and more carbohydrates were solubilized, however the hydrolysis yield of glucan was almost equal and the hydrolysis yield of xylan was higher than the reported by Kim for corn stover oxidatively pretreated at 55ºC for 4 weeks. The overall yield of glucan resulted lower in the case of poplar wood because of the lower pretreatment yield of glucan. Thus, it is important to complete the mass balances including an analysis on the pretreatment liquor to determine if the solubilized glucan was degraded.

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Baldrige, Six Sigma, & ISO:? Understanding Your Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baldrige, Six Sigma, & ISO: Understanding Your Options. CEO Issue Sheet. How do you choose among the performance ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Horizontal Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diff Diff erent pretreatment chemistry/ residence time combinations are possible using these multiple horizontal-tube reactors * Each tube is indirectly and directly steam heated to temperatures of 150 0 C to 210 0 C * Residence time is varied by changing the speed of the auger that moves the biomass through each tube reactor * Tubes are used individually or in combination to achieve diff erent pretreatment residence times * Smaller tubes made from Hastelloy, an acid-resistant material, are used with more corrosive chemicals and residence times from 3 to 20 minutes * Larger tubes made from 316 stainless steel are used for residence times from 20 to 120 minutes Horizontal Pretreatment Reactor System Versatile pretreatment system for a wide range of pretreatment chemistries

118

Energy Conservation Options in Distillation Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a survey of energy conservation options applicable to distillation processes. Over twenty such options were identified, and eight of these were selected for detailed presentation. These options were chosen on the basis of good economics, applicability to retrofit situations, and/or the use of novel technology.

Harris, G. E.; Hearn, W. R.; Blythe, G. M.; Stuart, J. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

SciTech Connect

Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahoma’s new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nation’s current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Team’s broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee Nation’s Energy Team.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

RCS program evaluation plan options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Conservation Service (RCS) Program evaluation plan is designed to provide an ongoing evaluation during the RCS Program's active period as well as a measurement of the RCS Program's cumulative effect after the program's termination. The study options described include utility case studies, random survey sampling, directed survey sampling, and remote data collection. Survey techniques are described and appropriate questions are suggested. Several sample selection criteria are included as background for a DOE policy decision on this issue. Present and anticipated data sources are listed and discussed. Statistical data analysis plans include a preliminary determination of required sample sizes.

Stovall, T.K.; Bayne, C.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Impact of Corn Stover Composition on Hemicellulose Conversion during Dilute Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Cellulose Digestibility of the Pretreated Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assessed the impact of corn stover compositional variability on xylose conversion yields during dilute acid pretreatment and on enzymatic cellulose digestibility of the resulting pretreated solids. Seven compositionally-different stovers obtained from various locations throughout the United States were pretreated at three different conditions in triplicate in a pilot-scale continuous reactor. At the same pretreatment severity, a 2-fold increase in monomeric xylose yield and a 1.5-fold increase in enzymatic cellulose digestibility from their lowest values were found. Similar results were observed at the other pretreatment conditions. It was found that xylose conversion yields decreased with increasing acid neutralization capacity or soil content of the corn stover. Xylose yields also increased with increasing xylan content. No other significant correlations between corn stover's component concentrations and conversion yields were found.

Weiss, N. D.; Farmer, J. D.; Schell, D. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Climate Financing Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Options Financing Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Financing Options Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/ Language: English References: Climate Finance Options[1] New climate finance tool for developing countries[2] "This Platform aims at providing comprehensive guidance on financial

123

New Energy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Options Options Jump to: navigation, search Name New Energy Options Place Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil Sector Wind energy Product Belo Horizonte-based wind farm developer and independent electric energy producer. References New Energy Options[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. New Energy Options is a company located in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil . References ↑ "New Energy Options" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=New_Energy_Options&oldid=349161" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

124

A review on biomass classification and composition, cofiring issues and pretreatment methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presently around the globe there is a significant interest in using biomass for power generation as power generation from coal continues to raise environmental concerns. Biomass alone can be used for generation of power which can bring lot of environmental benefits. However the constraints of using biomass alone can include high investments costs for biomass feed systems and also uncertainty in the security of the feedstock supply due to seasonal variations and in most of the countries biomass is dispersed and the infrastructure for biomass supply is not well established. Alternatively cofiring biomass along with coal offer advantages like (a) reducing the issues related to biomass quality and buffers the system when there is insufficient feedstock quantity and (b) costs of adapting the existing coal power plants will be lower than building new systems dedicated only to biomass. However with the above said advantages there exists some technical constrains including low heating and energy density values, low bulk density, lower grindability index, higher moisture and ash content to successfully cofire biomass with coal. In order to successfully cofire biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications need to be established to direct pretreatment options that may include increasing the energy density, bulk density, stability during storage and grindability. Impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation and boiler tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications including composition and blend ratios if necessary. Some of these limitations can be overcome by using pretreatment methods. This paper discusses the impact of feedstock pretreatment methods like sizing, baling, pelletizing, briquetting, washing/leaching, torrefaction, torrefaction and pelletization and steam explosion in attainment of optimum feedstock characteristics to successfully cofire biomass with coal.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Richard D. Boardman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Infrastructure Options Analysis January 26, 2006 Brian D. James Julie Perez Peter Schmidt (703) 243 - 3383 Brian_James@DirectedTechnologies.com Directed Technologies, Inc. Page 1 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Agenda 1. Project Description and Objective 2. Team Members 3. Approach 4. Model Theory, Structure and Assumptions 5. Model Description 1. Logic 2. Features 3. Cost Components (Production, Delivery & Dispensing) 6. Los Angeles Transitional Example 7. Model Flexibility Page 2 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Team Members & Interactions Start: May 2005 (effective) End: Summer 2007 * Directed Technologies, Inc.- Prime * Sentech, Inc., Research Partner * Air Products, Industrial Gas Supplier * Advisory Board * Graham Moore, Chevron Technology Ventures

126

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

127

Forecasting future volatility from option prices, Working  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weisbach are gratefully acknowledged. I bear full responsibility for all remaining errors. Forecasting Future Volatility from Option Prices Evidence exists that option prices produce biased forecasts of future volatility across a wide variety of options markets. This paper presents two main results. First, approximately half of the forecasting bias in the S&P 500 index (SPX) options market is eliminated by constructing measures of realized volatility from five minute observations on SPX futures rather than from daily closing SPX levels. Second, much of the remaining forecasting bias is eliminated by employing an option pricing model that permits a non-zero market price of volatility risk. It is widely believed that option prices provide the best forecasts of the future volatility of the assets which underlie them. One reason for this belief is that option prices have the ability to impound all publicly available information – including all information contained in the history of past prices – about the future volatility of the underlying assets. A second related reason is that option pricing theory maintains that if an option prices fails to embody optimal forecasts of the future volatility of the underlying asset, a profitable trading strategy should be available whose implementation would push the option price to the level that reflects the best possible forecast of future volatility.

Allen M. Poteshman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reducing volatilization of heavy metals in phosphate-pretreated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigated the feasibility of reducing volatilization of heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium) in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals via phosphate pre-treatment. To evaluate the evaporation characteristics of three heavy metals from phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash, volatilization tests have been performed by means of a dedicated apparatus in the 100-1000 deg. C range. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and BCR sequential extraction procedure were applied to assess phosphate stabilization process. The results showed that the volatilization behavior in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash could be reduced effectively. Pyromorphite-like minerals formed in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash were mainly responsible for the volatilization reduction of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash at higher temperature, due to their chemical fixation and thermal stabilization for heavy metals. The stabilization effects were encouraging for the potential reuse of MSWI fly ash.

Sun Ying; Zheng Jianchang [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zou Luquan [Shanghai Center of Solid Waste Disposal, Shanghai (China); Liu Qiang; Zhu Ping [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Qian Guangren, E-mail: grqian@mail.shu.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Physical and Chemical Features of Pretreated Biomass that Influence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical and Chemical Features of Pretreated Biomass that Influence Macro-Micro-accessibility and Biological Processing Rajeev Kumar 1,3 and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Center for...

130

Use of Chemical Pretreatment to Enhance Liquid Waste of Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details unique chemical pretreatment and processing techniques presently used by utilities in their nuclear plant liquid radwaste treatment programs. It presents specific utility experience from a number of plants employing these processing alternatives.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pretreatment of industrial discharges to publicly owned treatment works (POTW)  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers a brief survey of federal regulations establishing standards for the pretreatment of pollutants discharged into POTW's; the experience of the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle (Metro) in dealing with the pretreatment of heavy metals in industrial and commercial discharges; a study and analysis by Seattle Metro of organic priority pollutants in wastewater including identification sources; and POTW treatment control technology for organic priority pollutants in Seattle Metro.

Ongerth, J.E.; Dewalle, F.B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

Lopez Torres, M. [National Center for Scientific Researcher (CNIC), Environmental Pollution Department (DECA), Ave. 25 y 158, Cubanacan, Playa, Havana City (Cuba)], E-mail: matilde.lopez@cnic.edu.cu; Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C. [National Center for Scientific Researcher (CNIC), Environmental Pollution Department (DECA), Ave. 25 y 158, Cubanacan, Playa, Havana City (Cuba)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Evaluation of coal pretreatment prior to co-processing  

SciTech Connect

The Western Research Institute is currently developing a mild gasification process for the recovery of a stabilized char product for use as a fuel. A liquid product of limited value is produced during the mild gasification process that may be suited as a co-processing vehicle for coal-oil co-processing. Research was conducted to evaluate co-processing of this mild gasification liquid with coal. The two major areas of research discussed in this report are: (1) coal pretreatment with a coal-derived liquid to induce coal swelling and promote catalyst dispersion and (2) co-processing coal that has been thermally pretreated in the presence of the mild gasification liquid. The results of the investigation to evaluate co-processing of coal that has been thermally pretreated in the presence of the mild gasification liquid indicate that the thermal pretreatment adversely affected the coal-oil co-processing under hydrogen pressure. Thermally pretreated coals co-processed under a hydrogen atmosphere and without benefit of catalyst exhibited about 86 wt % conversion as compared to 96 wt % for coal that was only thermally dried. The addition of the iron pentacarbonyl catalyst precursor to the thermally pretreated coals did improve the conversion to near that of the dried coal. Results from analysis of the product obtained from co-processing the Illinois No. 6 coal showed it was upgraded in terms of oxygen content and hydrogen to carbon atomic ratio when compared to the mild gasification liquid.

Guffey, F.D.; Barbour, F.A.; Blake, R.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Real options valuation in energy markets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Real options have been widely applied to analyze investment planning and asset valuation under uncertainty in many industries, especially energy markets. Because of their close… (more)

Zhou, Jieyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Microsoft Word - Accommodates All Generation Storage Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 v 3.0 Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The smart grid is defined by its seven principal characteristics. One of those characteristics...

137

Real options "in" projects and systems design : identification of options and solutions for path dependency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops a comprehensive approach to identify and deal with real options in" projects, that is, those real options (flexibility) that are integral parts of the technical design. It represents a first attempt ...

Wang, Tao, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Electric retail market options: The customer perspective  

SciTech Connect

This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Designating required vs. optional input fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a study comparing different techniques for visually distingishing required from optional input fields in a form-filling application. Seven techniques were studied: no indication, bold field labels, chevrons in front of the labels, ... Keywords: data input, optional fields, required fields, visual design

Thomas S. Tullis; Ana Pons

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity@IEOR.Berkeley.edu Abstract In a competitive electricity market traditional demand side management options offering customers curtailable service at reduced rates are replaced by voluntary customer responses to electricity spot prices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analysis of federal options to support photovoltaic industry growth  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodology and results of an analysis to determine the impact and leverage of federal options for supporting the growth of the photovoltaic industry. Results were projected for combinations of the following: an aggressive federal research and development program, achievement of a technological breakthrough, and immediate or breakthrough-dependent incentives including direct price reductions, keyed-to-breakeven subsidies, and federal puchases. The modeling methodology and market assumptions were also tested to determine their effect on analysis results.

Bennington, G.; Cherdak, A.; Williams, F.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Climate Finance Options Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Finance Options Platform Climate Finance Options Platform Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Finance Options Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, World Bank Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/ Climate Finance Options Screenshot References: CFO[1] "This Platform aims at providing comprehensive guidance on financial options available for climate action in developing countries. Here you can find information on where to access the wide range of funds available from multilateral and bilateral institution, as well as public and private sources. Learn more on how these funds are governed and whether your project is eligible. Users are invited to be a resource to share their

143

Method and apparatus for gasifying with a fluidized bed gasifier having integrated pretreating facilities  

SciTech Connect

An integral gasifier including a pretreater section and a gasifier section separated by a distribution grid is defined by a single vessel. The pretreater section pretreats coal or other carbon-containing material to be gasified to prevent caking and agglomeration of the coal in the gasifier. The level of the coal bed of the pretreater section and thus the holding or residence time in said bed is selectively regulated by the amount of pretreated coal which is lifted up a lift pipe into the gasifier section. Thus, the holding time in the pretreater section can be varied according to the amount of pretreat necessary for the particular coal to be gasified.

Rice, Louis F. (Arcadia, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime pretreatment (OLP). In the first study, the constant-selectivity assumption used in the continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) was determined to be invalid. During a 32-day batch fermentation, selectivity increased from 0.10 to 0.40 g acid/g non-acid volatile solid (NAVS) digested. Future revisions to CPDM should incorporate a non-constant selectivity term. In the second study, a revised procedure was developed to provide a more accurate determination of moisture content. Conventional drying at 105 degrees C allowed product acids to vaporize with water, which introduced errors. Using the revised procedure, calcium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide was added to samples at a concentration of 0.01 g base/g sample, which retained acids in the sample. The mass of additional retained material closely matched that of the additional retained acid. Three related studies involving biomass pretreatment were performed. In the first, recommended parameters for pretreating sugarcane bagasse with OLP and STP were determined. Recommended OLP parameters were 130 degrees C, 6.9-bar O2, and 2-h duration. The effects of solids concentration, liquid fill volume, particle size, type of shotgun shell, number of shocks, and pretreatment order were investigated. Liquid fill volume, particle size, type of shotgun shell, and pretreatment order were significant variables, whereas solids concentration and number of shocks were not. Recommended OLP parameters were used as a basis for an additional experiment. To simulate industrial-scale pile fermentation, fixed-bed batch fermentation of OLP + STP sugarcane bagasse was performed in 1-L PVC fermentors. Rubber mulch was used as a structural support material to prevent filter plugging, which had been reported in previous work. After 42 d, acid concentration reached 8 g/L with yield approximately 0.1 g acid/g NAVS fed. Poor fermentation performance was caused by short solid-liquid contact time and poor pH control. A third biomass pretreatment experiment investigated the potential of pretreated corn stover as a potential ruminant feed. Five samples (raw, OLP, STP, OLP + STP, and STP + OLP) were analyzed for composition and in vitro digestibility. STP followed by OLP increased neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility from 49.3 to 79.0 g NDF digested/100 g NDF fed. On an organic matter basis, STP + OLP corn stover plus water-soluble extractives had a total digestible nutrients (TDN) of 74.9, nearly reaching corn grain at 88.1.

Meysing, Daniel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A petroleum vacuum resid (1,000 F+) was pretreated by catalytic hydrogenation and hydrocracking reactions and the pretreated resids (host oils) were then coprocessed with coal. The fraction of coal converted to soluble products and the yield of pentane-soluble oils were determined after coprocessing. The phenolic oxygen concentration of the oil product provided a means for estimating the fraction of coal liquids in the products; oils originating from coal had much higher concentrations of phenolic oxygen than those originating from petroleum. Resids that were pretreated by mild temperature hydrogenation reactions, where cracking was suppressed, became better host oils; when these pretreated resids were coprocessed with coal, more of the mixture was converted to tetrahydrofuran-soluble products. Depending on the pretreatment, the pentane-soluble oil yields following thermal coprocessing were either significantly lower or slightly higher than the oil yields obtained with untreated resid. The yield of oils was strongly affected by the concentration of coal in the feed. The presence of small amounts, less than 33% of coal, enhanced the conversion of petroleum resid to oils during coprocessing, although the increases were small. 91 refs.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass holds great promise for renewable and clean energy production. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of lignocellulose breakdown during various pretreatment methods is needed to realize this potential in a cost and energy efficient way. Here, we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize morphological changes in switchgrass lignocellulose across molecular to sub-micron length scales resulting from the industrially-relevant dilute acid pretreatment method. Our results demonstrate that dilute acid pretreatment increases the cross-sectional radius of the crystalline cellulose fibril. This change is accompanied by removal of hemicellulose and the formation of Rg ~ 135 lignin aggregates. The structural signature of smooth cell wall surfaces is observed at length scales larger than 1000 , and it remains remarkably invariable during pretreatment. This study elucidates the interplay of the different biomolecular components in the break down process of switchgrass by dilute acid pretreatment. The results are important for the development of efficient strategies of biomass to biofuel conversion.

Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; McGaughey, Joseph [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Received: Received: 7 September 2012 Accepted: 13 September 2012 Published online in Wiley Online Library: (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI 10.1002/jctb.3959 New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, a† Anthe George b,c and Y-H Percival Zhang a,d,e∗ Abstract Non-food lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable bioresource as a collectable, transportable, and storable chemical energy that is far from fully utilized. The goal of biomass pretreatment is to improve the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. Many substrate factors, such as substrate accessibility, lignin content, particle size and so on, contribute to its recalcitrance. Cellulose accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes is believed to be the most important substrate characteristic limiting enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulose

148

Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre?treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically?sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source?sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre?treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170?°C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control

W. Hao; W. Hongtao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Measurement of Porosity in Dilute Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) pretreated corn stover appeared to have more accessible pore volume than raw corn stover; (2) solute exclusion method--differences in the pore volume were not detectable due to the high variability of the measurements; (3) thermoporosimetry--differences in pore volume between pretreated samples were not observed despite the low variability of the measurement and a good correction was found between unfrozen water at 240K and xylan content; and (4) porosity measurements showed no correlation between ethanol yields and the volume accessible to an enzyme size probe, for this sample set.

Ishizawa, C.; Davis, M. F.; Johnson, D. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Local Option - Special Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Special Districts Local Option - Special Districts Local Option - Special Districts < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Bioenergy Solar Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been

151

Pricing and hedging a barrier option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrier options are options where the payoff depends on whether the underlying asset's price reaches a certain level during a certain period of time. This path-dependency makes these options difficult to manage in practice. In this work, general methods of pricing and hedging are proposed. General properties of the Black - Scholes model are studied. Three methods of pricing are discussed and compared. Hedging issues are analyzed. Finally an improvement of the Black - Scholes model for the stock's price is proposed to take into account the stochastic aspect of the stock price volatility.

Bogossian, Alan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145 Degree-Sign C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8 days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

Shahriari, Haleh, E-mail: haleh.shahriari@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Warith, Mostafa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Hamoda, Mohamed [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Kennedy, Kevin J. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

154

Options for Handling Noncombustion Waste: Third Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities produce a wide variety of noncombustion wastes from generating and distributing electricity as well as from associated support operations. This manual addresses the management of 23 utility noncombustion wastes and describes options for managing these wastes.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4. Option Value of a Thermal Energy Storage System for 5counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage vii Abstractfor the day, operating thermal energy storage overnight for

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Transportation Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation SLAC and Stanford can be reached by a variety of transportation options. There are many resources to help you plan your trip to and around SLAC and Stanford. The...

157

New England Wind Forum: More Search Options  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT More Search Options New England Wind Forum Site...

158

Adaptive genetic programming for option pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic Programming (GP) is an automated computational programming methodology, inspired by the workings of natural evolution techniques. It has been applied to solve complex problems in multiple domains including finance. This paper illustrates the ... Keywords: enetic programming, options pricing

Zheng Yin; Anthony Brabazon; Conall O'Sullivan

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effects of catalyst pretreatment for carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of pretreatment of iron catalyst for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) thin-film catalyst deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C2H4 in a thermal chemical ...

Morgan, Caitlin D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300.degree. C. before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil.

Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Separations/pretreatment considerations for Hanford privatization phase 2  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Focus Area is funded to develop, demonstrate, and deploy technologies that will assist in the treatment and closure of its nuclear waste tanks. Pretreatment technologies developed to support the privatization effort by the Department of Energy are reviewed. Advancements in evaporation, solid-liquid separation, sludge treatment, solids controls, sodium management, and radionuclide removal are considered.

Hunt, R.D.; McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PRICING A CLASS OF EXOTIC OPTIONS VIA MOMENTS AND SDP ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which have been considered in the interest rate and the real option theories. In fact, any ... Here, T > 0 is the option's maturity time, K is the option's strike price,.

163

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP January 18, 2005 -...

165

Report on HVAC Option Selections for a Relocatable Classroom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report on HVAC Option Selections for a Relocatable Classroom Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Field Study Title Report on HVAC Option Selections for a Relocatable Classroom...

166

Energy Efficiency Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for Illinois Energy Efficiency Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for Illinois Chuck Goldman (LBNL) & Rich Sedano (RAP). ICC Staff...

167

State Policy Options for Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Policy Options for Renewable Energy State Policy Options for Renewable Energy Matthew H. Brown Energy Program Director National Conference of State Legislatures. September...

168

State Policy Options for Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Options for Renewable Energy State Policy Options for Renewable Energy Matthew H. Brown Energy Program Director National Conference of State Legislatures. September 2003...

169

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry Title Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in...

170

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

171

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications Title Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications Publication Type Report...

172

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has been steadilya Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters Title Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

174

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary This...

175

Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government...

176

Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights Law Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights Law Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed....

177

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a key challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has beena Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock to economically produce environmentally friendly biofuels. Corn stover was pretreated with an excess of calcium hydroxide (0.5 g Ca(OH)2/g raw biomass) in non-oxidative and oxidative conditions at 25, 35, 45, and 55oC. The optimal condition is 55oC for 4 weeks with aeration, determined by yields of glucan and xylan. The overall yields of glucose (g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g original glucan) and xylose (g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g original xylan) were 91.3 and 51.8 at 15 FPU/g cellulose, respectively. Furthermore, when considering the dissolved fragments of glucan and xylan in the pretreatment liquors, the overall yields of glucose and xylose were 93.2 and 79.5 at 15 FPU/g cellulose, respectively. The pretreatment liquor has no inhibitory effect on ethanol fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A. At the recommended condition, only 0.073 g Ca(OH)2 was consumed per g of raw corn stover. Under extensive delignification conditions, 87.5% of the initial lignin was removed. Extensive delignfication required oxidative treatment and additional lime consumption. Deacetylation quickly reached a plateau within 1 week. Delignification highly depended on temperature and the presence of oxygen. Lignin and hemicellulose were selectively removed, but cellulose was not affected by lime pretreatment in mild temperatures (25 ?? 55oC). The delignification kinetic models of corn stover were empirically determined by three simultaneous first-order reactions. The activation energies for the oxidative delignification were estimated as 50.15 and 54.21 kJ/mol in the bulk and residual phases, respectively. Crystallinity slightly increased with delignification because amorphous components (lignin, hemicellulose) were removed. However, the increased crystallinity did not negatively affect the 3-d sugar yield of enzyme hydrolysis. Oxidative lime pretreatment lowered the acetyl and lignin contents to obtain high digestibility, regardless of crystallinity. The enzymatic digestibility of lime-treated biomass was affected by the change of structural features (acetylation, lignification, and crystallization) resulting from the treatment. The non-linear models for 3-d hydrolysis yields of glucan and xylan were empirically established as a function of the residual lignin fraction for the corn stover pretreated with lime and air.

Kim, Se Hoon

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hydrothermal pretreatment to prevent scale during liquefaction of certain solid carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by hydrothermal pretreatment. The said pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The said pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1000 to about 4400 psia. Temperature during said pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 500.degree. to about 700.degree. F.

Stone, John B. (Houston, TX); Floyd, Frank M. (Baytown, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NREL Breaks New Ground in Plant Pretreatment for Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden knowledge of plant cell wall structures and identify ideal pretreatment of plant material.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Real options in information technology risk management: an empirical validation of risk-option relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, an option-based risk management (OBRiM) framework has been proposed to control risk and maximize value in information technology investment decisions. While the framework is prescriptive in nature, its core logic rests on a set of normative ... Keywords: IT investment, real options, risk, risk management

Michel Benaroch; Yossi Lichtenstein; Karl Robinson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

New Search Options in PeopleSoft 9 New Search Options in PeopleSoft 9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Search Options in PeopleSoft 9 New Search Options in PeopleSoft 9 To view or update data search box page. Person ID (or just ID) is often the default key criterion. If you enter nothing and click OK, the system searches for all records with IDs. However, because all records have IDs, the list

McConnell, Terry

183

Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy Options Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans Elizabeth Doris Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-52576 September 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans Elizabeth Doris Prepared under Task No(s). IDNO.1030 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-52576 September 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

184

High-Power Options for LANSCE  

SciTech Connect

The LANSCE linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of successful beam operations at 800 kW. We have recently studied options for restoration of high-power operations including approaches for increasing the performance to multi-MW levels. In this paper we will discuss the results of this study including the present limitations of the existing accelerating structures at LANSCE, and the high-voltage and RF systems that drive them. Several options will be discussed and a preferred option will be presented that will enable the first in a new generation of scientific facilities for the materials community. The emphasis of this new facility is 'Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes' (MaRIE) which will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges.

Garnett, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Disposition options for {sup 233}U  

SciTech Connect

The United States is implementing a program to dispose of excess nuclear-weapons-usable materials--including {sup 233}U. A series of studies have identified multiple {sup 233}U disposition options, and these options are described herein. Most of the options involve adding depleted uranium containing {sup 238}U to the {sup 233}U. Converting the {sup 233}U into a mixture of <12 wt % {sup 233}U in {sup 238}U converts the weapons-usable {sup 233}U into nonweapons-usable {sup 233}U. For {sup 233}U that is considered waste, further isotopic dilution to <0.66 wt % {sup 233}U in {sup 238}U minimizes potential long-term repository criticality concerns and in many cases minimizes final waste volumes.

Forsberg, C.W.; Icenhour, A.S.; Krichinsky, A.M.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).

Lumetta, G J; Swanson, J L

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Screen payback on cogeneration-system options  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are charts that provide a quick look at the relationship among the primary variables that affect the viability of a cogeneration project. The graphs are not intended to be complete feasibility studies, but rather screening aids for understanding the important interrelationships. Use of the charts will enable engineers to compare the predominant system options: gas turbine with heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG), diesel engine with HRSG, and fired boiler with steam turbine. The three options are presented separately because of differing capital costs and heat balances.

Wilson, F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p corn cobs.

Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Low-Cost Options for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control ADA- Environmental Solutions will test two new technologies for mercury control. The TOXECON II(tm) technology injects activated carbon directly into the downstream collecting fields of an electrostatic precipitator. The benefit of this technology is that the majority of the fly ash is collected in the upstream collecting fields which results in only a small portion of carbon-contaminated ash. Additionally, the TOXECON II(tm) technology requires minimal capital investment as only minor retrofits to the electrostatic precipitator are needed. The second technology is injection of novel sorbents for mercury removal on units with hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Mercury removal from hot-side electrostatic precipitators is difficult as their high operating temperature range keeps the mercury in the vapor phase and prevents the mercury from adsorbing onto sorbents. The TOXECON II(tm) technology will be tested at Entergy's Independence Station which burns PRB coal. The novel sorbents for hot-side ESPs technology will be tested at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center and MidAmerican's Louisa Station, both of which burn PRB coal. Additional project partners include EPRI, MidAmerican, Entergy, Alliant, ATCO Power, DTE Energy, Oglethorpe Power, Norit Americas Inc., Xcel Energy, Southern Company, Arch Coal, and EPCOR.

190

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and reserach needs and next steps

192

Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11 Option B: The program is organized by t Spanish Institute and the Asso program on renewable energy will provide students with advanced knowledge. opportunities: option A- two renewable energies; option B include on-site visits to renewable energy generation

Simaan, Nabil

193

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

Pricing Discretely Monitored Asian Options by Maturity Randomization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new methodology based on maturity randomization to price discretely monitored arithmetic Asian options when the underlying asset evolves according to a generic Lévy process. Our randomization technique considers the option expiry ... Keywords: Asian option, Lévy process, discrete monitoring, fast Fourier transform, integral equation, option pricing, quadrature formula

Gianluca Fusai; Daniele Marazzina; Marina Marena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

197

Finding the cheapest Clean power options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Speculation about why policies favor high-cost low-carbon generation options could fill a book. Vested interests? Lack of knowledge? Industry lobbying? Cost-plus regulatory mentality? Regardless of reasons, the data show that efficient generation that uses energy twice is largely ignored. While all other generation, both clean and dirty, receives large subsidies, energy recycling is ignored. (author)

Casten, Thomas R.; Smith, Jeffrey A.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Waste disposal options report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the potential options for the processing and disposal of mixed waste generated by reprocessing spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. It compares the proposed waste-immobilization processes, quantifies and characterizes the resulting waste forms, identifies potential disposal sites and their primary acceptance criteria, and addresses disposal issues for hazardous waste.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Defined Contribution Retirement Plan Fund Option Enhancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIAA-CREF Fidelity Investments Peter Crehan Consultant ­ Field Consulting Group TIAA-CREF #12;Agenda I will provide an overview of how enhanced fund options will benefit plan participants VI. Fidelity and TIAA Managing Consultant | Institutional Relationships TIAA-CREF I Financial Division of Human Resources

Salama, Khaled

200

Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Determination of porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simonsâ Â’ stain and NMR techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

porosity porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons' stain and NMR techniques Xianzhi Meng a , Marcus Foston a,1 , Johannes Leisen b , Jaclyn DeMartini c , Charles E. Wyman c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,⇑ a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th Street, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, BioEnergy Science Center, Riverside, CA 92507, USA h i g h l i g h t s  Cellulose accessibility was tested by Simons' stain and multiple NMR techniques.  Pretreatment increases the pore size and overall surface area of the

202

NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of physical and chemical pretreatments on the crystallinity of bagasse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass conversion technologies are receiving increasing attention due to global climate change and most recently plans from the President of the United States to reduce fossil fuel consumption. The MixAlco process converts a variety of feedstocks, such as agricultural residues, municipal solid waste, and sewage sludge, into mixed alcohols via microbial fermentation, which can then be used as fuel additives or independently as an alternative fuel. Optimizing the pretreatment step of this process is critical to improving product yields. The process uses lime pretreatment, which can be enhanced using new decrystallization pretreatment methods, namely hydrodynamic cavitation and shock tube pretreatment.Previous studies on biomass decrystallization showed an increase in biomass digestibility when hydrodynamic cavitation was utilized as a pretreatment step. This previous work was expanded by studying both acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model the cavitator to improve its efficiency. The crystallinity before and after pretreatment was analyzed. A new laboratory-scale MixAlco lime-pretreatment system was developed to produce greater quantities of lime-pretreated biomass that could be subjected to decrystallization experiments. The length of pretreatment, water loading, and bagasse loadings were varied for the shock tube experiments. After each pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, and the equivalent glucose yield was measured by the DNS (dinitrosalicylic acid) assay. Additionally, mixed-acid fermentation was performed to show the benefits of reduced crystallinity on the MixAlco fermentation. The acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation pretreatments had a modest effect on crystallinity. In contrast, the shock tube pretreatment shows greater promise as an effective decrystallization pretreatment, even for lime-treated bagasse. Repeated shocks had little effect on digestibility and the crystallinity; however, the water temperature used in shock tube pretreatment played an important role in bagasse digestibility and crystallinity.

Jones, Maxine Janette

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy Efficiency Programs:Energy Efficiency Programs: Administration and Governance OptionsAdministration and Governance Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency Programs:Energy Efficiency Programs: Administration and Governance Options Energy Efficiency programs?deliver Energy Efficiency programs? · General Administration and Coordination and Renewables Programs Board of Directors Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Regional Market Transformation

209

Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options  

SciTech Connect

Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern. Experimental results indicate that a solubility of at least 40 grams of Np/liter can be obtained using permanganate at ambient temperature, although it is expected that even higher neptunium concentrations can be achieved.

Hill, B.C.

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Exotic electricity options and the valuation of electricity generation and transmission assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: capacity valuation, electricity derivatives, electricity futures contract, exchange option, mean reversion, real options, spark spread

Shi-Jie Deng; Blake Johnson; Aram Sogomonian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cellulase Accessibility of Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) The dilute-acid pretreatment reduces xylan content in corn stover. This reduction in xylan content appears to render the substrate less recalcitrant. Below {approx}8%, xylan content is no longer the dominant factor in biomass recalcitrance. (2) Decreasing xylan content of corn stover also created more binding sites for Cel7A, but no strong correlation with actual xylan content. (3) We found no correlation between bound Cel7A concentration and lignin content. Maybe lignin is blocking the way for Cel7A? The contribution of lignin to biomass recalcitrance requires further investigation.

Jeoh, T.; Johnson, D. K.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Power of Experience The Power of Experience Final Report Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis DOE Award Number: DE-FG36-05GO15032 Project director/principal investigator: Tan-Ping Chen Consortium/teaming Partners: Air Liquide, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, NREL, Tiax, ANL Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis ii TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................... 1-1 1.1 HOW THE RESEARCH ADDS TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE AREA INVESTIGATED. 1-1 1.2 TECHNICAL EFFECTIVENESS AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF THE METHODS OR TECHNIQUES INVESTIGATED OR DEMONSTRATED .................................................... 1-1 1.3 HOW THE PROJECT IS OF BENEFIT TO THE PUBLIC..................................................... 1-1

213

Solar Photovoltaics Expanding Electric Generation Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and others have demonstrated that a broad portfolio of cost-competitive supply technologies will be needed to satisfy the world's rising demands for energy while meeting climate policy and other societal objectives. Solar energy is a particularly attractive renewable energy option because it is well distributed and abundant over most of the earth's surface. This White Paper reviews the status of PV technology and markets, the potential for evolutionary and revolutionary technology advances, the iss...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessing Renewable Energy Options | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Renewable Energy Options Assessing Renewable Energy Options Assessing Renewable Energy Options October 16, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis Preliminary Screening with an arrow pointing down to Screening. Square with the text planning in the center. A graphic of an arrow pointing down to Feasibility Study. The word Screening appears on the arrow. A square graphic showing the text Programming: Planning Charette and it's aligned to the right of arrow pointing down which reads Screening. An arrow pointing down which reads Feasibility Study. The arrow points to Size and Design Systems. A square graphic with the text Building Design: Schematic Design (35%) shown to the right of an arrow pointing down which reads Feasibility Study. An arrow pointing down which reads Size and Design Systems. This is the last of 4 arrows which show the progression from Preliminary Screening to Screening to Feasibility Study to Size and Design Systems. A square graphic which reads Building Design: Design Development (65%). This is the last of 4 boxes.

215

Power Supply Options for Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Supply Options for Data Centers Power Supply Options for Data Centers Title Power Supply Options for Data Centers Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63339 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Tschudi, William F., and Charles H. Williams Call Number LBNL-63339 Abstract For many federal facilities, the fastest growing end-use of electric energy is found in concentrations of computing capacity commonly known as data centers. For these users, the critical importance of information processing to their agency mission will present a serious challenge to meeting the aggressive new energy efficiency goals in Executive Order 13423. Federal energy managers can find a variety of methods for reducing energy intensity, in both design and operations, for these high-technology facilities . This report summarizes a recent demonstration of one such technique ? configuring power supply systems for data centers so that they use DC (direct current) power throughout, eliminating the conventional practice of multiple conversions from utility-supplied AC (alternating current) to DC and back again at every stage of the power supply system. This eliminates both the power loss and heat generated by each such conversion (which drives air conditioning energy use).

216

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Role of Pretreatment FDG-PET in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Pretreatment with 2- [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) was evaluated as a predictor of local failure-free survival (LFFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with nonkeratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (CCRT). Patients and Methods: Seventy-five M0 NPC patients who received FDG-PET before treatment were analyzed. The primary tumor FDG uptake was measured as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). The LFFS, DFS, and OS were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the differences were evaluated on log-rank test. The prognostic significance was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Eighteen patients received IMRT alone and 57 received CCRT. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in 12 patients with locoregional or distant failure than in those without failure (p 5) indicates poor outcome in patients with NPC.

Liu, Wen-Shan [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Fang [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Division of Medical Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Hsien-Chun [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liu, Jung-Tung [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Surgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Weng, Jui-Hung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Yueh-Chun [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jong-Kang, E-mail: jongkanglee@hotmail.com [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

EVSE Features Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Eight-segment Progress Indicator Auto-restart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Eight-segment Progress Indicator Auto-restart EVSE Specifications Grid connection Plug and cord NEMA 6-50 Connector type J1772 Test lab certifications UL Listed Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 10 x 13 x 4 Charge level AC Level 2 Input voltage 240 VAC Maximum input current 30 Amp Circuit breaker rating 40 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 10/30/2012 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 209.04 Supply frequency (Hz) 59.99 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 64 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state charge power (AC kW) 3.09 Maximum charge power (AC kW) 3.20 EVSE Test Results 1,2,4

220

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Financing Options for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financing Options for Geothermal Power Projects Financing Options for Geothermal Power Projects Different financing options are used at each stage in geothermal power project development, which include the exploration and drilling stage and construction and operation stage. The financing option in each stage earns a return proportionate with the risk accepted at that stage in the project's development. For each financing option, both financial and non-financial elements should be considered. Financing options and considerations for a typical geothermal power project are shown in the table below. Your project financing options and considerations may be different. Financing Options and Considerations for a Typical Geothermal Power Project* Financial Considerations Financing Stage Exploration and Drilling Construction and Operation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of sustainable water supply options for Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis considers several options for improving the sustainability of Kuwait's water supply system. The country currently relies heavily on desalination and brackish groundwater extraction. The options considered for ...

Murtaugh, Katharine A. (Katharine Ann)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The delivery option in mortgage backed security valuation simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A delivery option exists in mortgage-backed security market, which has not been considered in existing mortgage pricing simulation literature. We explain the delivery option in the "To Be Announced" trade. We discuss how the presence of the delivery ...

Scott Gregory Chastain; Jian Chen

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Security is Not an Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security is Not an Option Security is Not an Option A 10-year roadmap for achieving control system cyber security in the energy industry has been hailed as a model for other...

224

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix...

225

Local Option - Renewable Energy Financing District/Solar Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Improvement Special Assessments Local Option - Renewable Energy Financing DistrictSolar Energy Improvement Special Assessments < Back Eligibility Commercial...

226

Rolling Up a Put Option as Prices Increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural producers use put options to protect themselves against declining prices. The technique of "rolling up a put option, explained in this publication, allows the producer to raise the minimum expected selling price of a put option. Detailed examples are given for using this marketing method.

Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hybrid or electric vehicles? A real options perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the decision of an automaker concerning the alternative promotion of a hybrid vehicle (HV) and a full electric vehicle (EV). We evaluate the HV project by considering the option to change promotion from the HV to the EV in the ... Keywords: Alternative projects, American options on multiple assets, Exercise region, Hybrid and electric vehicles, Real options

Michi Nishihara

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION CENTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION CENTERS by Robert L. Bertini Kerri Date November 2002 4. Title and Subtitle DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION). The objectives of this report are to analyze data transmission options and provide cost estimates for VMT data

Bertini, Robert L.

229

EVALUATION OF SUPPLEMENTAL PRE-TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS TO MEET TRL 6 ROTARY MICROFILTRATION  

SciTech Connect

In spring 2011, the Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) for the Supplemental Treatment Project (RPP-PLAN-49827, Rev. 0), Technology Maturation Plan for the Treatment Project (T4S01) was developed. This plan contains all identified actions required to reach technical maturity for a field-deployable waste feed pretreatment system. The supplemental pretreatment system has a filtration and a Cs-removal component. Subsequent to issuance of the TMP, rotary microfiltration (RMF) has been identified as the prime filtration technology for this application. The prime Cs-removal technology is small column ion exchange (ScIX) using spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) as the exchange resin. During fiscal year 2011 (FY2011) some of the tasks identified in the TMP have been completed. As of September 2011, the conceptual design package has been submitted to DOE as part of the critical decision (CD-1) process. This document describes the remaining tasks identified in the TMP to reach technical maturity and evaluates the validity of the proposed tests to fill the gaps as previously identified in the TMP. The potential vulnerabilities are presented and the completed list of criteria for the DOE guide DOE G 413.3-4 different technology readiness levels are added in an attachment. This evaluation has been conducted from a technology development perspective - all programmatic and manufacturing aspects were excluded from this exercise. Compliance with the DOE G 413.3-4 programmatic and manufacturing requirements will be addressed directly by the Treatment Project during the course of engineering design. The results of this evaluation show that completion of the proposed development tasks in the TMP are sufficient to reach TRL 6 from a technological point of view. The tasks involve actual waste tests using the current baseline configuration (2nd generation disks, 40 psi differential pressure, 30 C feed temperature) and three different simulants - the PEP, an AP-Farm and an S-saltcake. Based on FY2011 dollars used in the TMP, these tests will have ROM costs of $950K and require up to 10 months to complete. Completion of the simulant testing will satisfy the TRL 5 and TRL 6 criteria that are related to system testing with materials that represent the full range of properties in a relevant environment.

HUBER HJ

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chemical Pretreatment And Enzymatic Hydrolysis Of Mixed Source-Separated Organic (SSO) And Wood Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper examines the effectiveness of two pretreatments on Source-Separated Organic waste (SSO) mixed with wood wastes: long term lime for SSO mixed with forestry… (more)

Faye, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effect of Pretreatment on the Strength and Formability of Vehicle Hot ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparing with the traditional hot-forming HSS, the microstructure obtained in the pretreated samples ... Multi-Scale Design of Open-Cell Aluminum Alloy Foam.

232

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and enzymatic hydrolysis for corn stover. In BookEnzymatic Hydrolysis for Corn Stover (Editor ed. ^eds. ).acid pretreatment of corn stover followed by enzymatic

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid pretreatment of biomass. Biotechnol. Bioeng. Symp. 15,that limit enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Appl. Biochem.hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Biofuels 2(4):421-450.

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

145. Wyman C, Huber G: Biomass and America's energy futuredevelopment of leading biomass pretreatment technologies.U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Comparison of Chemical Pretreatment Methods for Converting Cotton Stalks to Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone pretreatments for conversion of cotton stalks… (more)

Silverstein, Rebecca Anne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid,In: Soltes, E.J. (Ed. ), Wood and Agriculture Residues –D. , Wegener, G. , 1984. Wood: Chemistry, Ultrastructure,

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation of Cellruptor pre-treatment on biogas yield from various substrates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis work, Cellruptor pre-treatment was evaluated in order to increase biogas yield. Initially, the effects of residence time (30, 60, 90, 120… (more)

Thiruvenkadam, Selvakumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

High Throughput Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis of Biomass: Screening Recalcitrance in Large Sample Populations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the execution of the first high-throughput thermochemical pretreatment/enzyme digestion pipeline for screening biomass for recalcitrance.

Decker, S. R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Automated Surface Observing System Standby Options Power Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) General System Description * Self contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government weather operations, public consumption, etc. * Initial deployment began in 1991 and continued through 1997 * Located at 884 sites nationwide, normally at airports * System has two distinct subsystems: Field installed equipment (DCP & Sensor Group) and an indoor processor (ACU) with peripherals * Separate facility power for DCP & Sensors and ACU 1 * measure and collect data * Located on the airport * back up group for 10 minutes * Currently pl

240

Economic Options for Upgrading Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are at least six major types of equipment that upgrade waste heat: (1) thermocompressor; (2) electric drive compressor heat pump; (3) absorption heat pump; (4) high temperature heat powered compressor heat pump; (5) reverse absorption heat pump; and (6) waste heat driven compressor heat pump. Some of these are not widely known, and there has been a tendency to ascribe the characteristics and limitations of the most well-known member to all members of the group. This paper demonstrates the wide variation that actually exists between the different options, and highlights the considerations necessary to ensure the most economic choice for a particular application.

Erickson, D. C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

G:\\ISSS\\ORIENTATION\\129 Orientation\\Pre-Arrival\\KCI Transportation Option F2012.doc Transportation Option #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G:\\ISSS\\ORIENTATION\\129 Orientation\\Pre-Arrival\\KCI Transportation Option F2012.doc Transportation the last week of July or first three weeks of August, free shuttle transportation will be available through://www.iss.ku.edu/prearrival/getting-to-ku.shtml. Availability for this option is limited and fills quickly. Transportation Option #2 You can make your own

Peterson, Blake R.

242

G:\\ISSS\\ORIENTATION\\122 Orientation\\Pre-Arrival\\KCI Transportation Option S2012.doc Transportation Option #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G:\\ISSS\\ORIENTATION\\122 Orientation\\Pre-Arrival\\KCI Transportation Option S2012.doc Transportation the last week of December or first two weeks of January, free shuttle transportation will be available://www.iss.ku.edu/prearrival/getting-to-ku.shtml. Availability for this option is limited and fills quickly. Transportation Option #2 You can make your own

Peterson, Blake R.

243

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

244

Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iea.org/g8/2008/Empowering_Variable_Renewables.pdf Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Screenshot References: Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems[1] Summary "Increasing the share of renewables in energy portfolios is a key tool in the drive to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, as well as

245

Policy options for stabilizing global climate  

SciTech Connect

The structure of this paper is designed to answer the following questions in turn: What is the greenhouse effect What evidence i there that the greenhouse effect is increasing How will the Earth's climate respond to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations What activities are responsible for the greenhouse gas emissions How might emissions and climate change in the future What technologies are available for limiting greenhouse gas emissions And what domestic and international policy options, if implemented, would help to stabilize global climate This chapter provides a general introduction to the climate change issue and reviews selected previous studies. Chapter II discusses the greenhouse gases, their sources and sinks, chemical properties, current atmospheric concentrations and distributions, and related uncertainties. Chapter III relates the greenhouse gases to the process of climatic change. Once this link is made, Chapter IV examines those human activities that affect trace-gas emissions and ultimately influence climate change. Chapter V discusses the scenarios developed for this report to assist us in thinking about possible future emissions and climate change. Chapter VI then presents sensitivity analyses of the modeling results. Chapter VII gives a detailed description of existing and emerging technologies that should be considered in the formation of a comprehensive strategy for mitigating global warming. Chapter VIII outlines domestic policy options, and the concluding chapter (Chapter IX) discusses international mechanisms for responding to climate change.

Lashof, D.A.; Tirpak, D.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Evaluating home heating options in Krakow  

SciTech Connect

The city of Krakow, Poland, has poor air quality due, in part, to widespread use of coal for heating. Engineering analyses have been conducted to determine the technical feasibility and capital costs for a number of options for reducing pollution from home heating sources. Capital costs range from $90 per kilowatt (kW) to connect local boiler-houses to the district heating system to $227/kW to upgrade the electrical system and convert coal stoves to electric heat. Air quality analyses have estimated the reduction in pollutant emissions as well as in pollutant concentrations that would result from implementing the options under consideration. Significant reductions can be obtained at a lower cost by using briquettes instead of coal in home stoves than by converting the stoves to electricity or gas. Finally, incentives analyses are examining the cost-effectiveness of the various alternatives and identifying possible incentives that the city could provide to encourage adoption of less-polluting technologies and practices.

Bleda, J.; Nedoma, J.; Bardel, J.; Pierce, B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Economic considerations of commercial tokamak options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems studies have been performed to assess commercial tokamak options. Superconducting, as well as normal, magnet coils in either first or second stability regimes have been considered. A spherical torus (ST), as well as an elongated tokamak (ET), is included in the study. The cost of electricity (COE) is selected as the figure of merit, and beta and first-wall neutron wall loads are selected to represent the physics and technology characteristics of various options. The results indicate that an economical optimum for tokamaks is predicted to require a beta of around 10%, as predicted to be achieved in the second stability regime, and a wall load of about 5 MW/m/sup 2/, which is assumed to be optimum technologically. This tokamak is expected to be competitive with fission plants if efficient, noninductive current drive is developed. However, if this regime cannot be attained, all other tokamaks operating in the first stability regime, including spherical torus and elongated tokamak and assuming a limiting wall load of 5 MW/m/sup 2/, will compete with one another with a COE of about 50 mill/kWh. This 40% higher than the COE for the optimum reactor in the second stability regime with fast-wave current drive. The above conclusions pertain to a 1200-MW(e) net electric power plant. A comparison was also made between ST, ET, and superconducting magnets in the second stability regime with fast-wave current drive at 600 MW(e).

Dabiri, A.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Energy storage options for space power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Including energy storage in a space power supply enhances the feasibility of using thermal power cycles (Rankine or Brayton) and providing high-power pulses. Review of storage options (superconducting magnets, capacitors, electrochemical batteries, thermal phase-change materials (PCM), and flywheels) suggests that flywheels and phase-change devices hold the most promise. Latent heat storage using inorganic salts and metallic eutectics offers thermal energy storage densities of 1500 to 2000 kJ/kg at temperatures to 1675/sup 0/K. Innovative techniques allow these media to operate in direct contact with the heat engine working fluid. Enhancing thermal conductivity and/or modifying PCM crystallization habit provide other options. Flywheels of low-strain graphite and Kevlar fibers have achieved mechanical energy storage densities of 300 kJ/kg. With high-strain graphite fibers, storage densities appropriate to space power needs (approx. 550 kJ/kg) seem feasible. Coupling advanced flywheels with emerging high power density homopolar generators and compulsators could result in electric pulse-power storage modules of significantly higher energy density.

Hoffman, H.W.; Martin, J.F.; Olszewski, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development of stripper options for FRIB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University includes a heavy ion superconducting linac capable of accelerating all ions up to uranium with energies higher than 200 MeV/u and beam power up to 400 kW. To achieve these goals with present ion source performance it is necessary to accelerate simultaneously two charge states of uranium from the ion source in the first section of the linac. At an energy of approximately 16.5 MeV/u it is planned to strip the uranium beam to reduce the voltage needed in the rest of the linac to achieve the final energy. Up to five different charge states are planned to be accelerated simultaneously after the stripper. The design of the stripper is a challenging problem due to the high power deposited (approximately 0.7 kW) in the stripper media by the beam in a small spot. To assure success of the project we have established a research and development program that includes several options: carbon or diamond foils, liquid lithium films, gas strippers and plasma strippers. We present in this paper the status of the different options.

Marti, F.; Hershcovitch, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Thieberger, P.

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

FAQ 25-What are the options for managing depleted uranium in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

options for managing depleted uranium in the future? What are the options for managing depleted uranium in the future? The options for managing depleted uranium were evaluated in...

252

Using Real Options Theory to Evaluate Strategic Investment Options for Mobile Content Delivery: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With a rich fare of localized content, but limited regional media outlet channels, mobile content generates new business opportunities for Media News, a small media company with considerable growth potential. Two business models are considered: partnering ... Keywords: Decision-Making, Mobile Content Services, News Media, Real Options, Valuation

Divakaran Liginlal; Lara Khansa; Stella C. Chia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

CONRAD EA

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

OPTIONAL I-""... ..o SD  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OPTIONAL I-""... ..o SD , * ' y)IP-lW ' a * UNITED S T A T E S COVEKNMENT TO : Files DATE: September 25, 1962 M o m 4' Materials Branch; Division of Licensing & Regulation SUBJECT: PRE-LICENSING VISIT TO THE CONTEMPORARY METALS CORPORATION PROPOSED FACILITY AT HAZELWOOD, M ISSOURI, AND RESIDUE STOCKPILES AT ROBERTSON, M ISSOURI, DOCKET NO, 40-6811 The Contemporary Metals Corporation was awarded a contract by the AEC for the removal of uranium -bearing residues from stock- pile areas at Robertson, M issouri. These residues were generated by the Commission at its Destrehan Street Plant, St; Louis, M issouri. The applicant intends to process these residues at its Hazelwocd facility which is about three (3) m iles from the stock- pile site, Attempts will be made to extract the associated

255

POLICY OPTIONS FOR FCV MARKET INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G. Duleep G. Duleep Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. www.eea-inc.com POLICY OPTIONS FOR FCV MARKET INTRODUCTION Prepared for: Hydrogen 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Introduction Phases Phase 1 - sales of few hundred FCVs per year. Cost of vehicles will be 5 x over average vehicle and refueling infrastructure will be in an urban area. Phase 2 - ten to twenty thousand FCVs per model and one/two models per major manufacturer. Cost of vehicles will be 2 x over average vehicle, and urban and limited regional refueling infrastructure. Phase 3 - Mass market introduction, FCV cost at 1.1 to 1.2 x. Good regional refueling and limited city pair refueling sites. Policies for Phase 1 Vehicles will not be sold commercially but leased to select fleets and owners. Government fleet buy-

256

IAAP. However, Pantex Plant Option 2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

p,./qj ' . p,./qj ' . ,! Fdera~ Regbter / Vol. 4Q, No. 210 / Mot&lap, October 29, 3984 1 Notices 43493 be the optimal choice. However, for eignificantly lower caste, a major upgrade of existing facilitiee, including new constr@ion. will provide improved operational reliability and protection. Consequently, an all new facility at any of the three alternative locations was eliminated due to cost considerations. From the standpoint of environmental impact from normal operations (including offsite transportation end the risk of an accident-producing release of radioactive materials, there is little difference between existing operations at Pantex and partial relocation to IAAP. However, Pantex Plant Option 2 provided a greater degree of operational reliability and protection than the

257

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and load-serving entities (LSEs) to procure renewable energy generation. Utility procurement options may be a function of state policy and regulatory preferences, and in some cases, may be dictated by legislative authority. Utilities and LSEs commonly use competitive solicitations or bilateral contracting to procure renewable energy supply to meet RPS mandates. However, policymakers and regulators in several states are beginning to explore the use of alternatives, namely feed-in tariffs (FITs) and auctions to procure renewable energy supply. This report evaluates four procurement strategies (competitive solicitations, bilateral contracting, FITs, and auctions) against four main criteria: (1) pricing; (2) complexity and efficiency of the procurement process; (3) impacts on developers access to markets; and (4) ability to complement utility decision-making processes. These criteria were chosen because they take into account the perspective of each group of stakeholders: ratepayers, regulators, utilities, investors, and developers.

Kreycik, C. E.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

Ferguson, K.L.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

SOME OPTIONS FOR THE EAST CHINA SEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: 1 This paper analyzes the critical analytical and policy issues relating to the management of seabed hydrocarbon exploitation in transboundary and disputed areas. First, I examine various domestic and external factors that either promote or prevent the Sino-Japanese joint/cooperative development of seabed oil/gas deposits in the East China Sea. I will then define some principles and rules of cross-border petroleum exploitation and classify into five development models existing international agreements and treaties relating to seabed oil/gas exploitation in various disputed areas throughout the world. On the basis of the simplified spatial cost-benefit analysis of seabed oil/gas exploitation, different development models are suggested to fit in with the various zones of the East China Sea. Finally, I put forward several policy options for bilateral or multilateral cooperation on the exploration, exploitation, and transportation of the seabed oil/gas deposits in the East China Sea. 1.

Guo Rongxing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

September 2000Forecasting Future Variance from Option Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although it is widely believed that option prices provide the best possible forecasts of the future variance of the assets which underlie them, a large body of empirical evidence concludes that option prices consistently yield biased forecasts of future variance. The prevailing interpretation of these findings is that option investors may be forming unbiased forecasts of the future variance of underlying assets but that these unbiased forecasts fail to get impounded into option prices because of either (1) the difficulty of carrying out the necessary arbitrage strategies that would force the prices to their proper levels, or (2) the availability to market makers of lucrative alternative strategies in which they simply profit from the large bid-ask spreads in the options markets. This interpretation has significant consequences for nearly the entire range of option pricing research, since it implies that non-continuous trading, bid-ask spreads, and other market imperfections substantially influence option prices. This implication is important, both because incorporating these types of market imperfections into option pricing models is much more difficult than, for example, altering the dynamics of the underlying asset and also because it suggests that researchers cannot learn about option investor expectations by filtering option

Allen M. Poteshman; Mark R. Manfredo; Allen M. Poteshman; Allen M. Poteshman; Champaign Helpful; Jegadeesh Narasimhan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

GRR/Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Industrial wastewater permits are issued at the local level. If wastewater is not discharged into a municipal sewer system, the nonpoint source and NPDES permit inquiries are sufficient. A common approach to wastewater treatment is to treat on-site. See Idaho's

263

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching Pre-Treatment Technology Bench Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of biomass to remove or eliminate troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus presents an opportunity to solve many problems associated with firing and cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials to produce energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has taken interest in fostering the development of this potentially game-changing technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI, through the Technology Innovati...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Pretreatment and Fermentation of Sugarcane Trash to Carboxylic Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rising price of oil is hurting consumers all over the world. There is growing interest in producing biofuels from non-food crops, such as sugarcane trash. Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., sugarcane trash) is an abundant, inexpensive, and renewable resource. The patented MixAlco process is a cost-effective solution, which does not require sterility or the addition of expensive enzymes to convert lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels and valuable chemicals. In this study, the MixAlco process was used to convert sugarcane trash to carboxylic acids under thermophilic conditions. Lime-treated sugarcane trash (80%) and chicken manure (20%) was used as the feedstock in rotary 1-L fermentors. Ammonium bicarbonate buffer was used to mitigate the effects of product (carboxylic acid) inhibition. Marine inoculum was used because of the high adaptability of the mixed culture of microorganisms present. Iodoform solution was added to inhibit methanogenesis. Preliminary batch studies over a 20-day period produced 19.7 g/L of carboxylic acids. Sugarcane trash had the highest average yield (0.31 g total acid/g VS fed) and highest average conversion (0.70 g VS digested/g VS fed) among the three substrates compared. Countercurrent fermentations were performed at various volatile solid loading rates (VSLR) and liquid residence times (LRT). The highest acid productivity of 1.40 g/(L?d) was at a total acid concentration of 29.9 g/L. The highest conversion and yield were 0.64 g VS digested/g VS fed and 0.36 g total acid/g VS fed, respectively. The continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) was used to predict acid concentration at various VSLR and LRT. The average error in between the predicted and experimental acid concentration and conversion were 4.62% and 1.42%, respectively. The effectiveness of several pretreatment methods was evaluated using the CPDM method. The best-performing method was short-term, no-wash, oxidative lime pretreatment with ball milling. At an industrial-scale solids loading of 300 g VS/L liquid, the CPDM ?map? predicts a total acid concentration of 64.0 g/L at LRT of 30 days, VSLR of 7 g/(L?d), and conversion of 57%. Also high conversion of 76% and high acid concentration of 52 g/L are achieved at a VSLR of 4 g/(L?d) and LRT of 30 days.

Nachiappan, Balasubraman

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing One of the barriers for the small wind market has been the lack...

266

UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/ Cost: Free UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform Screenshot References: UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform[1] "This Climate Finance Options platform, launched under the chapeau "Acting on Climate Change: The UN System Delivering As One", addresses information needs on the multitude of funds available for climate action in developing countries. Based on the UNFCCC framework, the platform is composed of two complementary domains (one led by UNFCCC and one by

267

Green Power Network: Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option A number of states have adopted policies requiring or encouraging electricity suppliers to offer green power options to consumers. This section provides summaries of these policies and links to the full text of the legislation or public utility commission rules. Connecticut Iowa Maine Minnesota Montana New Jersey New Mexico Oregon Vermont Virginia Washington Connecticut June 2003—On June 26, Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland signed a bill (SB 733) amending the state's Electric Restructuring Act and granting authority to the Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to require electric distribution companies to offer green power options. The legislation enables the DPUC to determine the terms and conditions of renewable energy or energy efficiency options, including the contract terms and the minimum percentage of electricity to be derived from renewable energy sources. The green energy options will be developed and implemented by third-party companies selected through a competitive bidding process.

268

Attachment C: Optional AIP Provisions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C: Optional AIP Provisions C: Optional AIP Provisions Attachment C: Optional AIP Provisions Optional AIP Provisions This attachment contains sample language for a number of optional provisions that sites may choose to include or not to include in their AIPs. Optional AIP provisions are not mandatory and the language presented is a sample which may be used as is, serve as a guideline for the creation of a modified provision to suit the site-specific needs of a particular AIP program, or not included in a new or renegotiated AIP. 1. Public Participation/Public Accountability in the DOE Planning Process "The DOE will make available to the public in a timely manner all environmental planning documents that require public comment. The DOE will promptly reply to, and confirm receipt of, requests for information

269

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) - Power Generation and Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technical Assessment Guide (TAG)Power Generation and Storage Technology Options helps energy company decision makers optimize capital investments in power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2009 TAG has been significantly enhanced. The following topics are among those that are new or enhanced: several options on CO2 capture controls and costs for existing retrofits and for new Pulverized Coal and Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle plants; several options on hybrid and dry cooling f...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Integrated Generation Technology Options is intended to provide a snapshot of current cost and performance and technology trends for central electricity generation stations (>50 MW). This document is designed to help with information on the current options in power generation infrastructure capital investments. This 2008 Integrated Generation Technology Options draws from the results of the 2007 TAG studies with relevant current updates. However, while the TAG addresses about 20 different Power ...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

272

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 3 Crude Oil De-gumming and Acid Pre-treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 3 Crude Oil De-gumming and Acid Pre-treatment Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Crude Oil De-gumming and Acid Pre-treatment fro

273

Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic Liquid and AFEX pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

Ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreatments were studied to develop the first direct side-by-side comparative assessment on their respective impacts on biomass structure, composition, process mass balance, and enzymatic saccharification efficiency. AFEX pretreatment completely preserves plant carbohydrates, whereas IL pretreatment extracts 76% of hemicellulose. In contrast to AFEX, the native crystal structure of the recovered corn stover from IL pretreatment was significantly disrupted. For both techniques, more than 70% of the theoretical sugar yield was attained after 48 h of hydrolysis using commercial enzyme cocktails. IL pretreatment requires less enzyme loading and a shorter hydrolysis time to reach 90% yields. Hemicellulase addition led to significant improvements in the yields of glucose and xylose for AFEX pretreated corn stover, but not for IL pretreated stover. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of IL and AFEX pretreatment, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Li, Chenlin [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Kent, Michael S [ORNL; Ong, Markus [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Balan, Venkatesh [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Dale, Bruce E. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: More Search Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More Search Options Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home Site Search Search EERE Kids Site Search Search Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Search Search Search Help Printable...

275

How to implement renewable energy and energy efficiency options...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

implement renewable energy and energy efficiency options Support for South African local government Jump to: navigation, search Name How to implement renewable energy and energy...

276

A Note on Pricing Options on Defaultable Stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, we develop stock option price approximations for a model which takes both the risk o default and the stochastic volatility into account. We also let the intensity of defaults be influenced by the volatility. We show that it might be possible to infer the risk neutral default intensity from the stock option prices. Our option price approximation has a rich implied volatility surface structure and fits the data implied volatility well. Our calibration exercise shows that an effective hazard rate from bonds issued by a company can be used to explain the implied volatility skew of the implied volatility of the option prices issued by the same company.

Bayraktar, Erhan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Local Option - Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings For...

278

Recovering Risk-Neutral Probability Density Functions from Options ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theorem 2 provides us with a simple mechanism to eliminate "artificial" arbitrage ..... options prices: An application to crude oil during theI² ulfcw risis. © o£ rd¨.

279

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizing Transitionseconomies and lower infrastructure costs. REFERENCES 1. NRC,a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

In-car Airway Options for NASCAR Drivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medicine Background: “Stock car” drivers may require anpresentation pregnancy. In-car Airway Options for NASCARhelmeted, and apneic stock car driver simulation model.

Dyreyes, Jonathan Q; Grange, Jeff; Smith, Dustin; Jin, Peter; Guldner, Greg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Group * Energy Analysis Department 1 Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications Report Summary Presentation Mark Bolinger Lawrence...

282

A Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 A Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Options Linda Gaines and Jennifer Dunn Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory SAE World Congress April 2012 PAPER...

283

Price protection options for West Virginia beef cattle producers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to determine if a price protection option would be beneficial to West Virginia's beef cattle industry. Fourteen years of… (more)

Kleski, Matthew C., 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Clean Energy Options for Sabah: An Analysis of Resource Availability...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Latin America. For each renewable option we examine-biomass waste, hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, and demand-side energy efficiency-we compiled cost information...

285

EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set to 10 wt%. A comprehensive description of the run and the full suite of results were issued as SVF-2364-00. The list of individual feed events including the amounts of liquid and solids transferred for the first five years is added as Attachment 2; the chemical composition of the supernate feed comprises Attachment 3. For the simulant composition, only the first five years of proposed feed delivery were taken into account. The main outcome of MMR-049 was that for the first five years, the feed would come mostly from AP-farms. Multiple delivery campaigns to AP-105 are included in this average feed, while minimizing the amount of contributing tanks to the solids in the feed mix.

HUBER HJ

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

An R&D Investment Game under Uncertainty in Real Option Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the problems of using the financial options methodology to analyse investment decisions is that strategic considerations become extremely important. So, the theory of real option games combines two successful theories, namely real options and ... Keywords: C72, D80, Exchange Options, G13, Information Revelation, Option games, Real Options

Giovanni Villani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

On the Valuation of Warrants and Executive Stock Options: Pricing Formulae for Firms with Multiple Warrants/Executive Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the options or canceling an executive's existing options and granting him or her new options with a lower strike price, although not as frequent, are also in the agenda. Among others, Brenner, Sundaram, and Yermack (2000), Carter and Lynch (2001) examine... the “repricing” of ESOs and allocate it to poor firm-specific performance. The empirical evidence in Chance, Kumar, and Todd (2000) suggest that ESOs are usually repriced when the stock declines by about 25%. Acharya, John, and Sundaram (2000) investigate...

Darsinos, Theofanis; Satchell, Stephen E

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Financial options for neighborhood energy efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major problems facing the residents of Kansas City is the increasing cost of heating their homes. Approximately 95% of Kansas Citians heat their homes with natural gas. With the price of natural gas doubling every two to three years, it has become increasingly important to decrease consumption while increasing efficiency. Compounding this situation for low and moderate income residents is the shrinking availability of public funds for weatherization. If any progress is going to be made on this problem, alternative funding mechanisms will have to be developed. A potential solution to the problem is through development of the Kansas City Home Energy Assistance and Training Program (HEAT). This program addresses the problem on three levels: (1) using neighborhood groups and organizations as a catalyst to reach individual households through community development strategies; (2) providing education and training resources to assist neighborhood groups in the implementation of identified strategies; and (3) developing financial resources and delivery systems to provide financial options for energy efficiency.

Dreyfuss, P.; Miranti, K.E.; Peterson, J.E.; Payton, J.; Shechter, G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of passive solar retrofit options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation framework has been developed which allows for the assessment of the role of passive solar retrofit in the nationwide reduction of conventional fuel use. Three types of analysis are proposed within this framework: the physical/technical capability of the present housing stock to incorporate passive solar retrofit; the economic feasibility of the application of retrofit designs; and the actual market potential or acceptance of these alternative retrofit options. Each type of analysis has specific data requirements and a series of evaluation procedures to help establish estimates of the potential for passive solar retrofit in the present housing stock. The data requirements with their respective sources and evaluation procedures for the first two types of analysis-physical/technical setting and economic feasibility, are examined. A distinction is drawn between community specific case studies and more generalized national assessments. Information derived from these three types of analysis, whether case specific or national in scope, can then be used in an evaluation of potential economic impacts. The establishment of regional economic benefits and costs werve as a measure of the merit or attractiveness of the implementation of a passive solar retrofit program.

Ben-David, S.; Kirchemen, C.; Martin, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&D ·Plasma Material Interface Fusion Nuclear Facility Component test facility (CTF)* Pilot plant&D ·Plasma Material Interface Fusion Nuclear Facility Component test facility (CTF)* Pilot plant for a Nuclear Next Step ITER Demo Fusion S&T Research & Development ·High performance, steady state ·Materials R

292

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

Swanson, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Process chemistry for the pretreatment of Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

Current guidelines for disposing radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site call for the vitrification of high-level waste in borosilicate glass and disposal of the glass canisters in a deep geologic repository. Low-level waste is to be cast in grout and disposed of on site in shallow burial vaults. Because of the high cost of vitrification and geologic disposal, methods are currently being developed to minimize the volume of high-level waste requiring disposal. Two approaches are being considered for pretreating radioactive tank sludges: (1) leaching of selected components from the sludge and (2) acid dissolution of the sludge followed by separation of key radionuclides. The leaching approach offers the advantage of simplicity, but the acid dissolution/radionuclide extraction approach has the potential to produce the least number of glass canisters. Four critical components (Cr, P, S, and Al) were leached from an actual Hanford tank waste-Plutonium Finishing Plant sludge. The Al, P, and S were removed from the sludge by digestion of the sludge with 0.1 M NaOH at 100{degrees}C. The Cr was leached by treating the sludge with alkaline KMnO{sub 4} at 100{degrees}C. Removing these four components from the sludge will dramatically lower the number of glass canisters required to dispose of this waste. The transuranic extraction (TRUEX) solvent extraction process has been demonstrated at a bench scale using an actual Hanford tank waste. The process, which involves extraction of the transuranic elements with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), separated 99.9% of the transuranic elements from the bulk components of the waste. Several problems associated with the TRUEX processing of this waste have been addressed and solved.

Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Barker, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bounds for the price of discrete arithmetic Asian options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the pricing of European-style discrete arithmetic Asian options with fixed and floating strike is studied by deriving analytical lower and upper bounds. In our approach we use a general technique for deriving upper (and lower) bounds for ... Keywords: Asian option, Black and Scholes setting, analytical bounds, comonotonicity

M. Vanmaele; G. Deelstra; J. Liinev; J. Dhaene; M. J. Goovaerts

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Moment matching approximation of Asian basket option prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose some moment matching pricing methods for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black & Scholes framework. We generalize the approach of [M. Curran, Valuing Asian and portfolio by conditioning on the geometric ... Keywords: 60J65, 91B28, Asian basket option, Log-extended-skew-normal, Moment matching, Sum of non-independent random variables

Griselda Deelstra; Ibrahima Diallo; Michèle Vanmaele

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Bounds for the price of discrete arithmetic Asian options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the pricing of European-style discrete arithmetic Asian options with fixed and floating strike is studied by deriving analytical lower and upper bounds. In our approach we use a general technique for deriving upper (and lower) bounds for ... Keywords: Analytical bounds, Asian option, Black and Scholes setting, Comonotonicity

M. Vanmaele; G. Deelstra; J. Liinev; J. Dhaene; M. J. Goovaerts

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Evaluation of real options in an oil field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this paper is the application of real options models for valuing an offshore oil property in the North of Africa. Three different approaches were used - one based on the traditional Black-Scholes model, the Marketed Asset Disclaimer (MAD) ... Keywords: capital budgeting, decision analysis, investment appraisal, oil fields, real options

João Oliveira Soares; Diogo Baltazar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Methods for Pricing American Options under Regime Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze a number of techniques for pricing American options under a regime switching stochastic process. The techniques analyzed include both explicit and implicit discretizations with the focus being on methods which are unconditionally stable. In ... Keywords: American options, iterative methods, regime switching

Y. Huang; P. A. Forsyth; G. Labahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

C-1. Ground Water Remedial Technologies and Process Options C-1.1. Ground Water Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This appendix presents detailed descriptions of the remedial technologies and process options presented in Chapter 3. Sources for these descriptions are referenced at the end of appropriate sections. Several of the remedial technologies described in this appendix have already been tested and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300. The remedial technologies already being used in ongoing removal actions or prototype remedial actions at Site 300 are identified in the following discussion.

C. Ground; Water Extraction Wells

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Assessing Air Pollution Control Options at the Hudson Station of Public Service Electric and Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a pilot-scale assessment of air pollutant emission control options at the Hudson Generating Station of Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G). Tests over a period of a year and a half evaluated the capabilities of a high air-to-cloth ratio pulse jet baghouse (COHPAC) in controlling particulates, acid gases, and mercury and a tubular electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in controlling mercury emissions.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lignocellulose Recalcitrance Screening by Integrated High Throughput Hydrothermal Pretreatment and Enzymatic Saccharification  

SciTech Connect

We report a novel 96-well multiplate reactor system for comparative analysis of lignocellulose recalcitrance via integrated hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. The system utilizes stackable nickel/gold-plated 96-well aluminum reactor plates, a clamping device fit to a standard Parr reactor, and robotics for efficient liquids and solids handling. A capacity of 20 plates allows up to 1,920 separate hydrothermal reactions per run. Direct and rapid analysis of key end-products, glucose and xylose, is facilitated by the use of glucose oxidase/peroxidase and xylose dehydrogenase-linked assays. To demonstrate efficacy, a set of 755 poplar core samples from the US Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center was tested. Total sugar release ranged from 0.17 to 0.64 g/g of biomass and correlated strongly with the ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignins in the samples. Variance among sample replicates was sufficiently minimal to permit clear assignment of differences in recalcitrance throughout this large sample set.

Selig, M. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Sykes, R. W.; Reichel, K. L.; Brunecky, R.; Himmel, M. E.; Davis, M. F.; Decker, S. R.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Field Demonstration of Acetone Pretreatment and Composting of Particulate-TNT-Contaminated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid fragments of explosives in soil are common in explosives testing and training areas. In this study we initially sieved the upper 6 in of contaminated soil through a 3-mm mesh, and found 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) fragments. These contributed to an estimated concentration of 1.7 kg per cubic yard soil, or for 2000 ppm TNT in the soil. Most of the fragments ranged 4 mm to 10 mm diameter in size, but explosives particles weighing up to 56 g (about 4 cm diameter) were frequently observed. An acetone pretreatment/composting system was then demonstrated at field scale. The amount of acetone required for a TNT-dissolving slurry process was controlled by the viscosity of the soil/acetone mix rather than the TNT dissolution rate. The amount needed was estimated at about 55 gallons acetone per cubic yard soil. Smaller, 5- to 10-mm-diameter fragments went into solution in less than 15 min at a mixer speed of 36 rpm, with a minimum of 2 g TNT going into solution per 30 min for the larger chunks. The slurries were than mixed with compost starting materials and composted in a vented 1 yd3 container. After 34 days incubation time TNT was below the site-specific regulatory threshold of 44 ppm. TNT metabolites and acetone were also below their regulatory thresholds established for the site.

Radtke, Corey William; Smith, D.; Owen, S.; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

CHARACTERIZATION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Except for materials that remain in use for programs outside of national defense, including programs for nuclear-energy development, the surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. Some items will be disposed as transuranic waste, low-level waste, or spent fuel. The remaining surplus plutonium will be managed through: (1) the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (FFF), to be constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS), where the plutonium will be converted to fuel that will be irradiated in civilian power reactors and later disposed to a high-level waste (HLW) repository as spent fuel; (2) the SRS H-Area facilities, by dissolving and transfer to HLW systems, also for disposal to the repository; or (3) alternative immobilization techniques that would provide durable and secure disposal. From the beginning of the U.S. program for surplus plutonium disposition, DOE has sponsored research to characterize the surplus materials and to judge their suitability for planned disposition options. Because many of the items are stored without extensive analyses of their current chemical content, the characterization involves three interacting components: laboratory sample analysis, if available; non-destructive assay data; and rigorous evaluation of records for the processing history for items and inventory groups. This information is collected from subject-matter experts at inventory sites and from materials stabilization and surveillance programs, in cooperation with the design agencies for the disposition facilities. This report describes the operation and status of the characterization program.

Allender, J; Edwin Moore, E; Scott Davies, S

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Backup Power Options Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options In addition to electric generators powered by fuel, homeowners and business owners may consider alternative backup power options. Battery-stored backup power-Allows you to continue operating lights, refrigerators and other appliances, fans, and communications during a power outage. These systems can connect to renewable sources of energy, like solar panels and small-scale wind generators, to help the batteries stay charged during an emergency. You can also recharge many of these battery systems with diesel generators. The length of time you will be able to draw electricity from your batteries will depend on the size of your

307

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state. The PUC issued rules in October 2010 and issued an RFP. The PUC selected a company, 3 Degrees, to manage the statewide green power program for Maine's transmission and distribution territories. The program includes community-based renewable

308

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Screen Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) invests in research and development (R&D) to ensure that the United States will maintain its domestic nuclear energy capability and scientific and technical leadership in the international community of nuclear power nations in the years ahead. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap presents a high-level vision and framework for R&D activities that are needed to keep the nuclear energy option viable in the near term and to expand its use in the decades ahead. The roadmap identifies the development

309

Memorandum, Protective Force Career Options Committee - July 23, 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum, Protective Force Career Options Committee - July 23, Memorandum, Protective Force Career Options Committee - July 23, 2009 Memorandum, Protective Force Career Options Committee - July 23, 2009 On March 31,2009, this office commissioned a study to examine career opportunities and retirement options for the Department of Energy (DOE) protective force members. On March 3 1,2009, this office commissioned a study to examine career opportunities and retirement options for the Department of Energy (DOE) protective force members. The study was supported by senior leaders of the Department as well as by the leadership of the National Council of Security Police (NCSP), who took an active role in the study. The results of the study were briefed to several senior Departmental officials on June 30,2009. These leaders accepted the overall thrust of

310

Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June 30,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June 30, 2009 Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 On March 31, 2009 , the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief Health, Safety and Security Officxer commissioned a study to examine "realistic and reasponable options for improving the career opportunities and retirement prospects of protective force members while maintaining, within current and anticipated budgetary constraints, a robust and effective security posture. On March 31, 2009, the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief Health, Safety and Security Officxer commissioned a study to examine "realistic and reasponable options for improving the career opportunities and retirement prospects of protective force members while maintaining, within current and

311

Expanding Options for Nuclear Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expanding Options for Nuclear Power Expanding Options for Nuclear Power Expanding Options for Nuclear Power April 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to help accelerate the timelines for the commercialization and deployment of small modular reactor (SMR) technologies through the SMR Licensing Technical Support program. | Photo by the Energy Department. The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to

312

Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June 30,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June 30, 2009 Memorandum, Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options - June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 On March 31, 2009 , the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief Health, Safety and Security Officxer commissioned a study to examine "realistic and reasponable options for improving the career opportunities and retirement prospects of protective force members while maintaining, within current and anticipated budgetary constraints, a robust and effective security posture. On March 31, 2009, the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief Health, Safety and Security Officxer commissioned a study to examine "realistic and reasponable options for improving the career opportunities and retirement prospects of protective force members while maintaining, within current and

313

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Jump to: navigation, search Several states require certain electric utilities to offer customers the option of buying electricity generated from renewable resources, commonly known as “green power.” Typically, utilities offer green power generated using renewable resources that the utilities own (or for which they contract), or they buy renewable energy credits (RECs) from a renewable energy provider certified by a state public utilities commission [1] Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 17) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active DEMEC - Green Power Program (Delaware) Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Delaware Municipal Utility Solar Water Heat

314

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Washington State Department of Commerce In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible renewables include wind, solar, geothermal, landfill gas, wave or tidal action, wastewater treatment gas, certain biomass resources, and "qualified hydropower" that is fish-friendly. Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers

315

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable technologies. This policy complements Colorado's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires municipal utilities serving more than 40,000 customers to use renewable energy and energy recycling to account for 10% of retail sales by 2020.

316

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Iowa Utilities Board All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow customers to make voluntary contributions to support the development of renewable energy sources in Iowa. Utilities must file their program plans and tariff schedules with the IUB; however, the filings for non-rate-regulated utilities are intended to be for informational purposes only. This policy

317

Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission [http://www.energy.ca.gov/2009-SOPR-1/documents/sb_1_bill_20060821_chapte... Senate Bill 1 of 2006], which established the statewide California Solar Initiative, also required the California Energy Commission (CEC) to implement regulations that require sellers of production homes to offer a solar energy system option to all prospective homebuyers. Besides offering solar as an option to prospective homebuyers, sellers of homes constructed on land for which an application for a tentative subdivision map has been

318

Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New technologies, such as an efficient vapor-compression evaporator, a stationary lime kiln (SLK), and the MixAlco process, compelled us to re-evaluate methods for producing sugar from cane. These technologies allow more water and lime to be used, and they add more value to bagasse. Extracting and preserving the sugars, and lime pretreating the bagasse to enhance biodigestibility, all at the same time in a pile, was demonstrated to be unfeasible; therefore, sugar extraction must occur before lime treating the bagasse. Sugar extraction should occur countercurrently by lixiviation, where liquid moves in stages opposite to the soaked bagasse (megasse), which is conveyed by screw-press conveyors that gently squeeze the fiber in each stage, improving extraction. The performance of a pilot-scale screw-press conveyor was tested for dewatering capabilities and power consumption. The unoptimized equipment decreased megasse moisture from 96 to 89%. Simulation of the process suggested that eight stages are necessary to achieve 98% recovery from typical sugarcane. The cumulative power for the screw-press conveyor system was 17.0±2.1 hp?h/ton dry fiber. Thin raw juice preserved with lime for several months showed no sucrose degradation and no quality deterioration, except for reducing sugar destruction. The lime loading needed for 1-year preservation is 0.20 g Ca(OH)2/g sucrose. Shorter times require less lime. After preservation, the juice was carbonated and filtered, and the resulting sludge pelletized. Due to their high organic content, the pellets were too weak for calcination temperatures used in the SLK. The organics must be decreased prior to pelletization and sodium must be supplemented as a binding agent. Long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse showed two delignification phases: bulk (rapid) and residual (slow). These were modeled by two simultaneous first-order reactions. Treatments with air purging and higher temperatures (50 ? 57oC) delignified more effectively, especially during the residual phase, thus yielding higher cellulase-enzyme digestibilities after 2 ? 8 weeks of treatment. At temperatures > 60oC, pure oxygen purging is preferred. Fresh bagasse was of better quality than old bagasse. Treatment with NaOH yielded a larger bulk delignification phase than Ca(OH)2. Long-term lime pulping of bagasse was unsuitable for copy-quality paper, but it was appropriate for strawboard and other filler applications.

Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Changes in lignocellulosic supramolecular and ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment of Populus and switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lignocellulosic lignocellulosic supramolecular and ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment of Populus and switchgrass Marcus Foston, Art J. Ragauskas* BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 23 March 2009 Received in revised form 17 July 2010 Accepted 23 July 2010 Available online xxx Keywords: Dilute acid pretreatment Cellulose Supramolecular structure Populus Switchgrass a b s t r a c t Dilute acid pretreatment (DAP) is commonly employed prior to enzymatic deconstruction of cellulose to increase overall sugar and subsequent ethanol yields from downstream bioconversion processes. Typically optimization of pretreatment is evaluated by deter- mining hemicellulose removal, subsequent reactivity towards

320

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Quarterly technical progress report, June--August 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ultrastructure and Sugar Yields from Three Different Pretreatments of Corn Stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Joint BioEnergy Institute ( JBEI) are collaborating to understand how biomass pretreatments with much different deconstruction patterns impact the chemical and ultrastructural features of biomass and its biological conversion to sugars. Dilute sulfuric acid (DA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and ionic liquid (IL) pretreatments are applied to the same source of corn stover by the BESC, GLBRC, and JBEI, respectively. Common sources of cellulase and other accessory enzymes are then employed to release sugars from the solids left after each pretreatment. The GLBRC applies material balances to each overall pretreatment-hydrolysis system to determine the fates of key biomass constituents and also optimizes enzyme formulations for each substrate using their microplate saccharification system. The BESC

Genomic Science Awardee; Usda-doe Plant; Feedstock Genomics; Charles E. Wyman; Xiadi Gao; Leonardo Da; Costa Sousa; Shishir P. S. Chundawat; Bruce E. Dale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

C:\\Documents and Settings\\mrbrown\\My Documents\\Downloads\\KCI Transportation Option F2011.doc Transportation Option #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C:\\Documents and Settings\\mrbrown\\My Documents\\Downloads\\KCI Transportation Option F2011.doc Transportation Option #1 If you are a new KU international student arriving for the Fall 2011 semester during the last two weeks of July or the first two weeks of August, free shuttle transportation will be available

Peterson, Blake R.

323

Comparative Sugar Recovery and Fermentation Data Following Pretreatment of Poplar Wood by Leading Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Through a Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation among Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, leading pretreatment technologies based on ammonia fiber expansion, aqueous ammonia recycle, dilute sulfuric acid, lime, neutral pH, and sulfur dioxide were applied to a single source of poplar wood, and the remaining solids from each technology were hydrolyzed to sugars using the same enzymes. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative performance data for each combination of pretreatment and enzymes. Overall, compared to data with corn stover employed previously, the results showed that poplar was more recalcitrant to conversion to sugars and that sugar yields from the combined operations of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis varied more among pretreatments. However, application of more severe pretreatment conditions gave good yields from sulfur dioxide and lime, and a recombinant yeast strain fermented the mixed stream of glucose and xylose sugars released by enzymatic hydrolysis of water washed solids from all pretreatments to ethanol with similarly high yields. An Agricultural and Industrial Advisory Board followed progress and helped steer the research to meet scientific and commercial needs.

Wyman, C. E.; Dale, B. E.; Elander, R. T.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fixed-target option for the SSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three questions addressed are: (1) is slow extraction technically and economically feasible at the SSC; (2) can gas jet targets be used parasitically to produce secondary beams; (3) how can parasitic test beams be obtained during collider operation. 15 references. (GHT)

Colton, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Announcement Notice Options By STI Type | Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Notices Notices Announcement Notice Options By STI Type Print page Print page Email page Email page The following list provides basic information regarding which announcement notice should be used by which audience for the various types of STI. For more information, see Submittal Basics. Announcement Options STI Product Types Announcement Notice Audiences AN 241.1 Web Version AN 241.1 Transmission Option Books/Monographs (non-copyrighted) Books/Monographs (copyrighted) Conference Papers/Presentations/Proceedings (non-copyrighted Conference Papers/Presentations/Proceedings (copyrighted) Journal Article Reprints (announcement notice only with adequate information to enable linking via Digital Object Identifier (DOI)) Journal Articles - Accepted manuscript Patents Program Documents

326

Local Option - Sustainable Energy Financing Districts | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Sustainable Energy Financing Districts Local Option - Sustainable Energy Financing Districts Local Option - Sustainable Energy Financing Districts < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 8/15/2009 State Louisiana Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs.

327

Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Connecticut) Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Connecticut) Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 10/2012 State Connecticut Program Type PACE Financing Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority

328

Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Construction Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Solar Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Utah Program Type PACE Financing Provider Office of Energy Development Senate Bill 221 of 2013 authorizes local governments to adopt Commercial* Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) financing programs. C-PACE allows

329

ESMAP-Indonesia-Low Carbon Development Options Study | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Development Options Study Low Carbon Development Options Study Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-ESMAP Low Carbon Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Partner United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www-wds.worldbank.org/e Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References World Bank, ESMAP - Low Carbon Growth Country Studies - Getting Started[1] Overview "The Indonesia's study aimed to evaluate and develop strategic options to mitigate climate change without compromising the country's development

330

Local Option - Improvement Districts for Energy Efficiency and Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Improvement Districts for Energy Efficiency and Local Option - Improvement Districts for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements Local Option - Improvement Districts for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Construction Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Bioenergy Solar Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type PACE Financing

331

Local Option - Green Building Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Green Building Incentives Local Option - Green Building Incentives Local Option - Green Building Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 6/11/2009 State North Carolina Program Type Green Building Incentive To encourage sustainable building practices, North Carolina law allows all counties and cities to provide reductions or partial rebates for building permit fees. To qualify for a fee reduction, buildings must meet guidelines established by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)

332

Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects (Connecticut) Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection As of July 2011, Connecticut authorizes municipalities to pass a local

333

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure) Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure) This document discusses the policy of decoupling in utilities and how it can be used to encourage energy efficiency. 46606.pdf More Documents & Publications Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009 (Brochure) Greensburg, Kansas: A Better, Greener Place to Live (Revised) (Brochure) Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

334

Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options Focus Area: Solar Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/tribalenergy/guide/renewable_technologies_costs.h Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-renewable-energy-technology-opti Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This resource has been extracted and reformatted from the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Power Technologies Energy Data Book. The data book is an excellent source of consistent information on renewable energy technology status and future expectations. Cost information is available

335

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process- This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals in the subsequent liquefaction. This report describes the recent progress of our work. Substantial progress has been made in the spectroscopic characterization of structure and pretreatment-liquefaction reactions of a Montana subbituminous Coal (DECS-9), and thermochemical analysis of three mw and reacted bituminous coals. Temperature programmed liquefaction has been performed on three low-rank coals both in the presence and absence of dispersed molybdenum sulfide catalyst. We also performed a detailed study of the effects of mild thermal pretreatment -- drying in air and in vacuum -- on thermal and catalytic liquefaction of a Wyodak subbituminous coal. Important information on structure and structure transformation during thermal pretreatment and liquefaction reactions of low-rank coals has been derived by applying solid-state CPMAS [sup 13]C NMR and flash pyrolysis-GC-MS (Py-GC-MS) for characterization of the macromolecular network of a Montana subbituminous coal and its residues from temperature-programmed and nonprogrammed liquefaction (TPL and N-PL) at final temperatures ranging from 300 to 425[degree]C in H-donor and non-donor solvents. The results revealed that this coal contains significant quantities of oxygen-bearing structures, corresponding to about 18 O-bound C per 100 C atoms and one O-bound C per every 5 to 6 aromatic C.

Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Hou, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Windows Options for New and Existing Homes Windows Options for New and Existing Homes Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and

337

DOE Exercises Option for Mission Support Contract | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercises Option for Mission Support Contract Exercises Option for Mission Support Contract DOE Exercises Option for Mission Support Contract December 16, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Salony, DOE 509-376-0402, Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov Mission Support Alliance to Provide Site Services at Hanford through May 2017 WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) is extending Mission Support Alliance's (MSA) contract for infrastructure and site services at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state by three years. In 2009, following a competitive bid, DOE awarded MSA a cost-plus-award-fee contract valued at approximately $3 billion for up to 10 years, with a five-year base period. The department is exercising the first of two options for extension. The contract has been extended through May 2017 for

338

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider New Mexico Public Regulation Commission In addition to meeting the requirements of the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... renewables portfolio standard], New Mexico investor-owned utilities (IOUs) are required to offer a voluntary program for purchasing renewable energy to customers. The voluntary renewable tariff may also allow consumers to purchase renewable energy within certain energy blocks and by source of

339

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices, Technical report Website: nrelpubs.nrel.gov/Webtop/ws/nich/www/public/Record?rpp=25&upp=0&m=1&w= Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): feed-in tariffs, renewable portfolio standards, FITs, FIT, RPS, renewable energy, procurement UN Region: Northern America Language: English Tool Overview "State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and

340

Local Option - Property Tax Credit for Renewables and Energy Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Property Tax Credit for Renewables and Energy Local Option - Property Tax Credit for Renewables and Energy Conservation Devices Local Option - Property Tax Credit for Renewables and Energy Conservation Devices < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies by jurisdiction. Program Info State Maryland Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Varies by jurisdiction; credit may be available for up to 3 years. Title 9 of Maryland's property tax code provides local governments the option to allow a property tax credit for buildings equipped with a solar, geothermal or qualifying energy conservation device. These devices may be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Realising REDD+: National Strategy and Policy Options | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Realising REDD+: National Strategy and Policy Options Realising REDD+: National Strategy and Policy Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Realising REDD+: National Strategy and Policy Options Agency/Company /Organization: Center for International Forestry Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.cifor.cgiar.org/publications/pdf_files/Books/BAngelsen0902.pdf References: Realising REDD+: National Strategy and Policy Options[1] "This book seeks to answer these questions by examining what REDD+ at the national level might look like in four areas: institutions and processes to build the REDD+ framework, broad policy reforms to enable REDD+ implementation, sectoral policies to change incentives, and demonstration

342

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Varies (local option) Provider Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources Rhode Island allows cities and towns to exempt, by ordinance, renewable energy systems from property taxation. The term "renewable energy system" is not defined in the applicable statute (R.I. Gen. Laws § 44-3-21). Note that [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=RI02F&re=1&ee=1

343

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary This executive summary provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. 45843.pdf More Documents & Publications Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009 Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendices

344

Energy for Sustainable Development: Policy Options for Africa | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy for Sustainable Development: Policy Options for Africa Energy for Sustainable Development: Policy Options for Africa Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy for Sustainable Development: Policy Options for Africa Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.uneca.org/eca_resources/publications/unea-publication-tocsd15.pdf References: Energy for Sustainable Development: Policy Options for Africa[1] Overview "Over the last four decades, the gap between energy supply and demand in Africa has been growing. Projections by experts in the field forecast that

345

Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act (Nebraska) Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act (Nebraska) Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Bond Program Grant Program Loan Program Provider Economic Development This act gives local governments the option to provide direct and indirect assistance to business enterprises in their communities, whether for expansion of existing operations, the creation of new businesses, or the provision of new services, by the use of funds raised by local taxation when the voters of the municipality decide it is in their best interest. The act gives local governments broad freedoms to determine the specifics

346

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Automobile Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Automobile Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: Rocky Mountain Institute Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Best Practices Website: www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/T08-09_FeebatesLegislativeOption The purpose of this paper is to provide information about feebates. This paper discusses: what a feebate is, why Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) believes a feebate is a valuable tool, recent analysis that RMI had done on feebates, what the current status of the feebate is, and how the feebate could interact with existing laws.

347

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report. 48073.pdf More Documents & Publications Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009 Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendices

348

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Analyze Technology Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyze Technology Options Analyze Technology Options An effective climate action plan follows a portfolio approach and addresses each energy sector on campus. This section outlines how various technology options would fit into a campus climate action plan and provides examples of how others have used these technologies. Links to definitions, technology basics, and references are also provided. Use the Climate Action Planning Tool to identify which options will lead to the most significant reductions in consumption of fossil fuels and in turn meet campus greenhouse gas reduction goals. People and Policy People and Policy Formulate policies that have a long-term effect on energy consumption and identify human behaviors that lower energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Energy Conservation

349

Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and Risk Perceptions in Sweden Speaker(s): Mattias Viklund Date: February 7, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar...

350

Local Option- Property Tax Credit for High Performance Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Similar to Maryland's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=M... Local Option Property Tax Credit for Renewable Energy], Title 9 of Maryland's property tax code...

351

Platforms and real options in large-scale engineering systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces a framework and two methodologies that enable engineering management teams to assess the value of real options in programs of large-scale, partially standardized systems implemented a few times over ...

Kalligeros, Konstantinos C., 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: New Report Analyzes Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Report Analyzes Options for Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipelines Mar 14, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a new report...

353

Delta Hedged Option Valuation with Underlying Non-Gaussian Returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard Black-Scholes theory of option pricing is extended to cope with underlying return fluctuations described by general probability distributions. A Langevin process and its related Fokker-Planck equation are devised to model the market stochastic dynamics, allowing us to write and formally solve the generalized Black-Scholes equation implied by dynamical hedging. A systematic expansion around a non-perturbative starting point is then implemented, recovering the Matacz's conjectured option pricing expression. We perform an application of our formalism to the real stock market and find clear evidence that while past financial time series can be used to evaluate option prices before the expiry date with reasonable accuracy, the stochastic character of volatility is an essential ingredient that should necessarily be taken into account in analytical option price modeling.

Moriconi, L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Argument optionality in the LinGO grammar matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a library of implemented HPSG analyses for argument optionality based on typological studies of this phenomenon in the world's languages, developed in the context of a grammar customization system that pairs a cross-linguistic core grammar ...

Safiyyah Saleem; Emily M. Bender

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Real options approach to capacity planning under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis highlights the effectiveness of Real Options Analysis (ROA) in capacity planning decisions for engineering projects subject to uncertainty. This is in contrast to the irreversible decision-making proposed by ...

Mittal, Geetanjali, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Parametric Uncertainty Impacts on Option 2 Safety Significance Categorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment to determine the impact of parametric uncertainty on the safety significance categorization of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) using risk-importance measures. The study supports Risk-Informed Option 2, which allows elimination of special treatment requirements for low-risk-significant SSCs. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed an Option 2 Rulemaking, 10 CFR 50.69. Industry, through the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) with EPRI technical s...

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Biomass Repowering Options for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to help organizations with fossil-fired generation assets better understand their options for taking advantage of biomass-derived fuels at existing facilities. It considers plant conversions that completely replace fossil fuels through repowering as well as options that focus on high-percentage cofiring of biomass along with fossil fuels. Drawing on the experiences of operating facilities that have converted to biomass and from prior work, the analysis underlying this report...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

Power storage options for hybrid electric vehicles—A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are the future transportation structure as they provide better fuel economy. Energy storage devices are therefore required for the HEVs. The problem for deciding the optimum combination of power storage is still unresolved. The power storage options in this regard must have a feasible weight/energy ratio for better performance. This survey is about the comparison of different power storage options for HEV including the batteries

Hadeed Ahmed Sher; Khaled E. Addoweesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terneus College Station, Texas Pilot Testing: Pretreatment Options to Allow Re-Use of Flowback Water Water analysis and commissioning of mobile treatment unit at their TEES...

362

Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

Robison, W. L., LLNL

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Two-Stage Fungal Pre-Treatment for Improved Biogas Production from Sisal Leaf Decortication Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Sisal leaf decortications residue (SLDR) is amongst the most abundant agroindustrial residues in Tanzania and is a good feedstock for biogas production. Pretreatment of the residue prior to its anaerobic digestion (AD) was investigated using a twostage pre-treatment approach with two fungal strains, CCHT-1 and Trichoderma reesei in succession in anaerobic batch bioreactors. AD of the pre-treated residue with CCTH-1 at 10 % (wet weight inoculum/SLDR) inoculum concentration incubated for four days followed by incubation for eight days with 25 % (wet weight inoculum/SLDR) of T. reesei gave a methane yield of 0.292 ± 0.04 m 3 CH4/kg volatile solids (VS)added. On reversing the pre-treatment succession of the fungal inocula using the same parameters followed by AD, methane yield decreased by about 55%. Generally, an increment in the range of 30–101% in methane yield in comparison to the un-treated SLDR was obtained. The results confirmed the potential of CCHT-1 followed by Trichoderma reesei fungi pre-treatment prior to AD to achieve significant improvement in biogas production from SLDR.

Mutemi Muthangya; Anthony Manoni Msh; Amelia Kajumulo Kivaisi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Moessbauer studies of pretreated ultrafine iron oxide catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates that a 24 hour-pretreatment in CO at 260{degrees}C and 8 atm. in a tetralin solvent almost completely converts uftrafine iron oxide (about 3 nm) to iron carbide. However, pretreatment in hydrogen under the same conditions resulted in reduction of about 33% of the iron to metallic Fe; the remainder was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Exposure of the CO pretreated catalyst to a 1:1 HDCO synthesis gas resulted in the gradual reoxidation of the carbides to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. During the first 2 hours of exposure of the H{sub 2} pretreated sample to synthesis gas,.the metallic Fe was converted to iron carbides. Further exposure of the H{sub 2} pretreatment sample to synthesis gas did not result in a composition change of the catalyst. Therefore, it is concluded that iron carbides with different oxidation characteristics were formed in these two cases.

Chenshi Huang; Davis, B.H. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research); Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Inst. for Mining and Minerals Research)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Valuing innovative technology R&D as a real option : application to fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to elucidate real option thinking and real option valuation techniques for innovative technology investment. Treating the fuel cell R&D investment as a real option for General Motor's light passenger vehicle ...

Tsui, Maggie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Teaching Direct Marketing and Small Farm Viability: Resources for Instructors - Unit 6, Land Tenure Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this federal easement program. Resources Unit 6.0 | 13 LandTenure Options 14 | Unit 6.0 Land Tenure OptionsLecture Outline Resources Unit 6.0 | 1 Land Tenure Options

Miles, Albie; Brown, Martha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE OPTIONS The Department of Earth Sciences offers a Bachelor of Science in the following options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment, cartography, remote sensing, marketing, policy analysis and geographic information analysis. This option equips students for careers in hydrology, climatology, environmental analysis, resource and hazard exploration for and development of Earth's mineral and energy resources; environmental and engineering

Maxwell, Bruce D.

369

REPOSITORY SUBSURFACE LAYOUT OPTIONS AND ESF INTERFACE  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work completed by the repository subsurface design group during the 1993 fiscal year (FY93), and represents a portion of the ongoing, repository Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) effort. The ACD work is being performed in accordance with guidance and controls established for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). This document draws information from other ACD reports prepared and submitted during the year, and from other program studies, including the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Title II design. Site specific data gathered by the Surface Based Testing (SBT) program has been included to the extent that it became available early enough for use in the designs presented herein.

Dana J. Rogers

1993-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Conversion for Avicel and AFEX pretreated corn stover by Clostridium thermocellum and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation: Insights into microbial conversion of pretreated cellulosic biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for Avicel and AFEX pretreated corn stover by Clostridium thermocellum and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation: Insights into microbial conversion of pretreated cellulosic biomass Xiongjun Shao a , Mingjie Jin b,c , Anna Guseva a , Chaogang Liu d , Venkatesh Balan b,c , David Hogsett d , Bruce E. Dale b,c , Lee Lynd a,d,⇑ a Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755, USA b Biomass Conversion Research Laboratory (BCRL), Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, MBI Building, 3900 Collins Road, Lansing, MI 48910, USA c Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA d Mascoma Corporation, 67 Etna Road, Suite 300, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 March 2011 Received in revised form 6 May 2011 Accepted

371

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional first cost of energy efficiency design optionsS. Meyers, Cost and Energy Consumption of Energy Efficiencyadditional first cost of energy efficiency design options

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Real Options Valuation of U.S. Federal Renewable Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Options Valuation of US Federal Renewable Energy Research,Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning,Options Valuation of US Federal Renewable Energy Research,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Wiser, Ryan H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Statement of work for architect-engineer services, initial pretreatment module  

SciTech Connect

This Statement of Work describes the Architect-Engineer services to be provided by Raytheon/BNFL in providing a conceptual design (Contract TGW-SVV-063869) for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM), Project W-236B, at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington. The IPM Project, a radiochemical process facility, will be designed and constructed for an initial phase of waste pretreatment, which will be for the removal of cesium from supernatant wastes to produce a Low-level waste (LLW) stream to a vitrification facility. The design shall also accommodate side streams of High-Level Waste (HLW) fractions that will be directed to suitable, existing storage tanks where they will be recombined with an additional high-activity waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-activity waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository.

Sowa, K.B.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests and was spiked with the required amount of noble metals immediately prior to performing the test. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. SME cycles were also performed during six of the tests.

Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T; David Koopman, D

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock using aqueous ammonia pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF): process development and optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An integrated bioconversion process, which incorporated soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment and two-phase simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (TPSSF), was investigated. The TPSSF process consists… (more)

Li, Xuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hybrid options for light-duty vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer great promise in improving fuel economy. In this paper, we analyze why, how, and by how much vehicle hybridization can reduce energy consumption and improve fuel economy. Our analysis focuses on efficiency gains associated solely with vehicle hybridization. We do not consider such other measures as vehicle weight reduction or air- and tire-resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. The analysis starts with understanding the energy inefficiencies of light-duty vehicles associated with different operation modes in US and Japanese urban and highway driving cycles, with the corresponding energy-saving potentials. The potential for fuel economy gains due to vehicle hybridization can be estimated almost exclusively on the basis of three elements: the reducibility of engine idling operation, the recoverability of braking energy losses, and the capability of improving engine load profiles to gain efficiency associated with specific HEV configurations and control strategies. Specifically, we evaluate the energy efficiencies and fuel economies of a baseline MY97 Corolla-like conventional vehicle (CV), a hypothetical Corolla-based minimal hybrid vehicle (MHV), and a MY98 Prius-like full hybrid vehicle (FHV). We then estimate energy benefits of both MHVs and FHVs over CVs on a performance-equivalent basis. We conclude that the energy benefits of hybridization vary not only with test cycles, but also with performance requirements. The hybrid benefits are greater for ''Corolla (high) performance-equivalent'' vehicles than for ''Prius (low) performance-equivalent'' vehicles. An increasing acceleration requirement would result in larger fuel economy benefits from vehicle hybridization.

An, F., Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Speaker(s): Osman Sezgen Date: August 1, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare As some end-users of energy and aggregators are choosing to be exposed to real-time prices and energy price volatility, they are coming across new DSM opportunities that would not be feasible under typical utility rate structures. Effective evaluation of such opportunities requires a good understanding of the wholesale energy markets and the use of models based on recent financial techniques for option pricing. The speaker will give examples of such modeling approaches based on his experience in the retail-energy industry. Specific examples will include evaluation of distributed generation, load curtailment, dual-fuel cooling, and energy

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Local Option - Municipal Energy Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Municipal Energy Districts Local Option - Municipal Energy Districts Local Option - Municipal Energy Districts < Back Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing ''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided.'''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. California has authorized local governments to establish such

382

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:52pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 After establishing an employee commuting behavior baseline for evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, analyze the specific characteristics of the agency's major worksites to help determine which alternative commute methods and work arrangements are viable and what types of strategies may be most effective for promoting those alternatives. It is recommended that worksite-level data collection focus on worksites with the: Largest number of employees, or clusters of worksites with large employee populations in an area with diverse commuting infrastructure

383

Local Option - County Energy District Authority | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - County Energy District Authority Local Option - County Energy District Authority Local Option - County Energy District Authority < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Residential Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. [http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/Incentives/OK18F.htm S.B. 102] amended the law to make PACE loans junior and inferior to other liens. Effective November 1, 2011, this law should allow local governments to adopt PACE programs that are within the acceptable parameters established by the FHFA.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property

384

Local Option - Renewable Energy Financing District/Solar Energy Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Renewable Energy Financing District/Solar Energy Local Option - Renewable Energy Financing District/Solar Energy Improvement Special Assessments Local Option - Renewable Energy Financing District/Solar Energy Improvement Special Assessments < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 07/01/2009 State New Mexico Program Type PACE Financing Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been

385

Local Option - Special Assessment of Wind Energy Devices | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Special Assessment of Wind Energy Devices Local Option - Special Assessment of Wind Energy Devices Local Option - Special Assessment of Wind Energy Devices < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 01/01/1994 State Iowa Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Property valued at 0% of the net acquisition cost in the first assessment year, increasing annually by 5 percentage points to a maximum of 30% of the net acquisition cost in the 7th and succeeding years Provider Iowa Department of Revenue Any city or county in Iowa may pass an ordinance assessing wind energy conversion equipment at a special valuation for property tax purposes, beginning at 0% of the net acquisition cost in the first assessment year

386

Optional 2012 Project Management Workshop Course | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optional 2012 Project Management Workshop Course Optional 2012 Project Management Workshop Course Optional 2012 Project Management Workshop Course February 16, 2012 - 4:29pm Addthis Course Title: Enhanced Earned Value Analysis Using PARS II Course Description: This course will provide FPDs, contractor project managers, and their respective project control staffs information and best practices relative to PARS II functionality, business rules, reporting and analysis capabilities, as well as enhanced understanding of EV surveillance and analysis techniques, that coupled together will enhance their ability to manage capital asset projects. Course Objective: Explain the business rules underpinning the data and documentation requirements of PARS II Provide an understanding of the many types of standard EV performance analysis reports in PARS II and how to

387

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Varies (local option) Program Info Start Date 8/3/2007 State Colorado Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Varies (local option) Colorado enacted legislation in April 2007 ([http://www.leg.state.co.us/clics/clics2007a/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/31EEE26A... SB 145]) to authorize counties and municipalities to offer property or sales tax rebates or credits to residential and commercial property owners who install renewable energy systems on their property.

388

Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) < Back Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Other Program Info Start Date 7/1/2011 State Wyoming Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Wyoming has authorized local governments to establish such

389

Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans This document is adapted from a memo and report delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in 2008. The report outlines ideas for and potential impacts of various green building policies in New Orleans in the years following Hurricane Katrina. greenbuildingpolicy.pdf More Documents & Publications Greensburg Webinars Q&A Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009 Rebuilding After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up (Revised)

390

First Look at Renewable Energy Options | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Look at Renewable Energy Options First Look at Renewable Energy Options First Look at Renewable Energy Options October 16, 2013 - 5:11pm Addthis Picture of box-shaped structures for system metering installed on a wall. Installation of a feed in and metering system at Coleman Barracks capitalized on the need to repair a damaged roof by simultaneously installing photovoltaic panels, saving manpower, money, and energy consumption. Project planners should conduct a preliminary review of project energy needs and opportunities when considering renewable energy technologies. This makes energy an integral part of the project, begins the discussion about what renewable technologies may be available to the project. Planning is the time to assess the full project and think innovatively about ways renewable energy can be cost effectively and creatively applied.

391

Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/1991 State New York Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption for 15 years (unless local jurisdiction has opted out) Provider Office of Real Property Tax Services Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy

392

Solar Energy Option Requirement for Residential Developments | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Option Requirement for Residential Developments Solar Energy Option Requirement for Residential Developments Solar Energy Option Requirement for Residential Developments < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Building Energy Code Provider New Jersey Department of Community Affairs In March 2009 New Jersey enacted legislation ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2008/Bills/PL09/33_.PDF A.B. 1558]) designed to support the integration of solar energy systems into new residential developments. The law requires that, whenever "technically feasible", developers of residential developments with 25 or more dwelling units (i.e., single-family residences) offer to install or provide for the

393

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

394

Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on April 2, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Utah Name Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) Incentive Type PACE Financing Applicable Sector Commercial, Fed. Government, Industrial, Local Government, Multi-Family Residential, Nonprofit, State Government Eligible Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, Caulking/Weather-stripping, Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Custom/Others pending approval, Doors, Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Heat recovery, Lighting, Programmable Thermostats, Roofs, Windows, Daylighting, Geothermal Direct Use, Geothermal Electric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Other Distributed Generation Technologies, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Small Wind, Solar Water Heat, Wind

395

Local Option - Local Improvement Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Local Improvement Districts Local Option - Local Improvement Districts Local Option - Local Improvement Districts < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Program Info State Oregon Program Type PACE Financing Provider Oregon Department of Energy '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period

396

Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Virginia Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Virginia Department of Taxation In March 2008, Virginia enacted legislation that would allow local jurisdictions to assess the property tax of energy efficient buildings at a reduced rate. Under this law, eligible energy-efficient buildings, not including the real property on which they are located, may be considered a

397

Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans This document is adapted from a memo and report delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in 2008. The report outlines ideas for and potential impacts of various green building policies in New Orleans in the years following Hurricane Katrina. greenbuildingpolicy.pdf More Documents & Publications Greensburg Webinars Q&A Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009 USGBC_Roadmap_to_Sustainable_Govt_Blgd.pdf

398

DOE Assistance on EPA MATS Rule and CSAPR Implementation Options |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assistance on EPA MATS Rule and CSAPR Implementation Options Assistance on EPA MATS Rule and CSAPR Implementation Options DOE Assistance on EPA MATS Rule and CSAPR Implementation Options The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is offering technical assistance to state public utility commissioners, generation owner/operators, and utilities on implementing the new and pending EPA air rules affecting the electric utility industry. Examples of typical assistance include technical information on cost and performance of the various power plant pollution retrofit control technologies; technical information on generation, demand-side or transmission alternatives for any replacement power needed for retiring generating units; and assistance to public utility commissions regarding any regulatory evaluations or approvals they may have

399

Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options June 12, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis Students practice hooking out -- or removing -- DNA from a strawberry sample at Idaho National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of INL. Students practice hooking out -- or removing -- DNA from a strawberry sample at Idaho National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of INL. Kortny Rolston INL Communications & Governmental Affairs What are the key facts? 76 female students from Idaho Falls and Twin Falls attended the annual event. The event was organized by Idaho Women in Nuclear (IWIN). Portage, Inc., the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and several other groups support the event. Editor's note: This article was cross-posted from Idaho National

400

Local Option - Special Energy Improvement Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Special Energy Improvement Districts Local Option - Special Energy Improvement Districts Local Option - Special Energy Improvement Districts < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 10/16/2009 State Ohio Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Perturbation Expansion for Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fit the volatility fluctuations of the S&P 500 index well by a Chi distribution, and the distribution of log-returns by a corresponding superposition of Gaussian distributions. The Fourier transform of this is, remarkably, of the Tsallis type. An option pricing formula is derived from the same superposition of Black-Scholes expressions. An explicit analytic formula is deduced from a perturbation expansion around a Black-Scholes formula with the mean volatility. The expansion has two parts. The first takes into account the non-Gaussian character of the stock-fluctuations and is organized by powers of the excess kurtosis, the second is contract based, and is organized by the moments of moneyness of the option. With this expansion we show that for the Dow Jones Euro Stoxx 50 option data, a Delta-hedging strategy is close to being optimal.

Jizba, Petr; Haener, Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Use of influence diagrams in gas transfer system option prioritization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A formal decision-analysis methodology was applied to aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in deciding which of several gas transfer system (GTS) options should be selected. The decision objectives for this case study, i.e., risk and cost, were directly derived from the DOE guidelines. Influence diagrams were used to define the structure of the decision problem and clearly delineate the flow if information. A set of performance matrices wee used in conjunction with the influence diagrams to assess and evaluate the degree to which the objectives of the case study were met. These performance measures were extracted from technical models, design and operating data, and professional judgments. The results were aggregated to provide an overall evaluation of the different design options of the gas transfer system. Consequently, the results of this analysis were used as an aid to DOE to select a viable GTS option.

Heger, A.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Garcia, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Perturbation Expansion for Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fit the volatility fluctuations of the S&P 500 index well by a Chi distribution, and the distribution of log-returns by a corresponding superposition of Gaussian distributions. The Fourier transform of this is, remarkably, of the Tsallis type. An option pricing formula is derived from the same superposition of Black-Scholes expressions. An explicit analytic formula is deduced from a perturbation expansion around a Black-Scholes formula with the mean volatility. The expansion has two parts. The first takes into account the non-Gaussian character of the stock-fluctuations and is organized by powers of the excess kurtosis, the second is contract based, and is organized by the moments of moneyness of the option. With this expansion we show that for the Dow Jones Euro Stoxx 50 option data, a Delta-hedging strategy is close to being optimal.

Petr Jizba; Hagen Kleinert; Patrick Haener

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Model-Free No-arbitrage Price Bound for Variance Options  

SciTech Connect

We suggest a numerical approximation for an optimization problem, motivated by its applications in finance to find the model-free no-arbitrage bound of variance options given the marginal distributions of the underlying asset. A first approximation restricts the computation to a bounded domain. Then we propose a gradient projection algorithm together with the finite difference scheme to solve the optimization problem. We prove the general convergence, and derive some convergence rate estimates. Finally, we give some numerical examples to test the efficiency of the algorithm.

Bonnans, J. Frederic, E-mail: frederic.bonnans@inria.fr [Ecole Polytechnique, INRIA-Saclay (France); Tan Xiaolu, E-mail: xiaolu.tan@polytechnique.edu [Ecole Polytechnique, CMAP (France)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - Existing Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - Existing Homes Program Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - Existing Homes Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Maximum Rebate $3,000 Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Expiration Date 06/11/2013 State Louisiana Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 20% of improvement costs Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources '''''NOTE: All HERO program funding has been allocated as of December 6, 2012. Important dates related to the closure of the program have been announced. Please see summary below for more information. '''''

406

Guidelines for Upgrading Electrostatic Precipitator Performance: Electrostatic Precipitator Upgrade Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide, the second volume of a two-volume set, presents an analytical procedure to evaluate cost-effective options for enhancing the performance of an existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) when the performance of the ESP, even after optimization, is not satisfactory. The guide focuses on ESPs that require significant improvements (more than $20/kW) to achieve their emissions goals. The first volume of this report, published in September 1999, treated low-cost options that could be used to optimiz...

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Exemption Property Tax Exemption Local Option - Property Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Vermont Department of Taxes Vermont allows municipalities the option of offering an exemption from the municipal real and personal property taxes for certain renewable energy systems (Note: state property taxes would still apply). Eligible systems include, but are not limited to, "windmills, facilities for the collection of solar energy or the conversion of organic matter to methane, net-metered

408

Local Option - Property Assessed Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Local Option - Property Assessed Clean Energy Local Option - Property Assessed Clean Energy < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Other Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Start Date 04/01/2010 State Maine Program Type PACE Financing Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed

409

Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository. There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected.

Dixon, B.W.; Piet, S.J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Rural Energy Options Analysis Training Development and Implementation at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL has developed a rural energy options analysis training program for rural energy decision makers that provides knowledge, skills and tools for the evaluation of technologies, including renewables, for rural energy applications. Through the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), NREL has refined materials for the program and developed a module that offers hands-on training in the preparation of data for options analysis using HOMER, NREL's micropower optimization model. NREL has used the materials for training in Brazil, the Maldives, Mexico, and Sri Lanka.

Gilman, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effect of a surface pre-treatment on graphene growth using a SiC substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports surface pre-treatment techniques for the formation of a high-quality graphene layer on a SiC surface. It is demonstrated that silicon passivation of SiC surface using a silane flow and subsequent sacrificial oxidation can significantly ... Keywords: Graphene, Sacrificial oxidation, Silane treatment, Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), Surface passivation

Jun-Ho Seo; Byung-Jin Kang; Jeong Hun Mun; Sung-Kyu Lim; Byung Jin Cho

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Research on Turbidity Removal and Byproduct Magnesium Hydroxide in Alkalify Flocculation Desalination Pretreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reverse osmosis desalination is becoming an effective approach in seawater desalination to solve the shortage of freshwater resource. Since reverse osmosis desalination plants depend on high quality feed water to ensure. Turbidity is the most important ... Keywords: Alkalify Flocculation, Desalination Pretreatment

Liuhe Yishouzhi; Wuyan Wujiaquan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E (sugar-, and starch-containing) raw materials represent the major part of the total production cost- linked, rigid lignocellulose complex. This structure severely limits the biological conversion; therefore

415

Uncertainty and Industry Structure Effects on Managerial Intuition About Information Technology Real Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real options analysis is an important but costly tool for valuing many information technology (IT) investments. As a low-cost substitute for real options-based methods, firms often depend on managerial intuition, which sometimes approximates real options-based ... Keywords: Behavioral Finance, It Investments, Real Options Theory

Nancy Lankton; Joan Luft

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Multivariate Analysis of Real Option Value Based on Grey Relational Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real option value is determined by a variety of uncertain factors. It is very important to assess the intensity and importance of these factors affecting the real option value for investment decision makers. In this paper, the real option value system ... Keywords: real option value, multivariate analysis, grey relational model, optimization

Zheng-Xin Wang; Ling-ling Pei

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A semi-dynamic approach for valuing and hedging options on two assets with continuous payout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A central problem in risk management is how to develop effective and accurate hedging strategies for financial and physical assets which are usually not liquidly traded in the market. We consider the problem of replicating the payoffs of options on two ... Keywords: electricity derivatives, options pricing, real options, semi-dynamic hedging, spark spread, spread options

Shi-Jie Deng

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Considering Technical Options for Controlling the BP Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considering Technical Options for Controlling the BP Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico In response;Considering Technical Options for Controlling the BP Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico 1 Written by James Cameron Options for Controlling the BP Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico #12;Considering Technical Options

Fernandez, Eduardo

419

National Transportation Policy Options: A Time for Choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

connectivity, new technology, and a set of difficult environmental problems. Meanwhile, the existing program and transit mobility. National purpose has been an option, rather than a focus. Systematic analysis of mobility and other impacts is almost entirely absent. This mismatch has become increasingly evident to more

Minnesota, University of

420

Design Options for Enhancing IGCC Flexible Operations Performance and Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the cycling experience of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants, and the characteristics of IGCC and its component technologies that can make it particularly responsive to renewables-driven, flexible operation and cycling requirements. It also identifies a number of design options for optimizing IGCC cycling performance, and economics for such requirements to nearly meet natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) ramping ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Career Options Program/Courses Resources Why Choose Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Telecommunications. · Design things that people use. · Computers, personal electronics. · Cars, planes etc. (e. · Biomedical. · Micro-hydro (see http://www.ieee.org/portal/ieeetv/ viewer.html?progId=124039) · Help people #12;Career Options Program/Courses Resources Employers Utilities NL Hydro, NF Power, Aliant, Ontario

Peters, Dennis

422

DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and at past market changes in the energy industry. Both electricity and natural gas distribution are regulated1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies

423

An Analysis of Steam Process Heater Condensate Drainage Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production and reliability performance of Steam Process Heaters can be significantly affected by the condensate drainage design that is employed. There are currently a variety of drainage options which can be confusing to a system designer who is unaware of the reasons for each specific design. An understanding of the various types and why they may be used follows.

Risko, J. R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

On Asian option pricing for NIG Lévy processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we derive approximations and bounds for the Esscher price of European-style arithmetic and geometric average options. The asset price process is assumed to be of exponential Lévy type with normal inverse Gaussian (NIG) distributed ... Keywords: Esscher transform, comonotonicity, normal inverse Gaussian distribution

Hansjörg Albrecher; Martin Predota

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Investment options available through TIAA-CREF Columbia university  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investment options available through TIAA-CREF Columbia university Calvert Funds will be added to the TIAA-CREF administration & recordkeeping platform Below is a list of all the TIAA-CREF accounts on the TIAA-CREF platform as of April 2, 2013. As described in the enclosed letter, if you currently invest

Grishok, Alla

426

Simulating option prices and sensitivities by higher rank lattice rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the intermediate rank or higher rank lattice rule for the general case when the number of quadrature points is ntm, where m is a composite integer, t is the rank of the rule, n is an integer ... Keywords: Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo methods, lattice rules, option pricing, simulation of multivariate integrations

Yongzeng Lai

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Recent California Water Transfers: Emerging Options in Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN TRANSFERS Recent years have produced increased interest in the transfer of water and waterRecent California Water Transfers: Emerging Options in Water Management by Jay R. Lund Associate for Environmental and Water Resources Engineering DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING University

Lund, Jay R.

428

Burning Plasma Physics -The Next Frontier Three Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Physics - The Next Frontier Three Options (same scale) ITER-FEATFIRE IGNITOR US in Magnetic Fusion · Burning Plasma Performance Considerations · Compact High Field Approach - General for strengthening the base fusion sciences program 2. Directs DOE to submit a plan for a U.S. Burning Plasma

429

DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The important point is that whether natural gas or electricity is more energy efficient depends on specific1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies

430

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends and their relative magnitude within the overall TV market will have considerable impact on total energymarket potential those technical options or trends that are expected to save energymarket trends by technology, region, and screen size. Chapter 3, TV Technology Trends and Energy

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Selecting Optional Fees Optional fees include meal plans, money on Tigerstripe, and a TAPS yearbook. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supports all of the services at Redfern and includes: · Professional services of primary health care on pharmaceuticals, psychological testing, laboratory and x- ray services. · After Hours Nursewise telephone service. http://sisweb.clemson.edu/ Health Fee Policy University policy requires all students registered for six

Bolding, M. Chad

432

Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater adaptability of the process to DOE alkaline salt wastes, and greater readiness for implementation. Such benefits accrue from optimal sizing of centrifugal contactors for application of the CSSX process for the IPS; more accurate modeling of cesium extraction with greater flexibility and applicability to a variety of feeds and flowsheet conditions; and further improving and optimizing the alternative CSSX solvent and scrub/strip system.

Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Ionic liquid pretreatment of poplar wood at room temperature: swelling and incorporation of nanoparticles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass represents a potentially sustainable source of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. It could satisfy the energy needs for transportation and electricity generation, while contributing substantially to carbon sequestration and limiting the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Potential feedstocks are abundant and include crops, agricultural wastes, forest products, grasses, and algae. Among those feedstocks, wood is mainly constituted of three components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The conversion process of lignocellulosic biomass typically consists of three steps: (1) pretreatment; (2) hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars; and (3) fermentation of the sugars into liquid fuels (ethanol) and other commodity chemicals. The pretreatment step is necessary due to the complex structure of the plant cell wall and the chemical resistance of lignin. Most current pretreatments are energy-intensive and/or polluting. So it is imperative to develop new pretreatments that are economically viable and environmentally friendly. Recently, ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest, due to their ability to dissolve biopolymers, such as cellulose, lignin, native switchgrass, and others. Ionic liquids are also considered green solvents, since they have been successfully recycled at high yields for further use with limited efficiency loss. Also, a few microbial cellulases remain active at high ionic liquid concentration. However, all studies on the dissolution of wood in ionic liquids have been conducted so far at high temperatures, typically above 90 C. Development of alternative pretreatments at room temperature is desirable to eliminate the additional energy cost. In this study, thin sections of poplar wood were swollen at room temperature by a 3 h ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate or EMIMAc) pretreatment. The pretreated sample was then exposed to an aqueous suspension of nanoparticles that resulted in the sample contraction and the deposition of nanoparticles onto the surface and embedded into the cell wall. To date, both silver and gold particles ranging in size from 40-100 nm have been incorporated into wood. Penetration of gold nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter in the cell walls was best confirmed by near-infrared confocal Raman microscopy, since the deposition of gold nanoparticles induces a significant enhancement of the Raman signal from the wood in their close proximity, an enhancement attributed to the surface-enhanced Raman effect (SERS). After rinsing with water, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman images of the same areas show that most nanoparticles remained on the pretreated sample. Raman images at different depths reveal that a significant number of nanoparticles were incorporated into the wood sample, at depths up to 4 {micro}m, or 40 times the diameter of the nanoparticles. Control experiments on an untreated wood sample resulted in the deposition of nanoparticles only at the surface and most nanoparticles were removed upon rinsing. This particle incorporation process enables the development of new pretreatments, since the nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio and could be chemically functionalized. Other potential applications for the incorporated nanoparticles include isotope tracing, catalysis, imaging agents, drug-delivery systems, energy-storage devices, and chemical sensors.

Lucas, Marcel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Gregory L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rector, Kirk D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Proposed Fidelity Option Line-Up Tier Fund Type Fund Category/Asset Class Proposed Investment Option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fidelity BrokerageLink 3/1/11 #12;Proposed TIAA-CREF Option Line-Up Tier Fund Type Fund Category Fund TIAA-CREF Money Market Fund Fixed Income Fixed Annuity TIAA Traditional Annuity Intermediate Bond Stock Fund CREF Stock Variable Annuity Real Estate Real Estate Fund TIAA-CREF Real Estate Annuity IV

436

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Equipment Options for Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

438

The Sedov Test Problem  

SciTech Connect

The Sedov test is classically defined as a point blast problem. The Sedov problem has led us to advances in algorithms and in their understanding. Vorticity generation can be physical or numerical. Both play a role in Sedov calculations. The RAGE code (Eulerian) resolves the shock well, but produces vorticity. The source definition matters. For the FLAG code (Lagrange), CCH is superior to SGH by avoiding spurious vorticity generation. FLAG SGH currently has a number of options that improve results over traditional settings. Vorticity production, not shock capture, has driven the Sedov work. We are pursuing treatments with respect to the hydro discretization as well as to artificial viscosity.

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Masser, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Structural changes in switchgrass lignin and hemicelluloses during pretreatments by NMR analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

changes changes in switchgrass lignin and hemicelluloses during pretreatments by NMR analysis Reichel Samuel a, c , Marcus Foston a, c , Nan Jiang a, c , Lenong Allison a, c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a, b, c, * a School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA b Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 14 May 2011 Received in revised form 13 August 2011 Accepted 25 August 2011 Available online xxx Keywords: Switchgrass Pretreatment HSQC NMR analysis Lignin a b s t r a c t Switchgrass is currently being developed as a sustainable bio-energy crop due to its broad adaptability, high mass yield and low agricultural input. Its current conversion to biofuels is detrimentally impacted by its native recalcitrance which is typically addressed using

440

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission W. R. Wilmarth March 5 2009 March 5, 2009 HLW Corporate Board Phoenix AZ HLW Corporate Board, Phoenix, AZ Co-authors M. E. Johnson, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company G. Lumetta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory N Machara DOE Office of Engineering and Technology N. Machara, DOE Office of Engineering and Technology M. R. Poirier, Savannah River National Laboratory P C S DOE S h Ri P. C. Suggs, DOE Savannah River M. C. Thompson, Savannah River National Laboratory, Retired Retired 2 Background Separations is a fundamental business within DOE. The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval, processing and closure. Recognized as part of E&T Roadmap

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing pretreatment options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Activation of catalyst for gas-phase combustion by electrochemical pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic activity of an IrO{sub 2} catalyst used as an electrode on a YSZ solid electrolyte cell for the gas-phase combustion of ethylene can be increased by electrochemical pretreatment. Thus, the polarization of the IrO{sub 2} electrode during 90 min at 300 {micro}A, relative to a gold electrode, both deposited on YSZ, increases the activity of the IrO{sub 2} catalyst after current interruption by a factor of 3. In situ catalyst work function measurements showed that after the electrochemical pretreatment the IrO{sub 2} catalyst obtains higher work function. The activation of the catalyst is explained through the formation of a higher oxide, IrO{sub 2+{delta}}.

Nicole, J.; Wodiunig, S.; Comninellis, C. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Tsiplakides, D. [Univ. of Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5843 5843 November 2009 Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas Executive Summary S. Haase National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-45843 November 2009 Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas Executive Summary S. Haase Prepared under Task No. IDKS.1070 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

443

Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Comparison of Financing Benefits Innovations and Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Comparison of Financing Benefits, Innovations, and Options Bethany Speer Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51644 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Comparison of Financing Benefits, Innovations, and Options Bethany Speer Prepared under Task Nos. SM10.2442, SM12.3010 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51644 October 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

444

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Speaker(s): Thomas Durkin Date: February 23, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Moira Howard-Jeweler This seminar presentation will be video-conferenced from our Washington, DC Projects office.) According to USGBC, LBNL, and CBECS data, commercial/institutional buildings use one quarter of all the energy consumed in the US. Depending on the geographic area of the country, heating can be as little as 30% (Houston), or as much as 68% (Minneapolis) of the building total. Mr. Durkin will share his experience in dramatically reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from completed projects shows 50 to 60%

445

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

073 073 May 2010 Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas S. Haase National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48073 May 2010 Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas S. Haase Prepared under Task No. IDKS.1070 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

446

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

447

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Keith Paustian (keithp@nrel.colostate.edu; 970-491-1547) Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 Bruce Babcock (babcock@iastate.edu; 515-294-6785) Cathy Kling (ckling@iastate.edu; 515-294-5767) Center for Agriculture and Rural Development Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-1070 Jerry Hatfield (hatfield@nstl.gov; 515-294-5723) USDA - National Soil Tilth Laboratory Ames, IA 50011 Rattan Lal (lal.1@osu.edu; 614-292-9069) School of Natural Resources The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1085 Bruce McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu; 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-2124 Sandy McLaughlin (un4@ornl.gov; 865-574-7358)

448

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Investigate Smart Drilling Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 20, 2004 February 20, 2004 New Projects to Investigate "Smart Drilling" Options Promise Lower Cost, More Reliable Gas Drilling Two additional projects have been selected under a Department of Energy solicitation designed to advance performance when drilling for natural gas. The projects are a key component of the Department's gas exploration and production research program, and support the President's National Energy Policy, which calls for boosting domestic production of natural gas to ensure an adequate future supply at reasonable prices. With shallow and conventional natural gas resources in the United States being depleted, drillers must reach for gas miles below the earth's surface, where temperatures run up to 450 EF and pressures are hundreds of times greater than atmospheric pressure. "Smart drilling" options can increase productivity, improve drilling safety, and lower costs when drilling for these hard-to-reach deep gas supplies.

449

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems (Connecticut) Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Local Option Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management Connecticut municipalities are authorized, but not required, to offer a property tax exemption lasting up to 15 years for qualifying cogeneration systems installed on or after July 1, 2007 (see Conn. Gen. Stat. § 12-81

450

India-Options for Low Carbon Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-Options for Low Carbon Development India-Options for Low Carbon Development Jump to: navigation, search Name India-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry, Transportation Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country India Southern Asia References World Bank ESMAP[1] Overview "The India study includes the development of a detailed, bottom-up, modeling framework, that serves to comment on opportunities for low carbon growth. Input data was collected across several sectors covering: power supply, household appliances, transportation, industry, and buildings. The

451

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nonlethal weapons as force options for the Army  

SciTech Connect

This paper suggests that future challenges to US national security will be very different from those previously experienced. In a number of foreseeable circumstances, conventional military force will be inappropriate. The National Command Authority, and other appropriate levels of command, need expanded options available to meet threats for which the application of massive lethal force is counterproductive or inadvisable. It is proposed that nonlethal concepts be developed that provide additional options for military leaders and politicians. Included in this initiative should be exploration of policy, strategy, doctrine, and training issues as well as the development of selected technologies and weapons. In addition, civilian law enforcement agencies have similar requirements for less-than-lethal systems. This may be an excellent example for a joint technology development venture.

Alexander, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

Gerber, M.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

Gerber, M.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

456

Alternatives generation and analysis for the phase 1 high-level waste pretreatment process selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effects of enhanced sludge washing and sludge washing without caustic leaching during the preparation of the Phase 1 high-level waste feeds. The pretreatment processing alternatives are evaluated against their ability to satisfy contractual, cost minimization, and other criteria. The information contained in this report is consistent with, and supplemental to, the Tank Waste Remediation System Operation and Utilization Plan (Kirkbride et al. 1997).

Manuel, A.F.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

457

TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Reaching corporate sustainability goals requires new thinking, testing options, and a diverse skill set.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requires a system of sensors and software that gathers and analyzes data while balancing loads in real time. · Online display of remote microgrid data for analysis, management, and education;5 Economic & Environmental Analysis of Converting Waste Grease to Energy Shyyon Kishani & Kevin Dang JACK

459

Energy policy options for Illinois. Proceedings. [26 papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-six papers presented at the Fifth Annual Oil Illinois Energy Conference are categorized into five sections, namely: An overview of U.S. and Illinois Energy Policy; Energy Policy; Conservation--Solar--Biomass and Solid Wastes; Energy Policy; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Energy Policy; Coal and Electric Utilities; and Economic and Consumer Concerns. One paper, A Perspective on Long-Range Nuclear Energy Options, by William O. Harms has previously appeared in EAPA 4: 1364. (MCW)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Economic Evaluation of CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancement Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO2 in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of the carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MWe integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study w...

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Revealing the Value of Demand Response: Regulatory and Market Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market failures have plagued competitive electricity markets worldwide. This report explores market and regulatory options for correcting some of these failures. In doing so, it recognizes the critical role that regulation plays in assuring that the competitive process works, as it should, to the benefit of all. In particular, the report examines ways to better integrate demand response (DR) into electricity markets at both the wholesale and retail levels.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Space Conditioning Technology Options for High-Bay Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-bay facility owners are considering the addition of space conditioning systems and technologies to improve their operations. This trend creates an opportunity for utility representatives to provide sound guidance on space conditioning system selection alternatives and other energy efficiency options to cost-effectively meet the owner’s requirements. This report describes the common heating and cooling technologies applicable to high-bay facilities and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of each in...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

Role of Future Generation and Energy Efficiency Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides results of various policy scenarios using EPRI's financial model of the U.S. electric sector for generation capacity expansion and dispatch at the national and regional levels. The model evaluates the possible effects of climate policy, renewable portfolio standard (RPS), energy efficiency, technology availability, and market scenarios on the deployment and operation of nuclear, fossil, and renewable generation options and on electricity prices, emissions, fuel use, and oth...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Large Distributed Energy Resource Options to Alleviate Transmission Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility transmission systems require extensive investment for infrastructure upkeep. In addition, load growth requires upgrades to guard against overloading or loss of load. In some situations, an investment in a traditional transmission system upgrade may not be the most economic option. It may be possible to defer the need for an upgrade using distributed energy resources (DER), and in doing so, reduce the economic impact to the utility and its ratepayers. Additional considerations, such as impact on s...

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a condensed, public-domain reference for current cost, performance, and technology status data for eight central-station power generation technologies. In this report, central station is defined as >100 MW with the exception of some renewable-resource-based technologies. In addition to fossil- and nuclear-based technologies, four renewable-resource-based technologies are included. This report addresses the principal technology options for utility-scale power generation.